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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and ...  

A substantially higher surface area is very desirable in porous metallic bulk materials for functional applications such as catalysts, hydrogen storag ...

2

High Surface Area Molybdenum Nitride Support for Fuel Cell Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Alternative supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells were synthesized and catalytic activity was explored using electrochemical analysis. High surface area, molybdenum nitride supports were synthesized by rapidly heating a gel of polyethyleneimine bound molybdenum in a tube furnace under a forming gas atmosphere. Subsequent disposition of platinum through an incipient wetness approach lead to dispersed crystallites of platinum on the conductive support. All the ceramic materials were characterized with XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical analysis. The supports without platinum are highly stable to acidic aqueous conditions and show no signs of oxygen reduction reactivity (ORR). However, once the 20 wt % platinum is added to the material, ORR activity comparable to XC72 based materials is observed.

Blackmore, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Elbaz, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bauer, E D [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brosha, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Mccleskey, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Burrell, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

Lagasse, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schroeder, John L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Herdt, Gregory C. (Denver, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_CMU_High Surface Area Materials.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract 1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract Topic: High Surface Area, Mesoporous (La, Sr)MnO 3 For Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes Robin Chao, Graduate Student in Carnegie Mellon University 5700 Bunkerhill St. Apt 705, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA, hchao@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-260-5687 Dr. John Kitchin, Professor of Chemical Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh PA, 15213, jkitchin@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-7803 Dr. Paul Salvador, Professor of Material Science and Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 149 Roberts Eng Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, paul7@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-2702 Abstract: The efficiency of the solid oxide fuel cell is limited by the cathode polarizations. One essential approach is to include high-surface-area cathode materials into the fabrication. However, conventional synthesis methods to

10

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Water bathing synthesis of high-surface-area nanocrystal-assembled SnO{sub 2} particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in aqueous solutions. The particles showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. It was much higher than that of our previous studies. BJH analyses indicated that the particles had pores of about 2-5 nm. The particles included two kinds of morphologies. The first particles were about 300-1000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of acicular crystals of 5-10 nm in width and 100-200 nm in length. They contributed high BET surface area. The second particles were about 10,000-3000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of ellipse crystals of 100-200 in width and 200-400 nm in length. The ellipse crystals consisted of sheet crystals. They connected with a certain angle and arranged their long direction parallel. - Graphical abstract: Acicular crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles and ellipse crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in the aqueous solutions. They showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unique SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They were acicular crystals and ellipse crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They had high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g.

Masuda, Yoshitake, E-mail: masuda-y@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Comparison of equilibria and kinetics of high surface area activated carbon produced from different precursors and by different chemical treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated carbons prepared by chemical activation of coal and macadamia nutshell precursors with KOH and ZnCl{sub 2} have been studied in terms of their equilibrium and dynamic characteristics. These characteristics were then related to the micropore properties: surface area, volume, and half-width. Volumetric techniques were used for equilibria characterization and an FT-IR batch adsorber for dynamics. Carbons activated by KOH resulted in a more microporous structure, while those activated by zinc chloride were more mesoporous. High surface area samples were further studied in terms of their methane adsorption uptake. It was found that nutshell-derived activated carbons have a higher adsorption capacity per unit mass than those derived from coal; however, this was offset by lower particle density (mass/volume). High-pressure (2 GPa) pelletization of the carbons used for dynamic testing had a detrimental effect on capacity, presumably from pore collapse. Dynamic characteristics were found to be rather similar between the samples, with those treated with KOH displaying slower adsorption time scales.

Ahmadpour, A.; King, B.A.; Do, D.D. [Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland (Australia)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

Eric D. Wachsman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

Cranford, Steven Wayne

17

LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effects of Li[sup +}, K{sup +} and Ba{sup 2 sup +} cations on the ORR at model and high surface area Pt and Au surfaces in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

This Letter reveals new findings on the influence of noncovalent interactions on the electrochemical interface. Using surface X-ray scattering, we demonstrate that the barium cations are located at 3.4 {angstrom} away from the surface, suggesting that they are partially hydrated, though not adsorbed at the surface. The effect of the cation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) ranges from significant (Pt) to little (Au), depending on the nature of the metal and cation. Finally, we show that these results, as obtained on well-defined single-crystal surfaces, correlate well with observations on high surface area nanoparticle catalysts.

Strmcnik, D.; van der Vliet, D. F.; Chang, K-C.; Komanicky, V.; Kodama, K.; You, H.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Safarik Univ.); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode with high specific surface area and strong light scattering for dye-sensitized solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase-pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallite aggregates synthesized by a continuous supercritical fluid process have been first used for fabricating mesoporous photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Due to the small size (11 nm) of the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in the aggregates, the mesoporous photoanode provides a high specific surface area, 80 m{sup 2}/g, which ensures high dye loading. At the same time, the submicrometer-sized aggregates endow the mesoporous photoanode with strong light scattering effect. Therefore, the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode is increased. With an improved short-circuit current density, a high overall power conversion efficiency of 8.65% (100 mW/cm{sup 2}, AM 1.5) is achieved without additional scattering layers, 12% enhanced compared with the DSCs fabricated from commercial Degussa P25 with exactly the same procedures. In addition, this supercritical fluid process is scalable and rapid (less than one minute) for TiO{sub 2} aggregates synthesis, which will push the commercialization of DSCs in the future. - Graphical abstract: Due to the special morphology and structure, the photoanode of DSCs provides high specific surface area and strong light scattering at the same time, which results in high conversion efficiencies of the DSCs. Table of contents: Thanks to the synchronous realization of high specific surface area and strong light scattering, a high efficiency of 8.65% was achieved based on a novel mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregates photoanode for DSCs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode provides a possible route for highly efficient DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoanode with high dye loading and light scattering is successfully fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} synthesized by a supercritical fluid process is first applied to DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis method and high efficiency will push the commercialization of DSCs.

Li, Chunhui; Luo, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaozhi; Li, Dongmei [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Mi, Jianli; So, Lasse; Hald, Peter [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)] [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Meng, Qingbo, E-mail: qbmeng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Iversen, Bo B., E-mail: bo@chem.au.dk [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Final report, October 1991-October 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGVs is the low energy density of natural gas. The energy density can be increased by adsorption of the natural gas on high surface area sorbents. Present carbon adsorbents do not adsorb enough methane on a volume per volume basis to be commercially attractive for storage of methane on natural gas fueled vehicles. The report has begun exploring the use of organic gels for the adsorption of methane. Preliminary results are promising enough to warrant further research.

Ventura, S.C.; Hum, G.P.; Narang, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Horizontal and Vertical Resolution Limited-Area Model: Near-Surface and Wind Energy Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As harvesting of wind energy grows, so does the need for improved forecasts from the surface to the top of wind turbines. To improve mesoscale forecasts of wind, temperature, and dewpoint temperature in this layer, two different approaches are ...

Natacha B. Bernier; Stéphane Bélair

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

23

Formation Mechanisms of the Extreme High Surface Air Temperature of 40.9°C Observed in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area: Considerations of Dynamic Foehn and Foehnlike Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 40.9°C was observed on 16 August 2007 in Kumagaya, located 60 km northwest of central Tokyo. In this study, the formation mechanisms of this extreme high temperature event are ...

Yuya Takane; Hiroyuki Kusaka

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High-Surface-Area CO2 Sponge: High Performance CO2 Scrubbing Based on Hollow Fiber-Supported Designer Ionic Liquid Sponges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: The team from ORNL and Georgia Tech is developing a new technology that will act like a sponge, integrating a new, alcohol-based ionic liquid into hollow fibers (magnified image, right) to capture CO2 from the exhaust produced by coal-fired power plants. Ionic liquids, or salts that exist in liquid form, are promising materials for carbon capture and storage, but their tendency to thicken when combined with CO2 limits their efficiency and poses a challenge for their development as a cost-effective alternative to current-generation solutions. Adding alcohol to the mix limits this tendency to thicken in the presence of CO2 but can also make the liquid more likely to evaporate, which would add significantly to the cost of CO2 capture. To solve this problem, ORNL is developing new classes of ionic liquids with high capacity for absorbing CO2. ORNL’s sponge would reduce the cost associated with the energy that would need to be diverted from power plants to capture CO2 and release it for storage.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades ’ worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 1986–2005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

27

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

28

A variational level set approach for surface area minimization of triply-periodic surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study triply-periodic surfaces with minimal surface area under a constraint in the volume fraction of the regions (phases) that the surface separates. Using a variational level set method formulation, we present a theoretical characterization ...

Y. Jung; K. T. Chu; S. Torquato

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

SAW determination of surface area of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

N.sub.2 adsorption isotherms are measured from thin films on SAW devices. The isotherms may be used to determine the surface area and pore size distribution of thin films.

Frye, Gregory C. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Name: Andrea Status: student Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Will a sphere that has the identical surface area as a cube fit inside the cube? Replies: The surface area of a cube is 6L^2 where L is the length of a side. The surface area of a sphere is 4 pi r^2 where r is the radius of the sphere Setting these two terms equal (which we do because the surface areas are equal, [we do not need and exact number, mind you. We just have to know they are equal.]) and doing some algebra we find that the cube has a side 1.414 times as long as the radius of the sphere. BUT WAIT. The radius of the sphere is only half its size (diameter)! To hold the sphere, the cube needs a side of 2r or twice the sphere's radius!! It is only 1.414 times as long so, the sphere will not fit.

32

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Norman (2002) shows that the Cerro Prieto gas analyses collected by Cathy Janik and Alfred Truesdell from1977 to 1998 plot on a C02/N2 condensation

33

Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, Allegheny County, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the relationship between increased proportions of imperviousness in a watershed on surface water quality and examined the effectiveness of using remote sensing to systematically and accurately determine impervious surfaces. A supervised maximum likelihood algorithm was used to classify the 2008 high resolution National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery into six classifications. A stratified random sampling scheme was conducted to complete an accuracy assessment of the classification. The overall accuracy was 85%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.80. Additionally, field sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to examine the relationship between impervious surfaces and water quality in a rainfall simulation parking lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium in runoff concentrations than did asphalt. Finally, a pollutant loading application model was used to estimate pollutant loadings for three watersheds using two scenarios. Results indicated that national data may overestimate annual pollutant loads by approximately 700%. This study employed original techniques and methodology to combine the extraction of impervious surfaces, utilization of local rainfall runoff data and hydrological modeling to increase planners' and scientists' awareness of using local data and remote sensing data to employ predictive hydrological modeling.

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of high–spatial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Guidelines Manual for Surface Monitoring of GeothermalA07 Final Report GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OFi t a t i o n s o f t h e Manual PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION I

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Does the Surface Pressure Equal the Weight per Unit Area of a Hydrostatic Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common statement that the surface pressure in a hydrostatic atmosphere is equal to the weight per unit area of the air aloft is shown to be true only for a Cartesian world. Here the unit area is the surface area of the base of the atmospheric ...

Peter R. Bannon; Craig H. Bishop; James B. Kerr

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Boundary Layer Characteristics over Areas of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a June 1992 field program to study the response of the boundary layer over a site with well-defined extreme differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes over clearly separated areas, each with characteristic ...

J. C. Doran; W. J. Shaw; J. M. Hubbe

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a functioninterfacial mass-transport resistance was established.

He, Qinggang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Title Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Campra, Pablo, and Dev Millstein Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 47 Issue 21 Pagination 12284 - 12290 Date Published 11/2013 ISSN 0013-936X Keywords buildings, Heat Island Group Abstract A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m-2 of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

46

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

47

Areas of the Event Horizon and Stationary Limit Surface for a Kerr Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an elementary evaluation of the surface areas of the event horizon and stationary limit surface for an uncharged Kerr black hole. The latter appears not to have been previously given in the literature, and permits us to suggest new geometrical / physical interpretations of these areas.

Pickett, C A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1).

49

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

50

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689255"

51

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689392

52

Categorical Exclusion 4596: High Contamination Area (HCA) Cleanup Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detennination Form Detennination Form PropQsed Action Tit!~: High Contamination Area (HCA) C!e;;Jnup Project (4596) Pro~ram or Field Offif.s: Y-12 Site OffiCe Locmion(s) (City/CountvLState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Prot?Oscd Action Description: PAGE 02/04 l,:·:~:.s:~.t?)fuiW6v:: ~ 4fB~ir:::8~1 The proposed action is to disposition the materiels and equipment stored in a radiological high contamination area (HCA). This area is paved and fenced with no roof or shelter. Tile HCA was used as an accumulation area for rad contaminated materials and equipment from operations. Categorical Exclusion(s) Avoli!¢l: 81.3- ~outine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulnti011s regaruing categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

53

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Abstract The Rainbow Mountain area was the site of three surface-rupturing earthquakes on 6 July and 23 August 1954. More than 50 field measurements of surface offsets constrain the distribution of slip along the discontinuous and distributed rupture zone that formed during the earthquake sequence. Vertical offsets reach a maximum of ~0.8 m with the average vertical offset being ~0.2 m. In contrast to original reports, we

54

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

55

Area-efficient high-throughput MAP decoder architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iterative decoders such as turbo decoders have become integral components of modern broadband communication systems because of their ability to provide substantial coding gains. A key computational kernel in iterative decoders is the maximum a posteriori ... Keywords: area efficient, block-interleaved pipelining, high throughput, parallel processing, pipeline, symbol-based decoding, turbo decoder, turbo equalizer

Seok-Jun Lee; Naresh R. Shanbhag; Andrew C. Singer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Norman_%26_Moore,_2004)&oldid=689367"

57

The Relationship Between the Surface Wind Field and Convective Precipitation over the St. Louis Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall, wind and temperature data at the surface for a mesoscale area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri for seven summer days in 1975 were used to determine qualitative and quantitative relationships between divergence, and the location, timing ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

60

High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Surface Sensible Heat Flux Using Surface Radiative Temperatures in a Simple Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible heat fluxes over a light industrial area in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, are analyzed from observed tower fluxes and modeled using a bulk heat transfer approach. The bulk transfer models are initialized using remotely sensed ...

J. A. Voogt; C. S. B. Grimmond

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface ...  

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface Sampling Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

63

High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

Hill, Randal M. (Livermore, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Brentwood, CA); Biltoft, Peter J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

HIGH SURFACE AREA SILICON CARBIDE-COATED CARBON AEROGEL ...  

Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicon carbide, improving the thermal stability of the carbon ae ...

66

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

67

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera

68

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J.

69

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells.

70

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

71

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

72

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

73

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

74

NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

Newson, H.W.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

76

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

77

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

78

Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

Ramanathan Sampath

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

80

Fabrication of Amorphous Alloy Surface Composites by High ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2007 ... Fabrication of Amorphous Alloy Surface Composites by High-Energy Electron- Beam Irradiation by K. Lee, S. Lee, and N.J. Kim ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geology and surface geochemistry of the Roosevelt Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available data on the Roosevelt area were synthesized to determine the spatial arrangement of the rocks, and the patterns of mass and energy flow within them. The resulting model lead to a new interpretation of the geothermal system, and provided ground truth for evaluating the application of soil geochemistry to exploration for concealed geothermal fields. Preliminary geochemical studies comparing the surface microlayer to conventional soil sampling methods indicated both practical and chemical advantages for the surface microlayer technique, which was particularly evident in the case of As, Sb and Cs. Subsequent multi-element analyses of surface microlayer samples collected over an area of 100 square miles were processed to produce single element contour maps for 41 chemical parameters. Computer manipulation of the multi-element data using R-mode factor analysis provided the optimum method of interpretation of the surface microlayer data. A trace element association of As, Sb and Cs in the surface microlayer provided the best indication of the leakage of geothermal solutions to the surface, while regional mercury trends may reflect the presence of a mercury vapour anomaly above a concealed heat source.

Lovell, J.S.; Meyer, W.T.; Atkinson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K-AREA  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses selecting and Implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water, sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal. The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is considered the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The site covers 1,517 Km{sup 2} (586 square miles) along the Columbia River in an arid region of the northwest United States (U.S.). Hanford is the largest of the US former nuclear defense production sites. From the World War II era of the mid-1940s until the late-1980s when production stopped, Hanford produced 60 percent of the plutonium for nuclear defense and, as a consequence, produced a significant amount of environmental pollution now being addressed. Spent nuclear fuel was among the major challenges for DOE's environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. The end of production left Hanford with about 105,000 irradiated, solid uranium metal fuel assemblies--representing approximately 2,100 metric tons (80 percent of DOE's spent nuclear fuel). The fuel was ultimately stored in the K Basins water-filled, concrete basins attached to Hanford's K East (KE) and K West (KW) reactors. K Basin's fuel accounted for 95 percent of the total radioactivity in Hanford's former reactor production areas. Located about 457 meters (500 yards) from the Columbia River, the K Basins are two indoor, rectangular structures of reinforced concrete; each filled with more than 3.8 million liters (one million gallons) of water that has become highly contaminated with long-lived radionuclides. At the KW Basin, fuel was packaged and sealed in canisters. At the KE Basin, fuel was stored in open canisters that were exposed to water in the basin. The irradiated spent nuclear fuel corroded during long-term, wet storage; resulting in thousands of fuel assemblies becoming severely corroded and/or damaged. Corrosion, especially in the KE Basin, contributed to the formation of a layer of radioactive sludge in the basins. Sludge removal is now progressing and will be followed by dewatering and dispositioning the concrete structures. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) has given Fluor Hanford Inc./Fluor Government Group (Fluor) the task of preparing Hanford's K Basins for decontamination and disposal. Prior to dewatering, hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate the basin surfaces to prepare them for disposal. By removing highly contaminated surface layers of concrete, hydrolasing will be used to meet the dose objectives for protecting workers and complying with regulations for transporting demolition debris. Fluor has innovated, tested, and planned the application of the hydrolasing technology to meet the challenge of decontaminating highly radioactive concrete surfaces underwater. Newly existing technology is being adapted to this unique challenge.

CHRONISTER, G.B.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

HIGH EFFICIENCY BIFACIAL BACK SURFACE FIELD SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first high efficiency p÷-n-n + bifacial solar cells are presented. Efficiencies of 15.7 % and 13.6 % were measured under front and back air mass one illumination respectively at 28 °C. At 7 air mass one illumination and 28 °C the front efficiency increases to 16.5%. A pilot production of 200 cells was made following a fabrication process as simple as that for conventional back surface field cells. Mean efficiencies of 13.4 % and 10.7 % were obtained under front and back illumination respectively. The production yield is higher than 80%. The advantages that bifacial cells present in some applications, compared with conventional cells, have been pointed out for static [1] and quasi-static [2] concentrating systems, for luminescent concentrators [3] and also for flat panels. A transistor-like structure (n+-p-n +) has already been developed as a bifacial cell [4]. We have also suggested [5] and theoretically analysed [6] the use of a back surface field (BSF) structure (n+-p-p ÷ or p+-n-n +) as a bifacial cell. The purpose here is to demonstrate the feasibility of high efficiency bifacial BSF solar cells. p+-n-n ÷ bifacial cells with a 5 cm 2 area were made on float-zone silicon wafers. The resistivity of the n-type base region was 10 ~2 cm and the thickness was 260 pm. The p ÷ and n + regions were formed by open-tube diffusions using BBr3 and POC13 sources, the resulting sheet resistance being 45- 60 ~2/[:] for the p ÷ layer and 20- 30 ~2/[:] for the n ÷ layer. A TiOx antireflection (AR) coating was spun onto both sides of the cell; Ti-Pd-Ag grids were sputtered and lift-off defined also on both faces. The metallization pattern was designed for the cells to operate inside static compound parabolic mirrors with a concentration factor of 5 and a non-uniform distribution of light intensity on the cell surface. The optimum grid has ten fingers per centimetre (each finger is 50- 70 pm wide) and produces a coverage factor in the illuminated area of about 5.5%.

A. Cuevas; A. Luque; J. Eguren; J. Del Alamo

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility  

SciTech Connect

To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media Abstract Liquid saturation and gas-liquid interfacial area the specific gas-liquid interfacial area from the area under the primarydrainage branch of the Seff -h

Weisbrod, Noam

89

Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow Michael Baumer University Gravity Wave 2 3 Measurements 3 4 Mechanical Hardware: Problems and Solutions 5 5 Results 7 6 Conclusions investigated a free-surface gravity wave bifurcation in the large-separation regime, that is, where

Witten, Thomas A.

90

Highly Stable Silver Nanoplates for Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An SPR biosensor was developed by employing highly stable Au-protected Ag nanoplates (NP) as enhancers (see picture). Superior performance was achieved by depositing a thin and uniform coating of Au on the Ag surface while minimizing disruptive galvanic replacement and retaining the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the silver nanoplates.

Gao, Chuanbo [University of California, Riverside; Lu, Zhenda [University of California, Riverside; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Liu, ying [University of California, Riverside; Cheng, Quan [University of California, Riverside; Yin, Yadong [University of California, Riverside

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High-Order Surface Reconstruction and its Applications | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Order Surface Reconstruction and its Applications High-Order Surface Reconstruction and its Applications Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science Seminar Start Date: Dec 12 2013 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Navamita Ray Speaker(s) Title: Postdoc Interviewee - MCS Host: Tim Tautges Surface meshes are widely used by many numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. They not only represent computational grids for various discretization methods, but also are numerical objects in themselves. The accuracy of numerical methods, especially high-order methods, are highly dependent on the geometrical accuracy of the mesh as well as on that of differential or integral quantities defined over them. The situation is further complicated if the surface mesh does not have an

92

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

93

Effect of geometric configuration and surface area on the thermal transmittance of edge-sealed draperies  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies were carried out to investigate the influence of fabric structure and geometric configuration of multilayer window draperies on the thermal insulation characteristics of drapery models. Drapery assemblies representing various configurations of drapery fullness, lining fullness, and spatial separation between lining and drapery fabrics were sealed at sides, top, and bottom to a full-scale window built into an insulated wall between a cold chamber, which simulated outdoor winter conditions, and the inside of a test room, which was maintained at indoor winter conditions. Thermal transmittance of the window/fabric systems was measured by transducers mounted on the surface of the window glass. The temperature of the cold chamber, the temperature and relative humidity of the test room, and the heat transfer were monitored by a desk-top computer system. The influence of fabric structure, drapery and lining, fabric surface area, and volume of air space within the drapery assembly on thermal transmittance are discussed.

Epps, H.H.; Goswami, B.C.; Hassenboehler, C.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag. 10 figs.

Hubble, D.H.; Ulrich, K.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag.

Hubble, David H. (Export, PA); Ulrich, Klaus H. (Duisburg, DE)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-Density Infrared Surface Treatments of Refractories  

SciTech Connect

Refractory materials play a crucial role in all energy-intensive industries and are truly a crosscutting technology for the Industries of the Future (IOF). One of the major mechanisms for the degradation of refractories and a general decrease in their performance has been the penetration and corrosion by molten metals or glass. Methods and materials that would reduce the penetration, wetting, and corrosive chemistry would significantly improve refractory performance and also maintain the quality of the processed liquid, be it metal or glass. This report presents the results of an R&D project aimed at investigating the use of high-density infrared (HDI) heating to surface treat refractories to improve their performance. The project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). HDI is capable of heating the near-surface region of materials to very high temperatures where sintering, diffusion, and melting can occur. The intended benefits of HDI processing of refractories were to (1) reduce surface porosity (by essentially sealing the surface to prevent liquid penetration), (2) allow surface chemistry changes to be performed by bonding an adherent coating onto the underlying refractory (in order to inhibit wetting and/or improve corrosion resistance), and (3) produce noncontact refractories with high-emissivity surface coatings.

Tiegs, T.N.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)  

SciTech Connect

Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

Marquis Childs

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Forward-Looking Assimilation of MODIS-Derived Snow-Covered Area into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow cover over land has a significant impact on the surface radiation budget, turbulent energy fluxes to the atmosphere, and local hydrological fluxes. For this reason, inaccuracies in the representation of snow-covered area (SCA) within a land ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Matthew Rodell

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Relationships between Cloud Type and Amount, Precipitation, and Surface Temperature in the Mackenzie River Valley-Beaufort Sea Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly data from climatological stations in the Mackenzie River valley-Beaufort Sea area of northern Canada have been examined to determine the relationships between cloud type and amount, precipitation, and surface temperatures. During all ...

G. A. Isaac; R. A. Stuart

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Area-Averaged Surface Fluxes in a Semiarid Region with Partly Irrigated Land: Lessons Learned from EFEDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Field Experiment in a Desertification-Threatened Area (EFEDA) provides a comprehensive land surface dataset for a semiarid Mediterranean environment with natural vegetation and cultivated dry and irrigated land. This paper discusses ...

M. Anna Osann Jochum; Hendrik A. R. de Bruin; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Alfonso Calera Belmonte

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

High-performance land surface modeling with a Linux cluster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Land Information System (LIS) was developed at NASA to perform global land surface simulations at a resolution of 1-km or finer in real time. Such unprecedented scales and intensity pose many computational challenges. In this article, we demonstrate ... Keywords: Beowulf cluster, Distributed computing, High-resolution simulation, Hydrology modeling, Parallel computing, Peer-to-peer network

Y. Tian; C. D. Peters-Lidard; S. V. Kumar; J. Geiger; P. R. Houser; J. L. Eastman; P. Dirmeyer; B. Doty; J. Adams

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Frequency Radar Mapping of Surface Currents Using WERA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-station high-frequency Wellen Radar (WERA), transmitting at 16.045 MHz, was deployed along the west Florida shelf in phased array mode during the summer of 2003. A 33-day, continuous time series of radial and vector surface current fields ...

Lynn K. Shay; Jorge Martinez-Pedraja; Thomas M. Cook; Brian K. Haus; Robert H. Weisberg

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Land information system: An interoperable framework for high resolution land surface modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface states and fluxes. LIS employs the use of scalable, high performance computing and data management. All rights reserved. Keywords: Land surface modeling; High performance computing; Object

Houser, Paul R.

107

High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography  

SciTech Connect

In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 300: Surface Release Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 300 is located in Areas 23, 25, and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 300 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Surface Release Areas and is comprised of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), which are associated with the identified Building (Bldg): {sm_bullet} CAS 23-21-03, Bldg 750 Surface Discharge {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-02, Bldg 750 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-03, Bldg 751 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-01, Bldg 3113A Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-02, Bldg 3901 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-62-01, Bldg 3124 Contaminated Soil {sm_bullet} CAS 26-60-01, Bldg 2105 Outfall and Decon Pad The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 23-21-03, 23-25-02, and 23-25-03 is no further action. As a best management practice, approximately 48 feet of metal piping was removed from CAS 23-25-02 and disposed of as sanitary waste. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-60-01, 25-60-02, 25-62-01, and 26-60-01, is clean closure. Closure activities for these CASs included removing and disposing of soil impacted with total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics (TPH-DRO), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and cesium (Cs)-137, concrete impacted with TPH-DRO, and associated piping impacted with TPH-DRO. CAU 300 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 300 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 300 Corrective Action Decision Document (NNSA/NSO, 2005). This Closure Report documents CAU 300 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 40 cubic yards (yd3) of low-level waste consisting of TPH-DRO-, PCB-, and Cs-137-impacted soil and debris, approximately 7 yd3 of hydrocarbon waste consisting of TPH-DRO-impacted soil, and approximately 66 yd3 of sanitary debris consisting of soil and concrete debris were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of field screening and laboratory analysis to determine the extent of excavation required, were employed during the performance of closure work.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C. [7800 E. Union Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 801237 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Relationships among Remotely Sensed Data, Surface Energy Balance, and Area-Averaged Fluxes over Partially Vegetated Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous recent field experiments have examined the use of remote sensing to estimate land surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat using combinations of thermal, visible, and near-infrared data. While substantial progress has been made, ...

M. A. Friedl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area A. P. Trishchenko, Y. Luo, R. Latifovic, W. Park, J. Cihlar, and B. Hwang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li and M. C. Cribb University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is a key variable determining the disposition of solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Reliable mapping of surface albedo and improved understanding of radiation interactions at the surface are required for advancing weather forecasting and climate studies. The ground-based observations are limited to a handful of locations sparsely distributed in the South Great Plains (SGP). Frequently, they represent only small-scale features of surface reflective properties and

113

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Influence of Variations in Surface Treatment on 24-Hour Forecasts with a Limited Area Model, Including a Comparison of Modeled and Satellite-Measured Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of variations in surface parameters on 24-hour limited area forecasts has been examined on a day in July 1981. The vehicle for the study is a ten-level primitive equation model covering most of the continental United States. Variations ...

George Diak; Stacey Heikkinen; John Rates

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Limited-Area Model Sensitivity to the Complexity of Representation of the Land Surface Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling a multimode land surface scheme with a regional climate model, three scientific issues are addressed in this paper: (i) the regional model's sensitivity to the different levels of complexity presented by the land surface ...

H. Zhang; A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; C. E. Desborough; J. L. McGregor; J. J. Katzfey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Preparation of high porosity xerogels by chemical surface modification.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides an extremely porous xerogel dried at vacuum-to-below supercritical pressures but having the properties of aerogels which are typically dried at supercritical pressures. This is done by reacting the internal pore surface of the wet gel with organic substances in order to change the contact angle of the fluid meniscus in the pores during drying. Shrinkage of the gel (which is normally prevented by use of high autoclave pressures, such that the pore fluid is at temperature and pressure above its critical values) is avoided even at vacuum or ambient pressures.

Deshpande, Ravindra (51 Michelle Dr. Apt. A 11, Lancaster, PA 17603); Smith, Douglas M. (1412 Marquette Pl. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

UDT: UDP-based data transfer for high-speed wide area networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize our work on the UDT high performance data transport protocol over the past four years. UDT was designed to effectively utilize the rapidly emerging high-speed wide area optical networks. It is built on top of UDP with reliability ... Keywords: Congestion control, Design and implementation, High-speed networks, Transport protocol

Yunhong Gu; Robert L. Grossman

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models for the Solute-Solvent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models solvent hydration free energy models are an important component of most modern computational methods aimed. The nonpolar component of the hydration free energy, consisting of a repulsive cavity term and an attractive

122

1Satellite Surface Areas The NASA Imager for Magnetosphere-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that cover the satellite's surface actually face the sun at any given moment? #12;Answer Key 1 Question 1) satellite was launched on March 25, 2000. The instruments and other electrical systems inside the satellite area of the satellite, and how much electrical power can be collected by the satellite. (Hints - http

123

Robust difference imaging of high surface brightness targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last two decades the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) has been something of a test-bed for methods aimed at obtaining accurate time-domain relative photometry within highly crowded fields. Difference imaging methods, originally pioneered towards M31, have evolved into sophisticated methods, such as the Optimal Image Subtraction (OIS) method of Alard & Lupton (1998), that today are most widely used to survey variable stars, transients and microlensing events in our own Galaxy. We show that modern difference image (DIA) algorithms such as OIS, whilst spectacularly successful towards the Milky Way bulge, may perform badly towards high surface brightness targets such as the M31 bulge. Poor results typically occur in the presence of common data systematics that scale with image flux such as internal reflections, scattered light, flat field errors or fringing. Using data from the Angstrom Project microlensing survey of the M31 bulge, we show that very good results are usually obtainable by first performing caref...

Kerins, E; Duke, J P; Gould, A; Han, C; Newsam, A; Park, B -G; Street, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® May 1, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, today won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl®. Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy" competition, which concluded this afternoon. Members of the winning team include Jason Ma, Ylaine Gerardin, Barry Liu, Galen Lynch, Francois Greer and coach, Julie Gittings. This team won a research trip to France and $1,000 for their school's science department. The answer that clinched the championship was in response to an earth

125

Hazards to Electrical Distribution in Coastal Areas Subject to Flooding and High Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Dewberry and Davis, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have jointly prepared this study on hazards to electrical distribution in coastal areas that experience coastal and river flooding and high wind.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

High-Order, High-Pass Implicit Filters for Evaluating Information within Finite Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study high-order, high-pass implicit filters are introduced. They represent symmetric filters in an implicit formulation. In this investigation their use within a finite region is examined. The effects of the boundary are investigated and ...

William H. Raymond

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Break-up of Pt catalyst surfaces by high CO coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atomic arrangement of catalyst surface under reactionof reactant molecules on the catalyst surfaces are the norm.Break-up of Pt catalyst surfaces by high CO coverage Feng

Tao, Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sensible Heat Flux-Radiometric Surface Temperature Relationship for Eight Semiarid Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of sensible heat flux, radiometric surface temperature, air temperature, and wind speed made at eight semiarid rangeland sites were used to investigate the sensible heat flux-aerodynamic resistance relationship. The individual sites ...

J. B. Stewart; W. P. Kustas; K. S. Humes; W. D. Nichols; M. S. Moran; H. A. R. de Bruin

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Surface Di-directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations Y. Luo, A. P. Trishchenko, and R. Latifovic Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Natural Resources Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is an important parameter in atmospheric radiation research. Good knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is essential in order to obtain the hemispheric reflectance (albedo) using data from satellite systems, which only view the ground at particular angles. Linear kernel-driven BRDF models have been commonly used for simple operational implementation of

131

A Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study (CASES) Dataset for Analyzing and Parameterizing the Effects of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Area-Averaged Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiscale dataset that includes atmospheric, surface, and subsurface observations obtained from an observation network covering a region that has a scale order comparable to mesoscale and general circulation models is described and analyzed. ...

David N. Yates; Fei Chen; Margaret A. LeMone; Russell Qualls; Steven P. Oncley; Robert L. Grossman; Edward A. Brandes

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J. (Star City, WV); Meacham, G. B. Kirby (Shaker Heights, OH)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G.B. Kirby

1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Melt Area and Water Balance Modeling on the Greenland Ice Sheet 1995–2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SnowModel, a physically based snow-evolution modeling system that includes four submodels—MicroMet, EnBal, SnowPack, and SnowTran-3D—was used to simulate variations in Greenland [including the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS)] surface snow and ice melt,...

Sebastian H. Mernild; Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Konrad Steffen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

Plutonium Decontamination Using CBI Decon Gel 1101 in Highly Contaminated and Unique Areas at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

A highly contaminated glove-box at LLNL containing plutonium was decontaminated using a strippable decontamination gel. 6 x 12 inch quadrants were mapped out on each of the surfaces. The gel was applied to various surfaces inside the glove-box and was allowed to cure. The radioactivity in each quadrant was measured using a LLNL Blue Alpha meter with a 1.5 inch standoff distance. The results showed decontamination factors of 130 and 210 on cast steel and Lexan{reg_sign} surfaces respectively after several applications. The gel also absorbed more than 91% of the radiation emitted from the surfaces during gel curing. The removed strippable film was analyzed by neutron multiplicity counting and gamma spectroscopy, yielding relative mass information and radioisotopic composition respectively.

Sutton, M; Fischer, R P; Thoet, M M; O'Neill, M; Edgington, G

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing William aggregating and scheduling many resources. Data must be located and staged, cache and network capacity must and non-destructive imaging to supply real-time data to a remote, on-line, airframe structures expert who

138

Geostrophic Volume Transport in High Eddy-Energy Areas of the Kuroshio Extension and Gulf Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three new deep hydrographic sections taken in July 1980, May 1981 and May 1982, between 29–41°N along 152°E across the high eddy-energy area of the Kuroshio Extension are used to compute the relative geostrophic transport as a function of depth. ...

Pearn P. Niiler; William J. Schmitz; Dong-Kyu Lee

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

High-Performance Wide-Area Optical Tracking: The HiBall Tracking System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the early 1980s, the Tracker Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been working on wide-area head tracking for virtual and augmented environments. Our long-term goal has been to achieve the high performance required for ...

Greg Welch; Gary Bishop; Leandra Vicci; Stephen Brumback; Kurtis Keller; D'nardo Colucci

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained@ieor.berkeley.edu In this paper we present a unit commitment model for studying the impact of large-scale wind integration of renewable energy integration. Key words : unit commitment; stochastic programming; wind power; transmission

Oren, Shmuel S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Investigation of surface inhomogeneity and estimation of the GOES skin temperature assimilation errors of the MM5 implied by the inhomogeneity over Houston metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed a parameterization method to investigate the impacts of inhomogeneous land surfaces on mesoscale model simulations using a high-resolution 1-d PBL model. Then, the 1-d PBL model was used to investigate the inhomogeneity-caused model errors in applying the GOES satellite skin temperature assimilation technique into the MM5 over the Houston metropolitan area (HOU). In order to investigate the surface inhomogeneity impacts on the surface fluxes and PBL variables over HOU, homo- and inhomogeneous 1-d PBL model simulations were performed over HOU and compared to each other. The 1-d PBL model was constructed so that the surface inhomogeneities were able to be represented within model grid elements using a methodology similar to Avissar and Pielke (1989). The surface inhomogeneities over HOU were defined using 30-m resolution land cover data produced by Global Environment Management (GEM), Inc. The inhomogeneity parameterization method developed in the 1-d model was applied to a standard MM5 simulation to test the applicability of the parameterization to 3-d mesoscale model simulations. From the 1-d simulations it was inferred that the surface inhomogeneities would enhance the sensible heat flux by about 36 % and reduce the latent heat flux by about 25 %, thereby inducing the warmer (0.7 %) and drier (-1.0 %) PBL and the colder and moister PBL top induced by greater turbulent diffusivities. The 3-d application of the inhomogeneity parameterization indicated consistent results with the 1-d in general, with additional effects of advection and differential local circulation. The original GOES simulation was warmer compared to observations over HOU than over surrounding areas. The satellite data assimilation itself would lead to a warm bias due to erroneous estimation of gridpoint-mean skin temperature by the satellite, but 1-d simulations indicate that the impact of this error should be much weaker than what was observed. It seems that, unless the already existing warm and dry bias of the MM5 is corrected, the inhomogeneity parameterization in the MM5 would adversely affect the MM5 performance. Therefore, consideration of the surface inhomogeneities in the urban area needs to be confined to the GOES skin temperature retrieval errors at the moment.

Han, Sang-Ok

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Area High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science Bowl® Regional Championship: Lakeside and Evans High School Finish Second and Third - Dorman Wins AIKEN, S.C. - Feb. 25, 2013 - Using a format similar to the television show "Jeopardy," America's next generation of scientists and engineers put their knowledge to the test at the University of South Carolina Aiken during the DOE National Science Bowl regional compe- tition this past weekend. High School teams from across South Carolina and the greater Augusta, Ga. area relied on their collective knowledge as they participated in one of the coun- try's largest science tournaments. This regional competition, managed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS), hosted 120 high school students from 12 high schools. It is the only educational event

146

Surface Wind Regionalization over Complex Terrain: Evaluation and Analysis of a High-Resolution WRF Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the daily-mean surface wind variability over an area characterized by complex topography through comparing observations and a 2-km-spatial-resolution simulation performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model ...

Pedro A. Jiménez; J. Fidel González-Rouco; Elena García-Bustamante; Jorge Navarro; Juan P. Montávez; Jordi Vilà-Guerau de Arellano; Jimy Dudhia; Antonio Muñoz-Roldan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

148

Short-Term Probabilistic Forecasts of Ceiling and Visibility Utilizing High-Density Surface Weather Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated statistical system that utilizes regional high-density surface observations to forecast low ceiling and visibility events in the upper Midwest is presented. The system is based solely upon surface observations as predictors, ...

Stephen M. Leyton; J. Michael Fritsch

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cerebral extraction of N-13 ammonia: its dependence on cerebral blood flow and capillary permeability, surface area product. [Dogs; monkeys  

SciTech Connect

/sup 13/N-labeled ammonia was used to investigate: (1) the cerebral extraction and clearance of ammonia; (2) the mechanicsm by which capillaries accommodate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF); and (3) its use for the measure of CBF. This was investigated by measuring the single pass extraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ in rhesus monkeys during P/sub a/CO/sub 2/ induced changes in CBF, and with dog studies using in vitro tissue counting techniques to examine /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ extraction in gray and white matter, mixed tissue, and cerebellum during variations in CBF produced by combinations of embolization, local brain compression, and changes in P/sub a/CO/sub 2/. The single pass extraction fraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ varied from about 70 to 20% over a CBF range of 12 to 140cc/min/100gms. Capillary permeability-surface area product (PS) estimates from this data and the dog experiments show PS increasing with CBF. The magnitude and rate of increase in PS with CBF was highest in gray matter > mixed tissue > white matter. Tissue extraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ vs CBF relationship was best described by a unidirectional transport model in which CBF increases by both recruitment of capillaries and by increases of blood velocity in open capillaries. Glutamine synthetase, which incorporates /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ into glutamine, appears to be anatomically located in astrocytes in general and specifically in the astrocytic pericapillary end-feet that are in direct contact with gray and white matter capillaries. The net /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ extraction subsequent to an i.v. injection increases nonlinearly with CBF. Doubling or halving basal CBF produced from 40 to 50% changes in the /sup 13/N tissue concentrations with further increases in CBF associated with progressively smaller changes in /sup 13/N concentrations. /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ appears to be a good tracer for the detection of cerebral ischemia with positron tomography but exhibits a poor response at high values of CBF.

Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Slin, C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Large area, high spatial resolution tracker for new generation of high luminosity experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2014 the CEBAF electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will deliver a longitudinally polarized (up to 85%), high intensity (up to 100 ?A) beam with maximum energy of 12 GeV, twice the present value. To exploit the new opportunities that the energy upgrade will offer, a new spectrometer (Super BigBite - SBS) is under development, featuring very forward angle, large acceptance and ability to operate in high luminosity environment. The tracking system of SBS will consist of large area (40×150 cm2 and 50×200 cm2), high spatial resolution (better than 100 ?m) chambers based on the GEM technology and 2 small (10×20 cm) Silicon Strip Detector planes. The design of the GEM chambers and its sub-components such as the readout electronics is resented here.

Bellini, V; Castelluccio, D; Colilli, S; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; Fratoni, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Guiliani, F; Guisa, A; Gricia, M; Lucentini, M; Meddi, F; Minutoli, S; Musico, P; Noto, F; De Oliveira, R; Santavenere, F; Sutera, M C

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

Weston, Ken

154

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The High Performance and Wide Area Analysis and Mining of Scientific & Engineering Data  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes our accomplishments and findings and includes recent publications occurring in the final period of this award. One of our research goals was to develop algorithms and services for remote data analysis and distributed data mining which scaled from the commodity internet to high performance networks. When we began the project there was no effective mechanisms to achieve high end to end performance for data intensive applications over wide area, high bandwidth networks. For this reason, we developed algorithms and services for Layers 2,3, and 4 in the simple data web application stack below. We describe our research accomplishments for each of these layers in turn: Layer 4--Data Web Applications; Layer 3--Data Web Services; Layer 2--Network Protocol Services; Layer 1--IP.

Grossman, R.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surface Air Temperature and Humidity from Intersatellite-Calibrated HIRS Measurements in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-latitude ocean surface air temperature and humidity derived from intersatellite-calibrated High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) measurements are examined. A neural network approach is used to develop retrieval algorithms. HIRS ...

Lei Shi; Ge Peng; John J. Bates

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Resonance of the Surface Waves. The H/V Ratio in the Metropolitan Area of Bucharest  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the natural period of oscillation T{sub 0} for soils in Bucharest city area. We will start by examine the elastic waves excited at the surface of an isotropic body by an oscillatory, localized force (Rayleigh waves). We define the 'H/V'-ratio as the ratio of the intensity of the in-plane waves (horizontal waves) to the intensity of the perpendicular-to-the-plane waves (vertical waves). It is shown that this ratio exhibits a resonance at a frequency which is close to the frequency of the transverse waves. It may serve to determine Poison's ratio of the body. We consider the ratio H/V of the horizontal to the vertical component of the Fourier spectrum for the seismic events recorded at 34 locations during the period October 2003 to August 2004. The method gives reliable data regarding the fundamental frequencies for soil deposits and the results of this experiment allows us to improve the known distribution of T{sub 0}--regularly calculated with the approximate formula T = 4h/v{sub s}. The earthquakes with M{sub w}>4 that occurred on 21.01.2004, 07.02.2004, 17.03.2004 and 04.04.2004 will be used as input to compute H/V ratios for each site of a URS stations in the area of Bucharest city. The H/V ratio is also calculated from noise recordings in the same areas. Computation of H/V spectral ratios are performed by means of the SeismicHandler and J-SESAME software showing the reliability of the method used for the sites located in Bucharest. The fundamental period obtained for the majority of sites is in accordance with already known results. By obtaining the fundamental period for much more and different spots situated in the Bucharest area we covered the zones where these data did not exist before. This study is significant in seismic risk mitigation for the Bucharest city area, for a safer seismic design and for the improvement of microzonation efforts.

Balan, Stefan F.; Cioflan, Carmen O.; Apostol, Bogdan F.; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan [National Institute for Earth Physics, Calugareni 12, PO Box MG2, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Mapping Burned Areas in a Mediterranean Environment Using Soft Integration of Spectral Indices from High-Resolution Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a new method for burned area mapping using high-resolution satellite images in the Mediterranean ecosystem. In such a complex environment, high-resolution satellite images represent an appropriate data source for identifying ...

Mirco Boschetti; Daniela Stroppiana; Pietro Alessandro Brivio

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Synthesis of High-Surface Area Cathode Materials for Solid Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu-Pd/CeO2 Cermet Anodes for Direct Oxidation of Methane in LSGM Electrolyte -Supported SOFCs · Deposition of Porous Anode Film of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell ...

160

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 deg. C. Photomicrograph of TEM showed that the nanopowder sintered at 600 deg. C is composed of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (26.0-45.6 nm), which is well in agreement with the crystallite size calculated using XRD data. TGA study showed the thermal stability of the synthesized nano-HAP powder. The BET surface area decreased with increase in sintering temperature.

Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Kohli, Suchita [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chd. (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN  

SciTech Connect

The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

Karam, P. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN  

SciTech Connect

The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

Karam, P. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reduced-volume antennas with integrated high-impedance electromagnetic surfaces.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several antennas with integrated high-impedance surfaces are presented. The high-impedance surface is implemented as a composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial fabricated from a periodic structure characterized by a substrate, filled with an array of vertical vias and capped by capacitive patches. Omnidirectional antennas placed in close proximity to the high-impedance surface radiate hemispherically with an increase in boresight far-field pattern gain of up to 10 dB and a front-to-back ratio as high as 13 dB at 2.45 GHz. Several TEM rectangular horn antennas are realized by replacing conductor walls with high-impedance surfaces. The TEM horn antennas are capable of operating below the TE{sub 1,0} cutoff frequency of a standard all-metal horn antenna, enabling a reduction in antenna volume. Above the cutoff frequency the TEM horn antennas function similarly to standard rectangular horn antennas.

Forman, Michael A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A high-order boundary integral method for surface diffusions on elastically stressed axisymmetric rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications in materials involve surface diffusion of elastically stressed solids. Study of singularity formation and long-time behavior of such solid surfaces requires accurate simulations in both space and time. Here we present a high-order boundary ... Keywords: 65B10, 65B15, 65M99, 65R20, 74B99, Axisymmetric domain, Boundary integral method, Elastic stress, Integration factor methods, Surface diffusion

Xiaofan Li; Qing Nie

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Parabolic equation modeling of high frequency acoustic transmission with an evolving sea surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic equation modeling of high frequency acoustic transmission with an evolving sea surface J is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea

Archer, Cristina Lozej

169

Impacts of Sea Surface Temperature Uncertainty on the Western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) and Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of short-term forecasts of the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH) and rainfall to sea surface temperature (SST) uncertainty using the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). A ...

Xiaodong Hong; Craig H. Bishop; Teddy Holt; Larry O’Neill

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar regions have great sensitivity to climate forcing; however, understanding of the physical processes coupling the atmosphere and ocean in these regions is relatively poor. Improving our knowledge of high-latitude surface fluxes will require close ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Sarah T. Gille; Cecilia Bitz; David Carlson; Ivana Cerovecki; Carol Anne Clayson; Meghan F. Cronin; Will M. Drennan; Chris W. Fairall; Ross N. Hoffman; Gudrun Magnusdottir; Rachel T. Pinker; Ian A. Renfrew; Mark Serreze; Kevin Speer; Lynne D. Talley; Gary A. Wick

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically, probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

Lacy, Jeffrey L

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Treating high pressure zones in one trip in Canyon Reef area of Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Canyon Reef area near Snyder, Texas, Chevron U.S.A. Inc. is employing ratchet operated, packer type retrievable bridge plugs which have allowed operators to test, treat, or squeeze high pressure zones over a 35-day period on a single trip of the workstring. More zones could have been treated if necessary. The bridge plug was moved and set 31 times while treating the zones. Elapsed time is shown in days starting with T-date being the day tools were first run in for the treatment. The job was run with an average treating pressure of 1,000 psi, and a differential pressure of 2,500 psi that alternated from above the bridge plug to below and back each time the plug was moved to a new zone. The bridge plug used for the job seals by the action of a patented ratcheting mechanism which requires relatively light weight to set. Design of the ratchet enables the sealing elements to hold a seal against the casing wall while the hold-down slips are being set.

Cooley, G.; Mccowen, D.; Fore, M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image particles of a high-rate LiFePO4 sample containing a small amount of in situ carbon. The particle morphology is highly irregular, with a wide size distribution. Nevertheless, coatings, varying from about 5-10 nm in thickness, could readily be detected on surfaces of particles as well as on edges of agglomerates. Elemental mapping using Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM) indicates that these very thin surface layers are composed of carbon. These observations have important implications for the design of high-rate LiFePO4 materials in which, ideally, a minimal amount of carbon coating is used.

Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to these same feature surfaces to withstand the pulsating UHIP diesel injection without fatigue failure, through the expected life of the fuel system's components (10,000 hours for the pump and common rail, 5000 hours for the injector). The potential to Caterpillar of this fueling approach and the overall emissions reduction system is the cost savings of the fuel, the cost savings of not requiring a full emissions module and other emissions hardware, and the enabling of the use of biodiesel fuel due to the reduced dependency on after-treatment. A proprietary production CRS generating process was developed to treat the interior of the sac-type injector nozzle tip region (particularly for the sac region). Ninety-five tips passed ultra high pulsed pressure fatigue testing with no failures assignable to treated surfaces or materials. It was determined that the CRS impartation method does not weaken the tip internal seat area. Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development accepts that the CRS method initial production technical readiness level has been established. A method to gage CRS levels in production was not yet accomplished, but it is believed that monitoring process parameters call be used to guarantee quality. A precision profiling process for injector seat and sac regions has been shown to be promising but not yet fully confirmed. It was demonstrated that this precision profiling process can achieve form and geometry to well under an aggressively small micron peak-to-valley and that there are no surface flaws that approach an even tighter micron peak-to-valley tolerance. It is planned to purchase machines to further develop and move the process towards production. The system is targeted towards the high-power diesel electric power generators and high-power diesel marine power generators, with displacement from 20 liters to 80 liters and with power from 800 brake horsepower (BHP) to 3200BHP (0.6 megawatts to 2.4 megawatts). However, with market adoption, this system has the potential to meet EPA exhaust standards for all diesel engines nine liters and up, or 300B

Grant, Marion B.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Novel Approaches to Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Using Highly Charged Ions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Complex problems in materials science require very sensitive, high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) determination of chemical (molecular) structures in near-surface volumes. Slow, highly charged ions (HCIs) provide a new, unique tool for probing chemical structure on a nanometer scale. The authors have explored the potential of these new highly charged ion based techniques in studies of materials with programmatic significance such as high explosives and actinide surfaces. Specifically the are studying HCI based surface analysis techniques (such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS) that are capable of achieving sensitivity of less than 10{sup 9} atoms/cm{sup 2}. In addition, this technique can determine chemical structure and hydrogen concentration. These attributes make this technique especially important to Laboratory missions in enhanced surveillance and nonproliferation. The unique advantage of HCIs over singly charged ions is the extreme energy density that is deposited into a nanometer-sized near-surface volume at the impact of a single HCI. For example, a Au{sup 69+} ion deposits about 0.5 MJ/cm{sup 3}. This high energy density causes the emission of a large number of secondary particles (electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and clusters) from surfaces. The emitted particles act as probes of the energy dissipation mechanism, and their yields are of technological significance. The HCI-emission microscope concept they developed uniquely combines all three aspects, high spatial resolution with highly sensitive compositional analysis and chemical structure determination. The experiments have shown that individual HCI impacts lead to copious electron emission, over 200 electrons per incident highly charged ion. In addition, highly charged ion induced secondary ion mass spectrometry (HCI-SIMS) provides considerably more information per ion impact than conventional SIMS. Combining these two phenomena provides a unique tool to study important materials issues necessary for the laboratory to accomplish its missions.

Hamza, A.; Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A.; Schneider, D.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design of Phosphor Thermometry System for Transient High Heat Flux Surface Thermometry  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: A transformative calibration methodology is presented for predicting transient surface temperatures in a thermally conducting medium from in-depth, time-varying temperature measurements. The surface temperature is resolved using two experimental runs and a newly devised first-kind Volterra integral equation. The first experimental run involves calibration with known surface temperature while the second run involves resolving the surface temperature of interest through the ill-posed integral equation. This paper presents the concept genesis and numerically demonstrates the concept for feasibility, robustness, stability and accuracy. From this demonstration, we propose to implement surface placed thermographic phosphors in the calibration stage of the inverse method for estimating the required surface temperature. As a preliminary study, we consider transient, constant property, onedimensional heat conduction in a semi-infinite medium. It is mathematically demonstrated that a Volterra integral equation of the first kind is developed for estimating the surface temperature using a calibrated system (host material and sensor). Sensor characterization, explicit sensor positioning and thermophysical properties are implicitly contained in the new calibration integral equation. The calibration integral equation displays only four terms; namely, the measured front surface temperature and corresponding measured in-depth temperature response associated with the calibration run; and, the unknown surface temperature and its measured in-depth temperature response associated with the second run. Preliminary numerical results indicate the merit of the concept. This paper suggests using thermographic phosphors for estimating the surface temperature in the calibration portion of the process owing to their rapid thermal response, good surface thermal contact characteristics and lack of capacitance for assuring minimal delay. Though the present paper describes the theoretical basis for resolving such problems, it is intended for near-term application using the UTK s high-heat flux laser facility which is presently under development

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Frankel, Jay I [ORNL; Beshears, David L [EMCO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Observations of seasonal variations in atmospheric greenhouse trapping and its enhancement at high sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between observed values of atmospheric greenhouse trapping and sea surface temperature is found to vary seasonally. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping is defined here as the difference between infrared emissions from the earth's surface and infrared emissions from the top of the atmosphere through cloudless skies. Infrared surface emissions are calculated from known sea surface temperatures; emissions from the top of the atmosphere are taken from direct satellite measurements. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping at the same sea surface temperature is greater in the winter than in the summer over temperate oceans. In subtropical latitudes, the opposite is true. At surface temperatures above approximately 298 K, atmospheric greenhouse trapping is found to increase even more rapidly from regions of lower sea surface temperature to regions of higher surface temperature than infrared surface emissions. The causes for this [open quotes]super[close quotes] greenhouse effect are explored, and four processes are found to contribute. Water vapor continuum absorption and thermodynamically controlled increases in water vapor concentration at constant relative humidity with increasing atmospheric temperature make significant contributions, but do not explain the entire super greenhouse effect. To explain the observations of atmospheric greenhouse trapping, the upper and middle troposphere, must be increasingly moist over the warmest sea surface temperatures, while the atmospheric temperature profile becomes increasingly unstable. Regions with these high sea surface temperatures are also increasingly subject to deep convection, which suggests that convection moistens the upper and middle troposphere in regions of convective activity relative to nonconvective regions, resulting in the super greenhouse effect. Dynamic processes, along with local thermodynamic processes, are required to explain the observed super greenhouse effect. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Hallberg, R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Inamdar, A.K. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Energy Balance and Evapotranspiration in a High Mountain Area during Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A meteorological experiment was carried out in summer 1995 at two representative sites above and below the timberline in the Dischma Valley, near Davos, Switzerland. The study aimed at investigating the characteristics of the surface energy ...

T. Konzelmann; P. Calanca; G. Müller; L. Menzel; H. Lang

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-Resolution Weather Database for the Terminal Area of Frankfurt Airport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr meteorological dataset for the terminal area of Frankfurt Airport in Germany has been generated with a numerical weather prediction system to provide a synthetic though realistic database for the evaluation of new operational aircraft ...

Michael Frech; Frank Holzäpfel; Arnold Tafferner; Thomas Gerz

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High-Temperature Galling Characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V with and without Surface Treatments  

SciTech Connect

Galling is a severe form of surface damage in metals and alloys that typically arises under relatively high normal force, low-sliding speed, and in the absence of effective lubrication. It can lead to macroscopic surface roughening and seizure. The occurrence of galling can be especially problematic in high-temperature applications like diesel engine exhaust gas recirculation system components and adjustable turbocharger vanes, because suitable lubricants may not be available, moisture desorption promotes increased adhesion, and the yield strength of metals decreases with temperature. Oxidation can counteract these effects to some extent by forming lubricative oxide films. Two methods to improve the galling resistance of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were investigated: (a) applying an oxygen diffusion treatment, and (b) creating a metal-matrix composite with TiB2 using a high-intensity infrared heating source. A new, oscillating three-pin-on-flat, high-temperature test method was developed and used to characterize galling behavior relative to a cobalt-based alloy (Stellite 6B ). The magnitude of the oscillating torque, the surface roughness, and observations of surface damage were used as measures of galling resistance. Owing to the formation of lubricative oxide films, the galling resistance of the Ti-alloy at 485o C, even non-treated, was considerably better than it was at room temperature. The IR-formed composite displayed reduced surface damage and lower torque than the substrate titanium alloy.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Detection of surface impurity phases in high T.sub.C superconductors using thermally stimulated luminescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Detection of surface impurity phases in high-temperature superconducting materials. Thermally stimulated luminescence has been found to occur in insulating impurity phases which commonly exist in high-temperature superconducting materials. The present invention is sensitive to impurity phases occurring at a level of less than 1% with a probe depth of about 1 .mu.m which is the region of interest for many superconductivity applications. Spectroscopic and spatial resolution of the emitted light from a sample permits identification and location of the impurity species. Absence of luminescence, and thus of insulating phases, can be correlated with low values of rf surface resistance.

Cooke, D. Wayne (Los Alamos, NM); Jahan, Muhammad S. (Bartlett, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Evapotranspiration and Energy Exchange over Different Land Surfaces in a Semiarid Area of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual variations of evapotranspiration (ET) and energy exchange were estimated over degraded grassland and cropland land surfaces in a semiarid region of northeastern China using the eddy covariance technique from 2003 to 2008. ...

Liu Huizhi; Feng Jianwu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

AVHRR-Derived Land Surface Conditions for Flux Simulations with a Mesoscale Model over the HAPEX-Sahel Study Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of land surface conditions at a spatial scale adapted to climate and meteorological models is at the core of major problems in environment studies. In this regard, the information routinely provided by remote sensing observations ...

Roselyne Lacaze; Sylvie Donier; Pierre Lacarrère; Jean-Louis Roujean

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Large-area fabrication of high aspect ratio tantalum photonic crystals for high-temperature selective emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors present highly selective emitters based on two-dimensional tantalum (Ta) photonic crystals, fabricated on 2 in. polycrystalline Ta substrates, for high-temperature applications, e.g., thermophotovoltaic energy ...

Rinnerbauer, Veronika

188

Interaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules with clean metal surfaces. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present results from a grant funded under the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences. A collaboration between Prof. Alec Wodtke of the Department of Chemistry at UCSB and Daniel J. Auerbach of IBM Almaden Research Labs has allowed new experiments on the dynamics of surface chemical reactivity to be successfully executed. High quality data has been generated which provides an excellent test of theoretical models of surface reactivity, a topic of importance to catalysis. The authors have obtained the first experimental measurements on the influence of reactant velocity on the steric effect in a chemical reaction: the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on copper. They have also designed and built a molecular beam scattering apparatus for the study of highly vibrationally excited molecules and their interactions with clean and oxidized metal surfaces. With this apparatus they have observed the vibrational energy exchange of highly vibrationally excited NO with an oxidized copper surface. Multi-quantum vibrational relaxation was found ({Delta}v = 1-5). Such remarkably strong and efficient vibrational energy transfer represents a qualitatively new phenomenon and is representative of the exciting new behavior that they had hoped might be observable in this project. Evidence of chemical reactivity of vibrationally excited NO on a clean copper surface was also found.

Wodtke, A.M. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Auerbach, D.J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

High-Order Low-Pass Implicit Tangent Filters for Use in Finite Area Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-order implict tangent filters are developed. The implicit tangent filters possess a highly selective amplitude response function and they can be applied relatively close to a boundary. Comparisons are made between the implict and the ...

William H. Raymond

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Search for ultra-high energy photons using Telescope Array surface detector  

SciTech Connect

We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive an upper limit on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10{sup 19} eV.

Rubtsov, G. I.; Troitsky, S. V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D.; Stokes, B. T. [Rutgers - State University of New Jersey, Piscataway (United States); Thomson, G. B. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment High-resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new generation of integrated sea surface temperature (SST) data products are being provided by the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) High-Resolution SST Pilot Project (GHRSST-PP). These combine in near–real time various SST data ...

C. Donlon; N. Rayner; I. Robinson; D. J. S. Poulter; K. S. Casey; J. Vazquez-Cuervo; E. Armstrong; A. Bingham; O. Arino; C. Gentemann; D. May; P. LeBorgne; J. Piollé; I. Barton; H. Beggs; C. J. Merchant; S. Heinz; A. Harris; G. Wick; B. Emery; P. Minnett; R. Evans; D. Llewellyn-Jones; C. Mutlow; R. W. Reynolds; H. Kawamura

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interpretation of Coastal HF Radar–Derived Surface Currents with High-Resolution Drifter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense arrays of surface drifters are used to quantify the flow field on time and space scales over which high-frequency (HF) radar observations are measured. Up to 13 drifters were repetitively deployed off the Santa Barbara and San Diego coasts ...

Carter Ohlmann; Peter White; Libe Washburn; Brian Emery; Eric Terrill; Mark Otero

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-Resolution Satellite Surface Latent Heat Fluxes in North Atlantic Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new high-resolution satellite-derived ocean surface flux product, XSeaFlux, which is evaluated for its potential use in hurricane studies. The XSeaFlux employs new satellite datasets using improved retrieval methods, and uses ...

Jiping Liu; Judith A. Curry; Carol Anne Clayson; Mark A. Bourassa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Highly uniform step and terrace structures on SiC(0001) surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly uniform step and termination structures on 4H- and 6H-SiC(0001) surfaces have been prepared via moderate annealing in disilane. Atomic force microscopy and dark-field low-energy electron microscopy imaging indicate single-phase terminations separated ...

J. Sun; J. B. Hannon; R. M. Tromp; K. Pohl

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A PERCEPTION-INSPIRED BUILDING INDEX FOR AUTOMATIC BUILT-UP AREA DETECTION IN HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of automatic extraction of built-up areas from high-resolution remote sensing images. We propose a new building presence index from the point view of perception. We argue that built-up areas usually result in significant corners and junctions in high-resolution satellite images, due to the man-made structures and occlusion, and thus can be measured by the geometrical structures they contained. More precisely, we first detect corners and junctions by relying on a perception-inspired corner detector, called an a-contrario junction detector. Each detected corner is associated with a perceptual significance, which measures the structural saliency of the corner in the image and is independent of the contrast and scale. All these detected corners together with their significance are then used to compute the building index. The proposed approach is evaluated on a high-resolution satellite image set, including 15 big images from GeoEye-1, QuickBird and IKONOS. The results demonstrated that our method achieves the state-of-the-art results and can be used in practical applications. Index Terms — High-resolution satellite images, junction detection, built-up area detection, contrast independent, urban area detection. 1.

Gang Liu; Gui-song Xia; Xin Huang; Wen Yang; Liangpei Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Analysis on Feasibility of Engineering Application of High Efficiently Using Straw Stem Technology in North Rural Area of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented the research results on the feasibility of the engineering application of high-efficient using straw technologies in the north rural areas of China. The biochemical conversion, the thermo-chemical conversion and the straw briquette ... Keywords: Bio-energy, Renewable energy, Straw stem, Biomass energy

Tongli Chang; Shuyang Wang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Freshening of Surface Waters in High Latitudes: Effects on the Thermohaline and Wind-Driven Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of a freshening of surface waters in high latitudes on the deep, slow, thermohaline circulation have received enormous attention, especially the possibility of a shutdown in the meridional overturning that involves sinking of surface ...

Alexey Fedorov; Marcelo Barreiro; Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald Pacanowski; S. George Philander

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Prediction and visualization of GPS multipath signals in urban areas using LiDAR Digital Surface Models and building footprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains a ray tracing method which is applied to prediction and visualization of diffracted and reflected GPS signals in dense urban areas. Reflected and diffracted signals can have a detrimental effect on GPS positioning accuracy especially ... Keywords: 3D visualization, GPS multipath, LiDAR

Jing Li; George Taylor; David Kidner; Mark Ware

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-23, 100-B/C Area Surface Debris, Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-027  

SciTech Connect

The 100-B-23, 100-B/C Surface Debris, waste consisted of multiple locations of surface debris and chemical stains that were identified during an Orphan Site Evaluation of the 100-B/C Area. Evaluation of the collected information for the surface debris features yielded four generic waste groupings: asbestos-containing material, lead debris, oil and oil filters, and treated wood. Focused verification sampling was performed concurrently with remediation. Site remediation was accomplished by selective removal of the suspect hazardous items and potentially impacted soils. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

system that will lead the way in innovations including high-end computing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, energy sources, and other material science research. The American...

204

High Energy Large Area Surveys: optically obscured AGN and the history of accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard X-ray, large area surveys are a fundamental complement of ultra-deep, pencil beam surveys in obtaining a more complete coverage of the L-z plane, allowing to find luminous QSO in wide z ranges. Furthermore, results from these surveys can be used to make reliable predictions about the luminosity (and hence the redshift) of the sources in the deep surveys which have optical counterparts too faint to be observed with the present generation of optical telescopes. This allows us to obtain accurate luminosity functions on wide luminosity and redshift intervals.

F. Fiore; the HELLAS2XMM collaboration

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Characterization of a commercially available large area, high detection efficiency single-photon avalanche diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize a new commercial, back-illuminated reach-through silicon single-photon avalanche photo diode (SPAD) SAP500 (Laser Components. Inc.), operated in Geiger-mode for purpose of photon counting. We show that for this sensor a significant interplay exists between dark counts, detection efficiency, afterpulsing, excess voltage and operating temperature, sometimes requiring a careful optimization tailored for a specific application. We find that a large flat plateau of sensitive area of about 0.5 mm in diameter, a peak quantum efficiency of 73% at 560 nm and timing precision down to 150 ps FWHM are the main distinguishing characteristics of this SPAD.

Stip?evi?, Mario; Ursin, Rupert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Global dynamics of high area-to-mass ratios GEO space debris by means of the MEGNO indicator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we provide an extensive analysis of the global dynamics of high-area-to-mass ratios geosynchronous (GEO) space debris, applying a recent technique developed by Cincotta et al. (2000), Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO), which provides an efficient tool to investigate both regular and chaotic components of the phase space. We compute a stability atlas, for a large set of near-geosynchronous space debris by numerically computing the MEGNO indicator, to provide an accurate understanding of the location of stable and unstable orbits as well as the timescale of their exponential divergence in case of chaotic motion. The results improve the analysis presented in Breiter et al. (2005a) notably by considering the particular case of high-area-to-mass ratios space debris. The results indicate that chaotic orbits region can be highly relevant, especially for very high area-to-mass ratios. Then, we provide some numerical investigations and an analytical theory which lead to a detailed understanding of the resonance structures appearing in the phase space. These analyses bring to the fore a relevant class of secondary resonances on both sides of the well-known pendulum-like pattern of geostationary space debris, leading to complex dynamics of such objects.

S. Valk; N. Delsate; A. Lemaitre; T. Carletti

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Six-Beam-Switched Array Antenna for 5.2 GHz High-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-beam-switched array antenna with a flat profile was designed for the application of high-speed wireless local-area networks in the range of 5–6 GHz. This six-beam-switched array antenna is composed of an analog beamformer and a microstrip-slot ... Keywords: beamformer, single-pole double-throw switch, slot antenna, switched-beam antenna

Sheng-Fuh Chang; Jia-Liang Chen; Chin-San Lin; Jing-Jang Luo

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

KINEMATICS IN KAPTEYN'S SELECTED AREA 76: ORBITAL MOTIONS WITHIN THE HIGHLY SUBSTRUCTURED ANTICENTER STREAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the mean three-dimensional kinematics of stars in Kapteyn's Selected Area (SA) 76 (l = 209.{sup 0}3, b = 26.{sup 0}4) that were selected to be Anticenter Stream (ACS) members on the basis of their radial velocities (RVs), proper motions (PMs), and location in the color-magnitude diagram. From a total of 31 stars ascertained to be ACS members primarily from its main-sequence turnoff, a mean ACS RV (derived from spectra obtained with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope) of V{sub helio} = 97.0 {+-} 2.8 km s{sup -1} was determined, with an intrinsic velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub o} = 12.8 {+-} 2.1 km s{sup -1}. The mean absolute PMs of these 31 ACS members are {mu}{sub {alpha}} cos {delta} = -1.20 {+-} 0.34 mas yr{sup -1} and {mu}{sub {delta}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.36 mas yr{sup -1}. At a distance to the ACS of 10 {+-} 3 kpc, these measured kinematical quantities produce an orbit that deviates by {approx}30{sup 0} from the well-defined swath of stellar overdensity constituting the ACS in the western portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint. We explore possible explanations for this and suggest that our data in SA 76 are measuring the motion of a kinematically cold sub-stream among the ACS debris that was likely a fragment of the same infalling structure that created the larger ACS system. The ACS is clearly separated spatially from the majority of claimed Monoceros ring detections in this region of the sky; however, with the data in hand, we are unable to either confirm or rule out an association between the ACS and the poorly understood Monoceros structure.

Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Grillmair, Carl J., E-mail: jc4qn@mail.astro.virginia.ed, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed, E-mail: dana@astro.yale.ed, E-mail: girard@astro.yale.ed, E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.ed [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Extending PVSCAN to meet the market needs for high-speed, large-area scanning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PVSCAN is a versatile instrument that has many applications in the PV industry, including high-speed mapping of material and cell parameters such as defect density, reflectance, and LBIC response. Recently, the PV community has been interested in acquiring this instrument for material and cell analyses and for process monitoring. This paper explores various issues that arise in developing a commercial instrument such as PVSCAN. Emphasis is on the technical details of the ability to scan fast and the detrimental effects this fast scan can have on the image quality of various material/cell parameters.

Sopori, B.; Chen, W.; Zhang, Y.; Hemschoot, T.; Madjdpour, J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

211

The oxidation of Ba dosed Mo(100) surfaces with O/sub 2/ at moderately high temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oxidation of Mo(100) and Ba-covered Mo(100) by O/sub 2/ have been examined at moderately high temperature (700 to 1400/sup 0/K) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that the Ba or BaO overlayer retards but does not prevent oxidation of the underlying Mo surface. The high temperature surface chemistry of the O/Ba/Mo surface is described. 11 refs., 3 figs.

Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Blair, D.S.; Paffett, M.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Eulerian and Lagrangian Correspondence of High-Frequency Radar and Surface Drifter Data: Effects of Radar Resolution and Flow Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the correspondence between the near-surface drifters from a mass drifter deployment near Martha’s Vineyard, MA and the surface current observations from a network of 3 high-resolution high-frequency radars to understand the ...

I. I. Rypina; A. Kirincich; R. Limeburner; I. A. Udovydchenkov

213

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

214

Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 °C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

David Fairén-jiménez; Francisco Carrasco-marín; David Djurado; Françoise Bley; Françoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Directed Self-assembly of Nanoparticles at the Polymer Surface by Highly Compressible Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a versatile route for self-assembly of polymer-soluble nanoparticles at the polymer surface using highly compressible supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposite thin films with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester nanoparticles were prepared on Si substrates and exposed to scCO{sub 2} at different pressures under the isothermal condition of 36 C. The resultant structures could be then preserved by the vitrification process of the glassy polymers via quick pressure quench to atmospheric pressure and subsequently characterized by using various surface sensitive experimental techniques in air. We found that the surface segregation of these nanoparticles is induced in the close vicinity of P = 8.2 MPa where the excess absorption of the fluid into the polymers maximizes. However, when the film thickness becomes less than about 4R{sub g} thick (where R{sub g} is the radius of polymer gyration), the uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles is favorable instead even at the same CO{sub 2} conditions. We clarify that the phase transition is correlated with the emergence of a concentration gradient of the fluid at the polymer/CO{sub 2} interface and is a general phenomenon for different polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

M Asada; P Gin; M Endoh; S Satija; T Taniguchi; T Koga

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

218

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Global Trend in Sea Surface Temperature from 20 Years of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trend in sea surface temperature has been determined from 20 yr of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder data (version 5). The data span the period from January 1985 to December 2004, inclusive. The linear trends were calculated ...

S. A. Good; G. K. Corlett; J. J. Remedios; E. J. Noyes; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Eulerian and Lagrangian Statistics from Surface Drifters and a High-Resolution POP Simulation in the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics were calculated from the North Atlantic surface drifter dataset for the years 1993–97 and a high-resolution eddy-resolving configuration of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ...

Julie L. McClean; Pierre-Marie Poulain; Jimmy W. Pelton; Mathew E. Maltrud

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relationships between Radar Properties at High Elevations and Surface Rain Rate: Potential Use for Spaceborne Rainfall Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based radar data have been used to investigate the relationship between reflectivity at high elevations and surface rain rates. Such relations are useful for rainfall measurements by spaceborne radars at attenuating wavelength such as the ...

Eyal Amitai

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrogen sulfide, trace element and sulfur hexafluoride tracer treatment from the Geysers-Calistoga Geothermal Resource Area based on aircraft and surface sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This four-day study has provided initial data regarding the short-range transport of pollutants from The Geysers geothermal operations. The initial analysis of the data has shown that a measureable plume of gaseous sulfur (H{sub 2}S) is emitted from the Geysers and transported by surface and upper-level winds to distances beyond 20 km. Only one day had concentrations above 30 ppB and on this day H{sub 2}S was detected as a distinct odor at 1500 m (m.s.1.) at 4 km or more from the Geysers. The initial data analysis of the H{sub 2}S and SF{sub 6} plume data have revealed the important role that vertical wind shear plays in changing plume trajectories with height and enhancing diffusion of pollutants. Surface and aircraft sampling of aerosols indicate that small quantities of trace elements such as As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr and Br may be transported from the area.

Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Nickola, P.W.; Schreck, R.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method Development to Evaluate the Oxygen Reduction Activity of High-Surface-Area Catalysts for Li-Air Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a new method to quantitatively determine the electrocatalytic activity of Vulcan carbon and Vulcan-supported Au nanoparticles, dispersed as catalyst thin films on glass carbon, for oxygen reduction in ...

Lu, Yi-Chun

227

Ocean Surface Roughness Spectrum in High Wind Condition for Microwave Backscatter and Emission Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean surface roughness plays an important role in air–sea interaction and ocean remote sensing. Its primary contribution is from surface waves much shorter than the energetic wave components near the peak of the wave energy spectrum. Field ...

Paul A. Hwang; Derek M. Burrage; David W. Wang; Joel C. Wesson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ocean Surface Roughness Spectrum in High Wind Condition for Microwave Backscatter and Emission Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean surface roughness plays an important role in air-sea interaction and ocean remote sensing. Its primary contribution is from surface waves much shorter than the energetic wave components near the peak of the wave energy spectrum. Field ...

Paul A. Hwang; Derek M. Burrage; David W. Wang; Joel C. Wesson

229

High-Spatial-Resolution Surface and Cloud-Type Classification from MODIS Multispectral Band Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for automated classification of surface and cloud types using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiance measurements has been developed. The MODIS cloud mask is used to define the training sets. Surface and cloud-...

Jun Li; W. Paul Menzel; Zhongdong Yang; Richard A. Frey; Steven A. Ackerman

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Improving Numerical Weather Predictions of Summertime Precipitation over the Southeastern United States through a High-Resolution Initialization of the Surface State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that high-resolution, accurate representations of surface properties such as soil moisture and sea surface temperature are necessary to improve simulations of summertime pulse-type convective precipitation in high-resolution ...

Jonathan L. Case; Sujay V. Kumar; Jayanthi Srikishen; Gary J. Jedlovec

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A comparison of glass reaction at high and low glass surface/solution volume  

SciTech Connect

Static leach tests have been performed at glass surface area/leachant volume (SA/V) ratios of 10, 340, 2,000, and 20,000 m[sup [minus]1] to assess the effects of the SA/V on the mechanism and rate of the glass reaction. Tests were performed using actinide-doped borosilicate waste glasses [Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 131 and SRL 202] to monitor the distribution of released radionuclides in tests at different SA/V. Solution results show the major effect of the SA/V to be dilution of reaction of products. Differences in the pH and silicic acid concentrations attained in tests at different SA/V then affect the reaction rate. Tests at low SA/V maintain leachate pH values similar to the initial leachant, while tests at higher SA/V result in higher leachate pH values being attained due to ion-exchange reactions. Transuranics released as the glass corrodes may exist in the leachate in concentrations far above their solubility limits by sorbing onto colloids, although the colloids may eventually settle out of solution. Transuranics also sorb onto the steel reaction vessel. The glass reaction progress can be characterized by three stages: (a) an initial stage where the reaction rate depends on the leachant pH, (b) an intermediate stage where the reaction slows toward a minimum rate as the leachate solution approaches saturation,'' and (c) a long-term stage where the reaction rate may be affected by the formation of secondary phases that control the solution chemistry. Tests at different SA/V cannot always be compared directly because the dominant reaction step and the observed reaction stage (initial, intermediate, or long-term) may not be the same.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Decontamination Strategy for Large Area and/or Equipment Contaminated with Chemical and Biological Agents using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strategy for the decontamination of large areas and or equipment contaminated with Biological Warfare Agents (BWAs) and Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) was demonstrated using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) photolysis system. This strategy offers an alternative that is potentially quicker, less hazardous, generates far less waste, and is easier to deploy than those currently fielded by the Department of Defense (DoD). For example, for large frame aircraft the United States Air Force still relies on the combination of weathering (stand alone in environment), air washing (fly aircraft) and finally washing the aircraft with Hot Soapy Water (HSW) in an attempt to remove any remaining contamination. This method is laborious, time consuming (upwards of 12+ hours not including decontamination site preparation), and requires large amounts of water (e.g., 1,600+ gallons for a single large frame aircraft), and generates large amounts of hazardous waste requiring disposal. The efficacy of the HEAL system was demonstrated using diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP) a G series CWA simulant, and Bacillus globigii (BG) a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. Experiments were designed to simulate the energy flux of a field deployable lamp system that could stand-off 17 meters from a 12m2 target area and uniformly expose a surface at 1360 W/m2. The HEAL system in the absence of a catalyst reduced the amount of B. globigii by five orders of magnitude at a starting concentration of 1.63 x 107 spores. In the case of CWA simulants, the HEAL system in the presence of the catalyst TiO2 effectively degraded DIMP sprayed onto a 100mm diameter Petri dish in 5 minutes.

Schoske, Richard [ORNL; Kennedy, Patrick [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Smith, Rob R [ORNL; Huxford, Theodore J [ORNL; Bonavita, Angelo M [ORNL; Engleman, Greg [ORNL; Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Griest, Wayne H [ORNL; Ilgner, Ralph H [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Collective renovation : case study on the public / private relationship in high-density low-rise residential areas of central Tokyo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis starts with the interest in the undefined open spaces of high-density low-rise (HDLR) residential areas in Tokyo. In these spaces, one can witness numerous examples of overlapping public and private uses. For ...

Mizuguchi, Saki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Reactions of Water Vapour on the Surfaces of Stoichiometric and Reduced Uranium Dioxide: A High Resolution XPS Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of water with stoichiometric and O-defective UO{sub 2} thin film surfaces is studied by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron X-rays radiation. The decomposition of D{sub 2}O molecules and the oxidative healing of defects on the reduced surfaces was observed and quantified. D{sub 2}O adsorption on the stoichiometric UO{sub 2} surface at 300 K showed small amounts of OD species (ca. 532 eV) probably formed on trace amounts of surface defects, while at 95 K D2O ice (533.5 eV) was the main surface species. On the contrary, a large signal of OD species was seen on the 300 K-Ar{sup +}-sputtered (reduced) surface, UO{sub 2-x}. This was concomitant with a rapid healing of surface defects as monitored by their U4f signal. Quantitative analysis of the OD signal with increasing temperature showed their disappearance by 550 K. The disappearance of these species while hydrogen molecules are still desorbing from the surface as monitored by TPD [S.D. Senanayake, H. Idriss, Surf. Sci. 563 (1-3) (2004) 135; S.D. Senanayake, R. Rousseau, D. Colegrave, H. Idriss, J. Nucl. Mater. 342 (2005) 179] is shedding light on the re-combinative desorption mechanism from dissociatively adsorbed water molecules on the surfaces of this defective metal oxide.

Senanayake,S.; Waterhouse, G.; Chan, A.; Madey, T.; Mullins, D.; Idriss, H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Experimental Investigations Of Surface Interactions Of Shock Heated Gases On High Temperature Materials Using High Enthalpy Shock Tubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The re-entry space vehicles encounter high temperatures when they enter the earth atmosphere and the high temperature air in the shock layer around the body… (more)

Jayaram, V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Secrets Beneath the Surface of High-Speed Industrial Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and consumer applications, such as surface finishing (paint and particle coating) and gas turbine combustion applications. These sprays comprise a jet of liquid surrounded by a...

237

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis  

SciTech Connect

Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Extracting forest canopy structure from spatial information of high resolution optical imagery: tree crown size versus leaf area index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaves are the primary interface where energy, water and carbon exchanges occur between the forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of the amount of leaf area in a stand, and the tree crown size characterizes how leaves ...

C. Song; M. B. Dickinson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Large-Area Cross-Correlation Study of High Galactic Latutude Soft and Hard X-ray Skies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have made cross-correlation analyses of (2 -- 15 keV) HEAO A2 and 1 keV ROSAT PSPC All-Sky Survey maps over a selected area ($\\sim$ 4000 deg$^2$) with high galactic latitude (b>40 deg). We have calculated the correlations for the bright ROSAT sources and residual background separately with the \\HEAO A2 TOT (2 -- 10 keV) and HRD (5 -- 15 keV) maps. The amplitude of the bright \\ROSAT source -- A2 CCFs are consistent with expectations from model populations of AGNs and clusters of galaxies, which emit in both bands. However, the residual ROSAT background -- A2 CCFs amplitude at zero degree are about a factor of three larger than that expected from the model populations. Our soft-hard zero-lag and angular CCF results have been compared with the 1 keV auto-correlation function (ACF) found by Soltan et al. (1995) for the same ROSAT data. Their significant angular CCF at a scale of ACF has a hot plasma spectrum with kT\\sim 2 keV, contribution of this component is consistent with both our zero-lag CCF in excess of the population synthesis model prediction and the upper-limit to the angular CCF at \\theta \\sim 2.5 deg. On the other hand, if this component has a lower temperature or a steeper spectrum, a major modification to the population synthesis model and/or an introduction of new classes would be needed.

Takamitsu Miyaji; Guenther Hasinger; Roland Egger; Joachim Truemper; Michael J. Freyberg

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Decision support system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources potential in wide areas for connection to high voltage networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decision support information system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources (RES) potential in wide areas is presented in this paper. The system estimates the RES potential in specific areas, examines ... Keywords: DSS, GIS, biomass, decision support systeoms, distributed generation, geographical information systems, high voltage network, renewable energy estimation, renewable energy forecasting, renewable energy potential, renewable energy sources, small hydro, wind energy, wind power

Michael Psalidas; Demosthenes Agoris; Vassilis Kilias; Kostas Tigas; Panagiotis Stratis; Giannis Vlachos

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assimilating Surface Weather Observations from Complex Terrain into a High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anisotropic surface analysis method based on the mother–daughter (MD) approach has been developed to spread valley station observations to grid points in circuitous steep valleys. In this paper, the MD approach is further refined to allow ...

Xingxiu Deng; Roland Stull

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Observations of Seasonal Variations in Atmospheric Greenhouse Trapping and Its Enhancement at High Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlation between observed values of atmospheric greenhouse trapping and sea surface temperature is found to vary seasonally. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping is defined here as the difference between infrared emissions from the earth's ...

Robert Hallberg; Anand K. Inamdar

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Microfabricated surface ion trap on a high-finesse optical mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel approach to optics integration in ion traps is demonstrated based on a surface electrode ion trap that is microfabricated on top of a dielectric mirror. Additional optical losses due to fabrication are found to be ...

Herskind, Peter F.

245

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Available Technologies: Super High Rate Sputter Deposition  

Andre’ Anders of Berkeley Lab has developed a very high deposition rate magnetron sputtering wherein the surface of a target and the race track zone area of the ...

247

Research on high-efficiency, large-area, CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin- film modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1992--15 Aug 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to demonstrate 12.5% aperture efficient, large-area (3900-cm{sup 2}) encapsulated thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) photovoltaic modules. Module design consists of 53 series-connected ZnO/CdS/CIS/Mo/glass cells fabricated on a 4141-cm{sup 2} (128.6 {times} 32.2 cm) glass substrate with a nominal aperture area of 3895 cm{sup 2} (127.3 {times} 30.6 cm). Four CIS modules were shipped to NREL under the terms of the subcontract. Phase 2 consisted of fabricating large-area (3900-cm{sup 2}) modules for high-performance module processing. The large-area parts proved to be cumbersome, and we decided to use smaller substrates (100 cm{sup 2}) to accelerate the progress in solving the types of technical challenges that were discovered in processing large-area parts, and then to apply these solutions to larger areas to meet the objectives of the investigation. Most critical issues determining module yield losses can be grouped into three major categories: (1) Uniformity and reproducibility of the absorber formation process dominates the fundamental performance of the material over a large area, (2) interaction of the substrate with the Mm requires appropriate selection criterial and preparation techniques for minimizing defects that lead to shunting and areas of poor photoresponse, and (3) performance losses near interconnects reduce module performance and can cause inadequate performance through module durability testing.

Knapp, K.E.; Gay, R.R. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method for formation of high quality back contact with screen-printed local back surface field  

SciTech Connect

A thin silicon solar cell having a back dielectric passivation and rear contact with local back surface field is described. Specifically, the solar cell may be fabricated from a crystalline silicon wafer having a thickness from 50 to 500 micrometers. A barrier layer and a dielectric layer are applied at least to the back surface of the silicon wafer to protect the silicon wafer from deformation when the rear contact is formed. At least one opening is made to the dielectric layer. An aluminum contact that provides a back surface field is formed in the opening and on the dielectric layer. The aluminum contact may be applied by screen printing an aluminum paste having from one to 12 atomic percent silicon and then applying a heat treatment at 750 degrees Celsius.

Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA); Meemongkolkiat, Vichai (Atlanta, GA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Adsorption of Ions on Zirconium Oxide Surfaces from Aqueous Solutions at High Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an experimental program aimed first at determining the surface charge on zirconium oxide particles to 290 °C, or 554 °F (a limitation of the available equipment), as well as the concomitant effect of zero net point of charge pH (pHznpc). Additional experiments established the effect of boric acid and the nature of the cation in solution on the surface charge on zirconium oxide. Experiments measured the uptake and release of lithium ions in basic solutions under con...

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ocean Surface Wave Measurement Using a Steerable High-Frequency Narrow-Beam Ground Wave Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground wave radar is emerging as an important tool for routine monitoring of ocean surface conditions and for ship and sea-ice surveillance at ranges well beyond the line-of-sight horizon that limits conventional systems. A major Canadian advance ...

E. W. Gill; M. L. Khandekar; R. K. Howell; J. Walsh

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of Cloudiness on the High-Latitude Surface Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of hourly data on radiation, cloud and temperature collected at Resolute, Canada (75°N) show that with respect to clear skies: (i) clouds of all types, heights and extents heat the surface when it is snow-covered; (ii) low clouds ...

J. Graham Cogley; A. Henderson-Sellers

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The control of size and areal density of InAs self-assembled quantum dots in selective area molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (001) substrates by selective area molecular beam epitaxy (SA-MBE) with dielectric mask is investigated. The GaAs polycrystals on the mask, which is formed during growth due to low GaAs selectivity between ... Keywords: InAs quantum dots, Molecular beam epitaxy, Selective area epitaxy

J. C. Lin; P. W. Fry; R. A. Hogg; M. Hopkinson; I. M. Ross; A. G. Cullis; R. S. Kolodka; A. I. Tartakovskii; M. S. Skolnick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Formation and Limiting Mechanisms for Very High Sea Surface Temperature: Linking the Dynamics and the Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study composites atmosphere and ocean conditions associated with ocean hot spots. Ocean hot spots are defined as regions where SST exceeds 29.75°C and that have an area greater than 1 × 106 km2. The composite atmosphere includes ...

Duane E. Waliser

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Estimation of Surface Solar Global Radiation from NOAA AVHRR Data in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physical method for estimating the instantaneous global irradiance and daily cumulative insolation based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data was developed and tested at high latitudes in a boreal subarctic region. The satellite ...

Vesa Laine; Ari Venäläinen; Martti Heikinheimo; Otto Hyvärinen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of MM5 High-Resolution Real-Time Forecasts over the Urban Area of Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) forecast skill over an area of complex terrain is evaluated. Namely, the model is verified over a period of 1 yr (2002)...

V. Kotroni; K. Lagouvardos

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

In this paper, we argue that the deployment of high performance wide area networks coupled with the availability of commodity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the availability of commodity middleware will produce a new paradigm of high performance computing that we call community is on the cusp of a new era in high-performance computing. In order to understand the trends the next five to ten years. Traditional High Performance Computing (HPC) - Up until only a few years ago

Stodghill, Paul

257

Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

258

Potential Reductions in Variability with Alternative Approaches to Balancing Area Cooperation with High Penetrations of Variable Generation  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (EERE DOE). This project is a joint project with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report evaluates the physical characteristics that improve the ability of the power system to absorb variable generation. It then uses evidence from electricity markets in the Eastern Interconnection of the United States to show how large, fast energy markets can help with integration. The concept of Virtual Balancing Area is introduced, a concept that covers a broad range of cooperative measures that can be undertaken by balancing areas to help manage variability.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Beuning, S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Albedo Influences on Surface UV Irradiance at the Sonnblick High-Mountain Observatory (3106-m Altitude)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the influences of ozone, aerosols, and albedo on the clear sky UVA and UVB irradiance at a high-mountain station are investigated by using both routine spectral UV measurements from the high-mountain Sonnblick observatory in Austria (...

Philipp Weihs; Stana Simic; Wolfgang Laube; Wieslaw Mikielewicz; Govindaraj Rengarajan; Michael Mandl

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thin optic surface analysis for high resolution X-ray telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The art of glass developed throughout the years has covered artifacts ranging from crude ornaments to high precision optics used in flat panel displays, hard disk drives, and x-ray telescopes. Methods for manufacturing ...

Akilian, Mireille

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Modeling Land Surface Processes and Heavy Rainfall in Urban Environments: Sensitivity to Urban Surface Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are used in conjunction with observational analyses to investigate land surface processes and heavy rainfall over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid; Mary Lynn Baeck; Stephen Jessup; James A. Smith

263

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

264

Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electron emission and defect formation in the interaction of slow,highly charged ions with diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on electron emission and defect formation in theinteraction between slow (v~;0.3 vBohr) highly charged ions (SHCI) withinsulating (type IIa) and semiconducting (type IIb) diamonds. Electronemission induced by 31Pq+ (q=5 to 13), and 136Xeq+ (q=34 to 44) withkinetic energies of 9 kVxq increase linearly with the ion charge states,reaching over 100 electrons per ion for high xenon charge states withoutsurface passivation of the diamond with hydrogen. Yields from bothdiamond types are up to a factor of two higher then from reference metalsurfaces. Crater like defects with diameters of 25 to 40 nm are formed bythe impact of single Xe44+ ions. High secondary electron yields andsingle ion induced defects enable the formation of single dopant arrayson diamond surfaces.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Shrivastava, S.; Rebuli, D.B.; Persaud, A.; Schneider, D.H.; Schenkel, T.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effects of Synoptic-scale Wind under the Typical Summer Pressure Pattern on the Mesoscale High-Temperature Events in the Osaka and Kyoto Urban Areas in Japan by the WRF model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The actual conditions of the mesoscale summer high temperatures (HT) recorded in Osaka-Kyoto urban area in Japan were investigated by using our observation network. The daytime temperatures observed on ten HT events in this area were the highest ...

Yuya Takane; Yukitaka Ohashi; Hiroyuki Kusaka; Yoshinori Shigeta; Yukihiro Kikegawa

267

Characterization methodology for pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors using surface photovoltage spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the characterization of PHEMT structures. Information about the energy band diagram and related fields and charges and their analysis are shown to provide values for the electrical parameters of the structure. The sensitivity market of monolithic microwave integrated circuits. PHEMTs combine the high conductivity of an In

Shapira, Yoram

268

Cultural Heritage: High resolution acquisition of detailed surfaces with lens-shifted structured light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel 3D geometry acquisition technique at high resolution based on structured light reconstruction with a low-cost projector-camera system. Using a 1D mechanical lens-shifter extension in the projector light path, the projected pattern ... Keywords: Picture/image generation-Digitizing and scanning, Scene analysis-Range data

M. Ritz; F. Langguth; M. Scholz; M. Goesele; A. Stork

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A NOVEL LOW THERMAL BUDGET THIN-FILM POLYSILICON FABRICATION PROCESS FOR LARGE-AREA, HIGH-THROUGHPUT SOLAR CELL PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

methods. The poly-Si solar cell structure and the performance have been examined. In principle, the new process is potentially applicable to produce large-area thin-film poly-Si solar cells at a high throughput and low cost. A critical issue in this process is to prevent the excessive dopant diffusion during crystallization. Process parameters and the cell structure have to be optimized to achieve the production goal.

Yue Kuo

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiation-induced surface degradation of GaAs and high electron mobility transistor structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transistor heterostructures with high-carrier-mobility have been studied. It is shown that, as the {gamma}-irradiation dose {Phi} increases, their degradation occurs in the following sequence. (i) At {Phi} 0.2-eV decrease in the diffusion energy of intrinsic defects and, probably, atmospheric oxygen. (ii) At {Phi} > 10{sup 7} rad, highly structurally disordered regions larger than 1 {mu}m are formed near microscopic defects or dislocations. (iii) At {Phi} > 10{sup 8} rad, there occurs degradation of the internal AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs interfaces and the working channel. An effective method for studying the degradation processes in heterostructures is to employ a set of structural diagnostic methods to analyze processes of radiation-induced and aging degradation, in combination with theoretical simulation of the occurring processes.

Bobyl, A. V.; Konnikov, S. G.; Ustinov, V. M.; Baidakova, M. V.; Maleev, N. A.; Sakseev, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Milenin, V. V.; Prokopenko, I. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

New York state high-speed surface transportation study: Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, New York State Governor Mario M. Cuomo created an interagency task force under the leadership of Lt. Governor Stan Lundine to investigate the potential of high speed ground transportation (HSGT) systems. Building on information from previous agency activities, including consultant efforts contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), and in-house analyses performed by New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the task force focused on the corridor between New York City and the Niagara Frontier. In December 1991, NYSERDA issued a contract for a study of high speed ground transportation options for New York State. The study`s objective was to assess potential rights-of-way, ridership, energy and environmental impacts, economic benefits, capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and financial viability of HSGT systems. This study builds upon and supplements previous and on-going HSGT activities conducted by the members of the interagency task force. These activities include: Maglev Technical and Economic Feasibility Study (NYSERDA); Maglev Demonstration Site Investigation (NYSTA); and New York/Massachusetts High Speed Ground Transportation Study (NYSDOT). This study is intended to verify and refine previous information and analyses and provide supplemental information and insights to be used in determining if additional investigation and activities involving HSGT are desirable for New York State. This study evaluates HSGT technologies capable of speeds significantly higher than those achieved with the present rail system. Three HSGT categories are used in this study: incremental rail improvement, very high-speed rail, and Maglev.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effect of Space Charge on Surface Insulation of High-Voltage Direct-Current Bushings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating data on bushings and post insulators for HVDC converter stations demonstrate that large-diameter insulators perform poorly when exposed to a combination of rain or fog and airborne contaminants. A technique that produces an intense space charge, resulting in corona at the high-voltage electrode of HVDC bushings, shows promise of improving flashover performance in some laboratory applications, but apparently has little effect under simulated service conditions.

1987-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Layer Formation On Metal Surfaces In Lead-Bismuth At High Temperatures In Presence Of Zirconium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the operating temperature lead–bismuth cooled fission reactor could be extended to 800 °C, they could produce hydrogen directly from water. A key issue for the deployment of this technology at these temperatures is the corrosion of the fuel cladding and structural materials by the lead–bismuth. Corrosion studies of several metals were performed to correlate the interaction layer formation rate as a function of time, temperature, and alloy compositions. The interaction layer is defined as the narrow band between the alloy substrate and the solidified lead–bismuth eutectic on the surface. Coupons of HT-9, 410, 316L, and F22 were tested at 550 and 650 °C for 1000 h inside a zirconium corrosion cell. The oxygen potential ranged from approximately 10-22 to 10-19 Pa. Analyses were performed on the coupons to determine the depth of the interaction layer and the composition, at each time step (100, 300, and 1000 h). The thickness of the interaction layer on F22 at 550 °C was 25.3 µm, the highest of all the alloys tested, whereas at 650 °C, the layer thickness was only 5.6 µm, the lowest of all the alloys tested. The growth of the interaction layer on F22 at 650 °C was suppressed, owing to the presence of Zr (at 1500 wppm) in the LBE. In the case of 316L, the interaction layers of 4.9 and 10.6 µm were formed at 550 and 650 °C, respectively.

Loewen, Eric Paul; Yount, Hannah J.; Volk, Kevin; Kumar, Arvind

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Surface treated natural graphite as anode material for high-power Li-ion battery applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power application of Li-ion battery in hybrid electrical vehicles requires low cost and safe cell materials. Among the various carbon anode materials used in lithium ion batteries, natural graphite shows the most promise with advantages in performance and cost. However, natural graphite is not compatible with propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolytes, which have a lower melting point and improved safety characteristics. The problem with it is that the molecules of propylene carbonate intercalate with Li+ into graphite, and that frequently leads to the exfoliation of the graphite matrix.

Liu, J.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Barsukov, I. V.; Henry, F.; Doniger, J.; Chemical Engineering; Superior Graphite Co.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Failure Analysis With a New Tool Geometry, X-Die, in Areas With High Tension/Compression Strains  

SciTech Connect

Sheet-metal forming involves a complex strain distribution over the part. The strains consist of tension, compression, and a mix of both. A geometry has been developed, the X-Die, in order to gain insight into the strain behavior of different materials. The X-Die enables strain paths far into the tension/compression region, thus creating the possibility to extend the experimental base both for definition and for further extrapolation of the Forming Limit Curve (FLC) in the tension/compression region, as well as to evaluate FE-simulation results for the same region.Today, evaluation of cracks is made by using FLC. In the conventional test methods, the strains only reach 40% compression (true strain) and often much lower percentages. In conventional test methods, the FLC for any region beyond these levels is extrapolated from existing data.The experimental test proposed in this work consists of a geometry, the X-die, which has shown that rates of 70% tension/compression can be reached (point 0.7/-0.7 in the FLC). Thereby, the region for prediction of cracks on the compression side can be extended in the Forming Limit Diagram (FLD). Furthermore, the strain paths are easy to follow and the limits when cracks appear can be evaluated. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the behavior depends on the material quality. Qualities such as Extreme High Strength Steel (EHSS) and Aluminum have a limited tension/compression rate due to failure in plane strain tension. Material qualities with high r-values, e.g. Mild steel and High Strength Steel (HSS), reach high tension/compression rates before failure and have regions with clearly defined strain signatures. This will be favorable for comparison with numerical simulations, especially for strain signatures in the tension/compression region. Furthermore, the experiments did not indicate any limitation in the compression region besides the one defined in the normal procedure in creation of an FLC.This geometry is favorable to calibrate simulation results, in order to analyze prediction of strains located on the left side in an FLD.

Andersson, Alf [Volvo Cars Body Components, 293 80 Olofstroem (Sweden); Lund University, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Thilderkvist, Per [Industrial Development Center, 293 38 Olofstroem (Sweden)

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Method for full dispersion of active metals into a high surface area of support to promote efficiency Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory have ...

277

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

Mark Burmeister

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193, Japan and Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

High-frequency absorption of the dynamic mixed state in the surface superconductivity region  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the absorption of a high-frequency electromagnetic field in the type II superconductor Pb{sub 0.8}In{sub 0.2} in magnetic fields H{sub c2} < H < H{sub c3}. The absorption component proportional to the rate of variation of the external magnetic field is detected. We assume that this absorption component is associated with the dynamic mixed state of the superconducting shell containing 2D magnetic flux vortices (Kulik vortices). The motion of these vortices under the action of the critical current ensures the required difference between the external and internal magnetic inductions of the superconducting shell upon a change in the external magnetic field. This model correctly describes the observed behavior of absorption of rf electromagnetic radiation.

Berezin, V. A., E-mail: berezin@iptm.ru; Tulin, V. A., E-mail: tulin@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

LLOYD, E.R.

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

283

Groundwater Management and the Cost of Reduced Surface Water Deliveries to Urban Areas: The Case of the Central and West Coast Basins of Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the analysis is 2009-2030, the term of the Judgmentfor the analysis is 2009-2030, the term of the JudgmentNet Benefits, Years 2009-2030 (million $’s) Low High Central

Sunding, David L.; Hamilton, Stephen F; Ajami, Newsha K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hydrogen induced surface cracking in an 8090 Al-Li alloy during high cycle fatigue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in understanding the effects of aggressive or moist environments on the properties of Al-Li alloys. However, most of the existing work has been focused on their stress corrosion cracking resistance. Consequently, only a few reports are available on the environmental fatigue strength of these alloys. Upon exposure to aggressive environments, the fatigue crack propagation resistance can be detrimentally affected. R. Piascik and R. Gangloff found enhanced cyclic crack growth rates in an Al-Li-Cu alloy when a critical water vapor pressure was exceeded. Thermodynamically, at atmospheric pressures, strong interactions between hydrogen and lithium are expected to give rise to stable lithium hydrides. Evidence for the development of hydride phases in Al-Li alloys exposed to hydrogen environments has been reported by various workers. Thus, it is likely that HE via hydride formation can be the relevant mechanisms in Al-Li alloys that have been in contact with hydrogen. Since lithium hydrides are stable up to temperatures of 773 K, previous hydrogen exposure can lead to an irreversible mode of embrittlement. Thus, it was the objective of the present work to investigate the effects of hydrogen during aging on the ensuing high cycle fatigue (HCF) performance of an 8090 Al-Li alloy.

Laffin, C.; Raghunath, C.R.; Lopez, H.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Materials Dept.)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Surface Anchoring of Nematic Phase on Carbon Nanotubes: Nanostructure of Ultra-High Temperature Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is a dependable and economical source of electricity. Because fuel supply sources are available domestically, nuclear energy can be a strong domestic industry that can reduce dependence on foreign energy sources. Commercial nuclear power plants have extensive security measures to protect the facility from intruders [1]. However, additional research efforts are needed to increase the inherent process safety of nuclear energy plants to protect the public in the event of a reactor malfunction. The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is envisioned to utilize a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design with an operating temperature of 650-1000�°C [2]. One of the most important safety design requirements for this reactor is that it must be inherently safe, i.e., the reactor must shut down safely in the event that the coolant flow is interrupted [2]. This next-generation Gen IV reactor must operate in an inherently safe mode where the off-normal temperatures may reach 1500�°C due to coolant-flow interruption. Metallic alloys used currently in reactor internals will melt at such temperatures. Structural materials that will not melt at such ultra-high temperatures are carbon/graphtic fibers and carbon-matrix composites. Graphite does not have a measurable melting point; it is known to sublime starting about 3300�°C. However, neutron radiation-damage effects on carbon fibers are poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this project is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nanotexture on the properties of resulting carbon fibers and their neutron-damage characteristics. Although polygranular graphite has been used in nuclear environment for almost fifty years, it is not suitable for structural applications because it do not possess adequate strength, stiffness, or toughness that is required of structural components such as reaction control-rods, upper plenum shroud, and lower core-support plate [2,3]. For structural purposes, composites consisting of strong carbon fibers embedded in a carbon matrix are needed. Such carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have been used in aerospace industry to produce missile nose cones, space shuttle leading edge, and aircraft brake-pads. However, radiation-tolerance of such materials is not adequately known because only limited radiation studies have been performed on C/C composites, which suggest that pitch-based carbon fibers have better dimensional stability than that of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based fibers [4]. The thermodynamically-stable state of graphitic crystalline packing of carbon atoms derived from mesophase pitch leads to a greater stability during neutron irradiation [5]. The specific objectives of this project were: (i) to generating novel carbonaceous nanostructures, (ii) measure extent of graphitic crystallinity and the extent of anisotropy, and (iii) collaborate with the Carbon Materials group at Oak Ridge National Lab to have neutron irradiation studies and post-irradiation examinations conducted on the carbon fibers produced in this research project.

Ogale, Amod A

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparison between the Pathfinder Versions 5.0 and 4.1 Sea Surface Temperature Datasets: A Case Study for High Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Pathfinder sea surface temperature (SST) datasets—version 5.0 (V50) and version 4.1 (V41)—were compared in two test areas: 1) the Gulf Stream (GS) between 35° and 43°N, 75° and 60°W and 2) the California coast (CC) between 30° and 45°N, 130° ...

Jorge Vázquez-Cuervo; Edward M. Armstrong; Kenneth S. Casey; Robert Evans; Katherine Kilpatrick

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Task B: Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules: Semiannual subcontract report, 1 February 1987--31 July 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semiannual report presents results of research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules. High conversion efficiencies (up to 11.95%) were obtained in small-area, single-junction, a-Si solar cells by using textured tin oxide, superlattice p-layers, graded carbon concentrations near the p-i interface, and highly relective ITO/silver back contacts. Researchers also fabricated single-junction a-SiC and a-SiGe p-i-n cells with efficiencies of 9%--11%. Stacked-junction cells of a-SiC/a-Si, a-SiC/a-SiGe, and a-SiC/a-Si/a-SiGe were fabricated, and efficiencies of about 10% were achieved in some of them. Boron-doped microcrystalline SiC films were developed that contain up to 6 at.% C with conductivities of 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/3/ ohm /sup /minus/1/ cm/sup /minus/1/ at room temperature and activation energies of 0.11 eV. Stability studies showed that light-induced degradation is usually enhanced by the presence of C grading near the p-i interface. Light-induced degradation of the fill factor of p-i-n cells strongly correlates with optical absorption at 1.2 eV, as measured by photothermal deflection spectroscopy. 11 refs., 70 figs., 16 tabs.

Carlson, D.E.; Arya, R.R.; Bennett, M.S.; Catalano, A.; D'Aiello, R.V.; Dickson, C.R.; Fortmann, C.M.; Goldstein, B.; Morris, J.; Newton, J.L.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Comparison of SNOTEL and GHCN/CRU Surface Temperatures with Free-Air Temperatures at High Elevations in the Western United States: Data Compatibility and Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares high-elevation surface temperatures based on the Global Historical Climate Network/Climatic Research Unit (GHCN/CRU) and snow telemetry (SNOTEL) datasets, with simultaneous free-air equivalent temperatures, interpolated from ...

N. C. Pepin; M. Losleben; M. Hartman; K. Chowanski

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Validation of the Coupled NCEP Mesoscale Spectral Model and an Advanced Land Surface Model over the Hawaiian Islands. Part II: A High Wind Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high wind event (14–15 February 2001) over the Hawaiian Islands associated with a cold front is simulated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Mesoscale Spectral Model (MSM) coupled with an advanced land surface model (...

Yongxin Zhang; Yi-Leng Chen; Kevin Kodama

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Effect of a Well-Resolved Stratosphere on Surface Climate: Differences between CMIP5 Simulations with High and Low Top Versions of the Met Office Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of using a general circulation model that includes a well-resolved stratosphere for climate simulations, and particularly the influence this has on surface climate, is investigated. High top model simulations are run with the Met ...

S. C. Hardiman; N. Butchart; T. J. Hinton; S. M. Osprey; L. J. Gray

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Texture improvements in the high-temperature superconducting Bi?Sr?Ca?Cu?Ox̳/Ag system via surface energy driven grain alignment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between processing, microstructure, and material property was investigated in the high-temperature superconducting Bi?Sr?Ca?Cu?Ox̳/Ag system. Experiments were based on a theoretical surface energy model ...

Vodhanel, Mark E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

295

Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

Shaffer, Franklin D.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Bayesian Cloud Mask for Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian methods are used to develop a cloud mask classification algorithm for use in an operational sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval processing system for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) local area coverage (LAC) ...

Michael J. Uddstrom; Warren R. Gray; Richard Murphy; Niles A. Oien; Talbot Murray

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

High-Pressure Studies on CeO2 Nano-Octahedrons with a (111)-Terminated Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopies have been performed on well-shaped CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons enclosed by eight (111) planes. The CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons are shown to be more stable than their bulk counterparts and some other reported CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals of smaller size. The transition pressure from cubic to orthorhombic phase is approximately 10 GPa higher than that of 12 nm CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals even though they have similar volume expansion at ambient conditions. Additionally, the phase transition to {alpha}-PbCl2 phase is very sluggish and uncompleted even up to 55 GPa. The TEM image of the sample after decompression from 55 GPa clearly shows that the nano-octahedrons preserve the starting shape. Such distinct high-pressure behaviors in CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons have been discussed in terms of their special exposure surface. Further analysis shows that the lower compressibility of the exposed (111) planes in the nano-octahedrons is believed to be the major factor to the elevation of the phase transition pressure and the sluggishness of the transition.

B Liu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Highly uniform and reproducible visible to near-infrared vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers grown by MOVPE  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the growth and characterization of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) from visible to near-infrared wavelength grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include the control on growth rate and composition using an in situ normal-incidence reflectometer, optimization of ultra-high material uniformity, and comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire Al composition range. They will also demonstrate the recent achievements of selectively-oxidized VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous-wave demonstration of all-AlGaAs 700-nm red VCSELs, high-performance n-side up 850-nm VCSELs, and low threshold current and low-threshold voltage 1.06 {micro}m VCSELs using InGaAs/GaAsP strain-compensated quantum wells.

Hou, H.Q.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors Technology

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Study of Convection Initiation in a Mesoscale Model Using High-Resolution Land Surface Initial Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled convection-resolving mesoscale atmosphere–land surface model (LSM) is used to investigate land surface–planetary boundary layer (PBL) interactions responsible for the initiation of deep, moist convection over the southern Great Plains ...

Stanley B. Trier; Fei Chen; Kevin W. Manning

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Surface Water Mixing in the Solomon Sea as Documented by a High-Resolution Coral 14C Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bimonthly coral-based record of the postbomb radiocarbon content of Solomon Sea surface waters is interpreted to reflect mixing of subtropical surface water and that advected in from the east by the equatorial branch of the South Equatorial ...

T. P. Guilderson; D. P. Schrag; M. A. Cane

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record  

SciTech Connect

To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on simulations of CO2 concentrations, the model could be used for other atmospheric compounds with known estimated emissions.

Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Surface heat flow measurements over active geothermal systems indicate strongly positive thermal anomalies. Whereas in "normal" geothermal settings, the surface heat flow is usually below 100-120 mW m- 2, in active geothermal areas heat flow values as high as several watts per meter squared can be found. Systematic interpretation of heat flow patterns sheds light on heat transfer mechanisms at depth on different lateral, depth and time scales. Borehole temperature profiles in active geothermal

306

area | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area area Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data repr Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords area capacity clean energy international National Renewable Energy Laboratory

307

Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40 CFR 300.430(e)(9): ( 1) overall protection of human health and the environment; (2) compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriated requirement: (ARARs); (3) long-term effectiveness and permanence; (4) reduction of toxicity, mobility, or volume through treatment; (5) short-term effectiveness; (6) implementability; (7) cost; (8) state acceptable; and (9) community acceptance. Closure of each tank involves two separate operations after bulk waste removal has been accomplished: (1) cleaning of the tank (i.e., removing the residual contaminants), and (2) the actual closure or filling of the tank with an inert material, (e.g., grout). This process would continue until all the tanks and ancillary equipment and systems have been closed. This is expected to be about year 2028 for Type I, II, and IV tanks and associated systems. Subsequent to that, Type III tanks and systems will be closed.

N /A

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Intrinsic Surface Stability in LiMn2-xNix04-s (x = 0.45, 0.5) High Voltage Spinel Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work reports the surface stability of the high voltage Li ion cathode LiMn{sub 2–x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 4–?} (x = 0.5, 0.45) by comparing thin film and powder composite electrodes after cycling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The thin film electrodes offer the ability to probe the surface of the material without the need of a conductive agent and polymer binder typically used in composite electrodes. The results suggest that neither oxidation of PF{sub 6} to POF{sub 3} nor the decomposition of ethylene carbonate or dimethylene carbonate occurs on the surface of the spinel material. These results confirm the enhanced cycling stability and rate capability associated with the high voltage spinel material and suggests that the SEI layer forms due to the reaction of electrochemically inactive components in composite electrodes with the electrolyte.

Carroll, Kyler J.; Yang, Ming-Che; Veith, G. M.; Dudney, N. J.; Meng, Ying Shirley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A NOVEL LOW THERMAL BUDGET THIN-FILM POLYSILICON FABRICATION PROCESS FOR LARGE-AREA, HIGH-THROUGHPUT SOLAR CELL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

A novel thin-film poly-Si fabrication process has been demonstrated. This low thermal budget process transforms the single- and multi-layer amorphous silicon thin films into a poly-Si structure in one simple step over a pulsed rapid thermal annealing process with the enhancement of an ultrathin Ni layer. The complete poly-Si solar cell was fabricated in a short period of time without deteriorating the underneath glass substrate. The unique vertical crystallization process including the mechanism is discussed. Influences of the dopant type and process parameters on crystal structure will be revealed. The poly-Si film structure has been proved using TEM, XRD, Raman, and XPS methods. The poly-Si solar cell structure and the performance have been examined. In principle, the new process is potentially applicable to produce large-area thin-film poly-Si solar cells at a high throughput and low cost. A critical issue in this process is to prevent the excessive dopant diffusion during crystallization. Process parameters and the cell structure have to be optimized to achieve the production goal.

Yue Kuo

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Annual Range of Southern Hemisphere SST: Comparison with Surface Heating and Possible Reasons for the High-Latitude Falloff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the seasonal cycle is the largest single component of observed sea surface temperature (SST) variability, yet it is still not fully understood. Herein, the degree to which the structure of the seasonal cycle of Southern Hemisphere SST ...

A. M. Chiodi; D. E. Harrison

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Basin-Scale, High-Wavenumber Sea Surface Wind Fields from a Multiresolution Analysis of Scatterometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical technique sensitive to both spectral and spatial aspects of sea surface wind measurements is introduced to transform the irregularly sampled satellite-based scatterometer data into regularly gridded wind fields. To capture the ...

Toshio M. Chin; Ralph F. Milliff; William G. Large

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Impact of Breaking Wave Form Drag on Near-Surface Turbulence and Drag Coefficient over Young Seas at High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of breaking waves on near-surface wind turbulence and drag coefficient are investigated using large-eddy simulation. The impact of intermittent and transient wave breaking events (over a range of scales) is modeled as localized form ...

Nobuhiro Suzuki; Tetsu Hara; Peter P. Sullivan

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

314

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High Range Resolution Radar Measurements of the Speed Distribution of Breaking Events in Wind-Generated Ocean Waves: Surface Impulse and Wave Energy Dissipation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of X-band radar measurements, backscattered from the sea surface at near grazing incidence with very high spatial and temporal resolution (30 cm in range and 2000-Hz pulse repetition frequency) in moderate wind conditions, are dominated by ...

O. M. Phillips; F. L. Posner; J. P. Hansen

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low proliferation and high apoptosis of osteoblastic cells on hydrophobic surface are associated with defective Ras signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrophobic (HPB) nature of most polymeric biomaterials has been a major obstacle in using those materials in vivo due to low compatibility with cells. However, there is little knowledge of the molecular detail to explain how surface hydrophobicity affects cell responses. In this study, we compared the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoblastic MG63 cells adhered to hydrophilic (HPL) and hydrophobic surfaces. On the hydrophobic surface, less formation of focal contacts and actin stress fibers, a delay in cell cycle progression, and an increase in apoptosis were observed. By using fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a model growth factor, we also investigated intracellular signaling pathways on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The activation of Ras, Akt, and ERK by FGF1 was impaired in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface. The overexpression of constitutively active form of Ras and Akt rescued those cells from apoptosis and recovered cell cycle progression. Furthermore, their overexpression also restored the actin cytoskeletal organization on the hydrophobic surface. Finally, the proliferative, antiapoptotic, and cytoskeletal effects of constitutively active Ras in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface were blocked by wortmannin and PD98059 that inhibit Akt and ERK activation, respectively. Therefore, our results suggest that the activation of Ras and its downstream molecules Akt and ERK to an appropriate level is one of crucial elements in the determination of osteoblast cell responses. The Ras pathway may represent a cell biological target that should be considered for successful surface modification of biomaterials to induce adequate cell responses in the bone tissue.

Chang, Eun-Ju [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong-Hee [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Jung-Eun [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-Ae [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Seung Ko, Jea [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Man [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hyunmkim@plaza.snu.ac.kr

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mesoscale Surface Pressure and Temperature Features Associated with Bow Echoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines observed mesoscale surface pressure, temperature, and wind features of bow echoes. Bow-echo events in the area of the Oklahoma Mesonet are selected for study to take advantage of high-resolution surface data. Thirty-six cases ...

Rebecca D. Adams-Selin; Richard H. Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

High-performance Electrochemical Capacitors - Energy ...  

... metal oxides on the high-surface-area walls of carbon nanofoam papers (0 ... Pairing MnOx–carbon nanofoam with FeOx–carbon nanofoam yields an energy ...

319

Comparing robust and physics-based sea surface temperature retrievals for high resolution, multi-spectral thermal sensors using one or multiple looks  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of multi-spectral thermal imagers such as EOS's ASTER high spatial resolution thermal imagery of the Earth's surface will soon be a reality. Previous high resolution sensors such as Landsat 5 had only one spectral channel in the thermal infrared and its utility to determine absolute sea surface temperatures was limited to 6-8 K for water warmer than 25 deg C. This inaccuracy resulted from insufficient knowledge of the atmospheric temperature and water vapor, inaccurate sensor calibration, and cooling effects of thin high cirrus clouds. The authors will present two studies of algorithms and compare their performance. The first algorithm they call robust since it retrieves sea surface temperatures accurately over a fairly wide range of atmospheric conditions using linear combinations of nadir and off-nadir brightness temperatures. The second they call physics-based because it relies on physics-based models of the atmosphere. It attempts to come up with a unique sea surface temperature which fits one set of atmospheric parameters.

Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Szymanski, J.J.; Theiler, J.P.

1999-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal area, California, has produced hot water and steam for electricity generation for more than 20 years, during which time there has been a substantial amount of microearthquake activity in the area. Seismicity is monitored by a high-quality permanent network of 16 three-component digital borehole seismometers operated by the US Navy and supplemented by a ~ 14-station portable array of surface three-component digital instruments. The portable stations improve focal sphere coverage, providing seismic-wave polarity and amplitude data sets sufficient for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High-Resolution Surface Temperature Patterns Related to Urban Morphology in a Tropical City: A Satellite-Based Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution thermal data derived from Landsat's thematic mapper are evaluated for their correspondence to building geometry and landscape features in Singapore's high-rise housing estates. The image data are sufficiently detailed to reveal ...

Janet E. Nichol

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Convective System Area Expansion over Amazonia and Its Relationships with Convective System Life Duration and High-Level Wind Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the initial area expansion rate of tropical convective systems and their total life duration are analyzed during the period of the Wet Season Amazon Mesoscale Campaign/Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere (WETAMC/LBA) ...

Luiz Augusto T. Machado; Henri Laurent

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Percolation and excitonic luminescence in SiO{sub 2}/ZnO two-phase structures with a high density of quantum dots randomly distributed over a spherical surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of studies of structures formed of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanospheres and ZnO quantum dots randomly distributed over the nanosphere surface to cover an {approx}0.45 fraction of the surface area are given. Because of the large surface energy of the spheres, the quantum dots formed on their surface are shaped as disks, wherein charge carriers are influenced by the quantum-confinement effect despite the large disk radii. The disk height is calculated by the effective mass method. The height is found to be comparable with the diameter of excitons in bulk ZnO. Analysis of the optical spectra shows that, at the above-indicated surface area covered with quantum dots, excitons in the array of quantum dots are above the percolation level. The use of some concepts of the percolation theory and knowledge of the topological arrangement of the samples make it possible to obtain quantitative parameters that describe this phenomenon.

Bondar, N. V., E-mail: jbond@iop.kiev.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sandstone consolidation analysis to delineate areas of high-quality reservoirs suitable for production of geopressured geothermal energy along the Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of reservoir quality of lower Tertiary sandstones along the Texas Gulf Coast delineates areas most favorable for geopressured geothermal exploration. Reservoir quality is determined by whole core, acoustic log, and petrographic analyses. The Wilcox Group has good reservoir potential for geopressured geothermal energy in the Middle Texas Gulf Coast and possibly in adjacent areas, but other Wilcox areas are marginal. The Vicksburg Formation in the Lower Texas Gulf Coast is not prospective. Reservoir quality in the Frio Formation increases from very poor in lowermost Texas, to marginal into the Middle Texas Gulf Coast and to good through the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. The Frio Formation in the Upper Texas Gulf Coast has the best deep-reservoir quality of any unit along the Texas Gulf Coast. (MHR)

Loucks, R.G.; Dodge, M.M.; Galloway, W.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geometric and radiometric improvement of an ikonos panchromatic image using a digital surface model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High resolution satellite images are now important data sources for map update in urban areas. Digital surface models (DSM) acquired by laser scanning are also becoming popular for urban planning and other applications. This paper deals with the integration ...

José Gonçalves

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Micro-Earthquake At Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (2011) Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing

327

Surface Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Surface Analysis group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use surface analytical techniques help to determine the chemical, elemental, and molecular composition, and electronic structure of material surfaces and interfaces. The properties of the surface and outer few micrometers of a material often control the electrical, chemical, or mechanical properties of that material--hence, this region is of extreme importance. Our techniques use ions, electrons, and X-ray or ultraviolet photons in high vacuum to probe surfaces and interfaces of a material. We map the elemental and chemical composition of specimens, study impurities and grain boundaries, gather bonding and chemical-state information, measure surface electronic properties, and perform depth profiles to determine doping and elemental distributions. We have analyzed a wide range of materials, including photovoltaics, microelectronics, polymers, and biological specimens. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet describes our major technique capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval and Mapping Using High-Frequency Microwave Satellite Observations in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have shown the advantages of low-frequency (<5 GHz) microwave sensors for soil moisture estimation. Although higher frequencies have limited soil moisture retrieval capabilities, there is a vast quantity of systematic global high-...

Thomas J. Jackson; Ann Y. Hsu; Peggy E. O'Neill

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Annual Forcing of the Surface Radiation Balance Diurnal Cycle Measured from a High Tower near Boulder, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation balance consisting of upward and downward components of solar and thermal infrared broadband irradiances is continuously measured from the top of a 300-m tower situated on the Colorado high plains. The data are representative of a ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High mobility germanium MOSFETs : study of ozone surface passivation and n-type Dopant channel implants combined with ALD dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Germanium offers higher electron and hole mobility than silicon, making it an attractive option for future high-performance MOSFET applications. To date, Ge p-channel device behavior has shown promise, with many reports ...

Hennessy, John, 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The use of high glass temperature polymers in the production of transparent, structured surfaces using nanoimprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymers with high glass transition temperatures, fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer (FEP) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN), have been used in imprint lithography as a protective support layer and as a secondary mould, to imprint superficial ... Keywords: Embossing, Nanoimprint lithography, Polymer Engineering

Christopher A. Mills; Javier G. Fernandez; Abdelhamid Errachid; Josep Samitier

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Makela, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Jarmo Makela

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of critical surface diagnostic based on the ion acoustic decay instability in laser produced high density plasma  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a large angle, UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for high density, hot plasma relevant to laser fusion. The CTS measured the basic parameters of the plasma waves (frequency, wave number), or the spectral density function for selected wave vectors of plasma waves, which were excited by the IADI (ion acoustic parametric decay instability). It is a good diagnostic tool for a local electron temperature measurement. The electron temperature was estimated by measuring either ion acoustic wave or electron plasma wave in the laser intensity window of 1high density plasma.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

BSA 08-21: Calibration Test Surface for Surface Profilometers  

Describes a test tool that can be used to calibrate surface profilometers. Surface profilometers are basic metrology tools used to characterize high ...

336

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method and Case Study for Estimating the Ramping Capability of a Control Area or Balancing Authority and Implications for Moderate or High Wind Penetration: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In several regions of the United States there has been a significant increase in wind generation capability over the past several years. As the penetration rate of wind capacity increases, grid operators and planners are increasingly concerned about accommodating the increased variability that wind contributes to the system. In this paper we examine the distinction between regulation, load following, hourly energy, and energy imbalance to understand how restructured power systems accommodate and value inter-hour ramps. We use data from two restructured markets, California and PJM, and from Western Area Power Administration's (WAPA's) Rocky Mountain control area to determine expected load-following capability in each region. Our approach is to examine the load-following capability that currently exists using data from existing generators in the region. We then examine the levels of wind penetration that can be accommodated with this capability using recently collected wind farm data. We discuss how load-following costs are captured in restructured markets, what resources are available to meet these requirements, why there are no explicit load-following tariffs, and the societal importance of being able to access generator ramping capability. Finally, the implications for wind plants and wind integration costs are examined.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Meaning of Success: Young Women and High Academic Achievement in Rapidly Developed Areas. A Comparative Study of Contemporary Rural Vermont, USA and Leinster, Ireland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an in-depth, comparative international study on young women’s high academic achievement in rural Leinster (Ireland) and Vermont (USA). The research analyses how… (more)

Fuller, Wendy Irene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Details Activities (7) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Extensive geological and geophysical studies were carried out during the summer of 1973 in a blind geothermal area near Marysville, Montana. Earlier studies of regional heat flow resulted in the discovery of the area (BLACKWELL 1969; BLACKWELL, BAAG 1973). The area is blind in the sense that there are no surface manifestations of high heat flow (recent volcanics, hot springs, etc.) within the area. The country rocks are Precambrian sedimentary rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. The most recent Tertiary igneous event took place approximately 37 M.Y.

340

Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during Pleistocene and Holocene times; these paleoseismic studies form the basis for evaluating the potential for future earthquakes and fault displacements. Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed underground storage facility, was studied by using rock varnish cation-ratio and {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl cosmogenic dating methods to determine the length of time bedrock outcrops and hillslope boulder deposits were exposed to cosmic rays, which then served as a basis for calculating long-term erosion rates. The results indicate rates ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 cm/k.y., which represent the maximum downcutting along the summit of Yucca Mountain under all climatic conditions that existed there during most of Quaternary time. Associated studies include the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in Fortymile Wash, the major drainage course in the area, which record a complex history of four to five cut-and-fill cycles within the channel during middle to late Quaternary time. The last 2 to 4 m of incision probably occurred during the last pluvial climatic period, 22 to 18 ka, followed by aggradation to the present time.

W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Research on high efficiency, large-area CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to demonstrate 12.5% aperture efficient, large area (3900 cm{sup 2}) encapsulated thin thin CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) modules. The module design consists of 53 series-connected ZnO/CdS/CIS/Mo/glass cells fabricated on a glass substrate. A baseline characterization of the CIS modules was established during Phase 1. Maps of open circuit voltage provide information on junction quality uniformity. Maps of cell voltages at fixed forward bias show variations in resistance losses due to interconnects. Individual cell I-V curves can be evaluated. Physical nature of defects is correlated using OBIC, EBIC, SEM, tape adhesion, etc. A new world record of 37.7 W and 9.7% aperture efficiency was attained for an encapsulated module; an unencapsulated CIS module plate achieved 40.8 W and 10.5% aperture efficiency.

Mitchell, K.W.; Eberspacher, C. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Surface rheology and interface stability.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Climatic Variability of Near-Surface Turbulent Kinetic Energy over the United States: Implications for Fire-Weather Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined ...

Warren E. Heilman; Xindi Bian

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (2011) Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can

346

Lifshits quantum phase transitions and rearrangement of the Fermi surface upon a change in the hole concentration in high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the electronic structure in the normal phase of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSCs), viz., layered cuprates, are considered. The results of LDA + GTB calculations of the electron structure and the Fermi surface of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} one-layer cuprates with allowance for strong correlations are compared with ARPES and quantum oscillations data. Two critical points x{sub c1} and x{sub c2} are discovered at which the rear-rangement of the Fermi surface takes place. In the vicinity of these points, changes in the thermodynamic properties at low temperatures are determined using the Lifshits ideology concerning 2.5-order quantum phase transitions. A singularity {delta}(C/T) {proportional_to} (x - x{sub e}){sup 1/2} in the electron heat capacity agrees well with the available experimental data in the vicinity of x{sub c1} {approx} 0.15. Sign reversal of the Hall constant upon doping is also considered qualitatively.

Ovchinnikov, S. G., E-mail: sgo@iph.krasn.ru; Korshunov, M. M.; Shneyder, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirenskii Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ne{sup +} ion sputtering effect on amorphous Ga-In-Zn-O thin-film surface investigated by high-resolution XPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of Ne{sup +} ion sputtering on amorphous Ga-In-Zn-O (a-GIZO) thin films was investigated by using surface-sensitive, synchrotron-radiation-based, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). a-GIZO thin films having different compositions (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}:In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:ZnO = 1:1:1, 2:2:1, 3:2:1, 4:2:1) were investigated. It was found out that the amounts of the In and Zn contents relative to that of Ga decreased noticeably after sufficient sputtering, and that there occurred a subgap state above the valence band maximum and metallic states at the In 3d and 4d core levels as well as at the Fermi edge.

Kang, Se-Jun; Lee, Mi Ji [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Jae Yoon; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Thakur, Anup [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun-Joon [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Eunha; Lee, Jaecheol; Lee, JaeHak [A E Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-si 440-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

349

High School  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Please click on the title for more information about each program. Nano*High Nano High Saturday presentations for Bay Area high school students Science Bowl Science...

350

Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold  

SciTech Connect

Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting device using indium-free transparent anode Ga:ZnO with scalability for large area coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of economically-produced and environmentally-stable transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings is critical for the development of a variety of electronic devices requiring transparent electrodes. Such devices include liquid crystal display pixels and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs),[1, 2] solar cell applications,[3, 4] and electrically heated windows.[5, 6] The materials fulfilling these requirements are usually wide band gap inorganic transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). Tin-doped indium oxide, or ITO, has traditionally been used for electronic TCO applications because of its low resistivity, high work function and transparency. Due to the increasing cost and limited supply of indium and its tendency to migrate in to the device, there has been increasing research interest to substitute ITO with an indium-free material. A number of alternative metal oxides and doped oxides have been evaluated as TCO materials with varying degrees of success.[7, 8] Among these alternatives to ITO, gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) [2, 9] and aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) [10, 11] have drawn particular attention. These materials have been demonstrated to have resistivities and transparencies approaching those of the best ITO, low toxicity, and much lower materials cost. Although AZO is attractive as a TCO electrode material, GZO features a greater resistance to oxidation as a result of gallium’s greater electronegativity compared to Submitted to 2 aluminum.[12, 13

Wang, Liang (Frank); Matson, Dean W.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

Castillo, D. A., [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Adelaide (Australia); Younker, L.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

354

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Tech Area II: A History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy's compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission's integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area's primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on hi...

Rebecca Ullrich; Rebecca Ullrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

358

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2002 a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was conducted over a 940 km2 area extending from Dixie Meadows northeastward to the Sou Hills, and from the eastern front of the Stillwater Range to the western edge of the Clan Alpine Range (Grauch, 2002). The resulting aeromagnetic map is described and discussed by Smith et al. (2002). Many of the shallow faults revealed by the aeromagnetic data (Figure 3) coincide with faults mapped based on surface expression on aerial photographs (Smith et al., 2001). However, in

359

Improved Spatial Filter for high power Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new pinhole architecture incorporates features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation in a spatial filter for high-energy laser pulse beams. An elongated pinhole aperture is provided in an apertured body for rejecting off-axis rays of the laser pulse beam. The internal surface of the elongated aperture has a diameter which progressively tapers from a larger entrance cross-sectional area at an inlet to a smaller output cross-sectional area at an outlet. The tapered internal surface causes off-axis rays to be refracted in a low density plasma layer that forms on the internal surface or specularly reflected at grazing incidence from the internal surface. Off-axis rays of the high-energy pulse beam are rejected by this design. The external surface of the apertured body adjacent to the larger entrance cross-sectional area at the inlet to the elongated aperture is angled obliquely with respect to the to direction of the path of the high-energy laser pulse beam to backscatter off-axis rays away from the high-energy pulse beam. The aperture is formed as a truncated cone or alternatively with a tapered square cross-section. The internal surface of the aperture is coated with an ablative material, preferably high-density material which can be deposited with an exploding wire.

Estabrook, Kent G.; Celliers, Peter M.; Murray, James E.; DaSilva, Luiz; MacGowan, Brian J.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Drake, Robert P.; Afeyan, Bedros

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

TMS 2013: Technical Area - High Performance Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium will address the growing interest in shape memory alloys (SMAs ) actuators in the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, oil, and gas industries.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Self Potential At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1979) 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More recently, Zablocki (1976) has reported the results of an extensive self-potential survey of the summit area of Kilauea. Unusually large positive potential differences (1000--2000 mV) are present over known fumarolic areas and recent eruptive fissures, as well as in areas without surface expression K539of high heat flow but where subsurface intrusions are probably present. A large negative anomaly (Fig. 1) in self-potential (-2000 mV) is coincident with the area of inflation, low resistivity, and

362

Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Surface-Induced Orientation Control of CuPc Molecules for the Epitaxial Growth of Highly Ordered Organic Crystals on Graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The epitaxial growth and preferred molecular orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on graphene has been systematically investigated and compared with growth on Si substrates, demonstrating the role of surface-mediated interactions in determining molecular orientation. X-ray scattering and diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and first-principles theoretical calculations were used to show that the nucleation, orientation and packing of CuPc molecules on films of graphene are fundamentally different compared to those grown on Si substrates. Interfacial dipole interactions induced by charge transfer between CuPc molecules and graphene are shown to epitaxially align the CuPc mole-cules in a face-on orientation in a series of ordered superstructures. At high temperatures, CuPc molecules lie flat with respect to the graphene substrate to form strip-like CuPc crystals with micron sizes containing monocrystalline grains. Such large epitaxial crystals may potentially enable bulk-like properties to improve the device properties in organic electronics, which charge transport, exciton diffusion and dissociation are currently limited by grain size effects and molecular orientation.

Xiao, Kai [ORNL; Deng, Wan [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Yoon, Mina [ORNL; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby [ORNL; Smith, Sean C [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Micro-Earthquake At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Under Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This project consisted of (1) a 3-D surface seismic survey conducted in the fall of 2000, (2) a micro-seismic survey run from November 2000 to April 200 1, and (3) a gravity survey conducted in April and May 2001. The 3-D surface seismic data are still being processed at this time, but initial results indicate that there are two major lineations of high velocity running orthogonal to each other which are presumably related to the fault

365

Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Under Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This project consisted of (1) a 3-D surface seismic survey conducted in the fall of 2000, (2) a micro-seismic survey run from November 2000 to April 200 1, and (3) a gravity survey conducted in April and May 2001. The 3-D surface seismic data are still being processed at this time, but initial results indicate that there are two major lineations of high velocity

366

Mapping Surface Currents and Waves with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar in Coastal Waters: Observations of Wave Breaking in Swell-Dominant Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne and spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radars (InSARs) produce surface velocity measurements at very high spatial resolutions over a large area. The data allow construction of the velocity strain field for highlighting ocean ...

Paul A. Hwang; Jakov V. Toporkov; Mark A. Sletten; Steven P. Menk

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Smart, passive sun facing surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

Hively, L.M.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Smart, passive sun facing surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Structural, chemical, and electronic state on La[subscript 0.7]Sr[subscript 0.3]MnO[subscript 3] dense thin-film surfaces at high temperature - Surface segregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolution of the surface topographic and electronic structure and chemical state of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) thin films were probed using Scanning Tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to identify ...

Jalili, Helia

370

Solar absorption surface panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

Santala, Teuvo J. (Attleboro, MA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Division/ Interest Area Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn more about Divisions and Interest areas. Division/ Interest Area Information Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Membership memori

373

Intrinsic Surface Stability in LiMn2-xNixO4-d (x=0.45, 0.5) High Volt-age Spinel Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the surface stability of the high voltage Li ion cathode LiMn2-xNixO4- (x= 0.5, 0.45) by comparing thin film and powder composite electrodes after cycling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The thin film electrodes offer the ability to probe the surface of the material without the need of a conductive agent and polymer binder typically used in composite electrodes. The results suggest that neither oxidation of PF6 to POF5 nor the decomposition of ethylene carbonate or dimethylene carbonate occurs on the surface of the spinel material. These results confirm the enhanced cycling stability and rate capability associated with the high voltage spinel material and suggests that the SEI layer forms due to the reaction of electrochemically inactive components in composite electrodes with the electrolyte.

Carroll, Kyler J [University of California, San Diego; Yang, Ming-Che [University of Florida, Gainesville; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Meng, Ying Shirley [University of California, San Diego

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part I: Comparing Modeled Surface Flux Maps with Surface-Flux Tower and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface heterogeneity over an area of 71 km × 74 km in the lower Walnut River watershed, Kansas, was investigated using models and measurements from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) field experiment. As an ...

Fei Chen; David N. Yates; Haruyasu Nagai; Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Surface Forcing of the Infrared Cooling Profile over the Tibetan Plateau. Part I: Influence of Relative Longwave Radiative Heating at High Altitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Tibetan Plateau on the behavior of the surface longwave radiation budget is examined, and the behavior of the vertical profile of longwave cooling over the plateau, including its diurnal variation, is quantified. The investigation ...

Eric A. Smith; Lei Shi

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Monin-Obukhov similarity functions for the structure parameters of temperature and humidity in the unstable surface layer: results from high-resolution large-eddy simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulations (LES) of free convective to near-neutral boundary layers are used to investigate the surface layer turbulence. The article focuses on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) relationships that relate the structure ...

Björn Maronga

377

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

378

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric...

379

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

380

Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface-science-related problems of energy technology.the first day, various energy technology areas were reviewedon the various energy technologies? How would you optimize

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

High current capacity electrical connector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

Bettis, Edward S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watts, Harry L. (Lake City, TN)

1976-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location New York Canyon Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing

384

Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

386

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

387

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Area Research Area Radiation Processes | Cloud Distributions/Characterizations | Surface Properties | General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations | Aerosol Properties | Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures | Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) | Vertical Velocity | Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Cloud Processes | Aerosol Processes Radiation Processes Alexandrov, M. D. Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties ARM Berg, L. Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP ARM Bergmann, D. The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing ASR Bhattacharya, A. Burning on the Prairies ARM

389

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wastewater absorption beds that received effluent from the DP Site radioactive laundry facility from 1945 to 1963, two surface debris disposal sites, and a former septic...

390

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze three-dimensional Vp/Vs variation Notes A tomographic inversion for the 3D variations of the Vp/V s, the ratio of compressional to shear velocity, was performed. Iterative back projection of 2966 shear and compressional wave travel time residuals from local earthquakes recorded on vertical instruments reveals that Vp/Vs is generally high at the surface and decreases systematically to 10 km depth. Near Devil's Kitchen in the Coso Geothermal Area, Vp/Vs values are very low near the surface, consistent with measured values for steam-dominated

391

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Controlled-source electromagnetic soundings were found to be substantially more successful in the southwest rift than either the Schlumberger or the self-potential studies. This was largely due to the ability of time-domain methods to penetrate high-resistivity surface layers and thus to define lower-resistivity sections at depth. The results of this sounding study, which was conducted at elevations ranging from 75 to 497 m a.s.l., generally indicated moderate- to lowresistivity (6 - 7 ohm.m) sections to depths of 1 km on the lower rift zone and higher resistivities (12-16

392

Aeromagnetic Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

77) 77) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. This survey defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system that has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km) partially due to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomoly coincides with two other geophysical anomalies: 1) a bedrock electrical resistivity low and 2) an area of relatively high near-surface temperatures. References Fox, R. C. (1 May 1978) Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a

393

Crane Creek known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Crane Creek known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in Washington County, in southwestern Idaho. Estimated hydrothermal resource temperatures for the region are 166/sup 0/C (Na-K-Ca) and 176/sup 0/C (quartz). The KGRA is situated along the west side of the north-south trending western Idaho Fault Zone. Historic seismicity data for the region identify earthquake activity within 50 km. The hot springs surface along the margin of a siliceous sinter terrace or in adjacent sediments. Approximately 75% of the KGRA is underlain by shallow, stony soils on steep slopes indicating topographic and drainage limitations to geothermal development. Species of concern include sage grouse, antelope, and mule deer. There is a high probability of finding significant prehistoric cultural resources within the proposed area of development.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Influence of leaf area index prescriptions on simulations of heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaf-area index (LAI), the total one-sided surface area of leaf per ground surface area, is a key component of land surface models. We investigate the influence of differing, plausible LAI prescriptions on heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes ...

Jatin Kala; Mark Decker; Jean-François Exbrayat; Andy J. Pitman; Claire Carouge; Jason P. Evans; Gab Abramowitz; David Mocko

395

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

NIST Aperture area measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... particularly critical, for example, in climate and weather applications on ... of aperture areas used in exo-atmospheric solar irradiance measurements; ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lyman-$\\alpha$ line is expected to be strong in the presence of active star formation and the absence of dust, making it a good tool for finding chemically primitive galaxies in the early universe. We report on a new survey for high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new $8192^2$ pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ galaxies have an observed surface density corresponding to $11000 \\pm 700$ per square degree per unit redshift at $z=4.5$. Early spectroscopic followup from the Keck telescope suggests that $\\sim 1/3$ of these are actually at $z\\approx 4.5$, and has confirmed five $z > 4$ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters so far. Combining our photometric survey with spectroscopic results, we estimate a net density of $\\sim...

Rhoads, J E; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T; Stern, D; Spinrad, H; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Stern, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Forensic Topography and Surface Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Provide to US industry world-leading calibrations of surface roughness and ... This led to high participation by industry in the ... Lead Organizational Unit ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage.

Simmons, Joseph H.

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aquarious Mountain Area, Arizona: APossible HDR Prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exploration for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the ability to delineate areas of thermal enhancement. It is likely that some of these areas will exhibit various sorts of anomalous conditions such as seismic transmission delays, low seismic velocities, high attenuation of seismic waves, high electrical conductivity in the crust, and a relatively shallow depth to Curie point of Magnetization. The Aquarius Mountain area of northwest Arizona exhibits all of these anomalies. The area is also a regional Bouguer gravity low, which may indicate the presence of high silica type rocks that often have high rates of radioactive heat generation. The one deficiency of the area as a HDR prospect is the lack of a thermal insulating blanket.

West, F.G.; Laughlin, A.W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method of surface preparation of niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a method of preparing a surface of niobium. The preparation method includes polishing, cleaning, baking and irradiating the niobium surface whereby the resulting niobium surface has a high quantum efficiency.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY); Schill, John F. (Ridge, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

Peter C. Eklund (deceased); T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Urban Bias in Area-averaged Surface Air Temperature Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set derived from the United States Historical Climate Network has been compared to two global land-based temperature data sets that have been commonly cited in connection with the detection of the greenhouse effect and in other studies of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Philip D. Jones

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Guidelines manual for surface monitoring of geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: preliminary investigation, design of monitoring system, and monitoring operations. Included in appendices are: characteristics of geothermal subsidence, guidelines for specifications for monitoring subsidence, instruments for monitoring, formats for data presentation, and statistical analyses. (MHR)

Van Til, C.J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the United States", Land Subsidence, Proceedings, IAHS-AIHS-1973, "Collapsing Soil and Subsidence", Geolo Seismicit -Factors Controlling Mine Subsidence in Utah and Colorado",

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Anti-Stain Surface Treatment for Housing Wet Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical state of Ag in the glaze was investigated by using XAFS. Proceedings ... Preparation of Biomass Char for Ironmaking and Its Reactivity · Production ...

409

An update on the SRP burial ground area water balance and hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the burial ground area prepared by Hubbard and Emslie concluded that about 15 inches, almost one-third of the average annual precipitation, normally infiltrates the land surface and recharges the groundwater. Also, evapotranspiration was estimated to average 30 inches annually, and runoff from the land surface was estimated as 1 to 3 inches. More information has become available recently from lysimeter studies, climatic stations, groundwater studies, and stream discharge measurements. These additional data generally support the conclusions above with some modifications. The type of vegetation cover on the land surface affects the site hydrology and water budget components of evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The lysimeter studies indicate that about 12 inches more water is lost annually to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration with deep-rooted pine trees present than in areas where bare soil or shallow-rooted grass cover occur. Therefore, recharge in the burial ground area may differ from that with similar soils in forested areas of the Savannah River Plant. Study of the hydrologic properties of soils in the burial ground area indicates that infiltration rates for the soils generally are relatively high, exceeding one inch per hour. Runoff as overland flow tends to occur only with intense rainfall events of 1 inch or more. The soil-water characteristic curves are representative of relatively coarse-textured soils.

Wells, D.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site; Cook, J.W.

1986-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Bespoke Materials Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bespoke Materials Surfaces Bespoke Materials Surfaces Background The Department of Energy (DOE) has established performance and efficiency goals for power generation systems which will improve the ability of the U.S. energy sector to produce electricity efficiently with less impact to the environment. Power systems showing the most promise for reaching these goals require corrosion resistance alloys able to perform at very high pressures and temperatures. Increasing both the

411

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Surface Integrity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...inclusions introduced Plastically deformed debris as a result of grinding Voids, pits, burrs, or foreign material inclusions in surface Metallurgical Transformation of phases Grain size and distribution Precipitate size and distribution Foreign inclusions in material Twinning Recrystallization...

413

Programmable surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

415

Surface Characterization of Stainless Steel Part by Eddy Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has nearly a 40 year history of research and development in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). One area of NDE expertise at PNNL is electromagnetic testing which includes a field of eddy current testing (ET). One benefit is that ET can typically be performed at high speeds, and as a result has found many applications in process monitoring and poduction lines. ET has been used in the nuclear, aerospace, and automotive industries for many years. Et technology lends itself well to the detection of near-surface or surface breaking defects such as surface scratches. This paper provides an overview of theory regarding the usage of ET, selected application studies performed by PNNL, a safety analysis, and a wrtie up pertaining to the operations of ET to detect surface scratches.

Andersen, Eric S.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Prince, James M.; Good, Morris S.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geographic Area Month  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

417

3. Producing Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The OCS area provides surplus capacity to meet major seasonal swings in the lower 48 States gas requirements. The ... Jun-86 9,878 17,706 1,460 19,166 9,288 51.5

418

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

419

300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

{sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

BORGHESE JV

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

APS Area Emergency Supervisors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Emergency Supervisors BUILDING AES AAES 400-EAA Raul Mascote Debra Eriksen-Bubulka 400-A (SPX) Tim Jonasson 400-Sectors 25-30 Reggie Gilmore 401-CLO Steve Downey Ed Russell...

422

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate thermal regime and potential of the system Notes A three-dimensional generalized linear inversion of the delta t* observations was performed using a three-layer model. A shallow zone of high attenuation exists within the upper 5 km in a region bounded by Coso Hot Springs, Devils Kitchen, and Sugarloaf Mountain probably corresponding to a shallow vapor liquid mixture or "lossy" near surface lithology.

423

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine extent of low velocity body Notes An area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5 km beneath the array. An intense low-velocity body, which coincides with the surface expressions of late Pleistocene rhyolitic volcanism, high heat flow, and hydrothermal activity,

424

Refraction Survey At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. The data acquisition (which included the use of LBNL's three-component high temperature borehole geophone in well 44-28) was accomplished in August 1998. Initial processed results provided by the subcontractor Subsurface Exploration Co. (SECO) were delivered to

425

Effect of sequential removal of organic matter on the surface morphology of humin  

SciTech Connect

Natural organic matter in soils interacts with surfaces of inorganic materials, primarily aluminosilicates or clay minerals, to form a strongly associated organo-mineral composite known as humin. Because of humin`s insolubility, it is recognized as the primary sorbent of many anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) introduced into soil systems. This recognition has significant implications for understanding the fate and transport of AOCs, the effective remediation of contaminated sites, and the formulation and application of various agrochemicals. Humin was isolated from four soil samples. Surface area, surface charge, porosity measurements, and fractal analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data were used to characterize changes in the surface properties resulting from selective removal of the various components of organic matter from humin. Organic matter was removed selectively from humin by Soxhlet extraction, disaggregation with the methylisobutylketone (MIBK) method, and bromine oxidation. The surface fractal dimensions decreased while surface area increased, and surface pore size decreased upon removal of organic matter. These results suggest that the mineral components of humin have smooth surfaces over length scales of {approximately}1 to 15 run, and that it is the organic matter coatings that are responsible for their surface roughness. The surfaces of all the components of humin were found to be dominated by micro and mesopores that could be responsible for humin`s high sorptive uptake of organic chemicals.

Malekani, K.; Rice, J.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)] [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Lin, Jar-Shyong [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Science Thrust Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Thrust Areas Science Thrust Areas User research at the Lujan Center is focused in four science thrust areas. Each has a contact person who is available to discuss proposed experiments and to provide advice on the appropriate instrument and instrument scientist, available sample environments, and other details for planned experiments. Lujan Center instrument scientists welcome questions and discussions about new experiments and are happy to provide guidance for proposal development. New users are encouraged to contact the appropriate instrument scientist before submitting a proposal. Primary Instruments and Contacts: Surfaces and Interfaces Rex Hjelm - Principal Contact Neutron reflectivity and small angle scattering probe interfaces, surfaces, defects, and their influence on material properties and functionality.

427

Geology of the Soda Lake geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Soda Lake geothermal area is located in the Carson Desert, west-central Nevada. Hot springs activity has occurred in the Soda Lake area in the past, resulting in surface deposits which have motivated present geothermal exploration. The geothermal anomaly is in Quaternary clastic sediments which are as much as 4600 feet thick. The sediments consist of interbedded deltaic, lacustrine, and alluvial sediments. Quaternary basaltic igneous activity has produced cinder cones, phreatic explosions that formed the maar occupied by Soda Lake, and possible dikes. Opal deposition and soil alteration are restricted to a small area two miles north of Soda Lake. The location of hot springs activity and the surface thermal anomaly may be partially controlled by north-northeast-trending faults.

Sibbett, B.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Maximum Surface Albedo of Seasonally Snow-Covered Lands in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areally weighted clear sky surface albedo of snow-covered land in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere was measured from satellite imagery in A 1×1° latitude-longitude cells. The study area included 87% of the land polewards ...

David A. Robinson; George Kukla

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Early Cloud Formation by Large Area Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fires simultaneously burning in hundreds of square kilometers could result from a nuclear weapon explosion. The strong buoyancy field of such large area fires induces high-velocity fire winds that turn upward in the burning region. This results ...

R. D. Small; K. E. Heikes

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NREL: Living in the Golden Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Golden Area The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is located in Golden, Colorado, just west of Denver, the state's capital. Called the Mile High City because of its...

432

Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can be used for a variety of EGS

433

Micro-Earthquake At Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can

434

Micro-Earthquake At Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can

435

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

437

High-energy detector  

SciTech Connect

The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

The effect of mineral surface chemistry on the biodegradation of petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The implementation of intrinsic bioremediation for the cleanup of petroleum contaminated subsurface sites requires an understanding of how mineral surface and organic matter sorption affects contaminant bioavailability. This experiment quantified the biodegradation of a crude oil in soils with different characteristics including mineral surface chemistry, organic matter content, and surface area in order to determine the impact of soil chemistry on bioavailability and biodegradability of petroleum. Two soils used in this study were; a Vertisol, dominated by the permanenty-charged phyllosilicate smectite,; and, an aquifer sand, dominated by pH-dependent charged iron oxides (1.8% Fe). The Vertisol is 62% clay, has an organic matter content of 1.5% and an external surface area of 52 m 2/g. The aquifer sand is 85% sand. has a very low organic matter content (0.02%) and an external surface area of 8 m2/g. Biodegradation of the light crude oil was quantified in flasks containing soil slurries that varied in soil type while controlling for soil surface area, soil-to sollution ratio, oil loading, microbial inoculation and environmental conditions. Duplicate flasks at two different surface areas (186 M2 and 372 m') were extracted at 0, 7, 21, 36, and 56 days and analyzed for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), saturate hydrocarbons, gross composition of the extracted petroleum and heterotrophic plate counts. The results were compared to soil-free samples and uninoculated controls. A nutrient solution sorption study was performed to determine-nine the possible impact of nutrient sorption on the biodegradation of petroleum in the two soils. The overall extent of biodegradation was substantially greater in the sand treatments than in the Vertisol treatments after normalizing based on the amount of available surface area. The high surface area (372 M2) sand treatment degraded faster than the low surface area (186 M2) sand treatment whereas the opposite was true for the Vertisol. The observed differences in biodegradation between the two soils are the result of differences in organic contaminant bioavailability and microbial population dynamics. Differences in rnicropore structure, mineral surface sorption, and organic matter content are likely responsible for the differences in contaminant bioavailability and biodegradability.

Allan, Katherine Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fluid origin in two exploratory wells Notes Collected water from original coso hot springs well (1967) and CGEH No. 1. and completed chemical analysis to determine fluid origin. The surface expression of fumarole and acid sulfate pools and shallow steam wells gives a false indication of an extensive vapor dominated system because upward convecting, boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface.

440

Highly IR-transparent microfluidic chip with surface-modified BaF2 optical windows for Infrared Microspectroscopy of living cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution we present the first example of a microfluidic chip based on BaF"2 for Infrared Microspectroscopy (IRMS) of living cells. The advantage in using barium fluoride as platform relies on its high IR transparency, especially in the spectral ... Keywords: Barium fluoride, IRMS, Living cells, Microfluidic

E. Mitri, A. Pozzato, G. Coceano, D. Cojoc, L. Vaccari, M. Tormen, G. Grenci

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Bay Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bay Area Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Bay Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Bay Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Bay Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Bay Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area Products and Services in the Bay Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

442

Texas Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Texas Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Texas Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Texas Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Texas Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area Products and Services in the Texas Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

443

Rockies Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Area Rockies Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Rockies Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Rockies Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Rockies Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area Products and Services in the Rockies Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

444

The Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lyman-$\\alpha$ line is expected to be strong in the presence of active star formation and the absence of dust, making it a good tool for finding chemically primitive galaxies in the early universe. We report on a new survey for high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new $8192^2$ pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ galaxies have an observed surface density corresponding to $11000 \\pm 700$ per square degree per unit redshift at $z=4.5$. Early spectroscopic followup from the Keck telescope suggests that $\\sim 1/3$ of these are actually at $z\\approx 4.5$, and has confirmed five $z > 4$ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters so far. Combining our photometric survey with spectroscopic results, we estimate a net density of $\\sim 4000 $ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters per square degree per unit redshift at $z\\approx 4.5$. The star formation rate density (estimated both from UV continuum and from line emission) is comparable to that of the