Sample records for high risk property

  1. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property Rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magin, Konstantin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper # 2009 -01 Equity Risk and Insecure Property Rightsof California Berkeley Equity Risk Premium and InsecureHow much of the equity risk premium puzzle can be attributed

  2. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property Right

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magin, K. , 2012. The Equity Risk Premium Puzzle: A Res-Edelstein, The Coleman Fung Risk Management Research CenterMagin, K. , 2009. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property

  3. Oilfield property development: Risk assessment, management and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, M.; Robles, H.; Manweiler, D. [Environmental Science & Engineering, Inc., Fountain Valley, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several regulatory authorities in California have developed new regulations/guidelines for oilfield remediation and subsequent development. The sole intent of the new regulations/guidelines is to protect public health; however, these efforts are often misdirected. In fact, many of the regulations/guidelines impose remediation or construction standards that, in effect, render the development of such properties impractical. These standards include or require stringent contaminant cleanup standards, minimum development setbacks from active and abandoned wells, natural-gas venting provisions for abandoned wells, and the widespread use of soil-gas barriers. Clearly, these regulatory changes have been made without due consideration of risk. Because, in actuality, the risks posed by former oilfield properties are insignificant when compared to other non- oilfield properties. The history of oilfield development in Southern California has shown that although some physical and chemical hazards do exist, oilfield development, properly managed, can usually be accomplished with acceptable residual risk. Rigid control measures, based on inaccurate assumptions, merely inhibit the useful development of valuable property and misdirect resources that could be more effectively applied where the risks are real and significant. To protect public health and allow for efficient resource allocation, risk control measures must be both adequate and proportional to the actual health risks and hazards posed. This paper reviews the history of oil production in Southern California, explains the known health risks associated with oilfield property development, and describes a risk management approach that will address these risks at an acceptable cost.

  4. High risk of permafrost thaw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Abbott, B.; Koven, C.D,; Riley, W.J.; Subin, Z.M.; al, et

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Arctic, temperatures are rising fast, and permafrost is thawing. Carbon released to the atmosphere from permafrost soils could accelerate climate change, but the likely magnitude of this effect is still highly uncertain. A collective estimate made by a group of permafrost experts, including myself, is that carbon could be released more quickly than models currently suggest, and at levels that are cause for serious concern. While our models of carbon emission from permafrost thaw are lacking, experts intimately familiar with these landscapes and processes have accumulated knowledge about what they expect to happen, based on both quantitative data and qualitative understanding of these systems. We (the authors of this piece) attempted to quantify this expertise through a survey developed over several years, starting in 2009. Our survey asked experts what percentage of surface permafrost they thought was likely to thaw, how much carbon would be released, and how much of that would be methane, for three time periods and under four warming scenarios that are part of the new IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.

  5. OUT OF BOUNDS SKIERS AND AVALANCHE RISK: HIGH-RISK COHORT IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Characterization Project No.: 487 Examining Committee: Chair: Anna Usborne Master of Resource Management Candidate risk assessment; high-risk cohort; risk perception; sensation seeking scale; self-efficacy; discrete

  6. High Risk Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department HIGH PERFORMANCE andHigh Risk

  7. Measuring Property Management Risk and Loss: Step One Toward Managing Property on a Foundation of Risk, Cost, and Benefit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Curtis

    1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a period of ever-tightening defense budgets and continuing pressure on the public sector to be more commercial-like, Property policies, practices, and regulations are increasingly being challenged and changed. In these times, we must be leaders in understanding and defining the value of our profession from a commercial standpoint so that we can provide the right services to our customers and explain and defend the value of those services. To do so, we must step outside current property management practices, regulations, and oversight. We must learn to think and speak in the language of those who fund us--a financial language of risk, cost, and benefit. Regardless of regulation and oversight, our bosses are demanding that we demonstrate (financially) the benefits of current practice, or else. This article is intended to be the beginning of an effort to understand and define our profession in terms of risk, cost, and benefit so that we can meet these new challenges. The first step in this effort must be defining and measuring risk, cost, and benefit. Our costs, although sometimes difficult to capture, are easy to understand: they are almost exclusively the effort, both within and without the property management organization, involved in managing property. Unfortunately, property risks and benefits are not so simple or so well understood. Generally, risks and benefits are identified and measured through physical inventory results: potential and actual shortages. This paper will explore the weaknesses in the current understanding and use of shortage information as the yardstick for property management risks and performance. It will define a new framework for understanding the purpose and value of property management. And finally, it will set a course for a new method of measuring and valuing physical inventoty shortages. This new method will yield accurate and useful measures of property management risk and benefit. Once risk and benefit are accurately understood and measured, it will be possible to evaluate, adjust, and explain property management practices and regulations from a commercial, financial perspective; it will be possible for us to be the leaders in redefining the purpose and value of the property management profession for today's environment.

  8. Potential Health Risks The same properties that make asbestos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    , and strong. Its high tensile strength, heat and chemical resistance, flexibility, and good frictional materials: Surfacing materials- such as fireproofing, plaster Thermal system insulation- such as pipe wrap properties have made it an ideal material to meet the demands of an increasingly industrial world. Asbestos

  9. Ensemble Procedures for Finding High Risk Prison Inmates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Berk; Jong-Ho Baek

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We make no claims that the procedures we have applied are insense optimal. However, procedures like those we used wouldEnsemble Procedures for Finding High Risk Prison Inmates ?

  10. Basis risk and property derivative hedging in the UK : implications of the 2007 IPF Study of tracking error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how the basis risk affects property derivative hedging in the UK market, based on the tracking error (basis risk) report from the Investment Property Forum study in 2007 (the IPF Study). The thesis ...

  11. EM Makes Progress on GAO High-Risk List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has removed EM capital asset projects of $750 million or less from its high-risk list because of the nuclear cleanup program’s progress in completing that work.

  12. Howard County- High Performance and Green Building Property Tax Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings and energy conservation devices (Md Code: Property Tax §...

  13. Using the social ecological model to understand the contextual factors associated with HIV risk in commercial sex workers at high risk for contracting HIV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larios, Sandra Erika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Perceived Risk of Contracting HIV in a Drug Usingsex workers at high risk for contracting HIV A dissertationsex workers at high risk for contracting HIV by Sandra Erika

  14. Anne Arundel County- High Performance Dwelling Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. In October 2010 Anne Arundel...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing high-risk drinking Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on high-risk drinking and alcohol-related injuries... .D. AND FAULKNER, K.K. Behavioral strategies for alcohol abuse prevention with high-risk college males. J. Alcohol... .E.,...

  16. Approaches To Crisis Prevention In Lean Product Development By High Performance Teams And Through Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    This thesis investigates crisis prevention in lean product development, focusing on high performance teams and risk management methods.

  17. Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs.

  18. Electromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    an equivalent circuit by application of network theory. The Mason equivalent circuit, shown in Fig. 1 for a oneElectromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency Timothy Ritter the electromechanical properties of high frequency 20 MHz piezoelectric strip vibrators. A nonlinear regression

  19. High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larner, Craig

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

  20. Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patitsas, Leon S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

  1. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTIONS AT HIGH STRAIN RATES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    characteristics of high purity nickel processed by electrodeposition tested in compression up to a dynamic strainMECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTIONS AT HIGH STRAIN RATES OF ELECTRODEPOSITED NICKEL H. Couque1 , A. Ouarem2 , G. Dirras2 and J. Gubicza3 Summary ­ The mechanical and microstructural

  2. Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubin, K V; Bak, P A; Kot, N K; Logatchev, P V

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source

  3. Wave Function Properties in a High Energy Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A model example is given of how properties of the hadronic light-cone wave function are revealed in a particular high energy process. The meson wave function is derived in scalar quark QCD. We apply it to compute the form of the cross section for lossless diffractive jet-production, an upcoming possiblity at HERA.

  4. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% ...

  5. asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    programs, prohibits undergraduate travel Ghosh, Somnath 36 8B.6 A DETAILED ANALYSIS OF SPC "HIGH RISK" OUTLOOKS, 2003-2009 Jason M. Davis* Geosciences Websites Summary: 8B.6 A...

  6. A systems approach to enterprise risk management in high-tech industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Atul, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-tech industry is showing increased interest in developing an enterprise wide approach to risk management. There are three reasons for this increased interest; first as the industry has matured, as evidenced by ...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptomatic high-risk group Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: asymptomatic high-risk group Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Applied Ergonomics 36 (2005) 8595 Workplace design guidelines for asymptomatic vs. Summary: was caused...

  8. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

  9. Demolition of High-Rise Public Housing Increases Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Communities of High-Risk Asthmatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ) air pollution, which may ad- versely affect the respiratory health of nearby residents. DemolitionDemolition of High-Rise Public Housing Increases Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Communities of High-Risk Asthmatics Samuel Dorevitch Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

  10. Electrodeposited ZnO films with high UV emission properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matei, Elena [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG 7, 77125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)] [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG 7, 77125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Enculescu, Ionut, E-mail: encu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG 7, 77125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)] [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG 7, 77125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Electrodeposition of ZnO from nitrate baths is investigated. {yields} The influence of process parameters on morphological and optical properties is studied. {yields} Experimental conditions to fabricate ZnO films with high UV emission were found. -- Abstract: We report here our results in the preparation of ZnO films with high UV band to band characteristic luminescence emission by potentiostatic electrodeposition. Zinc nitrate aqueous baths with different concentration and additives were employed for the preparation of the films on platinum substrates. We focused our research in determining how the electrodeposition bath composition, i.e. zinc nitrate concentration and addition of KCl or polyvinyl pyrolidone and applied overpotential influence the morphological and optical properties of the oxide films. Scanning electron microscopy was employed for characterizing the films in terms of morphology. Optical reflection, photoluminescence spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence were used for determining the optical characteristics of the samples. The morphology of the deposit varies from hexagonal prisms to platelets as a function of the deposition rate. This experimental parameter also influences the luminescence properties. We found that at low deposition rates high UV luminescent material is obtained.

  11. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Swenson, C. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  12. Property:EstimatedTimeHigh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to: navigation, search PropertyEstimatedCostLowUSDEstimatedTimeHigh

  13. GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contribute...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk Designation GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk...

  14. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon liquids at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, P. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geology); Oelkers, E.H. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Geochimie); Helgeson, H.C. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the organic/inorganic interface in the Earth's crust requires values of the thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon species in crude oil, coal, and natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. Values of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation and the standard partial molal entropies and heat capacities of these organic species can be computed as a function of temperature at 1 bar using the equations of state adopted by Helgeson et al (1991). The pressure dependence of the thermodynamic properties can be calculated from a modified version of the Parameters From Group Contributions (PFGC) equation of state. To improve the accuracy of these predictions, critical evaluation of high-pressure density experiments reported in the literature was used in the present study to characterize b[sub j] as a function of pressure and temperature. The revised PFGC equation of state permits accurate calculation of the standard partial molal volumes of the major hydrocarbon species in the aliphatic, aromatic, and naphthenic fractions of crude oil, as well as fatty acids, phenols, and naphthenic acids at temperatures and pressures to 500 C and 5 kbar. Combining the revised PFGC equation of state and parameters with the standard partial molal properties of these species at one bar and those of aqueous species and minerals permits calculation of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs Free energies of reaction, and thus equilibrium constants for a wide variety of chemical equilibria among organic liquids, solids, and gases, aqueous species, and minerals at temperatures and pressures characteristic of both diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust.

  15. Condensation Risk in a Room with High Latent Load and Chilled Ceiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    proposed a new ventilation system with radiant cooling panel and air supplied from a liquid desiccant dehumidification system, which provided very dry supply air and chilled water for radiant cooling. This study usedCondensation Risk in a Room with High Latent Load and Chilled Ceiling Panel and with Air Supplied

  16. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  17. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  18. Local Option- Property Tax Credit for High Performance Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Similar to Maryland's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=M... Local Option Property Tax Credit for Renewable Energy], Title 9 of Maryland's property tax code...

  19. Wildfire and development : why stronger links to land-use planning are needed to save lives, protect property, and minimize economic risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mowery, Molly Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploding growth along the Colorado Front Range has expanded the wildland-urban interface-the area where homes and vegetation mix. This area, known as the WUI, is at high risk of wildfires. Wildfire risk is based on both ...

  20. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simion, G.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bulmahn, K.D. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement.

  1. Causes of Death in Men With Prevalent Diabetes and Newly Diagnosed High- Versus Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, Anthony V., E-mail: adamico@partners.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Moran, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether prevalent diabetes mellitus (pDM) affects the presentation, extent of radiotherapy, or prostate cancer (PCa)-specific mortality (PCSM) and whether PCa aggressiveness affects the risk of non-PCSM, DM-related mortality, and all-cause mortality in men with pDM. Methods: Between October 1997 and July 2907, 5,279 men treated at the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center with radiotherapy for PCa were included in the study. Logistic and competing risk regression analyses were performed to assess whether pDM was associated with high-grade PCa, less aggressive radiotherapy, and an increased risk of PCSM. Competing risks and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess whether PCa aggressiveness described by risk group in men with pDM was associated with the risk of non-PCSM, DM-related mortality, and all-cause mortality. Analyses were adjusted for predictors of high-grade PCa and factors that could affect treatment extent and mortality. Results: Men with pDM were more likely (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-2.7; p = .002) to present with high-grade PCa but were not treated less aggressively (p = .33) and did not have an increased risk of PCSM (p = .58) compared to men without pDM. Among the men with pDM, high-risk PCa was associated with a greater risk of non-PCSM (AHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = .035), DM-related mortality (AHR, 5.2; 95% CI, 2.0-14.0; p = .001), and all-cause mortality (AHR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.7; p = .01) compared to favorable-risk PCa. Conclusion: Aggressive management of pDM is warranted in men with high-risk PCa.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Regions of Low and High Gastric Cancer Risk in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    The draft genome sequences of six Colombian Helicobacter pylori strains are presented. These strains were isolated from patients from regions of high and low gastric cancer risk in Colombia and were characterized by ...

  3. High-Oleic Ground Beef, Exercise, and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Men and Postmenopausal Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Linda Anne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    HIGH-OLEIC GROUND BEEF, EXERCISE, AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN MEN AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN A Dissertation by LINDA ANNE GILMORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Nutrition HIGH-OLEIC GROUND BEEF, EXERCISE, AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN MEN AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN A Dissertation...

  4. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  5. Production and Properties of Solidified High-Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assistance from Risø to ELSAM/ELKRAFT's waste management project. Abstract. Available information.1. Glass 6 2.1.1. Types of glass 8 2.1.2. Glass as material 13 2.2. Crystalline materials 16 2.2.1. Types of crystalline materials 17 2.2.2. Properties of crystalline materials ... 19 2.3. Composite materials 20 2

  6. Property:EstimatedCostHighUSD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to: navigation, search Property

  7. Electronic properties of doped Mott insulators and high temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Tiago Castro

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting cuprates, which are the quintessential example of a strongly correlated system and the most extensively studied materials after semiconductors, spurred the development in the fields of ...

  8. High sensitivity measurements of thermal properties of textile fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeli, D; Esposito, S; Rosace, G; Salesi, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new testing apparatus is proposed to measure the thermal properties of fabrics made from polymeric materials. The calibration of the apparatus and the data acquisition procedure are considered in detail in order to measure thermal conductivity, resistance, absorption and diffusivity constants of the tested fabric samples. Differences between dry and wet fabrics have been carefully detected and analyzed. We have developed a new measurement protocol, the "ThermoTex" protocol, which agrees with the UNI EN 31092 standard and entails an accurate quantification of the experimental errors according to a standard statistical analysis, thus allowing a rigorous investigation of the physical behavior of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, our machinery exhibits great potentialities for optimizing the thermal comfort of fabrics, according to the market demand, thanks to the possible development of a predictive phenomenological theory of the effects involved.

  9. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  10. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN POLYMORPHISMS AND ABNORMAL RPFNA CYTOMORPHOLOGY IN HIGH-RISK POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN TAKING HRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaels, Whitney Lee

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is an effective treatment option for women experiencing symptoms of menopause but long-term use is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. HRT-related breast cancer risk is dependent...

  11. Functional Properties and Utilization of High pH Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Lyda G.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    water activity, MPR and toughest jerky slices. In frankfurter production, emulsion stability and hydration values was highest for C (1.98mL) followed by 100H (3.37mL) that decreased as percent high pH decreased. As storage day increased, frankfurter pH...

  12. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  13. Thermoelectric properties of high quality nanostructured Ge:Mn thin D. Tanoff2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The thermoelectric performance ZT of such material is as high as 0.15 making them a promising thermoelectric p the thermal properties by inducing phonon diffusion. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is given properties of a nanostructured thermoelectric material are never those of the related bulk ones. Different

  14. An instrument for high-throughput measurements of fiber mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofek, Grant William, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an instrument is designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring the mechanical properties of single fibers. The instrument is intended to provide high throughput measurement of single fiber geometric ...

  15. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  16. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  17. External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

  18. Properties of heterogeneous energetic materials under high strain, high strain rate deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jing

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactions in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (as self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Tablein self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS)[32] In

  19. Phase Structure and Properties of Poly(ethylene terephthalate)/High-Density Polyethylene Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase Structure and Properties of Poly(ethylene terephthalate)/High-Density Polyethylene Based.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Blends based on recycled high density polyethylene (R-HDPE) and recycled poly(ethylene tereph- thalate) (R-PET) were made through reactive extrusion. The effects of maleated polyethylene (PE

  20. Epoxy Nanocomposites with Highly Exfoliated Clay: Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Epoxy Nanocomposites with Highly Exfoliated Clay: Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanisms Ke; Revised Manuscript Received November 9, 2004 ABSTRACT: Epoxy/clay nanocomposites with a better exfoliated and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that clay was highly exfoliated and uniformly dispersed

  1. Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1 T. J. Immel,1 G. Lu,2 J different type of high latitude aurora, which does not show any signature of precipitating protons. It also causes the aurora. We interpret this aurora as the optical signature of electron precipitation

  2. Energy balance properties of steels subjected to high cycle A. Chrysochoos1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    associated with the fatigue of a dual-phase steel often used in mechanical industries. This paper is composedEnergy balance properties of steels subjected to high cycle fatigue A. Chrysochoos1 , A. Blanche1 estimate the different terms of the energy balance associated with the high cycle fatigue (HCF) of steels

  3. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  4. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  5. Identifying Men Diagnosed With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Who are at High Risk for Death From Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ming-Hui

    Identifying Men Diagnosed With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Who are at High Risk for Death From Prostate Cancer Anthony V. D'Amico,* Ming Hui-Chen, Andrew A. Renshaw, Brenda Sussman, Kimberly A), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, Department

  6. Lack of benefit of pelvic radiation in prostate cancer patients with a high risk of positive pelvic lymph nodes treated with high-dose radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Carlos Enrique [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Galalae, Razavan [Kiel University Hospital, Kiel (Germany); Demanes, Jeffrey [California Endocuritherapy Cancer Center, Oakland, CA (United States); Harsolia, Asif [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Meldolesi, Elisa [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Nuernberg, Nils [Municipal Hospital Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Schour, Lionel [California Endocuritherapy Cancer Center, Oakland, CA (United States); Martinez, Alvaro [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)]. E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of pelvic radiation for patients with a high risk of lymph node (LN) metastasis (>15%) remains controversial. We reviewed the data at three institutions treating patients with a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to address the prognostic implications of the use of the Roach formula and the benefit of pelvic treatment. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2003, 1,491 patients were treated with external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The Roach formula [2/3 prostate-specific antigen + (Gleason score -6) x 10] could be calculated for 1,357 patients. Group I consisted of patients having a risk of positive LN {<=}15% (n = 761), Group II had a risk >15% and {<=}30% (n = 422), and Group III had a risk of LN disease >30% (n 174). A >15% risk of having positive LN was found in 596 patients and was used to determine the benefit of pelvic radiation. The pelvis was treated at two of the cancer centers (n = 312), whereas at the third center (n = 284) radiation therapy was delivered to the prostate and seminal vesicles alone. Average biologic effective dose was {>=}100 Gy ({alpha}{beta} = 1.2). Biochemical failure was as per the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition. Statistics included the log-rank test as well as Cox univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: For all 596 patients with a positive LN risk >15%, median follow-up was 4.3 years, with a mean of 4.8 years. For all cases, median follow-up was 4 years and mean follow-up was 4.4 years. Five-year results for the three groups based on their risk of positive LN were significantly different in terms of biochemical failure (p < 0.001), clinical control (p < 0.001), disease-free survival excluding biochemical failure (p < 0.001), cause-specific survival (p < 0.001), and overall survival (p < 0.001). For all patients with a risk of positive LN >15% (n 596), Group II (>15-30% risk), or Group III (>30% risk), no benefit was seen in the 5-year rates of clinical failure, cause-specific survival, or overall survival with pelvic radiation. In the Cox multivariate analysis for cause-specific survival, Gleason score (p = 0.009, hazard ratio [HR] 3.1), T stage (p = 0.03, HR 1.8), and year of treatment (p = 0.05, HR 1.1) were significant. A log-rank test for cause-specific survival for all patients (n = 577) by the use of pelvic radiation was not significant (p = 0.99) accounting for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose, neoadjuvant hormones, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, T stage, and year of treatment as covariates. Conclusions: The use of the Roach formula to stratify patients for clinical and biochemical outcomes is excellent. Pelvic radiation added to high prostate radiation doses did not show a clinical benefit for patients at a high risk of pelvic LN disease (>15%) selected using the Roach formula.

  7. The Departments real property assets are vital to the accomplishment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    validation assessments. Finally, in FY 2007, the General Accountability Office (GAO) report updating the high risk status of Federal Real Property contained no negative findings...

  8. Endovascular Stenting of Peripheral Infected Aneurysms: A Temporary Measure or a Definitive Solution in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riga, Celia, E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.u [Vascular Secretaries Office (United Kingdom); Bicknell, Colin; Jindal, Ravul; Cheshire, Nicholas [St Mary's Hospital, Regional Vascular Unit (United Kingdom); Hamady, Mohamad [St Mary's Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of endovascular technology in the management of peripheral infected aneurysms in high-risk patients as a temporary measure or definitive solution. Five cases underwent successful endovascular stenting of infected aneurysms of the subclavian, femoral, and carotid arteries. All these patients were at high risk for open surgery. Covered stents were placed by percutaneous approach under local anesthesia in all patients. Postoperatively, antibiotics were continued for 3 months. A literature review using the Medline database was also undertaken, and all the relevant papers on endovascular management of peripheral infected aneurysms were taken into account. Stent deployment was successful in all patients. One patient died of mediastinal sepsis and another from type A aortic dissection 5 weeks later. Two patients required drainage of the infected hematoma. Three patients did well at a median follow-up of 1 year, with no evidence of sepsis. A review of the literature shows promising early and midterm results. Most early reports were of single cases, reflecting the low incidence of peripheral infected aneurysms. We conclude that further development of endoluminal techniques and long-term follow-up to establish the durability of stenting could potentially lead to a decrease in the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infected aneurysmal disease in this high-risk group of patients.

  9. Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

    2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

  10. Utilization of the microsomal epoxide hydolase gene for the detection of high risk epileptic pregnancies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielec, Barbara Young

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies, both animal and human, suggest that susceptibility to fetal anti-epileptic drug effects (FADE) may be linked to variation in the mEH gene. Low levels of mEH activity are associated with an increased risk for FADE and can be used to identify...

  11. High damping properties of magnetic particles doped rubber composites at wide frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Ye, E-mail: schtiany@163.com [Research Center for Engineering Technology of Polymeric Composites of Shanxi Province, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Liu, Yaqing, E-mail: lyq@nuc.edu.cn [Research Center for Engineering Technology of Polymeric Composites of Shanxi Province, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); He, Minhong; Zhao, Guizhe; Sun, Youyi [Research Center for Engineering Technology of Polymeric Composites of Shanxi Province, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A new kind of permanent magnetic rubber was prepared. ? The microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. ? The mechanical and damping properties were discussed. ? The new material is expected to be an isolator material to a changed frequency. - Abstract: A new kind of rubber composite was prepared by doping SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles coated with silane coupling agents (Si-69) into nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) matrix, which was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles were well dispersed in rubber matrix. Furthermore, the mechanical and magnetic properties of the rubber composites were investigated, in which the high tensile strength (15.8 MPa) and high saturation magnetization (22.9 emu/g) were observed. What is more, the high loss factor of the rubber composites was also obtained in a wide frequency range (0–100 Hz) at high loading (80 phr). The result is attributed to that the permanent magnetic field in rubber nanocomposites can absorb shock energy. These results indicate that the new kind of permanent magnetic rubber is expected to be a smart isolator material, in which the isolator will be able to adapt to a changed frequency.

  12. Optimization of ferrous burden high temperature properties to meet blast furnace requirements in British Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrand, R.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperature properties of ferrous burden materials have long been an important consideration in the operation of British Steel blast furnaces. Previous research presented at this conference has shown that the behavior of materials in the lower stack and bosh can have a significant effect on furnace permeability and stability of operation. However, with increasing levels of hydrocarbon injection via the tuyeres, the reduction conditions inside British Steel blast furnaces have significantly altered over recent years. This paper focuses on the further work that has been undertaken to study the effect on ferrous burden high temperatures properties of the widely differing reduction regimes which can be experienced in today`s blast furnaces. The implications of the findings, and how they have been used in optimizing blast furnace operation and burden quality, are discussed.

  13. Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY HDOBPvvIi va vGI ge(iD(vI oannItI au NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT 9(evP(n uDnuPnnBIrv au vGI eI0DPeIBIrvR uae vGI i...IteII au LEHNFA -M Ho2FYoF EDtDRv 3456 L(7ae HDO7I8v? oP1Pn FrtPrIIePrt ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY E99ea1Ii (R va RvTnI (ri 8arvIrv OT? LP...

  14. High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics) ABSTRACT This study surveys the optical and microphysical properties of high (ice) clouds over the Tropics on the gridded level-3 cloud products derived from the measurements acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging

  15. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  16. Neutrino properties deduced from the study of lepton number violating processes at low and high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Sabin [Horia Hulubei Foundation, P.O. Box MG-12, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania) and Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is nowadays a significant progress in understanding the neutrino properties. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly showed that neutrinos have mass and oscillate, in contradiction with the Standard Model (SM) assumptions, and these are the first evidences of beyond SM physics. However, fundamental properties of the neutrinos like their absolute mass, their character (are they Dirac or Majorana particles?), their mass hierarchy, the number of neutrino flavors, etc., still remain unknown. In this context there is an increased interest in the study of the lepton number violating (LNV) processes, since they could complete our understanding on the neutrino properties. Since recently, the neutrinoless double beta decay was considered the only process able to distinguish between Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and to give a hint on the absolute mass of the electron neutrino. At present, the increased luminosity of the LHC experiments makes feasible the search of LNV processes at high energy as well. In this lecture I will make a brief review on our present knowledge of the neutrino properties, on the present status of the double-beta decay studies and on the first attempts to search LNV processes at LHC.

  17. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hunter, Grant K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Seacoast Cancer Center New Hampshire, Dover, New Hampshire (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (?74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ?1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ?1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  18. Physical and magnetic properties of highly aluminum doped strontium ferrite nanoparticles prepared by auto-combustion route

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    Physical and magnetic properties of highly aluminum doped strontium ferrite nanoparticles prepared-Hexaferrite Al doped Sr-Ferrite High Coercivity Ferrite a b s t r a c t Highly Al3þ ion doped nanocrystalline Sr microscope show growth of needle shaped ferrites with high aspect ratio at Al3þ ion content exceeding xZ2. Al

  19. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Xiang, Shikai, E-mail: skxiang@caep.ac.cn; Chen, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Kuang, Xiaoyu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Academia Sinica, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  20. Synthesis and energetic properties of TAGDNAT: a new high-nitrogen material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of Bis-(triaminoguanidinium)3,3'-dinitro5,5'-azo-1,2,4-triazolate (TAGDNAT), a novel high-nitrogen molecule that derives its energy release from both a high heat of formation and intramolecular oxidation reactions. TAGDNAT shows promise as a propellant or explosive ingredient not only due to its high nitrogen content (66.35 wt%) but additionally due to its high hydrogen content (4.34 wt%). This new molecule has been characterized with respect to its morphology, sensitivity properties, explosive and combustion performance. The heat of formation of TAGDNAT was also experimentally determined. The results of these studies show that TAGDNAT has one of the gastest low-pressure burning rates (at 1000 PSI) we have yet measured, 6.79 cm/s at 100 p.s.i. (39% faster than triaminoguanidinium azotetrazolate (TAGzT), a comparable high-nitrogen/high-hydrogen material). Furthermore, its pressure sensitivity is 0.507, a 33% reduction compared to TAGzT.

  1. Mechanical properties of welds in commercial alloys for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, J.R.; Li, C.C.; Ryder, R.H.; Thurgood, B.E.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weld properties of Hastelloy-X, Incoloy alloy 800H (with and without Inconel-82 cladding), and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo are being studied to provide design data to support the development of steam generator, core auxiliary heat exchanger, and metallic thermal barrier components of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam cycle/cogeneration plant. Tests performed include elevated-temperature creep rupture tests and tensile tests. So far, data from the literature and from relatively short-term tests at GA Technologies Inc. indicate that the weldments are satisfactory for HTGR application.

  2. Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

  3. Ground state properties and high pressure behavior of plutonium dioxide: Systematic density functional calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium dioxide is of high technological importance in nuclear fuel cycle and is particularly crucial in long-term storage of Pu-based radioactive waste. Using first-principles density-functional theory, in this paper we systematically study the structural, electronic, mechanical, thermodynamic properties, and pressure induced structural transition of PuO$_{2}$. To properly describe the strong correlation in the Pu $5f$ electrons, the local density approximation$+U$ and the generalized gradient approximation$+U$ theoretical formalisms have been employed. We optimize the $U$ parameter in calculating the total energy, lattice parameters, and bulk modulus at the nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic configurations for both ground state fluorite structure and high pressure cotunnite structure. The best agreement with experiments is obtained by tuning the effective Hubbard parameter $U$ at around 4 eV within the LDA$+U$ approach. After carefully testing the validity of the ground state, we further in...

  4. High-temperature, structural disorder, phase transitions, and piezoelectric properties of GaPO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, J.; Cambon, O.; Prudhomme, N.; Fraysse, G.; Keen, D. A.; Chapon, L. C.; Tucker, M. G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 5617, Universite Montpellier II, Place Eugene Bataillon, cc003, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Department of Physics, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); and ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium orthophosphate was studied at high temperature up to 1303 K by total neutron scattering and 1173 K by piezoelectric measurements. Rietveld refinements at 1223 K confirm the stability of the structural distortion in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase with an average tilt angle {delta}=18.8 deg. at this temperature. In contrast, reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of total neutron scattering data indicate that, whereas the degree of structural disorder initially slowly varies over a very large temperature interval in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase, an increase in disorder is observed beginning above 1023 K. Piezoelectric measurements indicate that the quality factor (Q) of GaPO{sub 4} resonators remains stable up to this temperature above which the piezoelectric properties of the material degrade. This degradation can be correlated to the increase in structural disorder. RMC refinements indicate that the high-temperature {beta}-cristobalite-type phase at 1303 K is characterized by significant thermally induced disorder with oxygen atom density forming a continuous ring around the vector joining neighboring gallium and phosphorous atoms. Gallium phosphate may be expected to retain its piezoelectric properties up to within 200 K of the phase transition temperature and as a consequence be used in applications at temperatures slightly above 1000 K.

  5. Ultrasonic properties of low solvus high refractory (LSHR) super alloy disk material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Na, Jeong K. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Blodgett, Mark [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXLP) Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are made for ultrasonic linear and nonlinear properties of the powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR material designed with a relatively low {gamma}' precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content. This allows versatile heat treatment processing which results in high tensile, creep and fatigue properties depending on the grain size controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the {gamma}' precipitate solvus temperature. Sound velocity and attenuation for both longitudinal and shear modes at various frequencies from 5 to 20 MHz help to identify and quantify the size of transition zone nondestructively between the small grain ({approx}10 {mu}m) and the large grain ({approx}100 {mu}m) zones. The shear wave velocity measurements taken by aligning the transducer polarization direction parallel and perpendicular to the grain transition direction reveal some results that we do not fully understand at this time and will be the basis of future research. Similarly, measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter show some variations that may originate from uncertain sources.

  6. Exotic normal and superconducting properties of high T/sub c/ oxides and small E/sub f/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kresin, V.Z.; Deutscher, G.; Wolf, S.A.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key feature of the high T/sub c/ oxides is a very small value of the Fermi energy. This feature leads to peculiar thermodynamic and transport properties in the normal and superconductive state. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Comparison of risk for pre- and post-remediation of uranium mill tailings from vicinity properties in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espegren, M.L.; Pierce, G.A.; Halford, D.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre- and post-remedial action dose rates were calculated on 101 Monticello, Utah, properties included in the Monticello Vicinity Property Remedial Action Project. Dose rates were calculated using the RESRAD computer code, which indicated that 98% of the effective dose equivalent was contributed by external gamma radiation and radon emanation. Radium concentrations in pCig{sup {minus}1} were averaged for pre- and post-remedial action measurements: point sources were not included in the averages. The volume of the deposit was also used in the dose calculation. In all cases the dose was reduced, and at 77 properties the dose was reduced to 0.30 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (Department of Energy ALARA recommendation). A paired t-test showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) between the pre- and post-remedial action dose rates. The average cost of remedial action, number of persons per household, number of properties remediated, and the reduction of cancer mortalities through remediation resulted in an approximate cost of $11,000,000 per life saved by remediation of mill tailings. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. A Prospective Phase III Randomized Trial of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio, E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.i [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. Results: The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}8, or T {>=}2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF.

  9. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaoyu, E-mail: xiaoyu.yang@wdc.com; Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu [Western Digital Corporation, 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ?, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ? and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2?nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6?nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  10. The UV, Lyman-alpha, and dark matter halo properties of high redshift galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garel, T; Guiderdoni, B; Michel-Dansac, L; Hayes, M; Verhamme, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the properties of high-redshift Lyman-alpha emitters (LAE), and their link with the Lyman-Break galaxy population (LBG), using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that takes into account resonant scattering of Lya photons in gas outflows. We can reasonably reproduce the abundances of LAEs and LBGs from redshift 3 to 7, as well as most UV LFs of LAEs. The stronger dust attenuation for (resonant) Lya photons compared to UV continuum photons in bright LBGs provides a natural interpretation to the increase of the LAE fraction in LBG samples, X_LAE, towards fainter magnitudes. The redshift evolution of X_LAE seems however very sensitive to UV magnitudes limits and EW cuts. In spite of the apparent good match between the statistical properties predicted by the model and the observations, we find that the tail of the Lya equivalent width distribution (EW > 100 A) cannot be explained by our model, and we need to invoke additional mechanisms. We find that LAEs and LBGs span a very similar dynamical ra...

  11. Whole-Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy in the Context of Hypofractionation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: A Step Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit [Division of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa (Israel)] [Division of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa (Israel); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Créhange, Gilles, E-mail: gcrehange@cgfl.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georges-François Leclerc Cancer Center, Dijon (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georges-François Leclerc Cancer Center, Dijon (France)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the low ?/? ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  12. STORAGE, NUTRITIONAL AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF HIGH-FAT FISH AND RICE FLOUR COEXTRUDATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Sukumar Bandyopadhyay; Amarender Singh Bawa

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research is on understanding the storage, nutritional and sensory characteristics of high-fat fish (khoira) and rice flour coextrudates at storage temperature of 30C. The extruder processing conditions used are barrel temperature (200C), screw speed (109 rpm), fish content of feed (44%) and feed moisture content (39%). Sorption isotherm data indicated that the safe aw level was about 0.4–0.7. Guggenheim -Anderson -de Boer model described the sorption data adequately with an r2 value of 0.99. During the initial 15 days of storage, there was a loss of vitamin A and total tocopherols by 64.4 and 20.6%, and an increase in peroxides and free fatty acid content by about 116 mg/kg and 21.7%. The nonlinear mathematical model developed has adequately described the changes in nutritional and storage properties. Sensory attributes indicated that the product fried for 15 s was most acceptable.

  13. Optical properties of ITO films obtained by high-frequency magnetron sputtering with accompanying ion treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krylov, P. N., E-mail: ftt@uni.udm.ru; Zakirova, R. M.; Fedotova, I. V. [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)] [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A variation in the properties of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films obtained by the method of reactive magnetron sputtering with simultaneous ion treatment is reported. The ITO films feature the following parameters in the optical range of 450-1100 nm: a transmission coefficient of 80%, band gap of 3.50-3.60 eV, and a refractive index of 1.97-2.06. All characteristics of the films depend on the ion-treatment current. The latter, during the course of deposition, reduces the resistivity of the ITO films with the smallest value of the resistivity being equal to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm. The degradation of films with a high resistivity when kept in air is observed.

  14. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  15. Influence of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on All-Cause Mortality in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer and a History of Congestive Heart Failure or Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Beckman, Joshua A. [Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J.; Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ennis, Ronald D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt and Beth Israel Hospitals, Continuum Cancer Centers of New York, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: It is unknown whether the excess risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) observed when androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is added to radiation for men with prostate cancer and a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) or myocardial infarction (MI) also applies to those with high-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Of 14,594 men with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy-based radiation from 1991 through 2006, 1,378 (9.4%) with a history of CHF or MI comprised the study cohort. Of these, 22.6% received supplemental external beam radiation, and 42.9% received a median of 4 months of neoadjuvant ADT. Median age was 71.8 years. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. Cox multivariable analysis tested for an association between ADT use and ACM within risk groups, after adjusting for treatment factors, prognostic factors, and propensity score for ADT. Results: ADT was associated with significantly increased ACM (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-2.34; p = 0.0001), with 5-year estimates of 22.71% with ADT and 11.62% without ADT. The impact of ADT on ACM by risk group was as follows: high-risk AHR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.17-5.67; p = 0.019; intermediate-risk AHR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.13-2.73; p = 0.012; low-risk AHR = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.96-2.43; p = 0.075). Conclusions: Among patients with a history of CHF or MI treated with brachytherapy-based radiation, ADT was associated with increased all-cause mortality, even for patients with high-risk disease. Although ADT has been shown in Phase III studies to improve overall survival in high-risk disease, the small subgroup of high-risk patients with a history of CHF or MI, who represented about 9% of the patients, may be harmed by ADT.

  16. High-temperature stability, structure and thermoelectric properties of CaMn1xNbxO3 phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies such as solid oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric (TE) modules and high-temperature superconductorsHigh-temperature stability, structure and thermoelectric properties of CaMn1Ã?xNbxO3 phases Laura diffraction and electron diffraction data. Thermogravi- metric heating/cooling studies showed a reversible

  17. Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and infrastructure. The development of ultra-high performance concrete of buildings or structures to dynamic loading and fire. Overview of research program on UHPC or CEP (concrete

  18. The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erba, A., E-mail: alessandro.erba@unito.it; Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy); Belmonte, D. [DISTAV, Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genoa (Italy)] [DISTAV, Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  20. Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

  1. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA). Results showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value decreases with the addition of spinel and silicide particles. Thermo-cycling tests showed that molybdenum alloy with 6% wt of spinel (MgAl2O4) developed microcracks which were caused by thermal expansion mismatch between the spinel particles and molybdenum matrix, as well as the processing conditions. Detailed post-mortem studies of microstructures and segregation of impurities to the oxide dispersion/Mo interfaces were conducted using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  2. HIGH RISK COUNTRIES Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Sudan Sri Lanka St. Vincent & the Grenadines Sudan Suriname

  3. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.e [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Graf, Norbert [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  4. Determination of mechanical properties of the high temperature ceramic superconductors YBa?Cu?O????x (where x[0.5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Saifur

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CERAMIC SUPERCONDUCTORS YBagCu305 5+@ (WHERE x & 0. 5) A Thesis by SAIF UR I&AHMAN Subniitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8:i%I University in partial fulfillment.... of the requirements f' or the degree of MASTLcit Ol" SCILNCL" Deceinbei 1989 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CERAMIC SUPERCONDUCTORS YBagCu306 5+x (WHERE x & 0. 5) A Thesis Approved...

  5. High-pressure structural and elastic properties of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomis, O., E-mail: osgohi@fis.upv.es; Vilaplana, R. [Centro de Tecnologías Físicas, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Santamaría-Pérez, D. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Earth Sciences Department, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Fuertes, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universität, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sans, J. A.; Manjón, F. J.; Mollar, M. [Instituto de Diseño para la Fabricación y Producción Automatizada, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); and others

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of Thallium (III) oxide (Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied both experimentally and theoretically under compression at room temperature. X-ray powder diffraction measurements up to 37.7?GPa have been complemented with ab initio total-energy calculations. The equation of state of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been determined and compared to related compounds. It has been found experimentally that Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} remains in its initial cubic bixbyite-type structure up to 22.0?GPa. At this pressure, the onset of amorphization is observed, being the sample fully amorphous at 25.2?GPa. The sample retains the amorphous state after pressure release. To understand the pressure-induced amorphization process, we have studied theoretically the possible high-pressure phases of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Although a phase transition is theoretically predicted at 5.8?GPa to the orthorhombic Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3}-II-type structure and at 24.2?GPa to the orthorhombic ?-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3}-type structure, neither of these phases were observed experimentally, probably due to the hindrance of the pressure-driven phase transitions at room temperature. The theoretical study of the elastic behavior of the cubic bixbyite-type structure at high-pressure shows that amorphization above 22?GPa at room temperature might be caused by the mechanical instability of the cubic bixbyite-type structure which is theoretically predicted above 23.5?GPa.

  6. GAO-11-879T Federal Real Property: Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk Designation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for Fast-Track CooperativeGAOa

  7. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  8. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 9. 2. Financial risk analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic, and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for management structural support.) This final report presents the work conducted under Task 9.2 (Risk Assessment) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process selected for the study. At this time, there is little technical doubt that the PEATGAS gasifier can indeed operate. In order to assess the risks associated with the peat gasification facility, it was subdivided according to the following risk areas; (1) peat harvesting; (2) peat dewatering; (3) peat gasification; and (4) environmental. In summary, the risks associated with the peat gasification facility are manageable. Even under the extreme risk of no peat availability, the gasification facility can be operated with lignite at a slightly higher SNG price. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  9. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Sean E., E-mail: semcguir@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cerne, Jasmina Z. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  10. Microlattices as architected thin films: Analysis of mechanical properties and high strain elastic recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Kevin J; Roper, Christopher S; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    glass. High-strain recoverability, reported previously in carbon nanotube forests 14–16 and viscoelastic polymer foams,

  11. Sintering and properties of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics for aerospace applications J.F. Justin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal shock resistance and makes them ideal for many high-temperature thermal applications : France (2013)" #12;for example, a high thermal conductivity reduces thermal stress within the material-francois.justin@onera.fr ABSTRACT The Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) represent a very interesting family of materials

  12. Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

  13. PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of Ni?Fe?Cr alloy libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rar, A.; Frafjord, J.J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E.D.; Rack, P.D.; Santella, M.L.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Pharr, G.M. (Tennessee-K); (Tennessee-K); (ORNL)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

  14. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

  15. 10-Year Survival and Quality of Life in Patients With High-Risk {sub P}N{sub 0} Prostate Cancer Following Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Arne [Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no; Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind Sverre; Fossa, Sophie Dorothea [Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T{sub 1-4p}N{sub 0}M{sub 0} prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. Methods and Materials: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. Results: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T{sub 3-4} or Gleason score (GS) {>=}7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T{sub 1-2} and GS {<=}7A [3+4]) were 79%, 95%, and 73%, respectively. Both CSS and cPFS were predicted by GS and T-classification; OS was associated with GS only. High-risk, but not low-risk, patients had reduced OS compared with the general population (p < 0.0005). When pelvis-related side effects were included in multivariate analyzes together with physical function and pain, sexual, urinary, and bowel function were not independently associated with self-reported global quality of life. Conclusions: Despite surgically proven {sub p}N{sub 0}, RT with dosage <70 Gy as monotherapy does not give satisfactory CSS rates after 10 years in patients with T{sub 3-4} or GS {>=}7B.

  16. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: Aaron.Spalding@nortonhealthcare.org [Kosair Children's Hospital and Brain Tumor Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children's Hospital, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Providence, Rhode Island and Seattle, Washington (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Arndt, Carola A.S. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  17. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  18. High-precision description and new properties of a spin-1 particle in a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander J. Silenko

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact Foldy-Wouthuysen Hamiltonian is derived for a pointlike spin-1 particle with a normal magnetic moment in a nonuniform magnetic field. For a uniform magnetic field, it is exactly separated into terms linear and quadratic in spin. New unexpected properties of a particle with an anomalous magnetic moment are found. Spin projections of a particle moving in a uniform magnetic field are not integer and the tensor polarization is asymmetric in the plane orthogonal to the field. Previously described spin-tensor effects caused by the tensor magnetic polarizability exist not only for nuclei but also for pointlike particles.

  19. Advanced properties of extended plasmas for efficient high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A. [Ophthalmology and Advanced Laser Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan) [Ophthalmology and Advanced Laser Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Physics Department, Voronezh State University, Voronezh 394006 (Russian Federation); Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H. [Ophthalmology and Advanced Laser Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)] [Ophthalmology and Advanced Laser Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the advanced properties of extended plasma plumes (5?mm) for efficient harmonic generation of laser radiation compared with the short lengths of plasmas (?0.3–0.5?mm) used in previous studies. The harmonic conversion efficiency quadratically increased with the growth of plasma length. The studies of this process along the whole extreme ultraviolet range using the long plasma jets produced on various metal surfaces, particularly including the resonance-enhanced laser frequency conversion and two-color pump, are presented. Such plasmas could be used for the quasi-phase matching experiments by proper modulation of the spatial characteristics of extended ablating area and formation of separated plasma jets.

  20. ULTRA-HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSORS BASED ON OPTICAL PROPERTY MODULATION AND VIBRATION-TOLERANT INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the first six months of this project were to begin laying the foundations for both the SiC front-end optical chip fabrication techniques for high pressure gas species sensing as well as the design, assembly, and test of a portable high pressure high temperature calibration test cell chamber for introducing gas species. This calibration cell will be used in the remaining months for proposed first stage high pressure high temperature gas species sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. Both design process and diagrams for the mechanical elements as well as the optical systems are provided. Photographs of the fabricated calibration test chamber cell, the optical sensor setup with the calibration cell, the SiC sample chip holder, and relevant signal processing mathematics are provided. Initial experimental data from both the optical sensor and fabricated test gas species SiC chips is provided. The design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed novel high temperature high pressure gas species detection optical sensor technology.

  1. Thermal properties of granular silica aerogel for high-performance insulation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neugebauer, Adam (Adam Halbert)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on mounting evidence in support of anthropogenic global climate change, there is an urgency for developments in high-performance building techniques and technologies. New construction projects provide substantial ...

  2. First principle study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of FeB{sub 4} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xinyu, E-mail: xyzhang@ysu.edu.cn, E-mail: jiaqianqin@gmail.com, E-mail: riping@ysu.edu.cn; Ning, Jinliang; Sun, Xiaowei; Li, Xinting; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping, E-mail: xyzhang@ysu.edu.cn, E-mail: jiaqianqin@gmail.com, E-mail: riping@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Qin, Jiaqian, E-mail: xyzhang@ysu.edu.cn, E-mail: jiaqianqin@gmail.com, E-mail: riping@ysu.edu.cn [Metallurgy and Materials Science Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic properties, elastic anisotropy, and thermodynamic properties of the lately synthesized orthorhombic FeB{sub 4} at high pressures are investigated using first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated equilibrium parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical data. The obtained normalized volume dependence of high pressure is consistent with the previous experimental data investigated using high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The complete elastic tensors and crystal anisotropies of the FeB{sub 4} are also determined in the pressure range of 0–100?GPa. By the elastic stability criteria and vibrational frequencies, it is predicted that the orthorhombic FeB{sub 4} is stable up to 100 GPa. In addition, the calculated B/G ratio reveals that FeB{sub 4} possesses brittle nature in the range of pressure from 0 to 100?GPa. The calculated elastic anisotropic factors suggest that FeB{sub 4} is elastically anisotropic. By using quasi-harmonic Debye model, the compressibility, bulk modulus, the coefficient of thermal expansion, the heat capacity, and the Grüneisen parameter of FeB{sub 4} are successfully obtained in the present work.

  3. Magnetic and microwave properties of U-type hexaferrite films with high remanence and low ferromagnetic resonance linewidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steven; Hu, Bolin; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA and The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    U-type barium hexaferrite films (Ba{sub 4}Ni{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 36}O{sub 60}) were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure and magnetic properties of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were performed at X-band. The results indicate an anisotropy field of ?8 kOe, and the saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) of ?3.6 kG. An optimal post-deposition annealing of films results in a strong (0 0?n) crystallographic texture and a high hysteresis loop squareness (M{sub r}/M{sub s}?=?92%) leading to self biased properties. Furthermore, the highly self-biased ferrite films exhibited an FMR linewidth of ?200?Oe. The U-type hexaferrite films having low microwave loss, low magnetic anisotropy field, and high squareness are a suitable alternative to Sc or In doped BaM ferrites that have been the choice material for self-biased microwave devices at X-band frequencies.

  4. Analytic properties of high energy production amplitudes in N=4 SUSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. N. Lipatov

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate analytic properties of the six point planar amplitude in N=4 SUSY at the multi-Regge kinematics for final state particles. For inelastic processes the Steinmann relations play an important role because they give a possibility to fix the phase structure of the Regge pole and Mandelstam cut contributions. These contributions have the Moebius invariant form in the transverse momentum subspace. The analyticity and factorization constraints allow us to reproduce the two-loop correction to the 6-point BDS amplitude in N=4 SUSY obtained earlier in the leading logarithmic approximation with the use of the s-channel unitarity. The exponentiation hypothesis for the remainder function in the multi-Regge kinematics is also investigated. The 6-point amplitude in LLA can be completely reproduced from the BDS ansatz with the use of the analyticity and Regge factorization.

  5. POST-IRRADIATION PROPERTIES OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-POWER TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon- carbon composite, a new capacity, and the fracture toughness of these materials. THE IRRADIATED MATERIALS Carbon-carbon composite that a carbon-carbon (CC)-composite with a 3-D weave, designed for very low coefficient of ther- hkirk

  6. Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei Tung

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion...

  7. Effect of Tin+ defects on electrochemical properties of highly-ordered titania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    and photoelectrocatalysis [2­5]. However, the general conclusion is that titanium dioxide is the most promising material due band gap, e.g., of about 3.2 eV, too high to provide a good match between the adsorption of spectrum defects, such as oxygen vacancies, titanium interstitial and more complex structures, which will increase

  8. Risk-based systems analysis of emerging high-level waste tank remediation technologies. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormack, W.D. [Enserch Environmental Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of DOE`s Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area is to identify and develop new technologies that will reduce the risk and/or cost of remediating DOE underground waste storage tanks and tank contents. There are, however, many more technology investment opportunities than the current budget can support. Current technology development selection methods evaluate new technologies in isolation from other components of an overall tank waste remediation system. This report describes a System Analysis Model developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) program. The report identifies the project objectives and provides a description of the model. Development of the first ``demonstration`` version of this model and a trial application have been completed and the results are presented. This model will continue to evolve as it undergoes additional user review and testing.

  9. Pelvic Nodal Radiotherapy in Patients With Unfavorable Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Evidence, Rationale, and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morikawa, Lisa K. [The University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States); Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.ed [University of California San Francisco (UCSF), Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 15 years, there have been three major advances in the use of external beam radiotherapy in the management of men with clinically localized prostate made. They include: (1) image guided (IG) three-dimensional conformal/intensity modulated radiotherapy; (2) radiation dose escalation; and (3) androgen deprivation therapy. To date only the last of these three advances have been shown to improve overall survival. The presence of occult pelvic nodal involvement could explain the failure of increased conformality and dose escalation to prolong survival, because the men who appear to be at the greatest risk of death from clinically localized prostate cancer are those who are likely to have lymph node metastases. This review discusses the evidence for prophylactic pelvic nodal radiotherapy, including the key trials and controversies surrounding this issue.

  10. Systematics of Kinetic Freeze-out Properties in High Energy Collisions from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lokesh Kumar

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program is to explore the QCD phase diagram which includes search for a possible QCD critical point and the phase boundary between QGP and hadronic phase. We report the collision energy and centrality dependence of kinetic freeze-out properties from the measured mid-rapidity ($|y|energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The STAR detector, with a large uniform acceptance and excellent particle identification is used in the data collection and analysis. The kinetic freeze-out temperature $T_{\\rm{kin}}$ and average collective velocity $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$ parameters are extracted from blast-wave fits to the identified hadron spectra and systematically compared with the results from other collision energies including those at AGS, SPS and LHC. It is found that all results fall into an anti-correlation band in the 2-dimension ($T_{\\rm{kin}}$, $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$) distribution: the largest value of collective velocity and lowest temperature is reached in the most central collisions at the highest collision energy. The energy dependence of these freeze-out parameters are discussed.

  11. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Hudgens, Jeffrey W. (Rockville, MD)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  12. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  13. Application of a systems-theoretic approach to risk analysis of high-speed rail project management in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawakami, Soshi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) is drawing attention as an environmentally-friendly transportation mode, and is expected to be a solution for socio-technical transportation issues in many societies. Currently, its market has been ...

  14. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency|FuelImpactLevel

  15. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

  16. A TRANSPORTATION RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR ANALYZING THE TRANSPORT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TO THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis addressed the potential for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 origins for 34 types of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, and 10,911 rail shipments. The analysis evaluated transportation over 59,250 unique shipment links for travel outside Nevada (shipment segments in urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 links in Nevada. In addition, the analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The analysis also used mode-specific accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. This complex mix of data and information required an innovative approach to assess the transportation impacts. The approach employed a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database tool that incorporated data from many sources, including unit risk factors calculated using the RADTRAN IV transportation risk assessment computer program. Using Microsoft{reg_sign} Access, the analysts organized data (such as state-specific accident and fatality rates) into tables and developed queries to obtain the overall transportation impacts. Queries are instructions to the database describing how to use data contained in the database tables. While a query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one sequence of queries that is used to calculate a particular transportation impact. For example, the incident-free dose to off-link populations in a state is calculated by a query that uses route segment lengths for each route in a state that could be used by shipments, populations for each segment, number of shipments on each segment, and an incident-free unit risk factor calculated using RADTRAN IV. In addition to providing a method for using large volumes of data in the calculations, the queries provide a straight-forward means used to verify results. Another advantage of using the MS Access database was the ability to develop query hierarchies using nested queries. Calculations were broken into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing unit risk factors calculated using RADTRAN IV to produce radiological impacts. Through the use of queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained. The paper will show both the flexibility of the assessment tool and the ease it provides for verifying results.

  17. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography column permeability and changes of the eluent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of four similar liquid chromatography columns (2.1 mm i.d. x30, 50, 100, and 150 mm, all packed with fine particles, average d{sub p} {approx} 1.7 {micro}m, of bridged ethylsiloxane/silica hybrid-C{sub 18}, named BEH-C{sub 18}) was studied in wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The pressure and the temperature dependencies of the viscosity and the density of the eluent (pure acetonitrile) along the columns were also derived, using the column permeabilities and applying the Kozeny-Carman and the heat balance equations. The heat lost through the external surface area of the chromatographic column was directly derived from the wall temperature of the stainless steel tube measured with a precision of C in still air and C in the oven compartment. The variations of the density and viscosity of pure acetonitrile as a function of the temperature and pressure was derived from empirical correlations based on precise experimental data acquired between 298 and 373 K and at pressures up to 1.5 kbar. The measurements were made with the Acquity UPLC chromatograph that can deliver a maximum flow rate of 2 mL/min and apply a maximum column inlet pressure of 1038 bar. The average Kozeny-Carman permeability constant of the columns was 144 {+-} 3.5%. The temperature hence the viscosity and the density profiles of the eluent along the column deviate significantly from linear behavior under high-pressure gradients. For a 1000 bar pressure drop, we measured {Delta}T = 25-30 K, ({Delta}{eta}/{eta}) {approx_equal} 100%, and ({Delta}{rho}/{rho}) {approx_equal} 10%. These results show that the radial temperature profiles are never fully developed within 1% for any of the columns, even under still-air conditions. This represents a practical advantage regarding the apparent column efficiency at high flow rates, since the impact of the differential analyte velocity between the column center and the column wall is not maximum. The interpretation of the peak profiles recorded in UPLC is discussed.

  18. High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, R.; Pagan, V.R.; Kabulski, A.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Harman, J.; Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E.; Hensel, J.P.; Famouri, P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE-grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

  19. Dynamical properties of high-temperature-superconductor granular bridge junctions: Inhomogeneous Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Yu, J.; Park, G. [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)] [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an attempt to understand the dynamical behavior of the high-temperature-superconductor (HTSC) granular bridge junction, we model the granular HTSC bridge junction consisting of many small grains inside by an inhomogeneous Josephson junction array, i.e., randomly arranged Josephson junction arrays (JJA). To describe randomly distributed critical currents between the grains inside the HTSC granular bridge junction, we chose various possible configurations in {l_brace}{ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}{r_brace} and {l_brace}{ital R}{sub {ital ij}}{r_brace} for the one-dimensional (1D) and 2D inhomogeneous Josephson junctions, and calculated the current-voltage ({ital IV}) characteristics and self-radiation spectral densities of the 1D and 2D inhomogeneous Josephson junctions. As a result, depending upon the distribution of critical currents and shunted resistances, it is found that there are large variations of {ital IV} characteristics. In contrast to the appearance of giant Shapiro steps in the regular ordered array, such Shapiro steps disappear in the case of the disordered JJA due to the increased randomness in the distribution of critical currents. On the contrary, however, when there exists a correlation between critical currents and resistances, i.e., a constant Josephson voltage, {ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}{ital R}{sub {ital ij}}={ital V}{sub {ital J}} (constant), the fundamental Shapiro step emerges despite the disordered distribution of {ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}. The relevance of this model to the HTSC granular bridge junctions is discussed. In particular, experimentally observed dynamical behaviors of the HTSC granular bridge junctions are shown to be closely related to the case of the correlated distribution with constant Josephson voltage. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Toxicity Assessment of Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Prostate for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian; Newell, Sherri B.S.; Newman, Francis M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate for patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective toxicity analysis was performed in 30 consecutive patients treated definitively with pelvic SIB-IMRT, all of whom also received androgen suppression. The IMRT plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 28 fractions (2.5 Gy/fraction) to the prostate while simultaneously delivering 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: The most common acute Grade 2 events were cystitis (36.7%) and urinary frequency/urgency (26.7%). At a median follow-up of 24 months, late toxicity exceeding Grade 2 in severity was uncommon, with two Grade 3 events and one Grade 4 event. Grade 2 or greater acute bowel toxicity was associated with signficantly greater bowel volume receiving {>=}25 Gy (p = .04); Grade 2 or greater late bowel toxicity was associated with a higher bowel maximal dose (p = .04) and volume receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = .02). Acute or late bladder and rectal toxicity did not correlate with any of the dosimetric parameters examined. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT with SIB to the prostate was well tolerated in this series, with low rates of Grade 3 or greater acute and late toxicity. SIB-IMRT combines pelvic radiotherapy and hypofractionation to the primary site and offers an accelerated approach to treating intermediate- to high-risk disease. Additional follow-up is necessary to fully define the long-term toxicity after hypofractionated, whole pelvic treatment combined with androgen suppression.

  1. Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with interstitial additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jason

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all interstitial atoms lower the thermal expansion anisotropy of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} due to the formation of bonds between the interstitial atom and the surrounding titanium atoms. Although interstitial atoms do have an effect on the thermal expansion of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, these effects were not strong enough to explain all the scatter of previous studies. These studies most likely suffered from systematic errors as a result of poor experimental design. The experimental procedure used in this study was designed to significantly reduce these systematic errors.

  2. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel–phosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi, E-mail: zhangyi520love@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickel–phosphorous (Ni–P) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with Ni–P layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with Ni–P layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  3. The Ultraviolet Emission Properties of Five Low-Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei at High Signal to Noise and Spectral Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; John N. Bahcall; Buell T. Jannuzi; Donald P. Schneider; Richard F. Green; George F. Hartig

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the ultraviolet (UV) emission line and continuum properties of five low-redshift active galactic nuclei (four luminous quasars: PKS~0405$-$123, H1821+643, PG~0953+414, and 3C273, and one bright Seyfert 1 galaxy: Mrk~205). The HST spectra have higher signal-to-noise ratios (typically $\\sim 60$ per resolution element) and spectral resolution ($R = 1300$) than all previously- published UV spectra used to study the emission characteristics of active galactic nuclei. We include in the analysis ground-based optical spectra covering \\hb\\ and the narrow [O III] $\\lambda\\lambda$4959,5007 doublet. The following new results are obtained: \\lyb/\\lya=0.03$-$0.12 for the four quasars, which is the first accurate measurement of the long-predicted \\lyb\\ intensity in QSOs. The cores of \\lya\\ and C~IV are symmetric to an accuracy of better than 2.5% within about 2000 km s$^{-1}$ of the line peak. This high degree of symmetry of \\lya\\ argues against models in which the broad line cloud velocity field has a significant radial component. The observed smoothness of the \\lya\\ and C~IV line profiles requires at least $\\sim 10^4$ individual clouds if bulk velocity is the only line-broadening mechanism. The overall similarity of the \\lya\\ and C IV $\\lambda$1549 profiles rules out models for the broad line region (BLR) with a radial distribution of virialized....

  4. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  5. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ?18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ?18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ?18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ?18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ?18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ?18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.

  6. RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document # 04 monitoring and analysis Systematic non-compliance with regulations/contract and risks are analyzed, deemed high, controls in place to keep risks low 2 Moderate Hazard to the safety and health of workers

  7. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  8. Comparison of high temperature mechanical properties of two monolithic SiC ceramics and an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breder, K.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast fracture strength, slow crack growth, and creep properties have been evaluated for three ceramics in air at room temperature and two elevated temperatures. The ceramics are candidate materials for heat exchangers in fossil energy systems, therefore, retained strength after coal ash exposure was also measured. At 1100{degrees}C the ceramics had acceptable mechanical properties, but two of them exhibited strength loss due to coal ash corrosion. At 1400{degrees}C creep and slow crack growth were observed in two of the materials, and the material which exhibited best resistance to coal ash showed unacceptably high creep rates.

  9. Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High Risk Interventional Settings is Driven by Stent Design and Deployment, and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran

    Background—Stent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. Concern has been raised about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings, yet clinical and animal ...

  10. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corn, Paul G., E-mail: pcorn@mdanderson.org [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Song, Danny Y. [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heath, Elisabeth; Maier, Jordan [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Meyn, Raymond [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DePetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mathew, Paul, E-mail: pmathew@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily.

  11. Does accounting quality mitigate risk shifting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loktionov, Yuri V

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the effect of financial reporting quality on risk shifting, an investment distortion that is caused by shareholders' incentives to engage in high-risk projects that are detrimental to debt holders. I ...

  12. Understanding risk in a biopharmaceutical portfolio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Alice Elizabeth, 1980-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investors have difficulty funding the life sciences because of the high risks involved in research and development and commercialization of new products. Risk in the biopharmaceutical industry is the result of scientific, ...

  13. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; ?uda, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  14. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.

  15. Effect of dietary high-oleic sunflower oil in a swine diet on properties of raw and cooked pork and pork products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Todd Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as influenced by storage of raw and cooked pork products. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) determine sensory properties of intact and restructured pork chops as influenced by incorporation of an elevated level of high-oleic sunflower oil... that the inner layer of backfat contained a consistently higher ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids than the outer layer. Recent studies have shown that the oleic acid content can be substantially elevated in pork without serious adverse effects...

  16. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150{degrees}C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  17. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115{degrees}C volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g} ), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions within 1 day have excellent tolerance with minimal acute and chronic toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging early results.

  19. Effect of high-temperature loading on mechanical properties of Nicalon fibers and Nicalon fiber/SiC matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Singh, J.P.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of an investigation into the effect of elevated temperature exposure on the strength distribution of Nicalon fibers as well on mechanical properties of Nicalon/SiC composites are reported in this paper. Single-fiber strength distribution of as-fabricated Nicalon fibers was obtained from bundle tests. Strength distributions of fractured fibers in as-fabricated Nicalon/SiC composites and after elevated temperature exposure of composites were assessed from measurements of fracture mirror radii. Variations in the mechanical properties of composites evaluated as a function of test temperatures are compared with those evaluated at room temperature and are correlated to the fiber strength characteristics. Limited tests were also conducted to investigate the effect of long term exposure at elevated temperatures on composite ultimate strength.

  20. The critical role of growth temperature on the structural and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor heterostructures grown on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, N. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); PICOGIGA International, Place Marcel Rebuffat, Parc de Villejust, 91971 Courtaboeuf (France); Cordier, Y.; Chenot, S.; Vennegues, P.; Tottereau, O.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Massies, J. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is dedicated to the study of the growth by ammonia source molecular beam epitaxy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors on (111) oriented silicon substrates. The effect of growth conditions on the structural and electrical properties of the heterostructures was investigated. It is shown that even a slight variation in the growth temperature of the thick GaN buffer on AlN/GaN stress mitigating layers has a drastic influence on these properties via a counterintuitive effect on the dislocation density. Both in situ curvature measurements and ex situ transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction experiments indicate that the relaxation rate of the lattice mismatch stress increases with the growth temperature but finally results in a higher dislocations density. Furthermore, a general trend appears between the final wafer curvature at room temperature and the threading dislocation density. Finally, the influence of the dislocation density on the GaN buffer insulating properties and the two-dimensional electron gas transport properties at the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface is discussed.

  1. The Impact of the Samantha Academy of Creative Education (SACE) on Students Placed At-Risk at a Suburban High School in Southwest Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez, Patrick J.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of calculating drop out rates, differing opinions on the causes of school dropout, and a body of literature that is sparse concerning educational approaches for keeping students placed at-risk in school. This study examined the impact of the Samantha Academy...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insure property and livelihoods against climate-related risks." To begin the forum, three panels gave presentations: The current state of climate research. Kate Ricke (Stanford...

  3. Intro -You are at Risk! a. Rangeplainsfirehistory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , tender, stock tanks 3. DefensibleSpace a. Homes/structures b. Barns/feedlots c. Windbreaks to these abundant dry fuels puts you and your property at risk. Residents need to know what measures to take

  4. Hole-conductor-free perovskite organic lead iodide heterojunction thin-film solar cells: High efficiency and junction property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Hole-conductor-free perovskite organic lead iodide heterojunction thin-film solar cells: High-conductor-free organic lead iodide thin film solar cells have been fabricated with a sequential deposition method are comparable to that of the high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. VC 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. [http

  5. RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    for handling hazardous situations and materials should be followed conscientiously. Directors, managersRISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK UVM PEOPLE WORKING 2004 The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT #12;2 © 2004 University · Fire and Life Safety · Property Protection · Vehicle Safety · Liability Risk Management · Insurance

  6. Risk Without Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Lisa R.; Mahmoud, Ola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mitra, I. (2010). Extreme risk analysis. The Journal offrom the fact that the risk parity strategy was diversifiedboth in capital and in risk weights. Further research into

  7. Successful Characterization Strategies for the Active High Risk Y-12 National Security Complex 9201-5 (Alpha-5) Facility, Oak Ridge, TN - 12164

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchfield, Joseph W. III [Link Technologies (United States); Albrecht, Linda [Alliant Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building 9201-5 (Alpha 5) was completed in May 1944 and served as a production facility for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Weapons Plant. During the Manhattan Project, it functioned as a uranium enrichment facility. The facility was renovated and altered over the years, converting the calutrons to support other missions. Alpha 5 consists of 4 floors and a basement measuring approximately 600,000 square feet. The facility contains various pieces of equipment remaining from legacy operations. A significant amount (approximately 200,000 kgs) of mercury (Hg) has been spilled in the facility over the operational history of the building. To further complicate matters, beryllium (Be) contamination in 9201-5 is found throughout approximately sixty percent of the facility. Concentrations varying from very low (< 0.2 micrograms (?g)/100 cm{sup 2}) to areas where concentrations are relatively high, approximately 600 ?g/100 cm{sup 2}, in regulated beryllium areas. The primary site related contaminants (SRCs) for the waste in this facility are enriched uranium, depleted uranium, beryllium and mercury. This facility represents the highest environmental risk for DOE-ORO EM and NNSA at Y-12 and must be quickly addressed to minimize impacts to future Y-12 missions, as well as human health and the environment. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 700,000 cubic feet of legacy material was removed in 2010 and 2011. In addition, characterization of the 9201-5 facility was scheduled in the winter and spring of 2011. This activity was initiated in January 2011 and was completed in July 2011. Heavy schedule pressure was further complicated by the fact that this building has active utility, security and process systems. Given these complex variables, a unique, out of the box characterization strategy was forged in an effort to bound radiological and chemical contaminants, as well as providing the appropriate level of quality to ensure that this data could be used to develop waste profiles when deactivation, decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities are authorized at a future date. The characterization strategy involved a hybrid model of statistically-based and biased sampling events. To achieve the desired results, traditional intrusive sampling and laboratory analysis, as well as a number of field-based characterization methodologies (e.g., X-ray Fluorescence [XRF], Lumex and Non-Destructive Assay [NDA]) were utilized. Results were captured and synthesized into meaningful, usable conclusions in a facility characterization report that will more accurately aid D and D cost estimates for future remedial actions. This massive characterization campaign involved over 1,200 separate sample locations using 4 separate characterization methods and was successfully completed to meet a performance-based milestone within 8 months of initiation. (authors)

  8. Rectification properties of n-type nanocrystalline diamond heterojunctions to p-type silicon carbide at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Masaki; Amano, Ryo; Shimoda, Naotaka [Graduate School of Automotive Science, Kyushu University, Nishiku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kato, Yoshimine, E-mail: yoshimine.kato@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishiku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Teii, Kungen [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly rectifying heterojunctions of n-type nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films to p-type 4H-SiC substrates are fabricated to develop p-n junction diodes operable at high temperatures. In reverse bias condition, a potential barrier for holes at the interface prevents the injection of reverse leakage current from the NCD into the SiC and achieves the high rectification ratios of the order of 10{sup 7} at room temperature and 10{sup 4} even at 570?K. The mechanism of the forward current injection is described with the upward shift of the defect energy levels in the NCD to the conduction band of the SiC by forward biasing. The forward current shows different behavior from typical SiC Schottky diodes at high temperatures.

  9. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Kaneko; M. M. Gonzalez; R. Preece; B. L. Dingus; M. S. Briggs

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another case with a extremely high peak energy (\\epeak $\\gtrsim$ 170 MeV). There have been very limited number of GRBs observed at MeV energies and above, and only a few instruments have been capable of observing GRBs in this energy band with such high sensitivity. Thus, our analysis results presented here should also help predict GRB observations with current and future high-energy instruments such as AGILE and GLAST, as well as with ground-based very-high-energy telescopes.

  10. Elastic properties, sp{sup 3} fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Burgess, Katherine; Jia, Ruth; Sharma, Shiv; Ming, Li-Chung [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Liu, Yongsheng [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an Shanxi (China); Ciston, Jim [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hong, Shiming [Laboratory of High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense BC{sub x} phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BC{sub x} (dl-BC{sub x}) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BC{sub x} phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BC{sub x} phases depend on the carbon sp{sup 2} versus sp{sup 3} content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BC{sub x} after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp{sup 3} fraction, the shear modulus ? of dl-BC{sub 4}, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp{sup 3} bonds, and dl-B{sub 3}C{sub 2}, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp{sup 3} bonds, were found to be ??=?19.3?GPa and ??=?170?GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp{sup 3} bonds during the deposition processes.

  11. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  12. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    ..........................................................................23 Appendix C - ERM Program Goals, ERM Guiding Principles, and Institutional Risk Philosophy Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ........................................................................................................................3 Step 2: Risk Identification

  13. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen, Norway and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo Faculty Division, Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Turesson, Ingela [Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Folin, Annika [Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Trovik, Clement S. [Departments of Oncology and of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  14. Human Resources hs_msc33 Page 1 of 1 Date issued: 15-Apr-10 Field Activity Risk Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    with high risk factors, logging, quarries and mines, roading or similar development sites. Controlled High

  15. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Y; Preece, R; Dingus, B L; Briggs, M S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another...

  16. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  17. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  18. Leveraging Formal Methods and Fuzzing to Verify Security and Reliability Properties of Large-Scale High-Consequence Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruthruff, Joseph; Armstrong, Robert C.; Davis, Benjamin Garry; Mayo, Jackson; Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formal methods describe a class of system analysis techniques that seek to prove specific propertiesabout analyzed designs, or locate flaws compromising those properties. As an analysis capability,these techniques are the subject of increased interest fromboth internal and external customersof Sandia National Laboratories. Given this lab's other areas of expertise, Sandia is uniquelypositioned to advance the state-of-the-art with respect toseveral research and application areaswithin formal methods. This research project was a one-yeareffort funded by Sandia's CyberSecurity S&T Investment Area in its Laboratory Directed Research&Development program toinvestigate the opportunities for formal methods to impactSandia's present mission areas, morefully understand the needs of the research community in the area of formal methods and whereSandia can contribute, and clarify from those potential research paths those that would best advancethe mission-area interests of Sandia. The accomplishmentsfrom this project reinforce the utilityof formal methods in Sandia, particularly in areas relevantto Cyber Security, and set the stagefor continued Sandia investments to ensure this capabilityis utilized and advanced within thislaboratory to serve the national interest.4

  19. Effects of Deletions of High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit Alleles on Dough Properties and Wheat Flour Tortilla Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuncil, Yunus

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , Lloyd W. Rooney Dirk B. Hays Intercollegiate Faculty Chair, Alejandro Castillo August 2012 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology iii ABSTRACT Effects of Deletions of High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit Alleles on Dough... and opportunities he provided me. I am thankful to my committee members Dr. Lloyd Rooney for his encouragements and Dr. Dirk Hays providing directions. I acknowledge to Dr. Amir Ibrahim for his support and help with statistical analysis and interpretation. I...

  20. Fundamental properties of monolithic bentonite buffer material formed by cold isostatic pressing for high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawakami, S.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kato, K.; Asano, H.; Ueda, H.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods of fabrication, handling, and emplacement of engineered barriers used in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste should be planned as simply as possible from the engineering and economic viewpoints. Therefore, a new concept of a monolithic buffer material around a waste package have been proposed instead of the conventional concept with the use of small blocks, which would decrease the cost for buffer material. The monolithic buffer material is composed of two parts of highly compacted bentonite, a cup type body and a cover. As the forming method of the monolithic buffer material, compaction by the cold isostatic pressing process (CIP) has been employed. In this study, monolithic bentonite bodies with the diameter of about 333 mm and the height of about 455 mm (corresponding to the approx. 1/5 scale for the Japanese reference concept) were made by the CIP of bentonite powder. The dry densities: {rho}d of the bodies as a whole were measured and the small samples were cut from several locations to investigate the density distribution. The swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity as function of the monolithic body density for CIP-formed specimens were also measured. High density ({rho}d: 1.4--2.0 Mg/m{sup 3}) and homogeneous monolithic bodies were formed by the CIP. The measured results of the swelling pressure (3--15 MPa) and hydraulic conductivity (0.5--1.4 x 10{sup {minus}13} m/s) of the specimens were almost the same as those for the uniaxial compacted bentonite in the literature. It is shown that the vacuum hoist system is an applicable handling method for emplacement of the monolithic bentonite.

  1. The structural and mechanical properties of a Cu??Zr??(at. %) alloy processed by High-Velocity-Injection (HVI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Charles C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /vacuum coupled pressure gradient. The molten jet rapidly solidifies, as it is in good thermal contact wi th the cir- cular walls of the copper channel. This process (melting and injection) is carried out in inert protective atmospheres (helium). The samples... produced are in the form of cylindrical rods with large length to diameter ratios (40:1). The samples exhibit a good sur- face finish and are of high density. The structural and mechanical characterization of the Cu6 Zr 0(at. %%u) samples produced...

  2. Validation of mathematical models for the prediction of organs-at-risk dosimetric metrics in high-dose-rate gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Cormack, Robert A. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Given the complicated nature of an interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy treatment plan, the use of a quantitative tool to evaluate the quality of the achieved metrics compared to clinical practice would be advantageous. For this purpose, predictive mathematical models to predict the D{sub 2cc} of rectum and bladder in interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy are discussed and validated.Methods: Previous plans were used to establish the relationship between D2cc and the overlapping volume of the organ at risk with the targeted area (C0) or a 1-cm expansion of the target area (C1). Three mathematical models were evaluated: D{sub 2cc}=?*C{sub 1}+? (LIN); D{sub 2cc}=?– exp(–?*C{sub 0}) (EXP); and a mixed approach (MIX), where both C{sub 0} and C{sub 1} were inputs of the model. The parameters of the models were optimized on a training set of patient data, and the predictive error of each model (predicted D{sub 2cc}? real D{sub 2cc}) was calculated on a validation set of patient data. The data of 20 patients were used to perform a K-fold cross validation analysis, with K = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20.Results: MIX was associated with the smallest mean prediction error <6.4% for an 18-patient training set; LIN had an error <8.5%; EXP had an error <8.3%. Best case scenario analysis shows that an error ?5% can be achieved for a ten-patient training set with MIX, an error ?7.4% for LIN, and an error ?6.9% for EXP. The error decreases with the increase in training set size, with the most marked decrease observed for MIX.Conclusions: The MIX model can predict the D{sub 2cc} of the organs at risk with an error lower than 5% with a training set of ten patients or greater. The model can be used in the development of quality assurance tools to identify treatment plans with suboptimal sparing of the organs at risk. It can also be used to improve preplanning and in the development of real-time intraoperative planning tools.

  3. JV Task 99-Integrated Risk Analysis and Contaminant Reduction, Watford City, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Barry W. Botnen

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a limited site investigation and risk analyses for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at a Construction Services, Inc., site in Watford City, North Dakota. Site investigation confirmed the presence of free product and high concentrations of residual gasoline-based contaminants in several wells, the presence of 1,2-dichloroethane, and extremely high levels of electrical conductivity indicative of brine residuals in the tank area south of the facility. The risk analysis was based on compilation of information from the site-specific geotechnical investigation, including multiphase extraction pilot test, laser induced fluorescence probing, evaluation of contaminant properties, receptor survey, capture zone analysis and evaluation of well head protection area for municipal well field. The project results indicate that the risks associated with contaminant occurrence at the Construction Services, Inc. site are low and, under current conditions, there is no direct or indirect exposure pathway between the contaminated groundwater and soils and potential receptors.

  4. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Yongtao, E-mail: yongtao.zou@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Qi, Xintong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting [Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Li, Xuefei [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry of the Ministry of Education, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Welch, David [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4?GPa and temperatures up to 1073?K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ?} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}?=?174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=?0.060(8) GPa K{sup ?1} and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=?0.046(8)?GPa K{sup ?1}, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10{sup ?5}+0.3(2)×10{sup ?8}T (K{sup ?1}), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1?}GPa{sup ?1}. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ?{sub 0}?=?276.6?K gives ?{sub 0}?=?1.27(8) and K{sub T0}?=?171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q?=?3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ?5?GPa as has been reported previously.

  5. Structure-Property Relationship for Two-Photon Absorbing Multiporphyrins: Supramolecular Assembly of Highly-Conjugated Multiporphyrinic Ladders and Prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easwaramoorthi, Shanmugam; Jang, So Young; Yoon, Zin Seok; Lim, Jong Min; Lee, Cheng-Wei; Mai, Chi-Lun; Liu, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Vura-Weis, Josh; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Kim, Dongho (NWU); (Yonsei); (NSHU)

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) phenomena of a series of single-strand as well as supramolecular self-assembled ladders and prisms of highly conjugated ethyne bridged multiporphyrin dimer, trimer, and star shaped pentamer have been investigated. The ligand mediated self-assembled supramolecular structures were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) analysis. The TPA cross section values of multiporphyrins increase nonlinearly from {approx}100 to {approx}18000 GM with an increased number of porphyrin units and elongated ?-conjugation length by virtue of charge transfer and excited-state cumulenic configurations. The observed opposite TPA behavior between their supramolecular ladder and prism configurations necessitates the importance of interstrand interactions between the multiporphyrinic units and the overall shape of the assembly. Furthermore, the diminished TPA cross section of the pentamer, despite the increased ?-conjugation resulting from duplex formation suggests that destabilizing the essential functional configurations at the cost of elongation of ?-delocalization pathway must cause unfavorable effects. We have also shown that one- and two-photon allowed energy-levels of linear multiporphyrins are nearly isoenergetic and the latter transition originates exclusively from the extent of ?-delocalization within the molecule. The identical TPA maximum position of the trimer and pentamer indicates that the TPA of the pentamer arises only from its basic trimer unit in spite of its extended two-dimensional {pi}-conjugation pathway involving five porphyrinic units.

  6. Manufacturing and properties of newly developed 9%CrMoVNiNbN high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ishiguro, Tohru; Yoshida, Hajime; Ikeda, Yasumi [Japan Steel Works, Muroran (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to obtain the improved strength and toughness for high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging, fundamental studies using laboratory heats were performed on the 9CrMoV base materials, and effects of chemistry on toughness and creep rupture strength were investigated. From the investigation, it is showed that the superclean 9CrMoVNiNbN steel with reduced Si and Mn contents and Ni addition provides a superior strength versus toughness balance. Based on these fundamental studies, a trial high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging with diameter of low-pressure section of 1,750 mm and diameter of high-pressure section of 1,200 mm was successfully manufactured from the diameter of 1,800 mm, and the weight of 65 ton ESR ingot. From the evaluation test results of this trial rotor forging, homogeneous distribution of chemistry was confirmed and low impurity contents was observed in the whole forging. The superior strength and toughness were confirmed with good creep rupture strength. The FATT at the center of low-pressure section was {minus}3 C with the tensile strength level of 870 MPa. From the results of fracture toughness test, low cycle fatigue test, and isothermal aging test, superior mechanical properties were demonstrated. Thus, the superclean 9CrMoVNiNbN steel with reduced Si and Mn contents and Ni addition, is particularly suitable for the high-pressure low-pressure rotor material for advanced combined cycle power plants.

  7. RAMS (Risk Analysis - Modular System) methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Strenge, D.L.; Buck, J.W. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Analysis - Modular System (RAMS) was developed to serve as a broad scope risk analysis tool for the Risk Assessment of the Hanford Mission (RAHM) studies. The RAHM element provides risk analysis support for Hanford Strategic Analysis and Mission Planning activities. The RAHM also provides risk analysis support for the Hanford 10-Year Plan development activities. The RAMS tool draws from a collection of specifically designed databases and modular risk analysis methodologies and models. RAMS is a flexible modular system that can be focused on targeted risk analysis needs. It is specifically designed to address risks associated with overall strategy, technical alternative, and `what if` questions regarding the Hanford cleanup mission. RAMS is set up to address both near-term and long-term risk issues. Consistency is very important for any comparative risk analysis, and RAMS is designed to efficiently and consistently compare risks and produce risk reduction estimates. There is a wide range of output information that can be generated by RAMS. These outputs can be detailed by individual contaminants, waste forms, transport pathways, exposure scenarios, individuals, populations, etc. However, they can also be in rolled-up form to support high-level strategy decisions.

  8. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  9. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties at elevated temperatures and pressures of saturated and aromatic high molecular weight solid and liquid hydrocarbons in kerogen, bitumen, petroleum, and other organic matter of biogeochemical interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, L.; Helgeson, H.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To supplement the relatively sparse set of calorimetric data available for the multitude of high molecular weight organic compounds of biogeochemical interest, group additivity algorithms have been developed to estimate heat capacity power function coefficients and the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar of high molecular weight compounds in hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoirs, including crystalline and liquid isoprenoids, steroids, tricyclic diterpenoids, hopanoids, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A total of ninety-six group contributions for each coefficient and property were generated from the thermodynamic properties of lower molecular weight reference species for which calorimetric data are available in the literature. These group contributions were then used to compute corresponding coefficients and properties for {approximately}360 representative solid and liquid high molecular weight compounds in kerogen, bitumen, and petroleum for which few or no experimental data are available. The coefficients and properties of these high molecular weight compounds are summarized in tables, together with those of the groups and reference species from which they were generated. The tabulated heat capacity power function coefficients and standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar include selected crystalline and liquid regular, irregular and highly branched isoprenoids, tricyclic diterpanes, 17{alpha}(H)- and 17{beta}(H)-hopanes, 5{alpha}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{beta}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{alpha}(H),14{beta}(H)-, and 5{beta}(H),14{beta}(H)-steranes, double ether- and ester-bonded n-alkanes, and various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including methylated biphenyls, naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes. However, corresponding coefficients and properties for many more saturated and unsaturated high molecular weight hydrocarbons can be estimated from the equations of state group additivity algorithms. Calculations of this kind permit comprehensive thermodynamic description of the chemical evolution of organic matter with increasing depth in sedimentary basins.

  10. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  11. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270?°C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270?°C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270?°C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?°C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?°C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  12. Quantum risk-sensitive estimation and robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Luc Bouten

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies a quantum risk-sensitive estimation problem and investigates robustness properties of the filter. This is a direct extension to the quantum case of analogous classical results. All investigations are based on a discrete approximation model of the quantum system under consideration. This allows us to study the problem in a simple mathematical setting. We close the paper with some examples that demonstrate the robustness of the risk-sensitive estimator.

  13. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ?3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 ? V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 m?·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  14. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  15. Irregularly Spaced Intraday Value at Risk (ISIVaR) Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) quanti...es market risk at an intraday time horizon, using Normal GARCH, Student GARCH, Risk- known as the Ultra-High-Frequency GARCH (UHF-GARCH) model of Engle (2000)- such that unequally spaced Va

  16. Effects of high energy electrons on the properties of polyethylene / multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites: Comparison of as-grown and oxygen-functionalised MWCNT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, B., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de; Pötschke, P., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de; Gohs, U., E-mail: krause-beate@ipfdd.de, E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de, E-mail: gohs@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer modification with high energy electrons (EB) is well established in different applications for many years. It is used for crosslinking, curing, degrading, grafting of polymeric materials and polymerisation of monomers. In contrast to this traditional method, electron induced reactive processing (EIReP) combines the polymer modification with high energy electrons and the melt mixing process. This novel reactive method was used to prepare polymer blends and composites. In this study, both methods were used for the preparation of polyethylene (PE)/ multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites in the presence of a coupling agent. The influence of MWCNT and type of electron treatment on the gel content, the thermal conductivity, rheological, and electrical properties was investigated whereby as-grown and oxidised MWCNT were used. In the presence of a coupling agent and at an absorbed dose of 40 kGy, the gel content increased from 57 % for the pure PE to 74 % or 88 % by the addition of as-grown (Baytubes® C150P) or oxidised MWCNT, respectively. In comparison to the composites containing the as-grown MWCNTs, the use of the oxidised MWCNTs led to higher melt viscosity and higher storage modulus due to higher yield of filler polymer couplings. The melt viscosity increased due to the addition of MWCNT and crosslinking of PE. The thermal conductivity increased to about 150 % and showed no dependence on the kind of MWCNT and the type of electron treatment. In contrast, the lowest value of electrical volume resistivity was found for the non-irradiated samples and after state of the art electron treatment without any influence of the type of MWCNT. In the case of EIReP, the volume resistivity increased by 2 (as-grown MWCNT) or 3 decades (oxidised MWCNT) depending on the process parameters.

  17. RISK ASSESSMENT FORM FIELD / LOCATION WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    the work. Detail such risks in the final section. ENVIRONMENT The environment always represents a safety weather, illness, hypothermia, assault, getting lost. Is the risk high/medium/low? CONTROL MEASURES environment trained leaders accompany the trip refuge is available work in outside organisations is subject

  18. Influence of steam-drive production on the properties of high-molecular weight components of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayukova, G.P.; Kurbskii, G.P.; Lifanova, Ye.V. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis has been made of the composition and properties of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil produced both by natural flow and by the steam-drive method. It has been shown that the use of the steam-drive method in order to improve Elie oil yield leads to certain changes in the composition of the oil produced, which is reflected in a change in quality of the target petroleum products. In particular, because of the additional presence in the crude oil of high-molecular weight n-alkanes, there is an increase in the pour point and viscosity index of paraffinic-naphthenic hydrocarbons, which are the main components of residual base oils. An experimental study of the influence of temperatures characteristic of the steam-drive method (300{degrees}C) on the asphaltene-resinous components of Ashal`chinsk crude oil confirmed that during steam-drive production these substances undergo degradation processes associated with detachment of alkyl substituents at peripheral fragments containing sulphur, oxygen, nitrogen and other heteroatoms and consequently are a potential source of alkane hydrocarbons.

  19. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  20. The Development of an Effective Transportation Risk Assessment Model for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSweeney; Thomas; Winnard; Ross; Steven B.; Best; Ralph E.

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Past approaches for assessing the impacts of transporting spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste have not been effectively implemented or have used relatively simple approaches. The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis considers 83 origins, 34 fuel types, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, 10,911 rail shipments, consisting of 59,250 shipment links outside Nevada (shipment kilometers and population density pairs through urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 shipment links in Nevada. There was additional complexity within the analysis. The analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The model also considered different accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. To capture the all of the complexities of the transportation analysis, a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database was created. In the Microsoft{reg_sign} Access approach the data is placed in individual tables and equations are developed in queries to obtain the overall impacts. While the query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one equation for a particular impact. This greatly simplifies the validation effort. Furthermore, in Access, data in tables can be linked automatically using query joins. Another advantage built into MS Access is nested queries, or the ability to develop query hierarchies. It is possible to separate the calculation into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing the state and mode specific accident rate to produce accidents by state. One of the biggest advantages of the nested queries is in validation. Temporarily restricting the query to one origin, one shipment, or one state and validating that the query calculation is returning the expected result allows simple validation. The paper will show the flexibility of the assessment tool to consider a wide variety of impacts. Through the use of pre-designed queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained.

  1. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  2. Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic Microscopy and Spectroscopy with High Spatial and Fast Temporal Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic, chemistry, and properties of energy storage materials Find general guiding principle for accelerated-situ chemical imaging and spectroscopic study of structure and chemical evolution of new energy storage

  3. Historic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    education, and technical preservation assistance for properties at LANL. Potential Los Alamos park properties include buildings in the town of Los Alamos associated with the...

  4. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  5. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bookstaber, R. (1999). "Risk Management in ComplexG. E. (2004). "How Useful Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?"Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "Preventing Diabetes:

  6. English version UNISDR Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage and environmental conditions. Comment: In engineering terms, acceptable risk is also used to assess and define

  7. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  8. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  9. Essays in time and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprenger, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4.1 Risk Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Additional Risk Preference Measures . . . . . . . .An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of

  10. Predicting the risk of extinction from shared ecological characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotiaho, Janne S.

    an ecological extinction risk rank and predicted which of the currently nonthreatened species are at the highest risk of extinction. Our analysis reveals that two species currently classified as nonthreatened are, in fact, at high risk of extinction, and that the status of a further five species should be reconsidered

  11. Influence of germanium and the melting method on the mechanical properties of NM23KhYu alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, D.V.; Rozonova, V.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the investigation was to increase the plasticity and ductility of NM233KhYu alloy without a detrimental effect on its service properties, selection of methods evaluation of placticity and ductility at increased temperatures, and establishment on the basis of the results obtained of the optimum temperature range for hot working by pressure. To evaluate the mechanical properties at increased temperature tension, impact strength and torsion tests were made. Alloying with germanium of NM23KhYu alloy leads to a two-to-three-time increase in its impact strength. Electron beam remelting of NM23KhYu alloy with germanium increases the impact strength, and the characteristics of plasticity by 1.5-2 times in comparison with the similar properties of this alloy produced by vacuum induction melting.

  12. First principle study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Na; Zhang, Xinyu, E-mail: jiaqianqin@gmail.com; Ning, Jinliang; Zhang, Suhong; Liang, Shunxing; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Qin, Jiaqian, E-mail: jiaqianqin@gmail.com [Metallurgy and Materials Science Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive investigation of the structural, elastic, and thermodynamic properties for Laves-phases ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} are conducted using density functional total energy calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic Debye model. The optimized lattice parameters of ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} compare well with available experimental values. We estimated the mechanical behaviors of both compounds under compression, including mechanical stability, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, ductility, and anisotropy. Additionally, the thermodynamic properties as a function of pressure and temperature are analyzed and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  13. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  14. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  15. INVENT SEMINAR Intellectual Property & Commercialisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    ­ Invent, DCU Protection of our intellectual property rights is becoming increasingly important as we of protection and exploitation of intellectual property. It will also detail the financial benefit scheme in protection of intellectual property. · Patenting process. · Maintaining high quality, verifiable research

  16. Project Risk Management:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koelmeyer, Chris

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The recent increase in international projects has resulted in higher risk along with difficulties in control and coordination. Effective project management can therefore be… (more)

  17. Risk-Informed Decisions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory's Risk-Informed Decisions division study the interaction between human and machines to determine how that relationship can be improved in order to enhance performance...

  18. Political Risk in Finland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsson, Jukka

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Thesis political risk in Finland will explain the real nature of the financial crisis in Finland in the beginning of 1990’s. Before 1990’s Finland… (more)

  19. Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor Long Beach, CA 90802 in this self-insured program. The Office of Risk Management in the Chancellor's Office administers the general liability, workers' compensation, property, and professional liability programs. The State Office of Risk

  20. Risk Evaluation for CO{sub 2} Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO{sub 2} plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO{sub 2}-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  1. High-Risk, High-Reward Simulations | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in thein theSurfactant-AssistedWater-Human

  2. Effect of nitrogen incorporation on improvement of leakage properties in high-k HfO{sub 2} capacitors treated by N{sub 2}-plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seong, Nak-Jin; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Yeom, Seung-Jin; Woo, Hyun-Kyung; Kil, Deok-Sin; Roh, Jae-Sung; Sohn, Hyun-Chul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami-ri Bubal-eub Icheon-si Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The nitrogen incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films with an EOT (equivalent oxide thickness) of 9 A was performed by N{sub 2}-plasma to improve the electrical properties. The dielectric properties and a leakage current characteristics of the capacitors were investigated as a function of plasma power and plasma treatment temperature. The dielectric constant of the capacitors is not influenced by nitrogen incorporation. The N{sub 2}-plasma treatment at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits the most effective influence on improvement of the leakage current characteristics. Leakage current density of the capacitors treated at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits a half order of magnitude lower than that without plasma treatment. Nitrogen incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} films possesses the intrinsic effect that drastically reduce the electron leakage current through HfO{sub 2} dielectrics by deactivating the V{sub O} (oxygen vacancy) related gap states.

  3. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  4. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Collogue CI, supplement au n 4, Tome 38, Avril 1977, page Cl-17 HIGH-FREQUENCY PROPERTIES OF Ni-Zn-Co FERRITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -FREQUENCY PROPERTIES OF Ni-Zn-Co FERRITES IN RELATION TO IRON CONTENT AND MICROSTRUCTURE J. G. M. DE LAU (*) and A-substitution d'ions Co3+ et des ions Co2+ dans des ferrites de Ni-Zn ainsi que la réduction de la taille des+ ions in addition to Co2+ in Ni-Zn ferrites and the reduction of grain size lead to a great improvement

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF RETAINED AUSTENITE ON THE THICK SECTION MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A COMMERCIAL LOW ALLOY ULTRA-HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, R.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fracture of High Strength Steels, Final Tech. Report,Arsenal Lab. , K. J. Irvine, Steel Strengthening Mechanisms,Diagrams, United States Steel, Pittsburgh, PA, 1963. E. G.

  6. 8. SYNTHESIS OF RISK ASSESSMENTS: TAXONOMIC, REGIONAL, AND THREAT-BASED PATTERNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    per species. The methods used to assess extinction risk, and the uncertainties that are reflected, do somewhat greater confidence in the extinction risk status of the respective species. At one end species a relatively lower risk of extinction, with a gradation of risk between these. Species with high estimated

  7. Investigation on the effects of ultra-high pressure and temperature on the rheological properties of oil-based drilling fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibeh, Chijioke Stanley

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a fit-for-purpose drilling fluid for high-pressure, high-temperature (HP/HT) operations is one of the greatest technological challenges facing the oil and gas industry today. Typically, a drilling fluid is subjected to increasing...

  8. Ab initio calculations of the physical properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides and possible routes to high-T{sub c} superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimov, E. G., E-mail: maksimov@lpi.ru; Ebert, S. V. [Lebedev Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Magnitskaya, M. V.; Karakozov, A. E. [Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report ab initio linear-response calculations of the phonon spectra and the electron-phonon interaction for several transition metal carbides and nitrides in a NaCl-type structure. For NbC, the kinetic, optical, and superconducting properties are calculated in detail at various pressures and the normal-pressure results are found to agree well with the experiment. Factors accounting for the relatively low critical temperatures T{sub c} in transition metal compounds with light elements are considered and the possible ways of increasing T{sub c} are discussed.

  9. Systems at Risk as Risk to the System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavelty, Myriam Dunn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    infrastructure protection (CIP) debate itself, but its twosystemic risk language. CIP practitioners are particularlyinteraction. Risk: Because CIP is primarily concerned with

  10. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  11. Personal Property

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-regulatory guidance and information to assist DOE organizations and contractors in implementing the DOE-wide and site-specific personal property management programs. It supplements the policy, requirements, and responsibilities information contained in the DOE Order cited above and clarifies the regulatory requirements contained in the Federal Property Management Regulation (FMR) and specific contracts.

  12. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned,...

  13. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Livestock risk protection (LRP) insurance policies protect producers from adverse price changes in the livestock market. This publication explains how LRP works, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these polices, and gives examples...

  14. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  15. Collapse of ferromagnetism in itinerant-electron system: A magnetic, transport properties, and high pressure study of (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diop, L. V. B., E-mail: leopold.diop@neel.cnrs.fr; Isnard, O. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Kastil, J. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Arnold, Z.; Kamarad, J. [Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetism and transport properties were studied for Laves (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} itinerant-electron compounds, which exhibit a temperature-induced first-order transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state upon heating. At finite temperatures, the field-induced metamagnetic phase transition between the AFM and FM has considerable effects on the transport properties of these model metamagnetic compounds. A large negative magnetoresistance of about 14% is observed in accordance with the metamagnetic transition. The magnetic phase diagram is determined for the Laves Hf{sub 1?x}Ta{sub x}Fe{sub 2} series and its Ta concentration dependence discussed. An unusual behavior is revealed in the paramagnetic state of intermediate compositions, it gives rise to the rapid increase and saturation of the local spin fluctuations of the 3d electrons. This new result is analysed in the frame of the theory of Moriya. For a chosen composition Hf{sub 0.825}Ta{sub 0.175}Fe{sub 2}, exhibiting such remarkable features, a detailed investigation is carried out under hydrostatic pressure up to 1?GPa in order to investigate the volume effect on the magnetic properties. With increasing pressure, the magnetic transition temperature T{sub FM-AFM} from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order decreases strongly non-linearly and disappears at a critical pressure of 0.75?GPa. In the pressure-induced AFM state, the field-induced first-order AFM-FM transition appears and the complex temperature dependence of the AFM-FM transition field is explained by the contribution from both the magnetic and elastic energies caused by the significant temperature variation of the amplitude of the local Fe magnetic moment. The application of an external pressure leads also to the progressive decrease of the Néel temperature T{sub N}. In addition, a large pressure effect on the spontaneous magnetization M{sub S} for pressures below 0.45?GPa, dln(M{sub s})/dP?=??6.3?×?10{sup ?2?}GPa{sup ?1} was discovered. The presented results are consistent with Moriya's theoretical predictions and can significantly help to better understand the underlying physics of itinerant electron magnetic systems nowadays widely investigated for both fundamental and applications purposes.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance: Its role as a microscopic probe of the electronic and magnetic properties of High-{Tc} superconductors and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Byoung Jin

    1995-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR experiments are reported for Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}, YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. NMR studies typify three different aspects of microscopic properties of HTSC. In non-superconducting antiferromagnetic (AF) prototype Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, we used NMR to investigate Cu{sup 2+} correlated spin dynamics and AF phase transition in CuO2 layers. In the superconductors, we used NMR both to investigate the electronic properties of the Fermi-liquid in normal and superconducting states and to investigate flux lattice and flux-line dynamics in the superconducting state in presence of magnetic field. A summary of each study is given: {sup 35}Cl NMR was measured in Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} single crystals with T{sub N}=257K. {sub 35}Cl NMR relaxation rates showed crossover of Cu{sup 2+} spin dynamics from Heisenberg to XY-like correlation at 290 K well above T{sub N}. A field-dependent T{sub N} for H{perpendicular}c was observed and explained by a field-induced Ising-like anisotropy in ab plane. {sup 199}Hg NMR was measured in HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}. Properties of the Fermi-liquid are characterized by a single-spin fluid picture and opening of a spin pseudo-gap at q=0 above {Tc}. Below {Tc}, spin component of Knight shift decreases rapidly in agreement with prediction for d-wave pairing scheme. {sup 11}B and {sup 89}Y NMR/magnetization were measured in YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Temperature dependence of {sup 11}B Knight shift and of the NSLR gave a normal state which agrees with the Korringa relation, indicating that the AF fluctuations on the Ni sublattice are negligible. Opening of the superconducting gap obeys BCS. A NMR approach to investigate vortex thermal motion in HTSC is presented, based on contribution of thermal flux-lines motion to both T{sub 2}{sup {minus}1} and T{sub 1}{sup {minus}1}. Effects are demonstrated in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}.

  17. LONG-CHAIN POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID INTAKE AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO RED BLOOD CELL AND SERUM LONG-CHAIN POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS IN WOMEN AT HIGH RISK FOR BREAST CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Katherine

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    questionnaire (DHQ). The mean age of the subjects was 47 ± 9.9 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 25 ± 4.4. The mean 5-year Gail risk was 2.7 ± 2.2%. Twenty-two (48%) of the subjects were premenopausal and 24 (52%) were postmenopausal. Fifteen (33...

  18. Roadmap: Insurance Studies Property and Casualty Insurance Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    , Finance and Risk Management 3 INS 49021 Property and Casualty Insurance Operations 3 C Fulfills Writing 3 INS 49041 Personal Lines Property and Casualty Insurance 3 INS 49042 Commercial Lines Property and Casualty Insurance 3 Major Program Requirement (upper division) 3 See note 1 on page 2

  19. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  20. Crystal structure and high temperature transport properties of Yb-filled p-type skutterudites Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Puneet, Pooja; Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Nolas, George S., E-mail: gnolas@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially Yb-filled Fe substituted polycrystalline p-type skutterudites with nominal compositions Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, with varying filler concentrations x, were synthesized by reacting the constituent elements and subsequent solid state annealing, followed by densification by hot-pressing. The compositions and filling fractions were confirmed with a combination of Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis. Their thermoelectric properties were evaluated from 300 to 800 K. The Seebeck coefficients for the specimens increase with increasing temperature and plateau at around 750 K. The thermal conductivity decreases with increasing Yb filling fraction, and bipolar conduction becomes evident and increases at elevated temperatures. A maximum ZT value of 0.8 was obtained at 750 K for Yb{sub 0.47}Co{sub 2.6}Fe{sub 1.4}Sb{sub 12}. The thermoelectric properties and potential for further optimization are discussed in light of our results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Yb-filled Fe-substituted p-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites, Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, were structurally and physically characterized. • Both filling fraction and Co-to-Fe ratio affect the transport properties. • High ZT was obtained for the composition with ?50% Yb filling and a slightly lower than nominal Fe content.

  1. Materials Science and Engineering A, 2011, 528(1-2): p. 7596 7605 High strain rate compressive response ofsyntactic foams: trends in mechanical properties and failure mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    comprising hollow particles dispersed in a matrix material. Available studies on high strain rate compressive with respect to the material composition. Syntactic foams reinforced with micro- and nano-sized fibers are a class of porous materials in which thin-walled hollow particles are dispersed in a matrix material

  2. Rethinking Risk: Aspiration as Pure Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Greg B

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of an environmental decision problem where di¤erent investment packages (acts) lead to di¤erent possible levels of global wealth and overall levels of global warming. Avoiding the all too easy economic assumption that the global wealth levels can simply be adjusted... by some amount to re‡ect the e¤ect of the global temperature levels, we are now left with two numerical components in this problem. There are thus separate measures of risk aversion that deal with wealth and temperature, and therefore two di¤erent concepts...

  3. High-temperature phase stability and tribological properties of laser clad Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicide coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.D. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China); Wang, H.M. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China)]. E-mail: wanghuaming@263.net

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi wear-resistant metal silicide composite coatings consisting of Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and interdendritic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi eutectic were fabricated on substrate of an austenitic stainless steel AISI321 by laser cladding using Ni-Mo-Si elemental powder blends. The high-temperature structural stability of the coating was evaluated by aging at 800 deg. C for 1-50 h. High-temperature sliding wear resistance of the as-laser clad and aged coatings was evaluated at 600 deg. C. Results indicate that the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicides coating has excellent high temperature phase stability. No phase transformation except the dissolution of the eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and the corresponding growth of the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and no elemental diffusion from the coating into the substrate were detected after aging the coating at 800 deg. C for 50 h. Aging of the coating at 800 deg. C leads to gradual dissolution of the interdendritic eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and subsequent formation of a dual-phase structure with equiaxed Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary grains distributed in the NiSi single-phase matrix. Because of the strong covalent-dominated atomic bonds and high volume fraction of the ternary metal silicide Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si, both the original and the aged Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi coating has excellent wear resistance under pin-on-disc high-temperature sliding wear test conditions, although hardness of the aged coating is slightly lower than that of the as-clad coating.

  4. Property rights, negotiating power and foreign investment: An international and comparative law study on Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotula, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Property rights are crucial in shaping foreign investment and its socio?economic outcomes. Their allocation, protection and regulation influence the way the risks, costs and benefits… (more)

  5. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  6. Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus for the UK and the Republic of Ireland #12;2 PRA for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus C.E. Sansford 23rd May 2013 Pest Risk Analysis Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus (Kowalski and Holdenrieder, 2009). 1 Please cite this document as: Sansford, CE (2013). Pest Risk Analysis

  7. High-resolution ALMA Observations of SDP.81. II. Molecular Clump Properties of a Lensed Submillimeter Galaxy at z=3.042

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yuichi; Hayashi, Masao; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spatially-resolved properties of molecular gas and dust in a gravitationally-lensed submillimeter galaxy H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) at $z=3.042$ revealed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We identified 14 molecular clumps in the CO(5-4) line data, all with a spatial scale of $\\sim$50-300 pc in the source plane. The surface density of molecular gas ($\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$) and star-formation rate ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$) of the clumps are more than three orders of magnitude higher than those found in local spiral galaxies. The clumps are placed in the `burst' sequence in the $\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$-$\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ plane, suggesting that $z \\sim 3$ molecular clumps follow the star-formation law derived for local starburst galaxies. With our gravitational lens model, the positions in the source plane are derived for the molecular clumps, dust clumps, and stellar components identified in the {\\sl Hubble Space Telescope} image. The molecular and dust clumps coexist in a similar re...

  8. High-frequency properties of two-dimensional josephson-junction arrays. Final report, 1 November 1994-31 December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobb, C.J.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobium Josephson junction arrays show great promise as compact, low dissipation, efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation at frequencies from below 100 GHz to as high as 1 THz. Current small resistively shunted arrays (containing 100 phase locked junctions) are tunable over a broad range and produce power which is within a factor of 3 the theoretical maximum. Unshunted arrays have also been made which are not tunable, but produce very narrow linewidth radiation with remarkably high efficiency (conservatively estimated at 15% from DC to 157 GHz). In addition, a new scanning probe, based on SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) has been designed and constructed, and is not in operation, yielding spatial images of the magnetic field distribution in arrays.

  9. Creep rupture properties of Hastelloy-X and Incoloy-800H in a simulated HTGR helium environment containing high levels of moisture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creep rupture tests on Incoloy-800H and Hastelloy-X have been carried out in a simulated steamcycle high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment containing a high level of moisture. For the maximum test time of 16 000 h, the creep rupture behavior of Incoloy-800H in the helium environment was not significantly different from that in air. Hastelloy-X showed a slightly lower rupture life in helium in comparison with standard air tests. Surface cracks initiated at the grain boundaries penetrating surface and cavities formed at the grain boundary triple points have been identified as major fracture mechanisms in both environments. Oxidation was the only gas/metal interaction observed in the helium environment.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute radiation risk Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pared with risks from acute or high-dose-rate exposure... - mates of risk of induction by low doses of radiation lies in the choice of the value of the DDREF (6... , Sources,...

  11. FY2011 Sensitive Property List Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drives Computers Desktop, Laptop, Workstation, Server Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Devices property is defined as property that is highly portable, easily converted to personal use and is more

  12. Risk prediction models for melanoma: A systematic review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A.; Emery, Jon; Kassianos, Angelos P.; Walter, Fiona M.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and Armstrong (35) point out, if a screening programme is to be directed towards a high risk group and is to have an impact on the disease as a whole, three criteria must be satisfied in addition to those for all screening programmes (41): People at high risk... :1000129. 35. English, DR, Armstrong, BK. Identifying people at high risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: Results from a case-control study in Western Australia. Br. Med. J. (Clin. Res. Ed). 1988; 296: 1285–1288. 36. Amir, E, Freedman, OC, Seruga...

  13. ITER risk workshop participant guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  14. Carroll County- Green Building Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits Carroll County (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-308(e)) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if it chooses to do so.* Carroll County has exercised...

  15. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  16. Reactor siting risk comparisons related to recommendations of NUREG-0625

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsell, A.W.; Dombek, F.S.; Orvis, D.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates how implementing the remote siting recommendations for nuclear reactors (NUREG-0625) made by the Siting Policy Task Force of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can reduce potential public risk. The document analyzes how population density affects site-specific risk for both light water reactors (LWRs) and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs).

  17. A Case Study in Sequential Pattern Mining for ITOperational Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggieri, Salvatore

    A Case Study in Sequential Pattern Mining for IT­Operational Risk Valerio Grossi, Andrea Romei of a network of Private Branch eXchanges (PBXs). The approach relies on preprocessing and data mining tasks. In this paper, we concentrate on the high frequency low impact class of risk by reporting a case study in IT­operational

  18. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  19. Properties of zinc oxide films grown on sapphire substrates using high-temperature H{sub 2}O generated by a catalytic reaction on platinum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasui, Kanji, E-mail: kyasui@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp; Takeuchi, Tomohiko; Nagatomi, Eichi; Satomoto, Souichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Kato, Takahiro [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Konya, Takayuki [Application Laboratory, Rigaku Corporation, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8666 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated the characteristics of ZnO films grown on a-plane (11-20) sapphire substrates at 773–873?K using a reaction between dimethylzinc and high-temperature H{sub 2}O generated by a catalytic reaction on Pt nanoparticles. The growth rate was 0.02–0.07??m min{sup ?1}. The largest electron mobility and the smallest residual carrier concentration for the ZnO films were 169 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} and 1.6?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3}, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns for the ZnO films exhibited intense (0002) and (0004) peaks associated with ZnO (0001) planes. The minimum full width at half maximum of the ?-rocking curve for ZnO (0002) was less than 0.1°. In a ZnO film with a high electron mobility, no rotational domains were identified using a ZnO (10-10) ? scan. From secondary ion mass spectroscopy, a hydrogen concentration of 3?×?10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3} and a boron concentration of 2–5?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} were determined. These were identified as extrinsic donor impurities.

  20. High-temperature low-cycle fatigue and tensile properties of Hastelloy X and alloy 617 in air and HTGR-helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strizak, J.P.; Brinkman, C.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of strain controlled fatigue and tensile tests are presented for two nickel base solution hardened alloys which are reference structural alloys for use in several high temperature gas cooled reactor concepts. These alloys, Hastelloy X Inconel 617, were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 871/sup 0/C in air and impure helium. Materials were tested in the solution annealed as well as in the pre-aged condition where aging consisted of isothermal exposure at one of several temperatures for periods of up to 20,000 h. Comparisons are also given between the strain controlled fatigue lives of these alloys and several other commonly used alloys all tested at 538/sup 0/C.

  1. Essays on risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jindapon, Paan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    more risk averse than v. Fix s, and let av be the value that maximizes v's expected utility. Assume, without loss of generality, that u(w ? c(av)) = v(w ? c(av)) = 1 and that u(w ? D(s) ? c(av...

  2. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  3. High Voltage Safety Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage...

  4. Magnetic properties and homogeneous distribution of Gd{sup 3+} ions in gadolinium molybdenum borate glass with high Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, F.; Honma, T. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Doi, Y.; Hinatsu, Y. [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)] [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Komatsu, T., E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? The magnetic susceptibility of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MoO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass was examined in T = 1.8–300 K. ? The effective magnetic moment was ?{sub eff} = 7.87 ?{sub B}. ? The Weiss constant was ? = ?0.7 K. ? Gd{sup 3+} ions are distributed homogeneously as paramagnetic ions down to T = 1.8 K. -- Abstract: The magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of 21.25Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–63.75MoO{sub 3}–15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%) glass showing the crystallization of ferroelastic ??-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals are examined in the temperature range of T = 1.8–300 K to clarify magnetic and distribution states of Gd{sup 3+} ions. The magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie–Weiss law, giving the effective magnetic moment of ?{sub eff} = 7.87 ?{sub B} and the Weiss constant of ? = ?0.7 K. Any peak such as ?-type anomaly is not observed in the temperature dependence of specific heat in T = 1.8–5 K. It is suggested that Gd{sup 3+} ions in the glass with a high Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of 21.25 mol% are distributed homogeneously and randomly as paramagnetic ions down to T = 1.8 K without inducing any strong magnetic interaction. The present study suggests that glasses based on the MoO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system are good hosts for the homogeneous solubility of a large amount of rare-earth oxides.

  5. A novel 3D structure composed of strings of hierarchical TiO{sub 2} spheres formed on TiO{sub 2} nanobelts with high photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yongjian [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Suzhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Song, Dandan; Li, Xiaodan; Yu, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hierarchical titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) composite nanostructure with strings of anatase TiO{sub 2} hierarchical micro-spheres and rutile nanobelts framework (TiO{sub 2} HSN) is successfully synthesized via a one-step hydrothermal method. Particularly, the strings of hierarchical spheres are assembled by very thin TiO{sub 2} nanosheets, which are composed of highly crystallized anatase nanocrystals. Meanwhile, the HSN has a large surface area of 191 m{sup 2}/g, which is about 3 times larger than Degussa P25. More importantly, the photocatalytic activity of HSN and P25 were evaluated by the photocatalytic oxidation decomposition of methyl orange (MO) under UV light illumination, and the TiO{sub 2} HSN shows enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with Degussa P25, as result of its continuous hierarchical structures, special conductive channel and large specific surface area. With these features, the hierarchical TiO{sub 2} may have more potential applications in the fields of dye-sensitized solar cells and lithium ion batteries. -- Graphical abstract: Novel TiO{sub 2} with anatase micro-spheres and rutile nanobelts is synthesized. Enhanced photocatalysis is attributed to hierarchical structures (3D spheres), conductive channel (1D nanobelts) and large specific surface area (2D nanosheet). Highlights: • The novel TiO{sub 2} nanostructure (HSN) is fabricated for the first time. • HSN is composed of strings of anatase hierarchical spheres and rutile nanobelt. • HSN presents a larger S{sub BET} of 191 m{sup 2}/g, 3 times larger than the Degussa P25 (59 m{sup 2}/g). • HSN owns three kinds of dimensional TiO{sub 2} (1D, 2D and 3D) simultaneously. • HSN exhibits better photocatalytic performance compared with Degussa P25.

  6. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  7. Risk management with residential real estate derivatives : strategies for home builders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddins, Quinn W. (Quinn William)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines why and how publicly-traded home builders might use index-based residential property derivatives to manage risk. After describing a number of alternative reasons for hedging, I argue for a paradigm for ...

  8. Worst-Case Value-at-Risk of Non-Linear Portfolios - Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Despite its popularity, VaR lacks some desirable theoretical properties. ..... The shape of the uncertainty set U should reflect the modeller's .... we assume that the returns of the derivative underliers are the only risk factors.

  9. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  10. Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with Shoreline Protection Publication Focused on Virginia Wetland Issues and Training Fall 2007 Erosion happens and the sea level of the property owner with the public interest in the Bay and its living resources. The Tidal Wetlands Act (1972

  11. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP and Chris Strickland. Energy Derivatives: Pricing and Risk Management (London: Lacima Publications, 2000). Chapter 4: Energy Forward Curves ­ Steven Errera and Stewart L. Brown. Fundamentals

  12. Commentary: Risk Management and Reliability Design for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Dennis L.; Cranwell, Robert M.; Hunter, Regina L.

    1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Where there is a significant actuarial basis for decision making (e.g., the occurrence of fires in single-family dwellings), there is little incentive for formal risk management. Formal risk assessments are most useful in those cases where the value of the structure is high, many people may be affected, the societal perception of risk is high, consequences of a mishap would be severe, and the actuarial uncertainty is large. For these cases, there is little opportunity to obtain the necessary experiential data to make informed decisions, and the consequences in terms of money, lives, and societal confidence are severe enough to warrant a formal risk assessment. Other important factors include the symbolic value of the structure and vulnerability to single point failures. It is unlikely that formal risk management and assessment practices will or should replace the proven institutions of building codes and engineering practices. Nevertheless, formal risk assessment can provide valuable insights into the hazards threatening high-value and high-risk (perceived or actual) buildings and structures, which can in turn be translated into improved public health, safety, and security. The key is to choose and apply the right assessment tool to match the structure in question. Design-for-reliability concepts can be applied to buildings, bridges, transportation sys- tems, dams, and other structures. The use of these concepts could have the dual benefits of lowering life-cycle costs by reducing the necessity for maintenance and repair and of enhancing the saiiety and security of the structure's users.

  13. Essays on Measuring Systemic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifova, Manizha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoRISK indicator, whereas HSBC with the lowest average VaRAG * † Barclays Bank Plc * † HSBC Holdings Plc * † Lloyds

  14. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  15. EHS DSP Authorization Request Form 2012-001 Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , regulations and Driver safety Program requirements. I authorize Safety & Risk Management to enroll me or more persons in one accident; $5,000 property damage). Vehicle Code Section 16020 (effective July 1EHS DSP Authorization Request Form 2012-001 Safety & Risk Management Request for Authorization

  16. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary...

  17. Risk-Averse Stochastic Dual Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Václav Kozmík

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2013 ... Abstract: We formulate a risk-averse multi-stage stochastic program using conditional value at risk as the risk measure. The underlying random ...

  18. Vulnerability, Risk Management, and Agricultural Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fafchamps, Marcel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. (1980). “Attitudes Towards Risk: Experimental MeasurementIncentive Flexibility, and Risk. ” Americal Journal ofCaria, A. S. (2009), Risk Attitudes and The Formation of

  19. Risk Taking and Gender in Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scotchmer, Suzanne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Investors’ Attitudes toward Risk. ” forthcoming (2003)in attitudes toward ?nancial risk. ” Evolution and HumanGrossman. 2005a. “Sex and Risk: Experimen- tal Evidence. ” (

  20. A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

  1. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  2. Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Chris

    Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke Chris T In the context of the Cardiovascular Health Study, a comprehensive investigation into the risk factors for stroke of assessing who is at high risk for stroke. 1 Introduction Stroke is the third leading cause of death among

  3. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought Hongning Zhou*, Masao on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear

  4. PROPERTY MANUAL Berkeley Laboratory Property Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    of Energy (DOE). The Property Management charter ensures the efficient and effective protection and controlPROPERTY MANUAL Issued by Berkeley Laboratory Property Management Lawrence Berkeley National of Property Management Policies · I. Parties and Organizations Responsible for Property · II. Acquiring

  5. Perceived Threat of a Heart Attack among Mexican Americans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florez, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Compared to the general population, Mexican Americans are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, such as heart attack, due to the high prevalence… (more)

  6. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia, E-mail: sonia.graham@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)] [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); Barnett, Jon, E-mail: jbarn@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)] [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); Fincher, Ruth, E-mail: r.fincher@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)] [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); Hurlimann, Anna, E-mail: anna.hurlimann@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, The University of Melbourne, Architecture and Planning Building, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)] [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, The University of Melbourne, Architecture and Planning Building, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Mortreux, Colette, E-mail: colettem@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)] [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); Waters, Elissa, E-mail: elissa.waters@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)] [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  7. Historic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in theinPlasticsreduction .Historic Properties

  8. Optimal risk sharing under distorted probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Michael; Young, Virginia R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory of risk. Geneva Pap. Risk Insurance Theory 25, 141–A. : Two-persons ef?cient risk-sharing and equilibria for36(2), 189–223 (2008) Optimal risk sharing under distorted

  9. Methodology of organizational learning in risk management A method of organizational risk perception by the stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Methodology of organizational learning in risk management A method of organizational risk) and the Departmental Veterinary Services (DDSV) within the framework of organizational learning in risk management Experience reflection, organizational risks, food-related sanitary alert, risk perception. Abstract

  10. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  11. Risk Identification and Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September DepartmentRio GrandeAssessmentRisk

  12. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  13. Property:SalinityHIgh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFYID6/OrganizationID8/WebsiteSalinityAverage

  14. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioconcentration factors Transfer factors Exposure parameters Inorganic chemicals Dioxinsfurans High explosives Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Other semivolatile organic...

  15. DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline...

  16. Risk assessment in environmental management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a straightforward exposition of US EPA-based procedures for the risk assessment and risk management of contaminated land, interwoven with discussions on some of the key fundamentals on the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the toxic action of environmental chemicals. The book is logically structured, commencing with a general overview of the principles of risk assessment and the interface with environmental legislation. There follows an introduction to environmental fate and transport, modeling, toxicology and uncertainty analysis, and a discussion of the elements of a risk assessment (site characterization, exposure analysis, toxic action and risk characterization), intake of a chemical with its environmental concentration and activity-related parameters such as inhalation rate and exposure time. The book concludes with a discussion on the derivation of risk-based action levels and remediation goals.

  17. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A New Formula for Prostate Cancer Lymph Node Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.ed [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT (United States); Makarov, Danil V. [Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Section of Urology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Gross, Cary [Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: The successful treatment of prostate cancer depends on the accurate estimation of the risk of regional lymph node (LN) involvement. The Roach formula (RF) has been criticized as overestimating LN risk. A modification of the RF has been attempted by other investigators using simplified adjustment ratios: the Nguyen formula (NF). Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was investigated for patients treated in 2004 through 2006 for whom at least 10 LN were examined at radical prostatectomy, cT1c or cT2 disease, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <26 ng/ml (N = 2,930). The Yale formula (YF) was derived from half of the sample (n = 1,460), and validated in the other half (n = 1,470). Results: We identified 2,930 patients. Only 4.6% of patients had LN+, and 72.6% had cT1c disease. Gleason (GS) 8-10 histology was found in 14.4% of patients. The YF for prediction of %LN+ risk is [GS - 5]x [PSA/3 + 1.5 x T], where T = 0, 1, and 2 for cT1c, cT2a, and cT2b/cT2c. Within each strata of predicted %LN+ risk, the actual %LN+ was closest to the YF. Using a >15% risk as an indicator of high-risk disease, the YF had increased sensitivity (39.0% vs. 13.6%) compared with the NF, without a significant reduction in specificity (94.9% vs. 98.8%). The NF was overly restrictive of the high-risk group, with only 2% of patients having a >15% risk of LN+ by that formula. Conclusion: The YF performed better than the RF and NF and was best at differentiating patients at high risk for LN+ disease.

  19. Alerting device and method for reminding a person of a risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Gunter, Wayne M. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An alerting device and method to remind personnel of a risk is disclosed. The device has at least two sensors, a logic controller, a power source, and an annunciator that delivers a visual message, with or without an audible alarm, about a risk to a person when the sensors detect the person exiting a predetermined space. In particular, the present invention reminds a person of a security, safety, or health risk upon exiting a predetermined space. More particularly, the present invention reminds a person of an information security risk relating to sensitive, proprietary, confidential, trade secret, classified, or intellectual property information.

  20. Wind derivatives: hedging wind risk:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyer, S.A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Wind derivatives are financial contracts that can be used to hedge or mitigate wind risk. In this thesis, the focus was on pricing these wind… (more)

  1. WON EXPOSURE AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    As information on indoor air quality accumulated * it became apparent that radon and its progeny are invariably present in indoor environments and that concentrations may reach unacceptably high levels. The lung cancer excess anong miners exposed to radon progeny raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also cause lung cancer in the general population. This presentation first provides an ovemiew of radon daughter carcinogenesis, and then reviews the recent BEIR IV report. The report described a statistical model * based on analysis of data from four studies of miners, for estimating the lung cancer risk associated with exposure to radon progeny. Tbe analyses showed that the risk of radon exposure declines with time since exposure and with increasing age. The BEIR IV committee concluded that radon progeny and cigarette smoking interact in a multiplicative fashion and that exposure-dose relationships are similar for exposure in homes and in mines.

  2. Collective Risk Control And Group Security: The Unexpected Consequences of Differential Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Martin C; Ihori, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003) Group formation in risk-sharing arrangements, Reviewof Tokyo, Conference on risk management, August 2, 2002.2002) Collective international risk control: failure of the

  3. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  4. Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute & Department of Decision Sciences Details of Seminar Date and statistics is leading to a greatly broadened theory of regression which draws on tools of convex analysis with factor analysis in finance and economics. Risk Management Institute Joint Seminar #12;

  5. Assessing node risk and vulnerability in epidemics on networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Tim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Which nodes are most vulnerable to an epidemic spreading through a network, and which carry the highest risk of causing a major outbreak if they are the source of the infection? Here we show how these questions can be answered to good approximation using the cavity method. Several curious properties of node vulnerability and risk are explored: some nodes are more vulnerable than others to weaker infections, yet less vulnerable to stronger ones; a node is always more likely to be caught in an outbreak than it is to start one, except when the disease has a deterministic lifetime; the rank order of node risk depends on the details of the distribution of infectious periods.

  6. Dielectric properties of aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Keene, L.E.; Latorre, V.R. (Chemistry and Material Sciences Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the real (dielectric constant) and imaginary (loss factor) components of the complex relative permittivity at 298 [degree]K using microwave frequencies (2, 10, and 18--40 GHz), for bulk SiO[sub 2]-aerogels and for two types of organic aerogels, resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) and melamine-formaldehyde (MF). Measured dielectric constants are found to vary linearly between values of 1.0 and 2.0 for aerogel densities from 10 to 500 kg/m[sup 3]. For the same range of densities, the measured loss tangents vary linearly between values of 2[times]10[sup [minus]4] and 7[times]10[sup [minus]2]. The observed linearity of the dielectric properties with density in aerogels at microwave frequencies shows that their dielectric behavior is more gas-like than solid-like. The dielectric properties of aerogels are shown to be significantly affected by the adsorbed water internal to the bulk material. For example, water accounts for 7% of the dielectric constant and 70% of the loss at microwave frequencies for silica aerogels. Because of their very high porosity, even with the water content, the aerogels are among the few materials exhibiting such low dielectric properties. Our measurements show that aerogels with greater than 99% porosity have dielectric constants less than 1.03; these are the lowest values ever reported for a bulk solid material.

  7. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  8. Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P. [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)] [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. This paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.

  9. 2008 Environmental risk management report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................. 6 4.2 Environmental risk by building ................................................................................................. 13 List of Figures and Tables Box 2.1 Pollution prevention / environmental risk management Environmental Risk by Building Type ............................................. 8 Figure 4.4 ANU Environmental

  10. Implementing Risk-Limiting Audits in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cast09.pdf. Philip B. Stark. Risk-limiting post-electionthe N.J. law the ?rst “risk-based statistical audit law. ”Holt bill does not limit risk. The Holt bill has a clause

  11. Predicting risk for the appearance of melanoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyskens, Frank L Jr; Ransohoff, David F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for projecting the absolute risk of breast cancer. J NatlD, Gail MH, et al: Cancer risk prediction models: A workshopal model of breast cancer risk prediction and implications

  12. Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non?destructive Borehole Logging Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1 Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2 Develop a correlation between field flow?property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow?properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3 Establish a method that uses the flow?property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in?situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased?hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predict effective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

  13. Workshop overview: Arsenic research and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, Reeder [Integrated Risk Information System Program, National Center for Environmental Assessment, MC: B-243 01, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: sams.reeder@epa.gov; Wolf, Douglas C. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ramasamy, Santhini; Ohanian, Ed [Health and Ecological Criteria Division, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chen, Jonathan [Antimicrobials Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lowit, Anna [Health Effects Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chronic exposure of humans through consumption of high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs)-contaminated drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, and cancers. Additionally, humans are exposed to organic arsenicals when used as pesticides and herbicides (e.g., monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) also known as cacodylic acid). Extensive research has been conducted to characterize the adverse health effects that result from exposure to iAs and its metabolites to describe the biological pathway(s) that lead to adverse health effects. To further this effort, on May 31, 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) sponsored a meeting entitled 'Workshop on Arsenic Research and Risk Assessment'. The invited participants from government agencies, academia, independent research organizations and consultants were asked to present their current research. The overall focus of these research efforts has been to determine the potential human health risks due to environmental exposures to arsenicals. Pursuant in these efforts is the elucidation of a mode of action for arsenicals. This paper provides a brief overview of the workshop goals, regulatory context for arsenical research, mode of action (MOA) analysis in human health risk assessment, and the application of MOA analysis for iAs and DMA{sup V}. Subsequent papers within this issue will present the research discussed at the workshop, ensuing discussions, and conclusions of the workshop.

  14. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Risk Analysis Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), operated on behalf of the ratepayers of the PNW by BPA and other Federal agencies, faces many uncertainties during the FY 2007-2009 rate period. Among these uncertainties, the largest revolve around hydro conditions, market prices and river operations for fish recovery. In order to provide a high probability of making its U.S. Treasury payments, BPA performs a Risk Analysis as part of its rate-making process. In this Risk Analysis, BPA identifies key risks, models their relationships, and then analyzes their impacts on net revenues (total revenues less expenses). BPA subsequently evaluates in the ToolKit Model the Treasury Payment Probability (TPP) resulting from the rates, risks, and risk mitigation measures described here and in the Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS). If the TPP falls short of BPA's standard, additional risk mitigation revenues, such as PNRR and CRAC revenues are incorporated in the modeling in ToolKit until the TPP standard is met. Increased wholesale market price volatility and six years of drought have significantly changed the profile of risk and uncertainty facing BPA and its stakeholders. These present new challenges for BPA in its effort to keep its power rates as low as possible while fully meeting its obligations to the U.S. Treasury. As a result, the risk BPA faces in not receiving the level of secondary revenues that have been credited to power rates before receiving those funds is greater. In addition to market price volatility, BPA also faces uncertainty around the financial impacts of operations for fish programs in FY 2006 and in the FY 2007-2009 rate period. A new Biological Opinion or possible court-ordered change to river operations in FY 2006 through FY 2009 may reduce BPA's net revenues included Initial Proposal. Finally, the FY 2007-2009 risk analysis includes new operational risks as well as a more comprehensive analysis of non-operating risks. Both the operational and non-operational risks will be described in Section 2.0 of this study. Given these risks, if rates are designed using BPA's traditional approach of only adding Planned Net Revenues for Risk (PNRR), power rates would need to recover a much larger ''risk premium'' to meet BPA's TPP standard. As an alternative to high fixed risk premiums, BPA is proposing a risk mitigation package that combines PNRR with a variable rate mechanism similar to the cost recovery adjustment mechanisms used in the FY 2002-2006 rate period. The proposed risk mitigation package is less expensive on a forecasted basis because the rates can be adjusted on an annual basis to respond to uncertain financial outcomes. BPA is also proposing a Dividend Distribution Clause (DDC) to refund reserves in excess of $800M to customers in the event net revenues in the next rate period exceed current financial forecasts.

  15. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Niobium for SRF Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimized mechanical and physical properties of high purity niobium are crucial for obtaining high performance SRF particle beam accelerator structures consistently. This paper summarizes these important material properties for both high purity polycrystalline and single crystal niobium.

  16. Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

  17. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  18. Key Attributes of the SAPHIRE Risk and Reliability Analysis Software for Risk-Informed Probabilistic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Kellie Kvarfordt; Ted Wood

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory is a primary developer of probabilistic risk and reliability analysis (PRRA) tools, dating back over 35 years. Evolving from mainframe-based software, the current state-of-the-practice has lead to the creation of the SAPHIRE software. Currently, agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the National Aeronautics and Aerospace Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Defense use version 7 of the SAPHIRE software for many of their risk-informed activities. In order to better understand and appreciate the power of software as part of risk-informed applications, we need to recall that our current analysis methods and solution methods have built upon pioneering work done 30 to 40 years ago. We contrast this work with the current capabilities in the SAPHIRE analysis package. As part of this discussion, we provide information for both the typical features and special analysis capabilities which are available. We also present the application and results typically found with state-of-the-practice PRRA models. By providing both a high-level and detailed look at the SAPHIRE software, we give a snapshot in time for the current use of software tools in a risk-informed decision arena.

  19. Optimization Online - Multilevel Optimization Modeling for Risk ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Eckstein

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 24, 2014 ... Abstract: Coherent risk measures have become a popular tool for incorporating risk aversion into stochastic optimization models. For dynamic ...

  20. Risk Aversion in Inventory Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

  1. Health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  2. NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, A.S.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NCR's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150. After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, the NRC initiated a sever accident research program to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a second technical basis to support regulatory decisions in this area. A key product of this program is NUREG-1150, which provides estimates of risk for several nuclear reactors of different design. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. A major aspect of the work was the development of a methodology that improved upon previous full-scale probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) in several areas which are described.

  3. Utility View of Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickham, J.

    This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

  4. Inherited risk for common disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banava, Helen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

  5. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  6. Risk Management In Major Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Scott William

    The integration of risk management in major projects within the construction and oil and gas industries has never been more significant especially as these projects are becoming larger and more complex. The increased ...

  7. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.W. [comp.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  8. Development of a Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety-goal policy of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has never included a true societal-risk goal. The NRC did acknowledge that the original goal for the risk of latent cancer facilities “was an individual risk goal not related to the number of people involved,” and stated that “a true societal risk goal would place a limit on the aggregate number of people affected.” However, this limitation was never satisfactorily addressed. Moreover, the safety goal has historically focused primarily on fatalities and latent health effects, while experience with actual nuclear accidents has shown that societal disruption can be significant even in accidents that yield only small to modest numbers of fatalities. Therefore, we have evaluated the social disruption effects from severe reactor accidents as a basis to develop a societal-risk goal for nuclear power plants, considering both health effects and non-health concerns such as property damage and land interdiction. Our initial analysis considered six different nuclear power plant sites in the U.S. for Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. The accident sequences considered for these two reactor types were station blackout sequences (both short-term and long-term SBO) as well as an STSBO with RCIC failure for the BWR and a Steam Generator Tube Rupture for the PWR. The source term release was an input in a RASCAL calculation of the off-site consequences using actual site-based weather data for each of the six plant sites randomly selected over a two-year period. The source term release plumes were then compared to Geographical Information System data for each site to determine the population affected and that would need to be evacuated to meet current emergency preparedness regulations. Our results to date suggest that number of people evacuated to meet current protective action guidelines appears to be a good proxy for disruption -- and, unlike other measures of disruption, has the advantage of being relatively straightforward to calculate for a given accident scenario and a given geographical location and plant site. Revised safety goals taking into account the potential for societal disruption could in principle be applied to the current generation of nuclear plants, but could also be used in evaluating and siting new technologies, such as small modular light water reactors, advanced Gen-IV high-temperature reactors, as well as reactor designs with passive safety features such as filtered vented containments.

  9. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  10. Measuring the viscoelastic properties of polytetrafluoroethylene copolymers at ultrasonic frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Verghese

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties must be measured directly. A new technique employing a piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator has been developed to measure the viscoelastic properties, GI(w) and G"(w), of Tefzel 280 (a high molecular weight copolymer of ethylene...

  11. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.hull@stfc.ac.uk [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Norberg, Stefan T. [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Mohn, Chris E. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  12. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    to assess the nation's military preparedness. However, risk management is not a panacea for the problemsThe Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow

  13. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Phillip, Bradley L. (Shaker Heights, OH)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  14. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Phillip, Bradley L. (20976 Fairmount Blvd., Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga County, OH 44120)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  15. An Introduction to Risk with a Focus on Design Diversity in the Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The maintenance and security of nuclear weapons in the stockpile involves decisions based on risk analysis and quantitative measures of risk. Risk is a factor in all decisions, a particularly important factor in decisions of a large scale. One example of high-risk decisions we will discuss is the risk involved in design diversity within the stockpile of nuclear weapons arsenal. Risk is defined as 'possibility of loss or injury' and the 'degree of probability of such loss' (Kaplan and Garrick 12). To introduce the risk involved with maintaining the weapons stockpile we will draw a parallel to the design and maintenance of Southwest Airlines fleet of Boeing 737 planes. The clear benefits for cost savings in maintenance of having a uniform fleet are what historically drove Southwest to have only Boeing 737s in their fleet. Less money and resources are need for maintenance, training, and materials. Naturally, risk accompanies those benefits. A defect in a part of the plane indicates a potential defect in that same part in all the planes of the fleet. As a result, safety, business, and credibility are at risk. How much variety or diversity does the fleet need to mitigate that risk? With that question in mind, a balance is needed to accommodate the different risks and benefits of the situation. In a similar way, risk is analyzed for the design and maintenance of nuclear weapons in the stockpile. In conclusion, risk must be as low as possible when it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk, and to help balance options in stockpile stewardship.

  16. Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

  17. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and vendor technical or business problems. HPC, by its very nature, is an exercise in multi-level risk management. Every aspect of stewarding HPCCs into the petascale era, from identification of the program drivers to the details of procurement actions and simulation environment component deployments, represents unprecedented challenges and requires effective risk management. The fundamental purpose of this workshop was to go beyond risk management processes as such and learn how to weave effective risk management practices, techniques, and methods into all aspects of migrating HPCCs into the next generation of leadership computing systems. This workshop was a follow-on to the Petascale System Integration Workshop hosted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)/NERSC last year. It was intended to leverage and extend the risk management experience of the participants by looking for common best practices and unique processes that have been especially successful. This workshop assessed the effectiveness of tools and techniques that are or could be helpful in HPCC risk management, with a special emphasis on how practice meets process. As the saying goes: 'In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is'. Finally, the workshop brought together a network of experts who shared information as technology moves into the petascale era and beyond.

  18. Risk assessment for organic micropollutants: U. S. point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic research and monitoring of sludge utilization programs have identified specific pathways by which potentially toxic constituents of sewage sludge can reach and cause toxicity to livestock, humans, plants, soil biota, wildlife, etc. In the process of preparing a new regulation for land application of sewage sludge in the US, a pathway approach to risk assessment was undertaken. Two Pathways were found to comprise the greatest risk from persistent lipophilic organic compounds such as PCBs: (1) direct ingestion of sludge by children; and (2) adherence of sludge to forage/pasture crops from surface application of fluid sludge, followed by grazing and ingestion of sludge by livestock used as human food. Each pathway considers risk to Most Exposed Individuals (MEIs) who have high exposure to sludge. Because 1990 sewage sludges contain very low levels of PCBs, the estimated risk level to MEIs was less 0.0001, low sludge PCBs and low probability of simultaneously meeting all the constraints of the MEI indicate that MEIs are at less 0.0000001 lifetime risk. The authors conclude that quantitative risk assessment for potentially toxic constituents in sewage sludge can be meaningfully conducted because research has provided transfer coefficients from sludges and sludge-amended soils to plants and animals needed for many organic compounds.

  19. DRAFT NISTIR 8023 Risk Management for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    appropriate countermeasures in the context of the System Development Life Cycle. A security risk assessment

  20. Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Francesco Bedini Jacobini, Erol Tutumluer, Mohd Rapik Saat Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (Rail

  1. High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (NARUC)), and appropriate government authorities in Canada to evaluate existing regulations and consider where appropriate recognition of circumstances may be warranted,...

  2. Identifying some high risk populations for mental retardation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duesterhoft, Kenneth Wayne

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ' $3 0 It- 0 cC 5- O 0 Cl I 0 0 IO X 0 I IG C! OJ O dl III lO 0 0 I/l Cl O m I 0 0 I? Since maternal age is a continuous variable and such a variable cannot be subjected to a chi square it was necessary to categor1ze this data...'s Family 2I K X ILI 0 Y ?I IZ IL O og I? ILI z w In ILI 0 I- ILI I- ~z O O LLJ O C) (f) 22 FIGURE 4 Relative Frequencies of the Distribution of Institutionalized IG) and Community Based (CG) Groups of Mentally Retarded Individuals...

  3. GAO High Risk List - An Update - David Trimble, Government Accountability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for Fast-Track Cooperative

  4. High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department HIGHImage of the

  5. SPRU Removes High-Risk Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 Roadmap forDKT.AwardsSPEER's Building- HistoricalPro

  6. Microsoft Word - 2007-fact-sheet-high-risk-children.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or eliminating the financial barriers to attaining safety devices (e.g. smoke alarms, bicycle helmets, car seats, and booster seats) * Increasing educational efforts directed...

  7. Schur Convex Functionals: Fatou Property and Representation Bogdan Grechuk and Michael Zabarankin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    probability space. 1 Introduction In risk analysis and finance, the uncertainty inherent in a random variable representations for positively homogeneous convex functionals have long been a major mod- eling tool in decision property. In particular, the existing quantile representations for law invariant coherent risk measures

  8. Alcohol consumption, Lewis phenotypes, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, H.O.; Suadicani, P.; Gyntelberg, F. (Rigshospitalet State Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Epidemiological Research Unit); Sorenson, H. (Rigshospitalet State Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Immunology); Hein, H.O. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1993-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have previously found an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a[minus]b[minus]) and suggested that the Lewis blood group has a close genetic relation with insulin resistance. The authors have investigated whether any conventional risk factors explain the increased risk in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men. 3,383 men aged 53-75 years were examined in 1985-86, and morbidity and mortality during the next 4 years were recorded. At baseline, the authors excluded 343 men with a history of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, or stroke. The potential risk factors examined were alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body-mass index, blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and social class. In 280 (9.6%) men with Le(a[minus]b[minus]), alcohol was the only risk factor significantly associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relation between alcohol consumption and risk; trend tests, with adjustment for age, were significant for fatal IHD (p=0.02), all IHD (p=0.03), and all causes of death (p=0.02). In 2649 (90.4%) men with other phenotypes, there was a limited negative association with alcohol consumption. In Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men, a group genetically at high risk of IHD, alcohol consumption seems to be especially protective. The authors suggest that alcohol consumption may modify insulin resistance in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men.

  9. A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

  10. RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS-BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS- BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON ELECTRIC POWER Simonoff, J.usc.edu/create Report #04-004DRAFT #12;Risk Management and Risk Analysis-Based Decision Tools for Attacks on Electric for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events University of Southern California Los Angeles

  11. Risk and Controls 101 What is a Risk and Control?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Control? Control Types Control Execution Control Categories A-123 Process here at LBNL Process Risk: The Airline Industry Controls: Security measures... What is a control? A control is an activity that prevents Preventive Controls Prevent undesirable events from occurring Facilitate desirable events System controls

  12. Initial Decision and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

  13. Risk Removal | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan Funds Revolving LoanA l i c e L i pRiskRisk

  14. Risk and Realities | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September DepartmentRioRisk Removal Risk

  15. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  16. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    are low risk Goal: Develop solar selective coatings for next- generation concentrated solar power towers that exhibit high absorptance with low thermal emittance, that can...

  17. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Loef, Edgar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Choong and W. W. Moses, “Strontium and barium iodide highEuropium-activated Strontium Iodide Scintillators,” USScintillation Properties of Strontium Iodide Scintillators

  18. LAVA (Los Alamos Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Methodology): A conceptual framework for automated risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.; Lim, J.J.; Phillips, J.R.; Tisinger, R.M.; Brown, D.C.; FitzGerald, P.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed an original methodology for performing risk analyses on subject systems characterized by a general set of asset categories, a general spectrum of threats, a definable system-specific set of safeguards protecting the assets from the threats, and a general set of outcomes resulting from threats exploiting weaknesses in the safeguards system. The Los Alamos Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Methodology (LAVA) models complex systems having large amounts of ''soft'' information about both the system itself and occurrences related to the system. Its structure lends itself well to automation on a portable computer, making it possible to analyze numerous similar but geographically separated installations consistently and in as much depth as the subject system warrants. LAVA is based on hierarchical systems theory, event trees, fuzzy sets, natural-language processing, decision theory, and utility theory. LAVA's framework is a hierarchical set of fuzzy event trees that relate the results of several embedded (or sub-) analyses: a vulnerability assessment providing information about the presence and efficacy of system safeguards, a threat analysis providing information about static (background) and dynamic (changing) threat components coupled with an analysis of asset ''attractiveness'' to the dynamic threat, and a consequence analysis providing information about the outcome spectrum's severity measures and impact values. By using LAVA, we have modeled our widely used computer security application as well as LAVA/CS systems for physical protection, transborder data flow, contract awards, and property management. It is presently being applied for modeling risk management in embedded systems, survivability systems, and weapons systems security. LAVA is especially effective in modeling subject systems that include a large human component.

  19. RISK AND INVESTMENT IN LIBERALIZED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Electricity Markets Energy Economics Volume 25, No. 5, 2003. [B] Jacob Lemming Price Modelling for Profit at Risk Management To be included in: Modelling Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets, edited by Derek process that changes the way electricity is traded and priced as a commodity. The electricity system has

  20. Decision Support and Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and emergency management officials during the planning, incident management preparedness, and response phasesDecision Support and Risk Management CVMDM: Community Vaccination and Mass Dispensing Model What and the performance of prophylaxis supply logistics and PODs. Decision and Information Sciences Division Decision

  1. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    ,395 or 5% from 2005-06 to 2006-07. Cost of Risk 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 Premiums except 2004-05 and 2005-06, where actual expenses are shown. Because they are only used

  2. Risk Price Dynamics Jaroslav Borovicka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Lars Peter

    Risk Price Dynamics Jaroslav Borovicka University of Chicago Lars Peter Hansen University November 11, 2009 Abstract We present a novel approach to depicting asset pricing dynamics by characterizing shock exposures and prices for alternative investment horizons. We quantify the shock exposures

  3. Decision Support and Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Information Sciences Division Decision Support and Risk Management Group #12;A U.S. Department of Energy to analyze many failure scenarios over the past 5 years. Restore's data library of applications was developed infrastructures. A new user with as little as 4­6 hours of training can use the tool to modify an existing data

  4. Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

  5. The 'Becoming' Insurable of Terrorism Risk in the US: Imagining Systemic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bougen, Philip

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Works Cited Beck, U. (1992). Risk society: towards a newSage. Beck, U. (1999). World risk society . London: Polity.The terrorist threat: world risk society revisited. Theory,

  6. High-Power Electrochemical Storage Devices and Plug-in Hybrid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conducting the high risk, high cost research and development associated with advanced battery systems. USABC Ahsan Habib, March 08 4 Organization USABCElectrochemical Energy...

  7. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  8. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Alexander Studenikin

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review on electromagnetic properties of neutrinos is presented. In spite of many efforts in the theoretical and experimental studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties, they still remain one of the main puzzles related to neutrinos.

  9. Risk uncertainty analysis methods for NUREG-1150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, U.S.; Boyd, G.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation and display of risk uncertainties for NUREG-1150 constitute a principal focus of the Severe Accident Risk Rebaselining/Risk Reduction Program (SARRP). Some of the principal objectives of the uncertainty evaluation are: (1) to provide a quantitative estimate that reflects, for those areas considered, a credible and realistic range of uncertainty in risk; (2) to rank the various sources of uncertainty with respect to their importance for various measures of risk; and (3) to characterize the state of understanding of each aspect of the risk assessment for which major uncertainties exist. This paper describes the methods developed to fulfill these objectives.

  10. Towards secure virtual directories : a risk analysis framework.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claycomb, William R.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directory services are used by almost every enterprise computing environment to provide data concerning users, computers, contacts, and other objects. Virtual directories are components that provide directory services in a highly customized manner. Unfortunately, though the use of virtual directory services are widespread, an analysis of risks posed by their unique position and architecture has not been completed. We present a detailed analysis of six attacks to virtual directory services, including steps for detection and prevention. We also describe various categories of attack risks, and discuss what is necessary to launch an attack on virtual directories. Finally, we present a framework to use in analyzing risks to individual enterprise computing virtual directory instances. We show how to apply this framework to an example implementation, and discuss the benefits of doing so.

  11. THE ROLE OF RISK MODELS IN THE FINANCIAL CRISIS bridges vol. 19, October 2008 / Pielke's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    technologies in the form of highly complex financial risk models. When the story of the current financial instruments possible during normal times are virtually useless during times of crisis. A second problem

  12. Conditional risk in volatility models Risk parameter in volatility models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    are of the form t = tt where (t) is iid, t > 0, t and t are independent. For GARCH-type (Generalized (GARCH), 2009) for an impressive list of more than one hundred GARCH-type models. Francq, Zakoian Risk Examples Standard GARCH(p,q) (Engle (82), Bollerslev (86)): 2 t = 0 + q i=1 0i 2 t-i + p j=1 0j2 t

  13. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning and decision making amidst programmatic and technological risks represent significant challenges for projects. This presentation addresses the four step risk-assessment process needed to determine clear path forward to mature needed technology and design, license, and construct advanced nuclear power plants, which have never been built before, including Small Modular Reactors. This four step process has been carefully applied to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. STEP 1 - Risk Identification Risks are identified, collected, and categorized as technical risks, programmatic risks, and project risks, each of which result in cost and schedule impacts if realized. These include risks arising from the use of technologies not previously demonstrated in a relevant application. These risks include normal and accident scenarios which the SMR could experience including events that cause the disablement of engineered safety features (typically documented in Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) as produced with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and design needs which must be addressed to further detail the design. Product - Project Risk Register contained in a database with sorting, presentation, rollup, risk work off functionality similar to the NGNP Risk Management System . STEP 2 - Risk Quantification The risks contained in the risk register are then scored for probability of occurrence and severity of consequence, if realized. Here the scoring methodology is established and the basis for the scoring is well documented. Product - Quantified project risk register with documented basis for scoring. STEP 3 - Risk Handling Strategy Risks are mitigated by applying a systematic approach to maturing the technology through Research and Development, modeling, test, and design. A Technology Readiness Assessment is performed to determine baseline Technology Readiness Levels (TRL). Tasks needed to mature the technology are developed and documented in a roadmap. Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  14. United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamuro, R.J.

    1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

  15. Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline modifying the leak hydraulic properties (e.g. permeability) may be unfeasible. An appealing option.e. by creating a hydraulic barrier. The present article presents and discusses the operational and strategic

  16. Accident, Illness and Liability Coverage Risk Management in the 4-H Youth Development Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    1 Accident, Illness and Liability Coverage Risk Management in the 4-H Youth Development Program for injuries or damages to person or property of others (tort liability), when the volunteer is: · Working volunteer, and enrolled or listed with the Oregon State University Extension 4-H Youth Development Program

  17. A Survey of Systemic Risk Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisias, Dimitrios

    We provide a survey of 31 quantitative measures of systemic risk in the economics and finance literature, chosen to span key themes and issues in systemic risk measurement and management. We motivate these measures from ...

  18. UAV Cooperative Control with Stochastic Risk Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geramifard, Alborz

    Risk and reward are fundamental concepts in the cooperative control of unmanned systems. This paper focuses on a constructive relationship between a cooperative planner and a learner in order to mitigate the learning risk ...

  19. Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk...

  20. Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /POLICY SUPPORTED Risk Management Policy Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency Act 2011 (TEQSA Act 2011) 21 Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management 1. LEGISLATION/ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT. PROCEDURAL DETAILS 2.1. Responsibilities Entity / Officer Responsibilities Planning and Management Committee

  1. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  2. Risk Management in Lean Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    This whitepaper summarizes 15 years of research conducted at MIT's Lean Advancement Initiative on the topic of risk management in product design and development. It discusses current challenges in risk management for product ...

  3. Modeling Risks in Infrastructure Asset Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyedolshohadaie, Seyed Reza

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in privatizing and operational risks in maintenance and rehabilitation of infrastructure facilities. To this end, a valuation procedure for valuing large-scale risky projects is proposed. This valuation approach is based on mean-risk portfolio optimization...

  4. Essays on macroeconomic risks and stock prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duarte, Fernando Manuel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study the relationship between macroeconomic risks and asset prices. In the first chapter, I establish that inflation risk is priced in the cross-section of stock returns: stocks that have low returns ...

  5. Minimizing Project Risk Through Financing Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaelson, M.

    One of the major barriers to greater corporate investment in energy conservation, cogeneration and alternative energy projects is the level of risk associated with these investments. Potential risks include technical malfunction of the equipment and...

  6. PFPC: Building an IT Risk Management Competency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerman, George

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    IT Risk management is becoming increasingly important for CIOs and their executive counterparts. Educators and managers have materials they can use to discuss specific IT risks in project management, security and other ...

  7. Risk in the Global Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon footprints are not on the priority list of risk analysts in operations management for at least half or more of global businesses. What are the other risks in the global supply chain?

  8. RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear...

  9. Perspectives on Low Power and Shutdown Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAMP,ALLEN L.; WHITEHEAD,DONNIE W.; WHEELER,TIMOTHY A.; LEHNER,JOHN; CHU,TSONG-LUN; LOIS,ERASMAI; DROUIN,MARY

    2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results from a program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to examine the risks from low power and shutdown operations. Significant progress has been made by the industry in reducing such risks; however, important operational events continue to occur. Current perceptions of low power and shutdown risks are discussed in the paper along with an assessment of the current methods for understanding important events and quantifying their associated risk.

  10. Optimization Online - Operations Risk Management by Planning ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Fragni re

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 1, 2007 ... Operations Risk Management by Planning Optimally the Qualified Workforce Capacity. Emmanuel Fragni re(Emmanuel.Fragniere ***at*** ...

  11. EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, D.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

  12. NUREG-1150 risk assessment results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, A.S.; Kunsman, D.M.; Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Amos, C.N.; Smith, L.N.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150 is noted. This paper discusses the results. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. The analyses have been completed so far for four reference plants: (a) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with a dry, subatmospheric containment (Surry Unit 1), (b) a PWR with an ice condenser containment (Sequoyah Unit 1), (c) a boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark I containment (Peach Bottom Unit 2), and (d) a BWR with a Mark III containment (Grand Gulf Unit 1). A fifth NUREG-1150 plant, a PWR with a large, dry containment (Zion Unit 1), has been evaluated separately by Brookhaven National Lab. Sample risk results for one of the plants (Surry) are presented. The results for Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf are broadly compared with those for Surry.

  13. Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price change (price risk) is a normal part commodities are sold suggests price risk is an unavoidable part of being involved in the industry. Producers that have significant price variability. Recent domestic farm policy changes and trade barrier reductions

  14. Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    65 20 3.4 Direct Mortality Risk 21 3.5 Ambient PM10 Concentrations 21 4.0 Low Wind Speed (Calm Risk Zones Table 2-7: Emission Factor Sensitivity Analysis Appendix 3: Low Wind Speed (Calm) Conditions Cancer Risk Spreadsheet 4-2: PM Mortality Table 4-3: Engine Size Distribution Table 4-4: Permitted vs

  15. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  16. 2005 Environmental risk management report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Australian National University 4 List of Tables Box ­ Pollution prevention / environmental risk management Figure 4.5 ­ Per cent residual environmental risk by building-type.................................14-wide environmental risk assessments since 1998. These have identified the ANU's priorities for pollution prevention

  17. Medical Surveillance n Based on risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Surveillance Risk Assessment 2.12 #12;n Top management n overall safety policy n resource allocation n2.12 #12;Medical Surveillance Criteria n Based on risk assessment n Pre-placement n evaluate of numbers exists n Predict an outcome given similar events Medical Surveillance Risk Assessment 2.12 #12;n

  18. Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

  19. Postgraduate Certificate in Safety and Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    in safety and risk management, including health and safety legislation, safety policy and culture, risk be fully integrated into the organisation and the safety culture of the organisation developed accordinglyPostgraduate Certificate in Safety and Risk Management #12;Programme Structure The Postgraduate

  20. Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference October 2009 1.0 Purpose The purposes of the Steering Committee are: a) to follow a continuous process to understand and communicate risk from an university-wide perspective: b) to provide a university-wide opportunity to discuss risk issues, including

  1. RISK AND TRADEOFFS Lara Buchak, UC Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    1 RISK AND TRADEOFFS Lara Buchak, UC Berkeley 1. Introduction Decision theories are theories ordinary decision makers take risk into account: ordinary decision makers seem to care about "global the way that many people take risk into account when forming preferences among gambles. The first

  2. Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update RETURN TO WORK or supervisor upon returning to work. The manager or supervisor should fax a copy of the release to Risk, the University's Workers' Compensation Program Manager, at extension 2824 or visit the Risk Management Website

  3. NOMINAL RISK Development or Equipment Acquisition Grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    NOMINAL RISK Development or Equipment Acquisition Grants Land Grants Planning Grants Required and at the grant's closeout. The FAA audit recommended develop- ing a risk-based approach to monitoring grant levels of risk are identified to rank each sponsor, and the rank deter- mines the level of grant

  4. aided risk management: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electricity market and has Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 Enterprise Risk Management Program Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Compliance Risk Operational Risk...

  5. Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cigarette smoking, and the risk of breast cancer. Cancerand breast cancer risk. JAMA Ambrosone, C.B. , Kropp, S. ,genotypes, and breast cancer risk: pooled analysis and meta-

  6. Informal Risk Sharing in an Infinite-horizon Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charness, Gary B; Genicot, Garance

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genicot, G. (forthcoming). “Risk Pooling, Commitment, and1981). “Attitudes Towards Risk: Theoretical Implications ofJ. (2004). “A Simple Risk-Sharing Experiment,” Journal of

  7. "Risk" in Social Theory: Where are the Feminist Voices?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mary

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , and Lupton, D. (2003). Risk and Everyday Life. London:2008). Social Theories of Risk and Uncertainty. Malden, MA:T. (Ed. ). ( ).2007). Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. New

  8. Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Biomass Program works with industry, academia and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. Through research, development, and demonstration efforts geared at the development of integrated biorefineries, the Biomass Program is helping transform the nation's renewable and abundant biomass resources into cost competitive, high performance biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower.(From the Biomass Program's home page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/) The Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database allows the user to choose from more than 150 types of biomass samples. The specialized interface then guides the user through choices within the sample (such as "Ash" as a choice in the "Hardwood" sample and displays tables based on choice of composition properties, structure properties, elemental properties, extractive properties, etc.

  9. Measures of Systemic Risk Cambridge 2014 1 Measures of Systemic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    ) · The underlying philosophy of our approach is that there is no distinction between risk and capital requirements General Philosophy No distinction between risk and capital requirements Stefan Weber ­ Leibniz Universit¨at Hannover #12;Measures of Systemic Risk ­ Cambridge 2014 7 General Philosophy No distinction between risk

  10. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the...

  11. II. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    Heat Capacity 4. Solvent Properties 5. Dissociation: Acids & Bases / pH II. Organic Chemistry A transport in plants #12;Water has a high specific heat capacity specific heat capacity = amount of energyII. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure 2. Cohesion / Surface Tension 3. High

  12. Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    to the appreciation that the eruptions may continue for 282 decades and should be regarded as a “chronic” problem for planning purposes (Donovan and 283 Oppenheimer, 2014). Managing this transition has required consistent yet innovative 284 approaches to scientific... to their advice. 524 There is abundant evidence of the political challenges of risk assessment and management on 525 Montserrat, and the complex boundaries and connectivities involved (Aspinall et al., 2002; 526 Haynes et al., 2007; Donovan and Oppenheimer...

  13. What is the Risk of European Sovereign Debt Defaults? Fiscal Space, CDS Spreads and Market Pricing of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Hutchison, Michael; Jinjarak, Yothin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is Sovereign Credit Risk? ” American Economic Journal:3), (August, Part 1). Amato, Jeffry D. 2005 “Risk Aversionand Risk Premia in the CDS Market”, BIS Quarterly Review,

  14. Interemporal Risk Aversion - or - Wouldn't it be Nice to Tell Whether Robinson Crusoe is Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. & Treich, N. (2004), ‘Risk aversion, intergenerational2), 195–207. Intertemporal Risk Aversion REFERENCES Hardy,Mirman, L. J. (1974), ‘Risk aversion with many commodities’,

  15. Thermophysical Properties of U-10MO Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Phillips; G. S. Mickum; D. E. Burkes

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of thermophysical properties of unirradiated uranium alloyed with ten weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo), with particular focus on those material properties needed for modeling of new fuels for HPRRs (High Performance Research Reactors). The report contains both historical data available in the literature on U-10Mo, as well as more recent results conducted by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative fuel development program. The main use of the report is intended as a standard U-10Mo alloy properties reference for reactor models and simulations.

  16. Initial Risk Analysis and Decision Making Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercialization of new carbon capture simulation initiative (CCSI) technology will include two key elements of risk management, namely, technical risk (will process and plant performance be effective, safe, and reliable) and enterprise risk (can project losses and costs be controlled within the constraints of market demand to maintain profitability and investor confidence). Both of these elements of risk are incorporated into the risk analysis subtask of Task 7. Thus far, this subtask has developed a prototype demonstration tool that quantifies risk based on the expected profitability of expenditures when retrofitting carbon capture technology on a stylized 650 MW pulverized coal electric power generator. The prototype is based on the selection of specific technical and financial factors believed to be important determinants of the expected profitability of carbon capture, subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty surrounding the technical performance and financial variables selected thus far is propagated in a model that calculates the expected profitability of investments in carbon capture and measures risk in terms of variability in expected net returns from these investments. Given the preliminary nature of the results of this prototype, additional work is required to expand the scope of the model to include additional risk factors, additional information on extant and proposed risk factors, the results of a qualitative risk factor elicitation process, and feedback from utilities and other interested parties involved in the carbon capture project. Additional information on proposed distributions of these risk factors will be integrated into a commercial implementation framework for the purpose of a comparative technology investment analysis.

  17. Accelerated Characterization of Polymer Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wroczynski; l. Brewer; D. Buckley; M. Burrell; R. Potyrailo

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the efforts to develop a suite of microanalysis techniques that can rapidly measure a variety of polymer properties of industrial importance, including thermal, photo-oxidative, and color stability; as well as ductility, viscosity, and mechanical and antistatic properties. Additional goals of the project were to direct the development of these techniques toward simultaneous measurements of multiple polymer samples of small size in real time using non-destructive and/or parallel or rapid sequential measurements, to develop microcompounding techniques for preparing polymers with additives, and to demonstrate that samples prepared in the microcompounder could be analyzed directly or used in rapid off-line measurements. These enabling technologies are the crucial precursors to the development of high-throughput screening (HTS) methodologies for the polymer additives industry whereby the rate of development of new additives and polymer formulations can be greatly accelerated.

  18. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  19. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  20. Dielectric properties and electronic applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibits unusual dielectric properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, our measurements of the dielectric constants and loss tangents for several aerogel varieties at microwave frequencies show that they both vary linearly with the aerogel density, indicating that the dielectric behavior of aerogels is more gas-like than solid-like. We have also measured the dielectric strength of silica aerogels and find that they are better than ceramics for high voltage insulation. The low dielectric constants and loss tangents of aerogels, along with their controllable thermal expansion properties, make them desirable materials for use as thin films in high speed integrated digital and microwave circuitry.

  1. Prioritizing Project Risks Using AHP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibadeau, Barbara M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay introduces the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) as a method by which to rank project risks, in terms of importance as well as likelihood. AHP is way to handle quantifiable and/or intangible criteria in the decision making process. It is a multi-objective multi-criteria decision-making approach that is based on the idea of pair-wise comparisons of alternatives with respect to a given criterion (e.g., which alternative, A or B, is preferred and by how much more is it preferred) or with respect to an objective (e.g., which is more important, A or B, and by how much more is it important). This approach was pioneered by Thomas Saaty in the late 1970's. It has been suggested that a successful project is one that successfully manages risk and that project management is the management of uncertainty. Risk management relies on the quantification of uncertainty which, in turn, is predicated upon the accuracy of probabilistic approaches (in terms of likelihood as well as magnitude). In many cases, the appropriate probability distribution (or probability value) is unknown. And, researchers have shown that probability values are not made very accurately, that the use of verbal expressions is not a suitable alternative, that there is great variability in the use and interpretation of these values and that there is a great reluctance to assign them in the first place. Data from an ongoing project is used to show that AHP can be used to obtain these values, thus overcoming some of the problems associated with the direct assignment of discrete probability values. A novel method by which to calculate the consistency of the data is introduced. The AHP approach is easily implemented and, typically, offers results that are consistent with the decision maker's intuition.

  2. Hanford Tank Farm interim storage phase probabilistic risk assessment outline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second in a series examining the risks for the high level waste (HLW) storage facilities at the Hanford Site. The first phase of the HTF PSA effort addressed risks from Tank 101-SY, only. Tank 101-SY was selected as the initial focus of the PSA because of its propensity to periodically release (burp) a mixture of flammable and toxic gases. This report expands the evaluation of Tank 101-SY to all 177 storage tanks. The 177 tanks are arranged into 18 farms and contain the HLW accumulated over 50 years of weapons material production work. A centerpiece of the remediation activity is the effort toward developing a permanent method for disposing of the HLW tank`s highly radioactive contents. One approach to risk based prioritization is to perform a PSA for the whole HLW tank farm complex to identify the highest risk tanks so that remediation planners and managers will have a more rational basis for allocating limited funds to the more critical areas. Section 3 presents the qualitative identification of generic initiators that could threaten to produce releases from one or more tanks. In section 4 a detailed accident sequence model is developed for each initiating event group. Section 5 defines the release categories to which the scenarios are assigned in the accident sequence model and presents analyses of the airborne and liquid source terms resulting from different release scenarios. The conditional consequences measured by worker or public exposure to radionuclides or hazardous chemicals and economic costs of cleanup and repair are analyzed in section 6. The results from all the previous sections are integrated to produce unconditional risk curves in frequency of exceedance format.

  3. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Conservation International...

  4. X-1 ROEBELING ET AL.: SEVIRI & AVHRR CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVALS Cloud property retrievals for climate monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Generation (METEOSAT-8) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the National Oceanic a consistent and high quality dataset of SEVIRI and AVHRR retrieved cloud properties for climate research studies. Clouds strongly modulate the energy balance of the Earth and its atmosphere through

  5. Mechanical Properties of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Farhad Farzbod; Eric Burgett

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed understanding between microstructure evolution and mechanical properties is important for designing new high burnup nuclear fuels. In this presentation we discuss the use of picosecond ultrasonics to measure localize changes in mechanical properties of fuel surrogates. We develop measurement techniques that can be applied to investigate heterogeneous elastic properties caused by localize changes in chemistry, grain microstructure caused by recrystallization, and mechanical properties of small samples prepared using focused ion beam sample preparation. Emphasis is placed on understanding the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

  6. Cavity degradation risk insurance assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampson, C.; Neill, P.; de Bivort, L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the risks and risk management issues involved with the implementation by electric power utilities of compressed air energy storage and underground pumped hydro storage systems. The results are listed in terms of relative risks for the construction and operation of these systems in different geologic deposits, with varying amounts of pressurization, with natural or man-made disasters in the vicinity of the storage equipment, and with different modes of operating the facilities. (LCL)

  7. Information needs for risk management/communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hazardous waste cleanup program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund) is delegated to the ten Regions of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and has, to date, identified more than 33,000 sites for consideration. The size and complexity of the program places great demands on those who would provide information to achieve national consistency in application of risk assessment while meeting site-specific needs for risk management and risk communication.

  8. Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Ian

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO?; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO? will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO? will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture, and storage (CCS). Assertions in the CCS literature, that CO2 levels of 10% for ten minutes, or 20 to 30% for a few minutes are lethal to humans, are not supported by the available evidence. The results of published experiments with animals exposed to CO2, from mice to monkeys, at both normal and depleted oxygen levels, suggest that lethal levels of CO2 toxicity are in the range 50 to 60%. These experiments demonstrate that CO2 does not kill by asphyxia, but rather is toxic at high concentrations. It is concluded that quantitative risk assessments of CCS have overestimated the risk of fatalities by using values of lethality a factor two to six lower than the values estimated in this paper. In many dispersion models of CO2 releases from pipelines, no fatalities would be predicted if appropriate levels of lethality for CO2 had been used in the analysis.

  9. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in Hydropower Production from Globalon high elevation hydropower generation in California’s7 reduction in the state’s hydropower resources, which last

  10. Quantitative Constraints on the Transport Properties of Hot Partonic Matter from Semi-Inclusive Single High Transverse Momentum Pion Suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment has measured the suppression of semi-inclusive single high transverse momentum pi^0's in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The present understanding of this suppression is in terms of energy-loss of the parent (fragmenting) parton in a dense color-charge medium. We have performed a quantitative comparison between various parton energy-loss models and our experimental data. The statistical point-to-point uncorrelated as well as correlated systematic uncertainties are taken into account in the comparison. We detail this methodology and the resulting constraint on the model parameters, such as the initial color-charge density dN^g/dy, the medium transport coefficient , or the initial energy-loss parameter epsilon_0. We find that high transverse momentum pi^0 suppression in Au+Au collisions has sufficient precision to constrain these model dependent parameters at the +/1 20%-25% (one standard deviation) level. These constraints include only the experimental uncertainties, and further studies are needed to compute the corresponding theoretical uncertainties.

  11. Entrepreneurial Finance and Non-diversifiable Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui

    We develop a dynamic incomplete-markets model of entrepreneurial firms, and demonstrate the implications of nondiversifiable risks for entrepreneurs' interdependent consumption, portfolio allocation, financing, investment, ...

  12. Use of Risk-Based End States

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy addresses conducting cleanup that is aimed at, and achieves, clearly defined, risk-based end states. Canceled by DOE N 251.106.

  13. Need for an Integrated Risk Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is passed to decision makers * Model is needed that (eventually) will integrate seismic risk with other initiators * Scenario approach definition * R

  14. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  15. Optimization Online - On the Coherent Risk Measure ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KEREM UGURLU

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 25, 2014 ... Abstract: We give a complete characterization of both comonotone and not comonotone coherent risk measures in the discrete finite probability ...

  16. Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Amin [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourimotlagh, Masoud [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alipour, Mohammad, E-mail: Alipourmo@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

  17. FORUM | PLANETARY SCIENCE & ASTROBIOLOGY Jupiter exploration: high risk and high rewards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kite, Edwin

    -delivered or generated in-situ by UV irradiation and the implantation of ionized particles from Jupiter's radiation belts Department of Energy (DoE)/NASA programme to develop advanced radioisotope power sources and nuclear fission, and might enable lengthy unmanned voyages to exotic destinations beyond Saturn. Radiosotope Thermoelectric

  18. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  19. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  20. The application of high-resolution 3D seismic data to model the distribution of mechanical and hydrogeological properties of a potential host rock for the deep storage of radioactive waste in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive wastes, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has conducted an extensive characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock and surrounding formations in the Eastern Paris Basin. As part of this project, an accurate 3D seismic derived geological model is needed. The paper shows the procedure used for building the 3D seismic constrained geological model in depth by combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons, consistent seismic velocity model and elastic impedance in time. It also shows how the 3D model is used for mechanical and hydrogeological studies. The 3D seismic field data example illustrates the potential of the proposed depth conversion procedure for estimating density and velocity distributions, which are consistent with the depth conversion of seismic horizons using the Bayesian Kriging method. The geological model shows good agreement with well log data obtained from a reference we...

  1. Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

  2. A new approach to risk analysis with a focus on organizational risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marais, Karen, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing accidents in complex socio-technical systems requires an approach to risk management that continuously monitors risk and identifies potential areas of concern before they lead to hazards, and constrains hazards ...

  3. Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of a Risk Measure is ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 30, 2015 ... required to render a random payoff acceptable in terms of risk. The key of our analysis lies in studying the worst-case risk measure ?R(?Z) ...

  4. Some computer simulations based on the linear relative risk model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of computer simulations designed to evaluate and compare the performance of the likelihood ratio statistic and the score statistic for making inferences about the linear relative risk mode. The work was motivated by data on workers exposed to low doses of radiation, and the report includes illustration of several procedures for obtaining confidence limits for the excess relative risk coefficient based on data from three studies of nuclear workers. The computer simulations indicate that with small sample sizes and highly skewed dose distributions, asymptotic approximations to the score statistic or to the likelihood ratio statistic may not be adequate. For testing the null hypothesis that the excess relative risk is equal to zero, the asymptotic approximation to the likelihood ratio statistic was adequate, but use of the asymptotic approximation to the score statistic rejected the null hypothesis too often. Frequently the likelihood was maximized at the lower constraint, and when this occurred, the asymptotic approximations for the likelihood ratio and score statistics did not perform well in obtaining upper confidence limits. The score statistic and likelihood ratio statistics were found to perform comparably in terms of power and width of the confidence limits. It is recommended that with modest sample sizes, confidence limits be obtained using computer simulations based on the score statistic. Although nuclear worker studies are emphasized in this report, its results are relevant for any study investigating linear dose-response functions with highly skewed exposure distributions. 22 refs., 14 tabs.

  5. Petroleum property valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the principal economic methods employed to assess the value of petroleum properties. The difference between wellhead and in situ resource values is examined, as well as drawbacks inherent ...

  6. Headquarters Personal Property Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures for managing Government personal property owned or leased by the Department of Energy and in the custody of DOE Headquarters employees, including those in the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE HQ O 580.1A

  7. Mean-Risk Optimization of Electricity Portfolios Using Multiperiod Polyhedral Risk Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    Mean-Risk Optimization of Electricity Portfolios Using Multiperiod Polyhedral Risk Measures Andreas-risk optimization of electricity portfolios containing electricity futures as well as several com- ponents to satisfy a stochastic electricity demand: electricity spot market, two different types of supply contracts

  8. Energy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    GDPannualgrowthrate 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 PercapitaGDP GDP Per capita GDP (index 1997=100) Source: CepalEnergy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing Conference on Energy Trading and Risk Management 21 - 22 November 2005, City University, London

  9. Reflective responsibility for risk: a critical view of software and information systems development risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Montfort University

    in moral philosophy. As a general idea of how the ethical problems of risk can be addressed, this paperReflective responsibility for risk: a critical view of software and information systems development risk management Bernd Carsten Stahl Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Centre for Computing

  10. Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After reviewing the reasons for addressing uncertainty in the Council's Fifth Power Plan the studies evaluated the performance of resource plans under uncertainty, including their associated risk

  11. Eighteenth Symposium on Thermophysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    Temperatures Properties of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals ! Properties of Aqueous Systems ! Properties and Engineering Data. Electronic submission of manuscripts is mandatory, and early submission is encouraged. http and Biological Engineering, Princeton University Prof. E. Dendy Sloan Professor Emeritus, Director, Center

  12. Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    vessels going to the heart get narrow and clogged. A heart attack can happen when these blood vesselsAre You at Risk for Heart Disease? Healthy Heart, Healthy Family Nangangamba Ka Bang Magkaroon ng Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Healthy Heart, Healthy Family Nangangamba Ka Bang Magkaroon ng Sakit sa

  13. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.H. Neilson, C.O. Gruber, J.H. Harris, D.J. Rej, R.T. Simmons, and R.L. Strykowsky

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  14. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.H. Neilson, C.O. Gruber, J.H. Harris, D.J. Rej, R.T. Simmons, and R.L. Strykowsky

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  15. Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action. Our study seeks to inform the decisions of both government managers and private entrepreneursApril 2000 Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage 00-787 Managing Technical Risk Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage Technology

  16. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -3905 or write to the St. Louis District, Corps of Engineers, FUSRAP Project Office, 8945 Latty Avenue, BerkeleySt. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT "Gateway to Excellence" U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Together, they help determine the most effective way to clean up a site while reducing the overall risk

  17. Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Huidong "Warren"

    Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer Jie Chen1 , Hongxing He1 , Huidong Jin1 of identifying and describing risk groups for colorectal cancer (CRC) from population based administrative health are applied to the colorectal cancer patients' profiles in contrast to background pa- tients' profiles

  18. MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management About Queens College Often referred to as "the jewel)." For more information, visit www.qc.cuny.edu/riskmanagement #12;Changes in Capital Markets The Transition.92$4#"!,&&%"*)0&$(.&/$6):,$)$-#")5,#$)*5$5,,4,#$&'%00$ &,/$%!$/6,7$6"4,$/"$&/)7$"*$/"4$"!$/6,%#$3,05&; Queens College master's degrees in Risk Management will help

  19. American Heart Month National High Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart for Heart Health # P2-2 Risk Factors - High Blood Pressure # P2-3 Sodium is needed to. . . # P2-4 Sources

  20. Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, A.C. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

  1. Russian risk assessment methods and approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorack, M.A.; Carlson, D.D.; Smith, R.E.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the benefits resulting from the collapse of the Soviet Union is the increased dialogue currently taking place between American and Russian nuclear weapons scientists in various technical arenas. One of these arenas currently being investigated involves collaborative studies which illustrate how risk assessment is perceived and utilized in the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The collaborative studies indicate that, while similarities exist with respect to some methodologies, the assumptions and approaches in performing risk assessments were, and still are, somewhat different in the FSU as opposed to that in the US. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the present knowledge of risk assessment methodologies and philosophies within the two largest nuclear weapons laboratories of the Former Soviet Union, Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70. Furthermore, This paper will address the relative progress of new risk assessment methodologies, such as Fuzzy Logic, within the framework of current risk assessment methods at these two institutes.

  2. Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.C.; Hamilton, D.W.; Holton, L.K.; Bailey, J.W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs.

  3. Experimental Investigation on High-pressure, High-temperature Viscosity of Gas Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davani, Ehsan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the performance of high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) natural gas reservoirs requires the understanding of gas behavior at such conditions. In particular, gas viscosity is an important fluid property that directly affects fluid flow...

  4. Magnetic properties and critical behavior of Fe(tetracyanoethylene){sub 2}(centre dot)x(CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}): A high-T{sub c} molecule-based magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girtu, Mihai A. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1106 (United States); Wynn, Charles M. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1106 (United States); Zhang, Jie [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States); Miller, Joel S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States); Epstein, Arthur J. [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210-1106 (United States)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report magnetic studies of Fe(TCNE){sub 2}{center_dot}x(CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), a member of the family of high-T{sub c} molecule-based magnets, M(TCNE){sub x}{center_dot}y(solvent) (M=V, Mn, TCNE=tetracyanoethelyne). Based on extensive static and dynamic magnetic measurements we show that this system has a complex magnetic behavior, with a mixture of ferrimagnetic and random anisotropy characteristics. The constricted hysteresis curve with a spin-flop shape, the ac susceptibility in the presence of a dc field, consistent with the spin-flop picture, and the remanent magnetization suggest ferrimagnetic behavior. The ac susceptibility data in zero dc field have modest frequency dependence suggesting glassiness, while the field-cooling/zero-field-cooling magnetization data show irreversibilities, starting at {approx}97 K, and increasing below {approx}20 K, all consistent with the behavior of reentrant random anisotropy magnets (RAM). Ferromagneticlike scaling analyses provide a critical temperature T{sub c}=97 K and the critical exponents {beta}=0.45 and {delta}=2.5, relatively consistent with random anisotropy magnet predictions. Also, the curvature of the T

  5. Local Option- Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont allows municipalities the option of offering an exemption from the municipal real and personal property taxes for certain renewable energy systems (Note: state property taxes would still...

  6. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Enrico

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Its Impact on Mechanical Properties. MacromoleculesO. L. ; Minor, A. M. , Mechanical annealing and source-Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals Enrico

  7. Agency risk in CMBS default resolution : a case study of the Peter Cooper Village - Stuyvesant Town mortgage loan default

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hengwa

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2010 and 2018, approximately $410 billion of maturing CMBS loans are expected not to able to refinance; that is, they are in high risk of default. The current real estate downturn has not only pushed delinquencies ...

  8. Is there an increased risk of hip fracture in multiple sclerosis? Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Rajib K.; Vaishnav, Niralee; Dubinsky, Richard M.

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Impaired ambulation, frequent falls, and prolonged immobilization combined with the high rate of vitamin D deficiency in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) could lead to an increased risk of hip fracture....

  9. Evaluation of fracture risk and potential drug holidays for postmenopausal women on long-term bisphosphonate therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostoff, Matthew D.; Saseen, Joseph J.; Borgelt, Laura M.

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Study objective: To describe characteristics of postmenopausal women on long-term bisphosphonate therapy who fall into one of four fracture risk categories (low, mild, moderate, high), and to determine the prevalence of women eligible for a drug...

  10. All On-Campus Property Non-Campus Property Public Property On Campus Residential Only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All On-Campus Property Non-Campus Property Public Property GRAND TOTAL On Campus Residential Only Residential Only Reported to other RU offices SUB- TOTAL Reported to RUPD Reported to other Police Depts

  11. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of the new materials, highly porous carbide-derived carbons (CDC), is the subject of an add-on to this grant awarded to myself and Taner Yildirim (NIST). Results from the add-on led eventually to a new 3-year award DE-FG02-08ER46522 “From Fundamental Understanding to Predicting New Nanomaterials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage”, $1000K, (05/31/2008 - 05/01/2011) with Taner Yildirim and myself as co-PI’s.

  12. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

  13. LARGE SCALE SIMULATIONS OF THE MECHANCIAL PROPERTIES OF LAYERED TRANSITION METAL TERNARY COMPOUNDS FOR FOSSIL ENERGY POWER SYSTEM APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  14. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin...

  15. Optical Properties and Orientation in Polyethylene Blown Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Optical Properties and Orientation in Polyethylene Blown Films AYUSH BAFNA,1 GREGORY BEAUCAGE,1 properties of blown poly- ethylene films. Two types of blown polyethylene films of similar degrees of crystallinity were made from (1) single-site-catalyst high-density polyethylene (HDPE; STAR ) and (2) Ziegler

  16. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES Shigeo MARUYAMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    , optical and mechanical properties, thermal properties of SWNTs are quite unique with the high thermal and thermal conductance between a nanotube and various materials are reviewed. The experimental approach, and thermal boundary resistance in a junction of nanotubes are reviewed. Then, the heat transfer from an SWNT

  17. High figure of merit and thermoelectric properties of Bi-doped Mg{sub 2}Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6} solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhang, Qiang; Yin, Kang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chi, Hang; Zhou, Xiaoyuan [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Tang, Xinfeng, E-mail: tangxf@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Uher, Ctirad, E-mail: cuher@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of Mg{sub 2}Si{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}-based thermoelectric materials has received widespread attention due to a potentially high thermoelectric performance, abundant raw materials, relatively low cost of modules, and non-toxic character of compounds. In this research, Mg{sub 2.16}(Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6}){sub 1?y}Bi{sub y} solid solutions with the nominal Bi content of 0?y?0.03 are prepared using a two-step solid state reaction followed by spark plasma sintering consolidation. Within this range of Bi concentrations, no evidence of second phase segregation was found. Bi is confirmed to occupy the Si/Sn sites in the crystal lattice and behaves as an efficient n-type dopant in Mg{sub 2}Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6}. Similar to the effect of Sb, Bi doping greatly increases the electron density and the power factor, and reduces the lattice thermal conductivity of Mg{sub 2.16}Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6} solid solutions. Overall, the thermoelectric figure of merit of Bi-doped Mg{sub 2.16}Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6} solid solutions is improved by about 10% in comparison to values obtained with Sb-doped materials of comparable dopant content. This improvement comes chiefly from a marginally higher Seebeck coefficient of Bi-doped solid solutions. The highest ZT?1.4 is achieved for the y=0.03 composition at 800 K. - Graphical abstract: (a)The relationship between electrical conductivity and power factor for Sb/Bi-doped Mg{sub 2.16}(Si{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6}){sub 1?y}(Sb/Bi){sub y} (0

  18. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    or unwanted chemicals can become a big problem. Some common disposal practices not only threaten ground water but also may be illegal. Small, unusable amounts of these products often wind up spilled, buried, dumped, or flushed onto a property. Minimizing... rules require that environmentally protective conditions be met before some disposal practices are permit- ted. Other previously common disposal prac- tices are now illegal because of their potential risks to human health and the environment. This new...

  19. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 and was the last of the quarks to be discovered. As the partner of the bottom quark the top quark is expected to have quantum numbers identical to that of the other known up-type quarks. Only the mass is a free parameter. We now know that it is more than 30 times heavier than the next heaviest quark, the bottom quark. Thus, within the Standard Model all production and decay properties are fully defined. Having the complete set of quarks further allows to verify constraints that the Standard Model puts on the sum of all quarks or particles. This alone is reason enough to experimentally study the top quark properties. The high value of the top quark mass and its closeness to the electroweak scale has inspired people to speculate that the top quark could have a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking. Confirming the expected properties of the top quark experimentally establishes the top quark as we expect it to be. Any deviation from the expectations gives hints to new physics that may help to solve the outstanding questions. In this review the recent results on top quark properties obtained by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 are summarized. At the advent of the LHC special emphasis is given to the basic measurement methods and the dominating systematic uncertainties. After a short introduction to the Standard Model and the experimental environment in the remainder of this chapter, Chapter 2 describes the current status of top quark mass measurements. Then measurments of interaction properties are described in Chapter 3. Finally, Chapter 4 deals with analyses that consider hypothetical particles beyond the Standard Model in the observed events.

  20. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  1. Investigating physical properties of novel carbon-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Nasser Soliman, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present the results of studies of physical properties in three classes of novel carbon-based materials: carbon aerogels, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and high thermal conductivity graphitic foams. The ...

  2. Carbon nanotubes: in situ studies of growth and electromechanical properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weis, Johan Ek

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes have been found to have extraordinary properties, such as ballistic electrical conductivity, extremely high thermal conductivity and they can be metallic or semiconducting with a wide range of band ...

  3. alloys by properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALLOYED STEEL X20 CiteSeer Summary: In this paper, the effect of service temperature and life on high-cycle fatigue properties of base metal, steel X20 CrMoV 12-1, has been...

  4. Processing and thermal properties of molecularly oriented polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skow, Erik (Erik Dean)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High molecular weight polymers that are linear in molecular construction can be oriented such that some of their physical properties in the oriented direction are enhanced. For over 50 years polymer orientation and processing ...

  5. Real Property Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes an integrated corporate-level, performance based approach to the life-cycle management of our real property assets. It links real property asset planning, programming, budgeting and evaluation to the Department's multi-faceted missions. Successful implementation of this order will enable the Department to carry out our stewardship responsibilities, and will ensure that our facilities and infrastructure are properly sized and in a condition to meet our mission requirements today and in the future. Cancels: DOE O 430.1A. Chg 1, dated 2-8-08. Chg 2, dated 4-25-11

  6. Real Property Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes an integrated corporate-level, performance based approach to the life-cycle management of our real property assets. It links real property asset planning, programming, budgeting and evaluation to the Department's multi-faceted missions. Successful implementation of this order will enable the Department to carry out our stewardship responsibilities, and will ensure that our facilities and infrastructure are properly sized and in a condition to meet our mission requirements today and in the future. Chg 1, dated 2-8-08. Chg 2, dated 4-25-11

  7. Corporate Governance as Risk Regulation in China: A Comparative View of Risk Oversight, Risk Management, and Accountability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper Ho, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk management and oversight have long been recognized as core corporate governance issues and have gained renewed attention in the wake of the financial crisis. Following global trends, recent corporate governance reforms in China also focus...

  8. The risks and efficacy of solar geoengineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith, David [Harvard University

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar geoengineering may enable a significant reduction in climate risks by partially offsetting climate change due to increasing greenhouse gases, however this emerging technology entails novel risks and uncertainties along with serious challenges to global governance. I will attempt a rough summary of the physics of solar geoengineering and present recent findings regarding (a) the climate's response to radiative forcing by stratospheric aerosols, (b) methods of producing appropriate aerosol distributions, and (c) risks. In closing I will discuss the trade-off between solar geoengineering, emissions reductions and adaptation in climate policy.

  9. NGNP Risk Management through Assessing Technology Readiness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project life cycle, technical risks are identified, analyzed, and mitigated and decisions are made regarding the design and selection of plant and sub-system configurations, components and their fabrication materials, and operating conditions. Risk resolution and decision making are key elements that help achieve project completion within budget and schedule constraints and desired plant availability. To achieve this objective, a formal decision-making and risk management process was developed for NGNP, based on proven systems engineering principles that have guided aerospace and military applications.

  10. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  11. Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zardecki, A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

  12. Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zardecki, A.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

  13. Structural risk management of buildings during erection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikorsky, Charles Steven

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Boe (8, 9) and Knoll (28). One given definition of safety is: something is safe if its risks are judged to be acceptable (32). Establishment of an acceptable level of risk implies judg- ment of safety. Once the level of risk is determined...). Statistics such as the above can only support a need not only for safety improvements in the construction process, but also in quality control of the process. In 1968 the Research Committee of the Construction Division of the American Society of Civil...

  14. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  15. 2009-10 Environmental risk management report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................. 6 4.2 Environmental risk by building Environmental Risk by Building Type ............................................8 Figure 4.4 ANU Environmental 6.1. Implementation of Risk and Pollution Strategies from ANU Environmental Management Plan 2009

  16. 2006-07 Environmental risk management report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................. 7 4.2 Environmental risk by building ................................................................................................. 16 List of Figures and Tables Box 2.1 Pollution prevention / environmental risk management Figure 4.3 ANU Environmental Risk by Building Type ............................................. 9 Figure

  17. Shabbir Ahmed Mean-risk objectives in stochastic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir

    propose a parametric cutting plane algorithm to generate the entire mean-risk efficient frontier algorithm to generate the mean-risk efficient frontier for a particular mean-risk objective in the context

  18. Product development risk management and the role of transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olechowski, Alison L. (Alison Louise)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risks in product development lead to schedule and cost over-runs and poor product quality. While numerous risk management frameworks have been published and research on specific risk management practices and methods has ...

  19. Risk and aversion in the integrated assessment of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crost, Benjamin; Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy under fat-tailed risk: An application of fund’, ESRIR. & Yaron, A. (2004), ‘Risks for the long run: A potentialY. (1996), ‘Understanding risk and return’, The Journal of

  20. Conditional Risk Premia in Currency Markets and Other Asset Classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lettau, Martin; Maggiori, Matteo; Weber, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. and J. D. MacBeth (1973). Risk, return, and equilibrium:and A. Verdelhan (2011). Sovereign risk premia. Unpublished2011a). Carry trades and risk. National Bureau of Economic