National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high risk property

  1. High Risk Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡High HIGH PERFORMANCE

  2. Some Properties of Empirical Risk Minimization Over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    error), if the minimum exists. The Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) algorithm above has been studied in Learning Theory to a great extent. In this paper we prove some properties of almost-ERM algorithms, which, to our knowledge, do not appear in the literature. ERM is a reasonable strategy only if the class F

  3. CORRELATION AND DEPENDENCY IN RISK MANAGEMENT: PROPERTIES AND PITFALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Alexander J.

    CORRELATION AND DEPENDENCY IN RISK MANAGEMENT: PROPERTIES AND PITFALLS PAUL EMBRECHTS, ALEXANDER MCNEIL, AND DANIEL STRAUMANN Abstract. Modern risk management calls for an understanding of stochastic de dependence concepts like comonotonicity and rank correlation should also be understood by the risk management

  4. High risk of permafrost thaw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Abbott, B.; Koven, C.D,; Riley, W.J.; Subin, Z.M.; al, et

    2011-11-01

    In the Arctic, temperatures are rising fast, and permafrost is thawing. Carbon released to the atmosphere from permafrost soils could accelerate climate change, but the likely magnitude of this effect is still highly uncertain. A collective estimate made by a group of permafrost experts, including myself, is that carbon could be released more quickly than models currently suggest, and at levels that are cause for serious concern. While our models of carbon emission from permafrost thaw are lacking, experts intimately familiar with these landscapes and processes have accumulated knowledge about what they expect to happen, based on both quantitative data and qualitative understanding of these systems. We (the authors of this piece) attempted to quantify this expertise through a survey developed over several years, starting in 2009. Our survey asked experts what percentage of surface permafrost they thought was likely to thaw, how much carbon would be released, and how much of that would be methane, for three time periods and under four warming scenarios that are part of the new IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.

  5. High performance in Procurement Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsha, Maya (Olsha-Yehiav)

    2010-01-01

    Research on Procurement Risk Management has been conducted by Accenture and MIT in order to identify the best practices used to manage commodity price volatility and supplier risk. In today's increasingly turbulent market ...

  6. The University of Texas at Austin High Value/High Risk Information Technology Purchase Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The University of Texas at Austin High Value/High Risk Information Technology Purchase Policy Officer Document Version: Approved Last Edited: 3/7/2011 1 High Value/High Risk Information Technology Original High Value/High Risk Information Technology Purchase Policy 3/4/2011 Converted web page to PDF

  7. GAO High Risk List - An Update - David Trimble, Government Accountabil...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management for the National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Environmental Management Workshop 2015 - TrimbleGAO High Risk List.PDF More Documents & Publications...

  8. Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies speed line, true high speed rail has seen an increasing success in those countries where such lines were speed rail (HSR) systems around the world during the past 50 years, one of the observed phenomena

  9. Risk analysis for truck transportation of high consequence cargo.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Robert David

    2010-09-01

    The fixed facilities control everything they can to drive down risk. They control the environment, work processes, work pace and workers. The transportation sector drive the State and US highways with high kinetic energy and less-controllable risks such as: (1) other drivers (beginners, impaired, distracted, etc.); (2) other vehicles (tankers, hazmat, super-heavies); (3) road environments (bridges/tunnels/abutments/construction); and (4) degraded weather.

  10. Howard County- High Performance and Green Building Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings and energy conservation devices (Md Code: Property Tax §...

  11. Electromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Electromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency Timothy Ritter the electromechanical properties of high frequency 20 MHz piezoelectric strip vibrators. A nonlinear regression backing indicated degraded performance when compared to values predicted from the electromechanical

  12. EM Makes Progress on GAO High-Risk List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has removed EM capital asset projects of $750 million or less from its high-risk list because of the nuclear cleanup program’s progress in completing that work.

  13. GAO-03-119, High-Risk Series: An Update | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-119, High-Risk Series: An Update GAO-03-119, High-Risk Series: An Update GAO-03-119, High-Risk Series: An Update More Documents & Publications GAO-05-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An...

  14. GAO-05-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An Update | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An Update GAO-05-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An Update GAO-05-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An Update More Documents & Publications GAO-03-119, High-Risk Series: An...

  15. PCARD HIGH RISK VENDOR PURCHASE AUTHORIZATION FORM (NOTE: GEORGIA TECH DOES NOT ENCOURAGE THE USE OF HIGH RISK VENDORS SUCH AS PAYPAL. IF NO OTHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PCARD HIGH RISK VENDOR PURCHASE AUTHORIZATION FORM (NOTE: GEORGIA TECH DOES NOT ENCOURAGE THE USE OF HIGH RISK VENDORS SUCH AS PAYPAL. IF NO OTHER FORM OF PAYMENT IS ACCEPTED BY THE VENDOR.2.1.8 HIGH RISK VENDOR LIST (FORM MUST BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING VENDORS): 1. PAYPAL VIEW EXAMPLES

  16. Conformal Properties in High Temperature QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, K -I; Nakayama, Yu; Yoshie, T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of quarks and gluons above the chiral phase transition temperature $T_c,$ using the RG improved gauge action and the Wilson quark action with two degenerate quarks mainly on a $32^3\\times 16$ lattice. In the one-loop perturbation theory, the thermal ensemble is dominated by the gauge configurations with effectively $Z(3)$ center twisted boundary conditions, making the thermal expectation value of the spatial Polyakov loop take a non-trivial $Z(3)$ center. This is in agreement with our lattice simulation of high temperature QCD. We further observe that the temporal propagator of massless quarks at extremely high temperature $\\beta=100.0 \\, (T \\simeq10^{58} T_c)$ remarkably agrees with the temporal propagator of free quarks with the $Z(3)$ twisted boundary condition for $t/L_t \\geq 0.2$, but differs from that with the $Z(3)$ trivial boundary condition. As we increase the mass of quarks $m_q$, we find that the thermal ensemble continues to be dominated by the $Z(3)$ twisted gauge fi...

  17. Anne Arundel County- High Performance Dwelling Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. In October 2010 Anne Arundel...

  18. Microsoft Word - FY10PropertyBSCContractor.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Items Performance Measure 3: Property Management Accounting and Control - High Risk Property, as defined in DOE Property Management Regulation (PMR) and DOE Property...

  19. Eliminating High Risk Work at Hanford | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergy 1 DOEEliminating High Risk Work at

  20. High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) A...

  1. Approaches To Crisis Prevention In Lean Product Development By High Performance Teams And Through Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    This thesis investigates crisis prevention in lean product development, focusing on high performance teams and risk management methods.

  2. SOME PROPERTIES OF EMPIRICAL RISK MINIMIZATION OVER DONSKER ANDREA CAPONNETTO AND ALEXANDER RAKHLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caponnetto, Andrea

    error), if the minimum exists. The Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) algorithm above has been studied in Learning Theory to a great extent. In this paper we prove some properties of almost-ERM algorithms, which, to our knowledge, do not appear in the literature. ERM is a reasonable strategy only if the class F

  3. High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larner, Craig

    2012-10-19

    With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

  4. Functional Properties and Utilization of High pH Beef 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Lyda G.

    2010-10-12

    Two Texas fed beef and cow/bull packing plants were surveyed for high pH beef carcasses as well as the evaluation of functional properties of high pH beef in whole muscle beef jerky, frankfurters, and snack stick production. An estimated 42% of cow...

  5. Volatility and Risk Estimation with Linear and Nonlinear Methods Based on High Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehlmann, Peter

    Volatility and Risk Estimation with Linear and Nonlinear Methods Based on High Frequency Data of risk management. The use of high frequency data approximately renders volatility from a latent: (i) to select an accurate forecasting procedure for predicting volatilities based on high frequency

  6. Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patitsas, Leon S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

  7. Review of high-level waste form properties. [146 bibliographies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    This report is a review of waste form options for the immobilization of high-level-liquid wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. This review covers the status of international research and development on waste forms as of May 1979. Although the emphasis in this report is on waste form properties, process parameters are discussed where they may affect final waste form properties. A summary table is provided listing properties of various nuclear waste form options. It is concluded that proposed waste forms have properties falling within a relatively narrow range. In regard to crystalline versus glass waste forms, the conclusion is that either glass of crystalline materials can be shown to have some advantage when a single property is considered; however, at this date no single waste form offers optimum properties over the entire range of characteristics investigated. A long-term effort has been applied to the development of glass and calcine waste forms. Several additional waste forms have enough promise to warrant continued research and development to bring their state of development up to that of glass and calcine. Synthetic minerals, the multibarrier approach with coated particles in a metal matrix, and high pressure-high temperature ceramics offer potential advantages and need further study. Although this report discusses waste form properties, the total waste management system should be considered in the final selection of a waste form option. Canister design, canister materials, overpacks, engineered barriers, and repository characteristics, as well as the waste form, affect the overall performance of a waste management system. These parameters were not considered in this comparison.

  8. Wave Function Properties in a High Energy Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    1994-11-14

    A model example is given of how properties of the hadronic light-cone wave function are revealed in a particular high energy process. The meson wave function is derived in scalar quark QCD. We apply it to compute the form of the cross section for lossless diffractive jet-production, an upcoming possiblity at HERA.

  9. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Swenson, C. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  10. A systems approach to enterprise risk management in high-tech industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Atul, 1973-

    2005-01-01

    The high-tech industry is showing increased interest in developing an enterprise wide approach to risk management. There are three reasons for this increased interest; first as the industry has matured, as evidenced by ...

  11. Effects of a High Oleic Acid Beef Diet on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors of Human Subjects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Thaddeus Hunter

    2012-10-19

    The consumption of high-fat hamburger enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) and trans-fatty acids (TFA) may increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease, whereas hamburger enriched with monounsaturated fatty acids ...

  12. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and Thermal Properties of Graphenegraphite heat spreaders for thermal management of high-powerthe Raman spectroscopy and thermal properties of a novel

  13. Analysis of Assembly 264 - Amended: Pediatric Asthma Self-Management Training and Education Services for Children at High Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2006-01-01

    with high-risk childhood asthma. This analysis has foundrisk” children distinguishes this report from CHBRP’s previous analysis.risk” children distinguishes this report from CHBRP’s previously-submitted analysis.

  14. GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contribute...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk Designation GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk...

  15. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% of standard rates...

  16. Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections Sam Pullen and Per Enge this assumption. A study of unscheduled GPS satellite outages from 1999 to present shows that, as expected, older experienced unscheduled outages are more likely to suffer additional unscheduled outages. Combining these two

  17. Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections SAM PULLEN and PER ENGE constellation are not expected to violate this assumption. A study of unscheduled GPS satellite outages from. In addition, satellites that have recently experienced unscheduled outages are more likely to suffer

  18. Baltimore County- Property Tax Credit for High Performance Buildings and Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. Baltimore County exercised this...

  19. Measured Properties of the DUVFEL High Brightness, Ultrashort Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emma, Paul J

    2002-08-20

    The DUVFEL electron linac is designed to produce sub-picosecond, high brightness electron bunches to drive an ultraviolet FEL. The accelerator consists of a 1.6 cell S-band photoinjector, variable pulse length Ti:Sapp laser, 4 SLAC-type S-band accelerating sections, and 4-dipole chicane bunch compressor. In preparation for FEL operation, the compressed electron beam has been fully characterized. Measurement of the beam parameters and simulation of the beam are presented. The properties of the laser and photoinjector are summarized in Table 1. In typical running, 10 mJ of IR light is produced by the Spectraphyics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire oscillator and TSA50 amplifier, which is frequency tripled to produce 450 uJ of UV light. After spatial filtering and aperturing of the gaussian mode to produce a nearly uniform laser spot, about 200-300 uJ is delivered to the cathode. This produces 300 pC of charge at the accelerating phase of 30 degrees. The RF cavity is a Gun IV [1] with copper cathode that has been modified for better performance [2]. In principle, the laser pulse length may be adjusted from 100 fs to 10 ps, however there are practical limitations on the range of adjustment due to dispersion characteristics and efficiency of the BBO crystals. The thickness of the harmonic crystals is optimized for pulse lengths from 1-5 ps. Within this range of pulse lengths there is evidence [3] of variations in the time profile of the UV light that are sensitive to the phase-matching angle of the crystal.

  20. Wildfire and development : why stronger links to land-use planning are needed to save lives, protect property, and minimize economic risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mowery, Molly Anne

    2008-01-01

    Exploding growth along the Colorado Front Range has expanded the wildland-urban interface-the area where homes and vegetation mix. This area, known as the WUI, is at high risk of wildfires. Wildfire risk is based on both ...

  1. Small-world properties emerge in highly compartmentalized networks with intermediate group sizes and numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Small-world properties emerge in highly compartmentalized networks with intermediate group sizes recent studies have focused on two statistical properties observed in diverse real-world networks: the small-world property and compartmentalization D. J. Watts and S. H. Strogatz, Nature 393, 440 1998 ; M

  2. Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2012-01-05

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

  3. PROPERTIES OF RELATIVELY-DILUTEPLASMAS IN PULSED-POWER SYSTEMS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-ACCURACY LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROPERTIES OF RELATIVELY-DILUTEPLASMAS IN PULSED-POWER SYSTEMS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-ACCURACY LASER plasmas under high-power pulses at the nanosecond time scale. The method is based on resonant laser application of laser-spectroscopy to investigate the electric fields and the properties of relatively dilute

  4. Health Care Behaviors and Decision-Making Processes Among Enrollees In A State High Risk Insurance Pool: Focus Group Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Carroll, Shawna L.; Moore, Janice M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose-To better understand the relationship between health insurance coverage and health care behaviors of persons with potentially disabling conditions enrolled in a state high risk insurance pool. Approach or Design-Six ...

  5. Effect Of False Alarm Rate On Pilot Use And Trust Of Automation Under Conditions Of Simulated High Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarelli, Deborah

    2010-11-05

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the relationships between automation false alarm rate, human trust in automation, and human use of automation, specifically under conditions of simulated high risk. The ...

  6. fMRI changes over time and reproducibility in unmedicated subjects at high genetic risk of schizophrenia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalley, H. C.; Gountouna, V-E.; Hall, J.; McIntosh, A. M.; Simonotto, E.; Job, D. E.; Owens, D. G. C.; Johnstone, E. C.; Lawrie, S. M.

    of functional imaging techniques. The current study aimed to examine these factors in healthy controls and in unmedicated subjects at high genetic risk of the disorder: (i) to examine the reproducibility of task-related activation patterns, (ii) to determine...

  7. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Csiszar, Susan A.; Fantke, Peter; Zhang, Xianming; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate dailymore »intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.« less

  8. Properties of heterogeneous energetic materials under high strain, high strain rate deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jing

    2007-01-01

    PTFE.Rate Flow and Failure in PTFE/Al/W Granular Composites”,and Microstructural Properties of PTFE-Al-W System”, 2007

  9. Thermal properties of high-volume fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    , the utilization of high-volume fly ash concrete mixtures to reduce CO2 emissions and cement consumption per unit, reducing cement consumption and the CO2 emissions accompanying its production, on a per volume unit a transient plane source method. Because the specimens being examined are well hydrated, estimates

  10. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  11. POST-IRRADIATION PROPERTIES OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH POWER TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    POST-IRRADIATION PROPERTIES OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH POWER TARGETS H. Kirk, N. Simos, P preliminary results of on-going experimental studies at BNL irradiation facilities. SEARCHING FOR SMART MATERIALS TO ACHIEVE >1 MW POWER Motivation Often dramatic change of key properties with irradiation (Figure

  12. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  13. Effect of Tin+ defects on electrochemical properties of highly-ordered titania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Electrochemical properties X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy In this paper, highly-ordered TiO2 nanotube (TNT respectively. The surface properties of the TiO2 electrodes after annealing treatment by different gases were for these electrode materials, there are only two that are not fulfilled by TiO2. The first one concerns the energy

  14. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  15. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  16. An instrument for high-throughput measurements of fiber mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofek, Grant William, 1980-

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, an instrument is designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring the mechanical properties of single fibers. The instrument is intended to provide high throughput measurement of single fiber geometric ...

  17. High-field remanence properties of synthetic and natural submicrometre haematites and goethites: significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-field remanence properties of synthetic and natural submicrometre haematites and goethites September 2004 Editor: V. Courtillot Abstract Haematite and goethite are significant magnetic components both of marine and terrestrial sediments. Variable magnetic behaviour in haematite and goethite has

  18. Properties of heterogeneous energetic materials under high strain, high strain rate deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jing

    2007-01-01

    17 2.3 Reaction at High Velocity Impact of PTFE-Basedprocess [60]. 2.3 Reaction at High Velocity Impact of PTFE-of reaction of energetic materials at high velocity impact,

  19. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayley, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Bayley@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  20. Optical variability properties of high luminosity AGN classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Stalin; Gopal-Krishna; Ram Sagar; Paul J. Wiita

    2003-06-19

    We present the results of a comparative study of the intra-night optical variability (INOV) characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, which involves a systematic intra-night optical monitoring of seven sets of high luminosity AGNs covering the redshift range {\\it z} $\\simeq 0.2$ to {\\it z} $\\simeq 2.2$. The sample, matched in the optical luminosity -- redshift (M$_B$ -- z) plane, consists of seven radio-quiet quasars (RQQs), eight radio lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs), six radio core-dominated quasars (CDQs) and five BL Lac objects (BLs). Systematic CCD observations, aided by a careful data analysis procedure, have allowed us to detect INOV with amplitudes as low as 1%. Present observations cover a total of 113 nights (720 hours) with only a single quasar monitored as continuously as possible on a night. Considering cases of only unambiguous detections of INOV we have estimated duty cycles (DCs) of 17%, 12%, 20% and 72% respectively for RQQs, LDQs, CDQs, and BLs. The low amplitude and low DC of INOV shown by RQQs compared to BLs can be understood in terms of their having optical synchrotron jets which are modestly misdirected from us. From our fairly extensive dataset, no unambiguous general trend of a correlation between the INOV amplitude and the apparent optical brightness of the quasar is noticed.

  1. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: Bridget.Koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Quaranta, Brian P. [21st Century Oncology, Asheville, North Carolina (United States); Pura, John A. [Division of Biostatistics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Haake, Michael [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W. [Department of Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  2. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy [Biology Department, Boston College, Higgins Hall, Room 578, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Moroianu, Junona [Biology Department, Boston College, Higgins Hall, Room 578, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)], E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  3. Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab-Initio Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab Database have been considered as nanograined, sintered-powder thermoelectrics with the high-throughput ab the electronic band gap and the carrier effective mass, and that the probability of having large thermoelectric

  4. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  5. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  6. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dees, L.A.

    1994-08-15

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  8. Estimating the Size of Populations at High Risk of HIV in Bangladesh Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Estimating the Size of Populations at High Risk of HIV in Bangladesh Using a Bayesian Hierarchical the numbers of injecting drug users and female sex workers in Bangladesh. Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Methods of Intravenous Drug Users in Bangladesh in 2004 7 3.1 Results from the multiplier method

  9. Effects of a high-risk environment on edge-drilling behavior: inference from Recent bivalves from the Red Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    Effects of a high-risk environment on edge-drilling behavior: inference from Recent bivalves from the Red Sea Devapriya Chattopadhyay, Martin Zuschin, and Adam Tomasov´ych Abstract.--Edge-drilling is an unusual predation pattern in which a predatory gastropod drills a hole on the commissure between

  10. Determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of grain boundaries using high temperature calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, C.D.; Chiang, Y.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Eastman, J.A.; Liao, Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    This work explores the use of high temperature differential scanning calorimetry as a novel way in which to measure thermodynamic and kinetic properties of grain boundaries in ceramics. A calorimetric study of grain growth has become practical only recently, with the development of processing methods for nanocrystalline materials (10--50 nm grain size) that have enough grain boundary area and thus grain boundary excess properties to be detected by commercial calorimeters. Here we report results from experiments on nanocrystalline silicon and titanium dioxide. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Properties of Galvanized and Galvannealed Advanced High Strength Hot Rolled Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.Y. Guertsman; E. Essadiqi; S. Dionne; O. Dremmailova; R. Bouchard; B. Voyzelle; J. McDermid; R. Fourmentin

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop the coating process information to achieve good quality coatings on 3 advanced high strength hot rolled steels while retaining target mechanical properties, (ii) to obtain precise knowledge of the behavior of these steels in the various forming operations and (iii) to establish accurate user property data in the coated conditions. Three steel substrates (HSLA, DP, TRIP) with compositions providing yield strengths in the range of 400-620 MPa were selected. Only HSLA steel was found to be suitable for galnaizing and galvannealing in the hot rolled condition.

  12. High-Oleic Ground Beef and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Men and Postmenopausal Women 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramany, Ghazal

    2012-07-16

    About half of all deaths in developed countries are caused by cardiovascular disease. It is well known that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk can be influenced by diet, but optimal dietary content of fatty acids continues ...

  13. Strengths-Based Case Management: Implementation With High-Risk Youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Walsh, Adam K.; Oldham, Michael S.; Rapp, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Few effective methods of intervention exist for youth at risk for negative life outcomes. One method used successfully with both adults with chronic mental illness and adults with substance abuse problems is strengths-based ...

  14. Optical and electronic properties of highly stable and textured hydrogenated ZnO:Al thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Younghun, E-mail: younghh@ulsan.ac.kr [Basic Science Research Institute, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Basic Science Research Institute, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungmin [Department of Physics, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Youngho, E-mail: yhum@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyoyeol [Semiconductor Applications, Ulsan College, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Semiconductor Applications, Ulsan College, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? We investigate the impact of hydrogen treatment at high temperature of ZnO:Al film. ? Electrical properties of the ZnO:Al films improved due to hydrogen annealing. ? Optical properties of the ZnO:Al films enhanced due to hydrogen annealing. ? ZnO:Al film properties strongly depend on the hydrogen treatment temperature. -- Abstract: We have experimentally investigated the effects of hydrogen-annealing on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature. From the X-ray diffraction observations, the orientation of ZnO:Al films was found to be a c-axis in the hexagonal structure. We found that intentionally incorporated hydrogen plays an important role in n-type conduction as a donor, improving free carrier concentration and electrical stability. We simultaneously obtained improved optical transmission and enhanced absorption edge of the ZnO:Al film due to hydrogen-annealing. Our experimental data suggest the hydrogen-annealing process as an important role in the enhancement of electrical and optical properties, which is promising as a back reflector material for thin-film solar cells.

  15. Optimization of ferrous burden high temperature properties to meet blast furnace requirements in British Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrand, R.

    1996-12-31

    The high temperature properties of ferrous burden materials have long been an important consideration in the operation of British Steel blast furnaces. Previous research presented at this conference has shown that the behavior of materials in the lower stack and bosh can have a significant effect on furnace permeability and stability of operation. However, with increasing levels of hydrocarbon injection via the tuyeres, the reduction conditions inside British Steel blast furnaces have significantly altered over recent years. This paper focuses on the further work that has been undertaken to study the effect on ferrous burden high temperatures properties of the widely differing reduction regimes which can be experienced in today`s blast furnaces. The implications of the findings, and how they have been used in optimizing blast furnace operation and burden quality, are discussed.

  16. Phase transition and dielectric properties of nanograin BaTiO3 ceramic under high pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Phase transition and dielectric properties of nanograin BaTiO3 ceramic under high pressure Jinlong Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of nanograin BaTiO3 ceramic has been investigated under decreases with at a rate of dTC/d =-40.0 1.1 K/GPa for coarse-grain ceramic and -34.3 1.4 K/GPa for ceramic

  17. High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics) ABSTRACT This study surveys the optical and microphysical properties of high (ice) clouds over the Tropics on the gridded level-3 cloud products derived from the measurements acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging

  18. Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

    2011-03-13

    In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

  19. Neutrino properties deduced from the study of lepton number violating processes at low and high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Sabin [Horia Hulubei Foundation, P.O. Box MG-12, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania) and Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2012-11-20

    There is nowadays a significant progress in understanding the neutrino properties. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly showed that neutrinos have mass and oscillate, in contradiction with the Standard Model (SM) assumptions, and these are the first evidences of beyond SM physics. However, fundamental properties of the neutrinos like their absolute mass, their character (are they Dirac or Majorana particles?), their mass hierarchy, the number of neutrino flavors, etc., still remain unknown. In this context there is an increased interest in the study of the lepton number violating (LNV) processes, since they could complete our understanding on the neutrino properties. Since recently, the neutrinoless double beta decay was considered the only process able to distinguish between Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and to give a hint on the absolute mass of the electron neutrino. At present, the increased luminosity of the LHC experiments makes feasible the search of LNV processes at high energy as well. In this lecture I will make a brief review on our present knowledge of the neutrino properties, on the present status of the double-beta decay studies and on the first attempts to search LNV processes at LHC.

  20. Physical and mechanical properties of single and large crystal high-RRR niobium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Myneni

    2005-07-10

    High RRR bulk niobium SRF cavities are the building blocks of the latest and future particle accelerators, free electron lasers (FEL's) and energy recovery linacs (ERL's.). These cavities are fabricated from high purity (RRR) poly crystalline niobium sheets via deep drawing, e-beam welding and surface treatment to obtain high accelerating gradients and quality factors. However, the starting bulk RRR niobium properties are not yet optimized with respect to both cost reduction and achievement of ultimate performance. A major limitation in achieving the highest performance can possibly be attributed to imperfections at or near the grain boundaries. Recently, at Jefferson Lab single/large grain RRR niobium cavities are developed using customized RRR ingots with optimized amounts of impurities such as Tantalum and minimizing the interstitial contents (O, C, N and H).

  1. Irradiation of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tape for potential fusion applications: electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Gapud, Albert A. [University of South Alabama, Mobile; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Greenwood, N T [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Alexander, J A [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Khan, A [University of South Alabama, Mobile

    2015-01-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  2. Property Loss Notice Instructions on filing a Property Loss Notice with the Office of Risk Management can be found in the Administrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Acquired Cost New/Replacement Repair 1. 2. 3. 4. CLAIMS INVOLVING UNIVERSITY PROPERTY OR EQUIPMENT A $500 that a loss occurred, e.g., no visible signs of forced entry, forcible theft, etc. Loss adjustment is subject

  3. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  4. Phonon densities of states and related thermodynamic properties of high temperature ceramics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loong, C.-K.

    1998-08-28

    Structural components and semiconductor devices based on silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and gallium nitride are expected to function more reliably at elevated temperatures and at higher levels of performance because of the strong atomic bonding in these materials. The degree of covalency, lattice specific heat, and thermal conductivity are important design factors for the realization of advanced applications. We have determined the phonon densities of states of these ceramics by the method of neutron scattering. The results provide a microscopic interpretation of the mechanical and thermal properties. Moreover, experimental data of the static, structures, and dynamic excitations of atoms are essential to the validation of interparticle potentials employed for molecular-dynamics simulations of high-temperature properties of multi-component ceramic systems. We present an overview of neutron-scattering investigations of the atomic organization, phonon excitations, as well as calculations of related thermodynamic properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, {beta}-sialon, AlN and GaN. The results are compared with those of the oxide analogs such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  5. Ground state properties and high pressure behavior of plutonium dioxide: Systematic density functional calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide is of high technological importance in nuclear fuel cycle and is particularly crucial in long-term storage of Pu-based radioactive waste. Using first-principles density-functional theory, in this paper we systematically study the structural, electronic, mechanical, thermodynamic properties, and pressure induced structural transition of PuO$_{2}$. To properly describe the strong correlation in the Pu $5f$ electrons, the local density approximation$+U$ and the generalized gradient approximation$+U$ theoretical formalisms have been employed. We optimize the $U$ parameter in calculating the total energy, lattice parameters, and bulk modulus at the nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic configurations for both ground state fluorite structure and high pressure cotunnite structure. The best agreement with experiments is obtained by tuning the effective Hubbard parameter $U$ at around 4 eV within the LDA$+U$ approach. After carefully testing the validity of the ground state, we further in...

  6. Mechanical properties, glass transition temperature, and bond enthalpy trends of high metalloid Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, Michael

    Mechanical properties, glass transition temperature, and bond enthalpy trends of high metalloid Fe December 2007; accepted 8 April 2008; published online 25 April 2008 Mechanical properties and glass plastic strain of 3% is obtained, despite the increase in the number of strong metal-metalloid bonds. Also

  7. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (?74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ?1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ?1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  8. High-temperature, structural disorder, phase transitions, and piezoelectric properties of GaPO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, J.; Cambon, O.; Prudhomme, N.; Fraysse, G.; Keen, D. A.; Chapon, L. C.; Tucker, M. G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 5617, Universite Montpellier II, Place Eugene Bataillon, cc003, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Department of Physics, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); and ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    Gallium orthophosphate was studied at high temperature up to 1303 K by total neutron scattering and 1173 K by piezoelectric measurements. Rietveld refinements at 1223 K confirm the stability of the structural distortion in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase with an average tilt angle {delta}=18.8 deg. at this temperature. In contrast, reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of total neutron scattering data indicate that, whereas the degree of structural disorder initially slowly varies over a very large temperature interval in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase, an increase in disorder is observed beginning above 1023 K. Piezoelectric measurements indicate that the quality factor (Q) of GaPO{sub 4} resonators remains stable up to this temperature above which the piezoelectric properties of the material degrade. This degradation can be correlated to the increase in structural disorder. RMC refinements indicate that the high-temperature {beta}-cristobalite-type phase at 1303 K is characterized by significant thermally induced disorder with oxygen atom density forming a continuous ring around the vector joining neighboring gallium and phosphorous atoms. Gallium phosphate may be expected to retain its piezoelectric properties up to within 200 K of the phase transition temperature and as a consequence be used in applications at temperatures slightly above 1000 K.

  9. Historical Disability Outcomes of Enrollees in the Kansas High Risk Pool: A White Paper presented to CMS by the Kansas DMIE Project January, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2006-01-01

    This white paper reports the historical rates of disability outcomes (e.g., transition to Social Security disability status) for people enrolled in Kansas' state high-risk health insurance pool....

  10. Screening for ovarian cancer in women with varying levels of risk, using annual tests, results in high recall for repeat screening tests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobbenhuis, Marielle A. E.; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Moskovic, Eleanor; Lennard, Fiona; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jacobs, Ian; Ward, Ann; Barton, Desmond P. J.; Ind, Thomas E. J.; Shepherd, John H.; Bridges, Jane E.; Gore, Martin; Haracopos, Chris; Shanley, Susan; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Thomas, Sarah; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background We assessed ovarian cancer screening outcomes in women with a positive family history of ovarian cancer divided into a low-, moderate- or high-risk group for development of ovarian cancer. Methods 545 women with a positive family...

  11. Temporal changes in HCV genotype distribution in three different high risk populations in San Francisco, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    high prevalence of IDU[25]; 2) The UFO Study, a prospectiveincident HCV infection in the UFO Study and the UHS usingfrom the UHS; 128 (27.8%) from UFO; and 130 (28.3%) from the

  12. Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

  13. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  14. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  15. Comparison of high and low intensity contact between secondary and primary care to detect people at ultra-high risk for psychosis: study protocol for a theory-based, cluster randomized controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Jesus; Russo, Debra A; Stochl, Jan; Byford, Sarah; Zimbron, Jorge; Graffy, Jonathan P; Painter, Michelle; Croudace, Tim J; Jones, Peter B

    2013-07-17

    Abstract Background The early detection and referral to specialized services of young people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis may reduce the duration of untreated psychosis and, therefore, improve prognosis. General practitioners (GPs...

  16. Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and infrastructure. The development of ultra-high performance concrete control the performance of these materials. A nano- micro-meso scale cohesive finite element method (CFEM

  17. Normal state properties of high-angle grain Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mennema, Sibe

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the normal-state properties of high-angle grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) and Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-d (calcium-doped YBCO). YBCO is a high-temperature superconducting material with a...

  18. Far-infrared properties of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-d films in high magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    Far-infrared properties of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-d films in high magnetic fields H.L. Liua,*, A of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA b National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA c Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute

  19. High-Risk Components Removed from K-25's Tc-99 Area | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Building America Top Innovation High-R Walls

  20. High-pressure structural and elastic properties of Tl?O?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomis, O., E-mail: osgohi@fis.upv.es; Vilaplana, R. [Centro de Tecnologías Físicas, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Santamaría-Pérez, D. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Earth Sciences Department, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Fuertes, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universität, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sans, J. A.; Manjón, F. J.; Mollar, M. [Instituto de Diseño para la Fabricación y Producción Automatizada, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); and others

    2014-10-07

    The structural properties of Thallium (III) oxide (Tl?O?) have been studied both experimentally and theoretically under compression at room temperature. X-ray powder diffraction measurements up to 37.7 GPa have been complemented with ab initio total-energy calculations. The equation of state of Tl?O? has been determined and compared to related compounds. It has been found experimentally that Tl?O? remains in its initial cubic bixbyite-type structure up to 22.0 GPa. At this pressure, the onset of amorphization is observed, being the sample fully amorphous at 25.2 GPa. The sample retains the amorphous state after pressure release. To understand the pressure-induced amorphization process, we have studied theoretically the possible high-pressure phases of Tl?O?. Although a phase transition is theoretically predicted at 5.8 GPa to the orthorhombic Rh?O?-II-type structure and at 24.2 GPa to the orthorhombic ?-Gd?S?-type structure, neither of these phases were observed experimentally, probably due to the hindrance of the pressure-driven phase transitions at room temperature. The theoretical study of the elastic behavior of the cubic bixbyite-type structure at high-pressure shows that amorphization above 22 GPa at room temperature might be caused by the mechanical instability of the cubic bixbyite-type structure which is theoretically predicted above 23.5 GPa.

  1. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erba, A., E-mail: alessandro.erba@unito.it; Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy); Belmonte, D. [DISTAV, Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genoa (Italy)] [DISTAV, Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  2. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pervez, Nadeem, E-mail: nadeempe@cancerboard.ab.c [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Small, Cormac [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); MacKenzie, Marc [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Division of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Field, Colin [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Murray, David [Division of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Fallone, Gino [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Pearcey, Robert, E-mail: robertpe@cancerboard.ab.c [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  3. Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

    2011-07-20

    We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

  4. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction beam-induced structural and property changes on WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Y., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov; Varga, T. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Zhang, K. H. L.; Chambers, S. A. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO{sub 3} as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO{sub 3}, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  5. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Zhang, Hongliang; Varga, Tamas; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-08

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  6. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21

    , fear and risk assessment. Findings also indicate that both male and female public safety employees internalize risk in much the same way, as well as agree that parenthood in general, is devalued in the public safety profession. With regard...

  7. The structural and mechanical properties of a Cu??Zr??(at. %) alloy processed by High-Velocity-Injection (HVI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Charles C.

    1986-01-01

    THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A Cu6OZr4D(at. X) ALLOY PROCESSED BY HIGH-VELOCITY- INJECTION (HVI) A Thesis by CHARLES C. HAYS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Physics THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A CuBOZr4O(at. %) ALLOY PROCESSED BY HIGH-VELOCITY- INJECTION (HVI ) A Thesis by CHARLES C. HAYS Approved as to style and content by: D. G...

  8. Structural Properties of High and Low Density Water in a Supercooled Aqueous Solution of Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Corradini; M. Rovere; P. Gallo

    2011-01-27

    We consider and compare the structural properties of bulk TIP4P water and of a sodium chloride aqueous solution in TIP4P water with concentration c = 0.67 mol/kg, in the metastable supercooled region. In a previous paper [D. Corradini, M. Rovere and P. Gallo, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 134508 (2010)] we found in both systems the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). The LLCP is believed to be the end point of the coexistence line between a high density liquid (HDL) and a low density liquid (LDL) phase of water. In the present paper we study the different features of water-water structure in HDL and LDL both in bulk water and in the solution. We find that the ions are able to modify the bulk LDL structure, rendering water-water structure more similar to the bulk HDL case. By the study of the hydration structure in HDL and LDL, a possible mechanism for the modification of the bulk LDL structure in the solution is identified in the substitution of the oxygen by the chloride ion in oxygen coordination shells.

  9. Realizing Health Reform’s Potential: Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.

    2014-12-01

    and register to receive email alerts. Commonwealth Fund pub. 1792 Vol. 31 Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace Jean P. Hall Abstract The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high...-risk pool established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to provide coverage for individuals with preexisting conditions who had been uninsured for at least six months. It was intended to be a temporary program: PCIPs opened in 2010 and closed in April...

  10. The Kansas Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment: Preventing or Forestalling Disability Among Participants in the Kansas High Risk Insurance Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2008-12-01

    Participants in the Kansas High Risk Insurance Pool Number 11 • December 2008 By Jean P. Hall, Ph.D. & Jan M. Moore, M.A., M.B.A., M.S.W. The Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (TWWIIA) was passed to address employment and health care... and enhanced health services to employed individuals with potentially disabling conditions enrolled in the State high risk health insurance pool. Historically, people in this pool have transitioned to federal disability programs at a rate eight times...

  11. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    developed rapidly for graphene preparation. One method is tostructure, graphene sample preparations, Raman spectroscopyProperties of Graphene and Sample Preparation The discovery

  12. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Noise Reduction in Graphene Transistors: Experiment andand Thermal Properties of Graphene Nanoribbons EncapsulatedGating of Single-layer Graphene with Single- stranded

  13. High frequency dielectric properties of A5B4O15 microwave ceramics S. Kamba,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    High frequency dielectric properties of A5B4O15 microwave ceramics S. Kamba,a) J. Petzelt, E dielectric ceramics are studied by means of the microwave cavity technique, a combination of far 15 ppm/°C. It is shown that the microwave permittivity of the ceramics studied is determined

  14. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF AUTOGENOUS HEALING AND RECOVERY OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES IN ULTRA-HIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the cementitious matrix can react with carbon dioxide dissolved in the water filling the crack. Autogenous healingNUMERICAL MODELLING OF AUTOGENOUS HEALING AND RECOVERY OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES IN ULTRA into the crack and leads to a partial recovery of mechanical properties (Young's modulus, tensile strength

  15. HIGH RISK COUNTRIES Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad China Columbia Comoros

  16. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  17. Protocol for ADDITION-PRO: a longitudinal cohort study of the cardiovascular experience of individuals at high risk for diabetes recruited from Danish primary care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Nanna B.; Hansen, Anne-Louise S.; Jensen, Troels M.; Philipsen, Annelotte; Rasmussen, Signe S.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Lauritzen, Torsten; Sandbæk, Annelli; Witte, Daniel R.

    2012-12-14

    ) were identified [12]. These stratified risk groups constitute the sampling frame for the ADDITION-PRO study (Figure 1). ADDITION-PRO study In 2009–2011, a follow-up health examination of a subset of the stratified high risk population was performed... • No space constraints or color figure charges • Immediate publication on acceptance • Inclusion in PubMed, CAS, Scopus and Google Scholar • Research which is freely available for redistribution Johansen et al. BMC Public Health 2012, 12:1078 Page 10 of 10...

  18. Microstructure–property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, D. R.; Casalena, L.; Yang, F.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-09-18

    NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal compression tests have revealed that the 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf alloy has useful shape memory properties that include a wide range of transformation temperatures as well as highly stable pseudoelastic behavior. These properties are governed by short-term aging conditions, which may be tailored to control transformation temperatures while giving rise to exceptionally high austenite yield strengths which aid transformation stability. The yield strength of the austenite phase can reach 2.1 GPa by aging for 3hrs at 500°C, while aging for 3hrs at 700°C produced an alloy with an austenite finish temperature (A f ) of 146°C. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed a new precipitate phase, H-phase, under the homogenized and extruded condition and the aged 3 hrs at 500°C condition, but only the previously identified H-phase precipitate was observed after aging at temperatures of 600°C and 700°C for 3 hrs. Finally, dislocation analysis indicated that plastic deformation of the austenite phase occurred by <100> type slip, similar to that observed in binary NiTi.

  19. Microstructure–property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coughlin, D. R.; Casalena, L.; Yang, F.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-09-18

    NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal compression tests have revealed that the 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf alloy has useful shape memory properties that include a wide range of transformation temperatures as well as highly stable pseudoelastic behavior. These properties are governed by short-term aging conditions, which may be tailored to control transformation temperatures while giving rise to exceptionally high austenite yield strengths which aid transformation stability. The yield strength of the austenite phase can reach 2.1 GPa by aging for 3hrsmore »at 500°C, while aging for 3hrs at 700°C produced an alloy with an austenite finish temperature (A f ) of 146°C. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed a new precipitate phase, H-phase, under the homogenized and extruded condition and the aged 3 hrs at 500°C condition, but only the previously identified H-phase precipitate was observed after aging at temperatures of 600°C and 700°C for 3 hrs. Finally, dislocation analysis indicated that plastic deformation of the austenite phase occurred by type slip, similar to that observed in binary NiTi.« less

  20. Method of manufacturing a high temperature superconductor with improved transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Askew, Thomas R. (Kalamazoo, MI)

    2001-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor. A method of preparing a superconductor includes providing a powdered high temperature superconductor and a nanophase paramagnetic material. These components are combined to form a solid compacted mass with the paramagnetic material disposed on the grain boundaries of the polycrystaline high temperature superconductor.

  1. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Sharma, A; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  2. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Sharma, A

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for op- timal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally un- friendly Freon-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  3. Mechanical properties of chromiumchromium sulfide cermets fabricated by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    dispersive spectroscopy. The me- chanical properties of the cermet (Young's modulus, fracture toughness applications. However, we found that the density and fracture toughness of the cermets increase, combine the hardness and stiffness of ce- ramics with the toughness and ductility of metals [1­5]. Among

  4. Elastic properties, sp³ fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Burgess, Katherine; Jia, Ruth; Sharma, Shiv; Ming, Li-Chung; Liu, Yongsheng; Ciston, Jim; Hong, Shiming

    2014-10-07

    Dense BC{sub x} phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BC{sub x} (dl-BC{sub x}) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BC{sub x} phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BC{sub x} phases depend on the carbon sp²versus sp³ content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BC{sub x} after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp³ fraction, the shear modulus ? of dl-BC?, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, and dl-B?C?, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, were found to be ? = 19.3 GPa and ? = 170 GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp³ bonds during the deposition processes.

  5. Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

  6. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stalheim, Mr. Douglas; Boggess, Todd; San Marchi, Chris; Jansto, Steven; Somerday, Dr. B; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Sofronis, Prof. Petros

    2010-01-01

    The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

  7. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  8. ULTRA-HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSORS BASED ON OPTICAL PROPERTY MODULATION AND VIBRATION-TOLERANT INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2005-07-22

    The goals of the first six months of this project were to begin laying the foundations for both the SiC front-end optical chip fabrication techniques for high pressure gas species sensing as well as the design, assembly, and test of a portable high pressure high temperature calibration test cell chamber for introducing gas species. This calibration cell will be used in the remaining months for proposed first stage high pressure high temperature gas species sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. Both design process and diagrams for the mechanical elements as well as the optical systems are provided. Photographs of the fabricated calibration test chamber cell, the optical sensor setup with the calibration cell, the SiC sample chip holder, and relevant signal processing mathematics are provided. Initial experimental data from both the optical sensor and fabricated test gas species SiC chips is provided. The design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed novel high temperature high pressure gas species detection optical sensor technology.

  9. Measurement of the dielectric properties of high-purity sapphire at 1.865 GHZ from 2-10 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Pogue, P. McIntyre, Akhdiyor Sattarov, Charles Reece

    2012-06-01

    A dielectric test cavity was designed and tested to measure the microwave dielectric properties of ultrapure sapphire at cryogenic temperatures. Measurements were performed by placing a large cylindrical crystal of sapphire in a Nb superconducting cavity operating in the TE01 mode at 1.865 GHz. The dielectric constant, heat capacity, and loss tangent were all calculated using experimental data and RF modeling software. The motivation for these measurements was to determine if such a sapphire could be used as a dielectric lens to focus the magnetic field onto a sample wafer in a high field wafer test cavity. The measured properties have been used to finalize the design of the wafer test cavity.

  10. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreto, H. F. R. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Gaia, R.

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  11. Advanced properties of extended plasmas for efficient high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Physics Department, Voronezh State University, Voronezh 394006 ; Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate the advanced properties of extended plasma plumes (5?mm) for efficient harmonic generation of laser radiation compared with the short lengths of plasmas (?0.3–0.5?mm) used in previous studies. The harmonic conversion efficiency quadratically increased with the growth of plasma length. The studies of this process along the whole extreme ultraviolet range using the long plasma jets produced on various metal surfaces, particularly including the resonance-enhanced laser frequency conversion and two-color pump, are presented. Such plasmas could be used for the quasi-phase matching experiments by proper modulation of the spatial characteristics of extended ablating area and formation of separated plasma jets.

  12. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Turin and A. A. Balandin, Electronics Letters 40, 81 (2004).REFERENCES G. E. Moore, Electronics 38 (1965). E. Pop, Nanofor High-power Electronics” PCSI-38:38th Conference on the

  13. Thermal properties of granular silica aerogel for high-performance insulation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neugebauer, Adam (Adam Halbert)

    2013-01-01

    Based on mounting evidence in support of anthropogenic global climate change, there is an urgency for developments in high-performance building techniques and technologies. New construction projects provide substantial ...

  14. Magnetic and microwave properties of U-type hexaferrite films with high remanence and low ferromagnetic resonance linewidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steven; Hu, Bolin; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA and The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    U-type barium hexaferrite films (Ba{sub 4}Ni{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 36}O{sub 60}) were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure and magnetic properties of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were performed at X-band. The results indicate an anisotropy field of ?8 kOe, and the saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) of ?3.6 kG. An optimal post-deposition annealing of films results in a strong (0 0?n) crystallographic texture and a high hysteresis loop squareness (M{sub r}/M{sub s}?=?92%) leading to self biased properties. Furthermore, the highly self-biased ferrite films exhibited an FMR linewidth of ?200?Oe. The U-type hexaferrite films having low microwave loss, low magnetic anisotropy field, and high squareness are a suitable alternative to Sc or In doped BaM ferrites that have been the choice material for self-biased microwave devices at X-band frequencies.

  15. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  16. Properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As with high x (>0.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiba, D.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nishitani, Y.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and the crystalline properties of a set of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layers with high nominal Mn compositions (x=0.101-0.198). Magnetization measurements and combined channeling Rutherford backscattering (c-RBS) and particle induced x-ray emission (c-PIXE) measurements have been performed to determine the effective Mn composition x{sub eff} and the fraction of Mn atoms at various lattice sites. Here, x{sub eff} determined from magnetization measurements, which increases with increasing x, is consistent with the results determined from c-RBS-PIXE measurements.

  17. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  18. Effect of high temperature on mechanical and physical properties of lightweight cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    ­800uC in terms of compressive strength loss. Most of the original strength is lost between 600 and 800u, loading conditions and moisture regime.10­34 Within the factors affecting the high temperature resistance during their formation and production process. Since such aggregates have low a values and more thermal

  19. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to themore »theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.« less

  20. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to the theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.

  1. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  2. Systematics of Kinetic Freeze-out Properties in High Energy Collisions from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lokesh Kumar

    2014-08-19

    The main aim of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program is to explore the QCD phase diagram which includes search for a possible QCD critical point and the phase boundary between QGP and hadronic phase. We report the collision energy and centrality dependence of kinetic freeze-out properties from the measured mid-rapidity ($|y|energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The STAR detector, with a large uniform acceptance and excellent particle identification is used in the data collection and analysis. The kinetic freeze-out temperature $T_{\\rm{kin}}$ and average collective velocity $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$ parameters are extracted from blast-wave fits to the identified hadron spectra and systematically compared with the results from other collision energies including those at AGS, SPS and LHC. It is found that all results fall into an anti-correlation band in the 2-dimension ($T_{\\rm{kin}}$, $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$) distribution: the largest value of collective velocity and lowest temperature is reached in the most central collisions at the highest collision energy. The energy dependence of these freeze-out parameters are discussed.

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & High Tan + CFV 3D Risk Profile All FV-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  4. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser on the electromagnetic (EM) properties in high-frequency domain (HF) of multiferroic Bi2FeCrO6 (BFCO) thin films. The films were epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Typical 50 nm-thick BFCO

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of bulk highly faulted fcc/hcp nanostructured cobalt microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Aliou Hamady [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Laboratoire Chimie des Matériaux, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Technique, Université de Nouakchott (Mauritania, Islamic Republic of); Dirras, Guy, E-mail: dirras@unv-paris13.fr [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Tétard, Florent; Jouini, Noureddine [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured cobalt powders with an average particle size of 50 nm were synthesized using a polyol method and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS experiments performed at 650 °C with sintering times ranging from 5 to 45 min under a pressure of 100 MPa, yielded to dense bulk nanostructured cobalt (relative density greater than 97%). X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-prepared powders showed only a face centered cubic (fcc) crystalline phase, whereas the consolidated samples exhibited a mixture of both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed a lamellar substructure with a high density of nanotwins and stacking faults in every grain of the sintered samples. Room temperature compression tests, carried out at a strain rate of 10{sup ?3} s{sup ?1}, yielded to highest strain to fracture values of up to 5% for sample of holding time of 15 min, which exhibited a yield strength of 1440 MPa, an ultimate strength as high as 1740 MPa and a Young's modulus of 205 GPa. The modulus of elasticity obtained from the nanoindentation tests, ranges from 181 to 218 GPa. The lowest modulus value of 181 GPa was obtained for the sample with the highest sintering time (45 min), which could be related to mass density loss as a consequence of trapped gases releasing. - Highlights: • Co nanopowder (50 nm) was prepared by reduction in polyol medium. • SPS was used to process bulk nanostructured Co specimens. • Microstructures were made of intricate fcc/hcp, along with nanotwins and SFs. • High strengths and moderate compressive ductility were obtained. • Deformation mechanisms related to complex interplay of different length scales.

  6. Magnetic and high frequency properties of nanogranular CoFe-yttrium-doped zirconia films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Guijie Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Zhang, Dainan

    2014-05-07

    Soft magnetic nanogranular FeCo-Yttrium-doped Zirconia thin films were fabricated using RF magnetron sputtering at different sputtering power. It was found that film electrical resistivity (?) decreased steeply with the increase of sputtering power, while both saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) and natural ferromagnetic resonant frequency (ƒ{sub r}) increased with the sputtering power ascending from 100?W to 200?W, but decreased when sputtering power exceeded 200?W. X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the films were nanocrystalline/amorphous composites. A saturation magnetization as high as 15.4 kGs and a ferromagnetic resonance frequency above 3?GHz were obtained.

  7. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢HelpHighJian Li,1andLevel

  8. Magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of high relative cooling power FeNiB nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhary, V. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute @NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chaturvedi, A.; Ramanujan, R. V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sridhar, I. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-10-28

    Low cost magnetocaloric nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention for energy efficient applications. We report a very high relative cooling power (RCP) in a study of the magnetocaloric effect in quenched FeNiB nanoparticles. RCP increases from 89.8 to 640?J kg{sup ?1} for a field change of 1 and 5?T, respectively, these values are the largest for rare earth free iron based magnetocaloric nanomaterials. To investigate the magnetocaloric behavior around the Curie temperature (T{sub C}), the critical behavior of these quenched nanoparticles was studied. Detailed analysis of the magnetic phase transition using the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel-Fisher method, and critical isotherm plots yields critical exponents of ??=?0.364, ??=?1.319, ??=?4.623, and ??=??0.055, which are close to the theoretical exponents obtained from the 3D-Heisenberg model. Our results indicate that these FeNiB nanoparticles are potential candidates for magnetocaloric fluid based heat pumps and low grade waste heat recovery.

  9. Thermoelectric properties of highly doped n-type polysilicon inverse opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, J; Sinha, S

    2012-10-01

    Nanostructured single-crystal silicon exhibits a remarkable increase in the figure of merit for thermoelectric energy conversion. Here we theoretically investigate a similar enhancement for polycrystalline silicon inverse opals. An inverse opal provides nanoscale grains and a thin-film like geometry to scatter phonons preferentially over electrons. Using solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons and phonons, we show that the figure of merit at 300 K is fifteen times that of bulk single-crystal silicon. Our models predict that grain boundaries are more effective than surfaces in enhancing the figure of merit. We provide insight into this effect and show that preserving a grain size smaller than the shell thickness of the inverse opal increases the figure of merit by as much as 50% when the ratio between the two features is a third. At 600 K, the figure of merit is as high as 0.6 for a shell thickness of 10 nm. This work advances the fundamental understanding of charge and heat transport in nanostructured inverse opals. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4758382

  10. Temperature-dependent H{sub 2} gas-sensing properties of fabricated Pd nanowires using highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sennik, Erdem; Kilinc, Necmettin; Oeztuerk, Zafer Ziya

    2010-09-15

    Horizontal palladium (Pd) nanowires and Pd nanoparticles were successfully fabricated directly on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite depending on the electrodeposition time using palladium nitrate [Pd(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}] solution at room temperature, and the temperature-dependent hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensing properties of these structures were investigated in the concentration range of 50-5000 ppm. Pd nanowires and Pd nanoparticles were fabricated on a graphite surface by applying triple-pulsed potential with varying the electrodeposition time from 400 to 600 s. The fabricated Pd nanowires were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. It was found that the nanowire arrays were continuous, parallel to each other and ordered after an electrodeposition time of 600 s. The diameters of the Pd nanowires and Pd nanoparticles are observed in the range of 70-180 nm. The H{sub 2} sensing properties of these structures were determined with variation in resistance measurements. It was observed that the limit of detection is lower than 50 ppm H{sub 2}, the sensor response was approximately 2% for 1000 ppm H{sub 2} at room temperature, and the sensor response was decreased with increasing temperature.

  11. 8B.6 A DETAILED ANALYSIS OF SPC "HIGH RISK" OUTLOOKS, 2003-2009 Jason M. Davis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well as the number of grid points that had a severe weather report (from Storm Data) within 40 km (25 was calculated based on the percentage of the area of the HR outlook that was covered by a severe weather warning for a high impact severe weather outbreak are expected to be present. On these days, forecasters have high

  12. GRB 120521C at z ? 6 and the properties of high-redshift ?-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Margutti, Raffaella; Fong, Wen-fai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Levan, Andrew [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Perley, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Menten, Karl [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hrudkova, Marie [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Apartado de Correos 321, E-387 00 Santa Cruz de la Palma, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2014-01-20

    We present optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 120521C. By modeling the multi-wavelength data set, we derive a photometric redshift of z ? 6.0, which we confirm with a low signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of the afterglow. We find that a model with a constant-density environment provides a good fit to the afterglow data, with an inferred density of n ? 0.05 cm{sup –3}. The radio observations reveal the presence of a jet break at t {sub jet} ? 7 d, corresponding to a jet opening angle of ?{sub jet} ? 3°. The beaming-corrected ?-ray and kinetic energies are E {sub ?} ? E{sub K} ? 3 × 10{sup 50} erg. We quantify the uncertainties in our results using a detailed Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. To compare GRB 120521C to other high-redshift bursts in a uniform manner we re-fit all available afterglow data for the two other bursts at z ? 6 with radio detections (GRBs 050904 and 090423). We find a jet break at t {sub jet} ? 15 d for GRB 090423, in contrast to previous work. Based on these three events, we find that ?-ray bursts (GRBs) at z ? 6 appear to explode in constant-density environments, and exhibit a wide range of energies and densities that span the range inferred for lower redshift bursts. On the other hand, we find a hint for narrower jets in the z ? 6 bursts, potentially indicating a larger true event rate at these redshifts. Overall, our results indicate that long GRBs share a common progenitor population at least to z ? 8.

  13. On the local properties of highly nonlinear unsteady gravity water waves. Part 1. Slowdown, kinematics and energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelemy, X; Peirson, W L; Dias, F; Allis, M

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic properties of unsteady highly non-linear 3D wave groups have been investigated using a numerical wave tank. Although carrier wave speeds based on zero-crossing analysis remain within +-7% of linear theory predictions, crests and troughs locally undertake a systematic cyclical leaning from forward to backward as the crests/troughs transition through their maximum amplitude. Consequently, both crests and troughs slow down by approximately 15% of the linear velocity, in sharp contrast to the predictions of finite amplitude Stokes steady wavetrain theory. Velocity profiles under the crest maximum have been investigated and surface values in excess of 1.8 times the equivalent Stokes velocity can be observed. Equipartitioning between depth-integrated kinetic and potential energy holds globally on the scale of the wave group. However, equipartitioning does not occur at crests and troughs (even for low amplitude Stokes waves), where the local ratio of potential to total energy varies systemically as a f...

  14. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  15. Application of a systems-theoretic approach to risk analysis of high-speed rail project management in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawakami, Soshi

    2014-01-01

    High-speed rail (HSR) is drawing attention as an environmentally-friendly transportation mode, and is expected to be a solution for socio-technical transportation issues in many societies. Currently, its market has been ...

  16. High-dose radioiodine treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not associated with change in female fertility or any genetic risk to the offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bal, Chandrasekhar . E-mail: csbal@hotmail.com; Kumar, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Chandrashekar, Narayana; Phom, Hentok; Murali, Nadig R.; Chandra, Prem; Pant, Gauri S.

    2005-10-01

    Background: We tried to evaluate the female fertility and genetic risk to the offspring from the exposure to high-dose {sup 131}I by assessing the pregnancy outcomes and health status of the children of female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had received therapeutic doses of {sup 131}I. Materials and Methods: From 1967 to 2002, a total of 1,282 women had been treated with {sup 131}I. Of these patients, 692 (54%) were in the reproductive age group (18-45 years). Forty women had a total of 50 pregnancies after high-dose {sup 131}I. Age at presentation ranged from 16 to 36 years (mean, 23 {+-} 4 years). Histopathology was papillary thyroid cancer in 32 cases and follicular thyroid cancer in 8 cases. Results: Single high-dose therapy was given in 30 cases, 2 doses were given in 7 cases, 3 doses were given in 2 cases, and four doses were given in 1 case in which lung metastases had occurred. In 37 patients (92%), disease was successfully ablated before pregnancy. Ovarian absorbed-radiation dose calculated by the MIRD method ranged from 3.5 to 60 cGy (mean, 12 {+-} 11 cGy). The interval between {sup 131}I therapy and pregnancy varied from 7 to 120 months (37.4 {+-} 28.2 months). Three spontaneous abortions occurred in 2 women. Forty-seven babies (20 females and 27 males) were born. Forty-four babies were healthy with normal birth weight and normal developmental milestones. Twenty women delivered their first baby after {sup 131}I therapy. The youngest child in our series is 11 months of age, and the oldest is 8.5 years of age. Conclusions: Female fertility is not affected by high-dose radioiodine treatment, and the therapy does not appear to be associated with any genetic risks to the offspring.

  17. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

    2001-08-17

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

  18. A Phase I Trial of Samarium-153-Lexidronam Complex for Treatment of Clinically Nonmetastatic High-Risk Prostate Cancer: First Report of a Completed Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard [Department of Urology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Intenzo, Charles [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lavarino, Jorosali [Department Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Xu Yihuan; Chervoneva, Inna [Department of Pharmacology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of samarium-153 EDTMP ({sup 153}Sm) with hormonal therapy (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in high-risk clinically nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk M0 prostate cancer patients (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >7, or >T3) were eligible for this prospective trial of dose-escalated radioactive {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25-2.0 mCi/kg) as primary or postoperative therapy. After 1 month of HT, we administered {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP followed by 4 more months of HT, 46.8 Gy to the pelvic region and 23.4 Gy to the prostate target (TD = 70.2 Gy). The primary endpoint was Grade III toxicity or higher by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Twenty-nine patients enrolled (median prostate-specific antigen = 8.2 ng/mL, 27/29 (93%) T stage {>=}T2b, 24/29 (83%) had Gleason >7) and received {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.5 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.75 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.0 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.5 mCi/kg, 5 patients; 2.0mCi/kg, 4 patients). Twenty-eight patients underwent all planned therapy without delays (1 patient required surgery before the start of RT). With a median follow-up time of 23 months, there were 2 patients (7 %) experiencing Grade III hematologic toxicity. There were no other Grade III or IV side effects. Conclusions: Our trial demonstrates that 2 mCi/kg {sup 153}Sm -EDTMP with HT and RT was safe and feasible in men with high-risk M0 prostate cancer. A Phase II study to test this treatment is currently underway by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.

  19. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, David; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille; Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille ; Cavillon, Fabrice; Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille ; Lacornerie, Thomas; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille ; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  20. When the facts are just not enough: Credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Barbara J.

    2011-07-15

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials.

  1. Sociocultural definitions of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-10-01

    Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. Mature Follow-Up for High-Risk Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Sublobar Resection and Intraoperative Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colonias, Athanasios, E-mail: acolonia@wpahs.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Betler, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Trombetta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bigdeli, Ghazaleh [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Keenan, Robert [Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Werts, E. Day; Parda, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Allegheny General Hospital experience of high-risk Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with sublobar resection and intraoperative {sup 125}I Vicryl mesh brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 5, 1996 and February 19, 2008, 145 patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who were not lobectomy candidates because of cardiopulmonary compromise underwent sublobar resection and placement of {sup 125}I seeds along the resection line. The {sup 125}I seeds embedded in Vicryl suture were attached with surgical clips to a sheet of Vicryl mesh, inserted over the target area, and prescribed to a 0.5-cm planar margin. Results: The mean target area, total activity, number of seeds implanted, and prescribed total dose was 33.3 cm{sup 2} (range, 18.0-100.8), 20.2 mCi (range, 11.1-29.7), 46 (range, 30-100), and 117 Gy (range, 80-180), respectively. The median length of the surgical stay was 6 days (range, 1-111), with a perioperative mortality rate of 3.4%. At a median follow-up of 38.3 months (range, 1-133), 6 patients had developed local recurrence (4.1%), 9 had developed regional failure (6.2%), and 25 had distant failure (17.2%). On multivariate analysis, no patient- or tumor-specific factors or surgical or dosimetric factors were predictive of local recurrence. The overall median survival was 30.5 months with a 3- and 5-year overall survival rate of 65% and 35%, respectively. Conclusion: {sup 125}I brachytherapy for high-risk, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer after sublobar resection is well tolerated and associated with a low local failure rate.

  3. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel–phosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickel–phosphorous (Ni–P) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with Ni–P layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with Ni–P layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  4. Quantitative Risk Management Rudiger Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    Lecture Quantitative Risk Management R¨udiger Frey Universit¨at Leipzig Wintersemester 2010 risk management C. Introduction to Portfolio Credit Derivatives c 2010 (Frey) 1 #12;A. Introduction of counterparties. Measuring and management of credit risk is of high importance for financial institutions

  5. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  6. RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK UVM PEOPLE WORKING 2004 The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT #12;2 © 2004 University · Fire and Life Safety · Property Protection · Vehicle Safety · Liability Risk Management · Insurance & Claims Management RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOKThe UNIVERSITY of VERMONT #12;4 © 2004 University of Vermont

  7. Nanodomain induced anomalous magnetic and electronic transport properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} highly epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Zepeda, F.; Ma, C.; Bahena Uribe, D.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Wang, H.; Xu, Xing; Yacaman, M. J.; Ponce, A., E-mail: arturo.ponce@utsa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); Chen, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); The Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Lorenz, B.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chu, P. C. W. [The Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    A giant magnetoresistance effect (?46% at 20?K under 7?T) and anomalous magnetic properties were found in a highly epitaxial double perovskite LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} (LBCO) thin film on (001) MgO. Aberration-corrected Electron Microscopy and related analytical techniques were employed to understand the nature of these unusual physical properties. The as-grown film is epitaxial with the c-axis of the LBCO structure lying in the film plane and with an interface relationship given by (100){sub LBCO} || (001){sub MgO} and [001]{sub LBCO} || [100]{sub MgO} or [010]{sub MgO}. Orderly oxygen vacancies were observed by line profile electron energy loss spectroscopy and by atomic resolution imaging. Especially, oxygen vacancy and nanodomain structures were found to have a crucial effect on the electronic transport and magnetic properties.

  8. Risk Prioritization

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is...

  9. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for more definitive surgery.

  10. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.

  11. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corn, Paul G.; Song, Danny Y.; Heath, Elisabeth; Maier, Jordan; Meyn, Raymond; Kuban, Deborah; DePetrillo, Thomas A.; Mathew, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily.

  12. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  13. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  14. Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High Risk Interventional Settings is Driven by Stent Design and Deployment, and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran

    Background—Stent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. Concern has been raised about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings, yet clinical and animal ...

  15. Effect of low and high storage temperatures on head space gas concentrations and physical properties of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; C. Jim Lim; Tony Bi; Xingya Kuang; Staffan Melin

    2013-11-01

    Headspace gas concentrations and wood pellet properties were studied in sealed glass canisters at 5–40 degrees C storage temperatures. CO2 and CO concentrations at 5, 10, 20 and 40 degrees C at the end of 23–28 days of storage were 1600 and 200, 4700 and 1200, and 31 200 and 15 800 parts per million by volume (ppmv) respectively. Corresponding O2 concentration was about 19•49, 19•20, 18•0 and 2•07% respectively. Non-linear regression equations adequately described the gas concentrations in the storage container as a function of time. Safe level estimation functions developed were linear for O2 and logarithmic for CO and CO2 concentrations. Measured pellet properties moisture, length, diameter, unit, bulk and tapped density, durability, calorific value, ash content and per cent fines were in the range of 4•6–5•02%, 14–15 mm, 6•4–6•5 mm, 1125–1175 kg m-3, 750–770 kg m-3, 825–840 kg m-3, 73–74%, 18•32–18•78 MJ kg-1, 0•65–0•74% and 0•13–0•15%. Durability values of pellets decreased by 13% at 40 degrees C storage temperature and other properties changed marginally.

  16. Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brigo, Damiano

    Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures GARP Seminar, London, Nov://www.capco.com/capco-insights -- Joint work with Claudio Nordio Prof. D. Brigo (Imperial College and Capco) Risk Management under Management under Liquidity Risk GARP Seminar London 2 / 60 #12;Introduction Liquidity in Risk Measurement

  17. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

  18. HIghMass-high H I mass, H I-rich galaxies at z ? 0 sample definition, optical and H? imaging, and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shan; Matsushita, Satoki [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael G.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Chengalur, Jayaram N. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Pune 411007 (India); Hunt, Leslie K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo East Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Masters, Karen L. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth POI 3FX (United Kingdom); Saintonge, Amelie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Spekkens, Kristine, E-mail: shan@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Royal Military College of Canada, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2014-09-20

    We present first results of the study of a set of exceptional H I sources identified in the 40% ALFALFA extragalactic H I survey catalog ?.40 as both being H I massive (M{sub HI}>10{sup 10} M{sub ?}) and having high gas fractions for their stellar masses: the HIghMass galaxy sample. We analyze UV- and optical-broadband and H? images to understand the nature of their relatively underluminous disks in optical and to test whether their high gas fractions can be tracked to higher dark matter halo spin parameters or late gas accretion. Estimates of their star formation rates (SFRs) based on spectral energy distribution fitting agree within uncertainties with the H? luminosity inferred current massive SFRs. The H II region luminosity functions, parameterized as dN/dlog L?L {sup ?}, have standard slopes at the luminous end (? ? –1). The global SFRs demonstrate that the HIghMass galaxies exhibit active ongoing star formation (SF) with moderate SF efficiency but, relative to normal spirals, a lower integrated SFR in the past. Because the SF activity in these systems is spread throughout their extended disks, they have overall lower SFR surface densities and lower surface brightness in the optical bands. Relative to normal disk galaxies, the majority of HIghMass galaxies have higher H? equivalent widths and are bluer in their outer disks, implying an inside-out disk growth scenario. Downbending double exponential disks are more frequent than upbending disks among the gas-rich galaxies, suggesting that SF thresholds exist in the downbending disks, probably as a result of concentrated gas distribution.

  19. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Kaneko; M. M. Gonzalez; R. Preece; B. L. Dingus; M. S. Briggs

    2008-01-12

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another case with a extremely high peak energy (\\epeak $\\gtrsim$ 170 MeV). There have been very limited number of GRBs observed at MeV energies and above, and only a few instruments have been capable of observing GRBs in this energy band with such high sensitivity. Thus, our analysis results presented here should also help predict GRB observations with current and future high-energy instruments such as AGILE and GLAST, as well as with ground-based very-high-energy telescopes.

  20. Does accounting quality mitigate risk shifting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loktionov, Yuri V

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effect of financial reporting quality on risk shifting, an investment distortion that is caused by shareholders' incentives to engage in high-risk projects that are detrimental to debt holders. I ...

  1. BRIDGE Risk Analyzer: A Collaborative Tool for Enhanced Risk Analysis in Crisis Situations1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    BRIDGE Risk Analyzer: A Collaborative Tool for Enhanced Risk Analysis in Crisis Situations1 Mass to develop a collaborative tool to support risk analysis in crisis situations. The tool will be tightly facility. Keywords: Risk analysis, crisis management 1 Introduction Crisis management is a highly

  2. High-definition analysis of fluid-induced seismicity related to the mesoscale hydromechanical properties of a fault zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, Martin

    -strain and seismic measurements taken in the fractured damage zone during the pressurization indicated that seismicity is triggered along low-permeable, highly rigid, low-dip angle, mesoscale-inherited fractures where-so-rigid, aseismic, sub- vertical, fault-related fractures. Using a three-dimensional distinct-element representation

  3. Orb-web-spinning spiders produce a variety of high-performance structural fibres with mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falvo, Michael

    Orb-web-spinning spiders produce a variety of high- performance structural fibres with mechanical The orb-web-weaving araneid spiders provide ideal model organisms for studying the functional design. The organization of these fibres in the spider's orb- web is illustrated in Fig. 1, where it can be seen that MA

  4. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Y; Preece, R; Dingus, B L; Briggs, M S

    2008-01-01

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another...

  5. The Impact of the Samantha Academy of Creative Education (SACE) on Students Placed At-Risk at a Suburban High School in Southwest Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez, Patrick J.

    2010-01-16

    of calculating drop out rates, differing opinions on the causes of school dropout, and a body of literature that is sparse concerning educational approaches for keeping students placed at-risk in school. This study examined the impact of the Samantha Academy...

  6. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  7. High pressure synthesis of a new phase of YbAg2. Structure, valence of Yb and properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsvyashchenko, A. V.; Menushenkov, A. P.; Sidorov, V. A.; Petrova, A. E.; Fomicheva, L. N.; Chernysheva, O. V.; Lebed, Yu. B.; Axenov, S. N.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Sun, Liling; et al

    2015-11-25

    The new phase of YbAg2 was obtained using high-pressure and high-temperature reaction. YbAg2 crystallizes in the MgZn2 structure (the space group P63/mmc space group, No 194) with a = 5.68153(3) Å and c = 9.31995(7) Å and the unit cell volumeV = 260.54(3) Å3. The XANES analysis showed that the valence state of Yb is +2.8. The low-temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility can be adequately described by a T2 term that supports the Fermi-liquid picture. Furthermore, the Kadowaki–Woods relation gives a low value of the degeneracy (N = 2).

  8. The effects of high magnetic field on the morphology and microwave electromagnetic properties of MnO{sub 2} powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Zhang [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Duan Yuping, E-mail: duanyp@dlut.edu.c [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Li Shuqing, E-mail: lsq6668@126.co [Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, 1 Jun Zhuang east Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100024 (China); Li Xiaogang, E-mail: lixiaogang99@263.ne [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Shunhua [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China)

    2010-07-15

    MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple chemical process, and a mechanism for the formation of this grain shape was discussed. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and vector network analysis. The dielectric constant and the loss tangent clearly decreased under a magnetic field. The magnetic loss tangent and the imaginary part of the magnetic permeability increased substantially. Furthermore, the theoretically calculated values of reflection loss showed that the absorption peaks shifted to a higher frequency with increases in the magnetic field strength. - Graphical abstract: MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape is first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple hydrothermal route.

  9. Leveraging Formal Methods and Fuzzing to Verify Security and Reliability Properties of Large-Scale High-Consequence Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruthruff, Joseph; Armstrong, Robert C.; Davis, Benjamin Garry; Mayo, Jackson; Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2012-09-01

    Formal methods describe a class of system analysis techniques that seek to prove specific propertiesabout analyzed designs, or locate flaws compromising those properties. As an analysis capability,these techniques are the subject of increased interest fromboth internal and external customersof Sandia National Laboratories. Given this lab's other areas of expertise, Sandia is uniquelypositioned to advance the state-of-the-art with respect toseveral research and application areaswithin formal methods. This research project was a one-yeareffort funded by Sandia's CyberSecurity S&T Investment Area in its Laboratory Directed Research&Development program toinvestigate the opportunities for formal methods to impactSandia's present mission areas, morefully understand the needs of the research community in the area of formal methods and whereSandia can contribute, and clarify from those potential research paths those that would best advancethe mission-area interests of Sandia. The accomplishmentsfrom this project reinforce the utilityof formal methods in Sandia, particularly in areas relevantto Cyber Security, and set the stagefor continued Sandia investments to ensure this capabilityis utilized and advanced within thislaboratory to serve the national interest.4

  10. Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low and high frequency radio observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcote, B; Paredes, J M; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01

    We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival VLA monitorings, all the available archival GMRT data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with GMRT and WSRT. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year timescales, with a variability $\\lesssim 25~\\%$ at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at $\\sim0.5$ GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for a size of the emitting region of $\\sim0.85~\\mathrm{mas}$, setting a magnetic field of $B\\sim20~\\mathrm{mG}$, an electron density of $n_{\\rm e}\\sim4\\times10^5~{\\rm cm^{-3}}$ and a mass-los...

  11. Successful Characterization Strategies for the Active High Risk Y-12 National Security Complex 9201-5 (Alpha-5) Facility, Oak Ridge, TN - 12164

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchfield, Joseph W. III [Link Technologies (United States); Albrecht, Linda [Alliant Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Building 9201-5 (Alpha 5) was completed in May 1944 and served as a production facility for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Weapons Plant. During the Manhattan Project, it functioned as a uranium enrichment facility. The facility was renovated and altered over the years, converting the calutrons to support other missions. Alpha 5 consists of 4 floors and a basement measuring approximately 600,000 square feet. The facility contains various pieces of equipment remaining from legacy operations. A significant amount (approximately 200,000 kgs) of mercury (Hg) has been spilled in the facility over the operational history of the building. To further complicate matters, beryllium (Be) contamination in 9201-5 is found throughout approximately sixty percent of the facility. Concentrations varying from very low (< 0.2 micrograms (?g)/100 cm{sup 2}) to areas where concentrations are relatively high, approximately 600 ?g/100 cm{sup 2}, in regulated beryllium areas. The primary site related contaminants (SRCs) for the waste in this facility are enriched uranium, depleted uranium, beryllium and mercury. This facility represents the highest environmental risk for DOE-ORO EM and NNSA at Y-12 and must be quickly addressed to minimize impacts to future Y-12 missions, as well as human health and the environment. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 700,000 cubic feet of legacy material was removed in 2010 and 2011. In addition, characterization of the 9201-5 facility was scheduled in the winter and spring of 2011. This activity was initiated in January 2011 and was completed in July 2011. Heavy schedule pressure was further complicated by the fact that this building has active utility, security and process systems. Given these complex variables, a unique, out of the box characterization strategy was forged in an effort to bound radiological and chemical contaminants, as well as providing the appropriate level of quality to ensure that this data could be used to develop waste profiles when deactivation, decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities are authorized at a future date. The characterization strategy involved a hybrid model of statistically-based and biased sampling events. To achieve the desired results, traditional intrusive sampling and laboratory analysis, as well as a number of field-based characterization methodologies (e.g., X-ray Fluorescence [XRF], Lumex and Non-Destructive Assay [NDA]) were utilized. Results were captured and synthesized into meaningful, usable conclusions in a facility characterization report that will more accurately aid D and D cost estimates for future remedial actions. This massive characterization campaign involved over 1,200 separate sample locations using 4 separate characterization methods and was successfully completed to meet a performance-based milestone within 8 months of initiation. (authors)

  12. Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options Emerging Risk Initiative ­ Position Paper November 2011 #12;2 Content 1. Summary 3 2. Power blackouts challenge society and economy 4 3. Blackout risks on the increase 5 3.1. How power market trends influence blackout risks 5 3.1.1. Liberalisation and privatisation

  13. Isoreticular Series of (3,24)-Connected Metal-Organic Frameworks: Facile Synthesis and High Methane Uptake Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barin, G; Krungleviciute, V; Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK

    2014-03-11

    We have successfully used a highly efficient copper-catalyzed "click" reaction for the synthesis of a new series of hexacarboxylic acid linkers with varying sizes for the construction of isoreticular (3,24)-connected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-namely, NU-138, NU-139, and NU-140. One of these MOFs, NU-140, exhibits a gravimetric methane uptake of 0.34 g/g at 65 bar and 298 K, corresponding to almost 70% of the DOE target (0.5 g/g), and has a working capacity (deliverable amount between 65 and 5 bar) of 0.29 g/g, which translates into a volumetric working capacity of 170 cc(STP)/cc. These values demonstrate that NU-140 performs well for methane storage purposes, from both a gravimetric and a volumetric point of view. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 along with simulated isotherms are also reported.

  14. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Yongtao E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng; Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Welch, David

    2014-07-07

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K?¹ and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K?¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10??+0.3(2)×10??T (K?¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10?? K?¹ GPa?¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ??=276.6 K gives ??=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prilliman, Gerald Stephen

    2003-09-01

    The behavior of nanocrystals under extreme pressure was investigated using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A major part of this investigation was the testing of a prototype synchrotron endstation on a bend magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source for high pressure work using a diamond anvil cell. The experiments conducted and documented here helped to determine issues of efficiency and accuracy that had to be resolved before the construction of a dedicated ''super-bend'' beamline and endstation. The major conclusions were the need for a cryo-cooled monochromator and a fully remote-controllable pressurization system which would decrease the time to change pressure and greatly reduce the error created by the re-placement of the diamond anvil cell after each pressure change. Two very different types of nanocrystal systems were studied, colloidal iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and thin film TiN/BN. Iron oxide nanocrystals were found to have a transition from the {gamma} to the {alpha} structure at a pressure strongly dependent on the size of the nanocrystals, ranging from 26 GPa for 7.2 nm nanocrystals to 37 GPa for 3.6 nm nanocrystals. All nanocrystals were found to remain in the {alpha} structure even after release of pressure. The transition pressure was also found, for a constant size (5.7 nm) to be strongly dependent on the degree of aggregation of the nanocrystals, increasing from 30 GPa for completely dissolved nanocrystals to 45 GPa for strongly aggregated nanocrystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction pattern of the pressure induced {alpha} phase demonstrated a decrease in intensity for certain select peaks. Together, these observations were used to make a complete picture of the phase transition in nanocrystalline systems. The size dependence of the transition was interpreted as resulting from the extremely high surface energy of the {alpha} phase which would increase the thermodynamic offset and thereby increase the kinetic barrier to transition that must be overridden with pressure. The anomalous intensities in the x-ray diffraction patterns were interpreted as being the result of stacking faults, indicating that the mechanism of transition proceeds by the sliding of {gamma}(111) planes to form {alpha}(001) planes. The increasing transition pressure for more aggregated samples may be due to a positive activation volume, retarding the transition for nanocrystals with less excess (organic) volume available to them. The lack of a reverse transition upon decompression makes this interpretation more difficult because of the lack of an observable hysteresis, and it is therefore difficult to ascertain kinetic effects for certain. In the case TiN/BN nanocomposite systems, it was found that the bulk modulus (B{sub 0}) of the TiN nanoparticles was not correlated to the observed hardness or Young's modulus of the macroscopic thin film. This indicates that the origin of the observed super-hard nature of these materials is not due to any change in the Ti-N interatomic potential. Rather, the enhanced hardness must be due to nano-structural effects. It was also found that during pressurization the TiN nanoparticles developed a great deal of strain. This strain can be related to defects induced in individual nanoparticles which generates strain in adjacent particles due to the highly coupled nature of the system.

  16. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  17. The design of steel for high strength line pipe requiring excellent notch toughness and corrosion properties for arctic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCaux, G.; Golini, F.; Rayner, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    Due to the cold climate and environmental requirements of Alaska`s North Slope and Western Canada`s oil production areas, line pipe steels intended for use in these areas must display not only high strength as required, but superior toughness. Additionally,if the line pipe is to be used in aggressive sour gas (i.e., H{sub 2}S containing) environments it must also have excellent resistance to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Such a steel has been designed, through selective chemistry, clean steel-making practices, nonmetallic inclusion control, and hot mill process control, that is capable of meeting stringent line pipe specifications covering X65 grade line pipe in Arctic service temperatures. This paper also examined the effect that hot rolling finishing temperature had on notch toughness. Steel-making knowledge developed for lower strength, HIC resistant X52 grade steel has been employed for the development of a X65 grade steel. Results of trial heats will be presented.

  18. Characterization of microstructure, texture and magnetic properties in twin-roll casting high silicon non-oriented electrical steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hao-Ze; Liu, Hai-Tao Liu, Zhen-Yu Lu, Hui-Hu; Song, Hong-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2014-02-15

    An Fe-6.5 wt.% Si-0.3 wt.% Al as-cast sheet was produced by twin-roll strip casting process, then treated with hot rolling, warm rolling and annealing. A detailed study of the microstructure and texture evolution at different processing stages was carried out by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. The initial as-cast strip showed strong columnar grains and pronounced < 001 >//ND texture. The hot rolled and warm rolled sheets were characterized by large amounts of shear bands distributed through the thickness together with strong < 110 >//RD texture and weak < 111 >//ND texture. After annealing, detrimental < 111 >//ND texture almost disappeared while beneficial (001)<210 >, (001)<010 >, (115)<5 ? 10 1 > and (410) < 001 > recrystallization textures were formed, thus the magnetic induction of the annealed sheet was significantly improved. The recrystallization texture in the present study could be explained by preferred nucleation and grain growth mechanism. - Highlights: • A high silicon as-cast strip with columnar structure was produced. • A thin warm rolled sheet without large edge cracks was obtained. • Microstructure and texture evolution at each stage were investigated. • Beneficial (001)<210 >, (001)<010 >, (410)<001 > recrystallization textures were formed. • The magnetic induction of annealed sheet was significantly improved.

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase Mn-Bi nanosheets with ultra-high coercivity and significant anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rongming, E-mail: rmliu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: shenbg@iphy.ac.cn; Zhang, Ming; Niu, E; Li, Zhubai; Zheng, Xinqi; Wu, Rongrong; Zuo, Wenliang; Shen, Baogen; Hu, Fengxia; Sun, Jirong [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-05-07

    The microstructure, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase (LTP) Mn-Bi nanosheets, prepared by surfactant assistant high-energy ball milling (SA-HEBM) with oleylamine and oleic acid as the surfactant, were examined with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Effect of ball-milling time on the coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets was systematically investigated. Results show that the high energy ball milling time from tens of minutes to several hours results in the coercivity increase of Mn-Bi powders and peak values of 14.3 kOe around 10 h. LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets are characterized by an average thickness of tens of nanometers, an average diameter of ?1.5??m, and possess a relatively large aspect ratio, an ultra-high room temperature coercivity of 22.3 kOe, a significant geometrical and magnetic anisotropy, and a strong (00l) crystal texture. Magnetization and demagnetization behaviors reveal that wall pinning is the dominant coercivity mechanism in these LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets. The ultrafine grain refinement introduced by the SA-HEBM process contribute to the ultra-high coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets and a large number of defects put a powerful pinning effect on the magnetic domain movement, simultaneously. Further magnetic measurement at 437?K shows that a high coercivity of 17.8 kOe and a strong positive temperature coefficient of coercivity existed in the bonded permanent magnet made by LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets.

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure and Cargo FV set at High Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  3. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  4. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks: ï‚· Radiation - alpha,

  5. Validation of mathematical models for the prediction of organs-at-risk dosimetric metrics in high-dose-rate gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Cormack, Robert A. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Given the complicated nature of an interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy treatment plan, the use of a quantitative tool to evaluate the quality of the achieved metrics compared to clinical practice would be advantageous. For this purpose, predictive mathematical models to predict the D{sub 2cc} of rectum and bladder in interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy are discussed and validated.Methods: Previous plans were used to establish the relationship between D2cc and the overlapping volume of the organ at risk with the targeted area (C0) or a 1-cm expansion of the target area (C1). Three mathematical models were evaluated: D{sub 2cc}=?*C{sub 1}+? (LIN); D{sub 2cc}=?– exp(–?*C{sub 0}) (EXP); and a mixed approach (MIX), where both C{sub 0} and C{sub 1} were inputs of the model. The parameters of the models were optimized on a training set of patient data, and the predictive error of each model (predicted D{sub 2cc}? real D{sub 2cc}) was calculated on a validation set of patient data. The data of 20 patients were used to perform a K-fold cross validation analysis, with K = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20.Results: MIX was associated with the smallest mean prediction error <6.4% for an 18-patient training set; LIN had an error <8.5%; EXP had an error <8.3%. Best case scenario analysis shows that an error ?5% can be achieved for a ten-patient training set with MIX, an error ?7.4% for LIN, and an error ?6.9% for EXP. The error decreases with the increase in training set size, with the most marked decrease observed for MIX.Conclusions: The MIX model can predict the D{sub 2cc} of the organs at risk with an error lower than 5% with a training set of ten patients or greater. The model can be used in the development of quality assurance tools to identify treatment plans with suboptimal sparing of the organs at risk. It can also be used to improve preplanning and in the development of real-time intraoperative planning tools.

  6. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  7. Resource allocation using risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bott, T. F. (Terrence F.); Eisenhawer, S. W. (Stephen W.)

    2003-01-01

    Allocating limited resources among competing priorities is an important problem in management. In this paper we describe an approach to resource allocation using risk as a metric. We call this approach the Logic-Evolved Decision (LED) approach because we use logic-models to generate an exhaustive set of competing options and to describe the often highly complex model used for evaluating the risk reduction achieved by different resource allocations among these options. The risk evaluation then proceeds using probabilistic or linguistic input data.

  8. JV Task 99-Integrated Risk Analysis and Contaminant Reduction, Watford City, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Barry W. Botnen

    2007-05-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a limited site investigation and risk analyses for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at a Construction Services, Inc., site in Watford City, North Dakota. Site investigation confirmed the presence of free product and high concentrations of residual gasoline-based contaminants in several wells, the presence of 1,2-dichloroethane, and extremely high levels of electrical conductivity indicative of brine residuals in the tank area south of the facility. The risk analysis was based on compilation of information from the site-specific geotechnical investigation, including multiphase extraction pilot test, laser induced fluorescence probing, evaluation of contaminant properties, receptor survey, capture zone analysis and evaluation of well head protection area for municipal well field. The project results indicate that the risks associated with contaminant occurrence at the Construction Services, Inc. site are low and, under current conditions, there is no direct or indirect exposure pathway between the contaminated groundwater and soils and potential receptors.

  9. SUTTER BASIN, SUTTER & BUTTE COUNTIES, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SUTTER BASIN, SUTTER & BUTTE COUNTIES, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT 22 October 2013 ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Sutter Basin Project is to reduce overall flood risk to the Sutter Basin study area the risk to property damage due to flooding to the Sutter Basin area located in the Sutter and Butte

  10. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2014-02-11

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ?3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 ? V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 m?·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  11. P3.2. Climate change and agricultural production risks PI: P. Calanca1), J. Fuhrer (Deputy PI)1), Co-PI: B. Lehmann2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    residues, soils may turn from a C sink to a source of atmospheric CO2. SOM stabilization depends on residue directly by more frequent and persistent dry spells and high temperatures, and indirectly through shifts (frequency/persistence) increase crop production risks by affecting physical and chemical properties

  12. Validation of MCNP4a for highly enriched uranium using the Battelle process safety and risk management IBM RS/6000 workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negron, S.B.; Lee, B.L. Jr.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This document has been prepared to allow use of the Radiation Shielding and Information Center (RSIC) release of MCNP4a, which has been installed on the Battelle Process Safety and Risk Management (PSRM) IBM RS/6000 workstation, for production calculations for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This hardware/software configuration is under the configuration control plan listed in Reference 1. The first portion of this document outlines basic information with regard to validation of MCNP4a using the supplied cross sections and the additional MCNPDAT cross sections. A basic discussion of MCNP is provided, along with discussions of the validation database in general. A description of the statistical analysis then follows. The results of this validation indicate that the software and data libraries examined may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). When the validation results are treated as a single group, there is a 95% confidence that 99.9% of future calculations of similar critical systems will have a calculated k{sub eff} > 0.95. Based on this result, the Battelle PSRM Nuclear Safety Group has adopted the calculational acceptance criteria that a calculated k{sub eff} + 2{sigma}, {le} 0.95 is safely subcritical. The conclusion of this document is that MCNP4a and all associated cross section libraries installed on the PSRM IBM RS/6000 are acceptable for use in performing production criticality safety calculations for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  13. Risk Management Policy 1 Risk Management Policy (December, 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Risk Management Policy 1 Risk Management Policy (December, 2014) Risk Management Policy Responsible Governance Level Principle No. 2 - Risk Management Responsible Organisational Unit Audit & Risk CONTENTS 1 ........................................................................................................2 3.1 Effective Risk Management

  14. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF HIGHLY REDDENED Type Ia SUPERNOVA 2014J: PECULIAR PROPERTIES OF DUST IN M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawabata, K. S.; Akitaya, H.; Itoh, R.; Moritani, Y. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Maeda, K.; Nogami, D. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ui, T.; Kawabata, M.; Mori, K.; Takaki, K.; Ueno, I.; Chiyonobu, S.; Harao, T.; Matsui, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nomoto, K.; Suzuki, N. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tanaka, M., E-mail: kawabtkj@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared multi-band linear polarimetry of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN) 2014J that appeared in M82. SN 2014J exhibits large polarization at shorter wavelengths, e.g., 4.8% in the B band, which decreases rapidly at longer wavelengths, while the position angle of the polarization remains at approximately 40° over the observed wavelength range. These polarimetric properties suggest that the observed polarization is likely predominantly caused by the interstellar dust within M82. Further analysis shows that the polarization peaks at a wavelengths much shorter than those obtained for the Galactic dust. The wavelength dependence of the polarization can be better described by an inverse power law rather than by the Serkowski law for Galactic interstellar polarization. These points suggest that the nature of the dust in M82 may be different from that in our Galaxy, with polarizing dust grains having a mean radius of <0.1 ?m.

  15. Influence of Ar/Kr ratio and pulse parameters in a Cr-N high power pulse magnetron sputtering process on plasma and coating properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Theiß, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Brugnara, Ricardo Henrique, E-mail: brugnara@iot.rwth-aachen.de [Surface Engineering Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Preissing, Sven; Hecimovic, Ante [Institute of Experimental Physics II, Research Department Plasmas with Complex Interactions, Ruhr-University Bochum, D- 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Krypton is sometimes used in physical vapor deposition processes due to its greater atomic mass and size compared to argon, which leads to a lower gas incorporation and may have beneficial effects on kinetics of the coating growth. In this paper, the authors investigate the plasma composition and properties of deposited high power pulse magnetron sputtering Cr-N coatings for discharges with various Ar/Kr ratios and for various pulse lengths of 40??s, 80??s, and 200??s, keeping the average discharge power constant. The results show that an addition of Kr influences the discharge process by altering the ignition and peak values of the discharge current. This influences the metal ion generation and growth conditions on the substrate by reducing the nucleation site densities, leading to a predominantly columnar grow. However, the deposition rate is highest for an Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. The integral of the metal ion and atom emission exhibits the same trend, having a maximum for Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. By decreasing the pulse length, the deposition rate of coatings decreases, while the hardness increases.

  16. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2011-01-01

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  17. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  18. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01

    Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "T. (2003). Foundations of Risk Analysis : A Knowledge andNJ. Ayyub, B. M. (2003). Risk Analysis in Engineering and

  19. Growth, strain relaxation properties and high-? dielectric integration of mixed-anion GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Clavel, M.; Goley, P.; Hudait, M. K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Mixed-anion, GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials with a wide range of antimony (Sb) compositions extending from 15% to 62%, were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs substrates. The impact of different growth parameters on the Sb composition in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials was systemically investigated. The Sb composition was well-controlled by carefully optimizing the As/Ga ratio, the Sb/Ga ratio, and the substrate temperature during the MBE growth process. High-resolution x-ray diffraction demonstrated a quasi-complete strain relaxation within each composition of GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y}. Atomic force microscopy exhibited smooth surface morphologies across the wide range of Sb compositions in the GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} structures. Selected high-? dielectric materials, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were deposited using atomic layer deposition on the GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} material, and their respective band alignment properties were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed XPS analysis revealed a valence band offset of >2 eV for all three dielectric materials on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, indicating the potential of utilizing these dielectrics on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} for p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) applications. Moreover, both Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} showed a conduction band offset of >2 eV on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, suggesting these two dielectrics can also be used for n-type MOS applications. The well-controlled Sb composition in several GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} material systems and the detailed band alignment analysis of multiple high-? dielectric materials on a fixed Sb composition, GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, provides a pathway to utilize GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials in future microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  20. Risk and robust optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David Benjamin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    This thesis develops and explores the connections between risk theory and robust optimization. Specifically, we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a class of risk measures known as coherent risk measures ...

  1. Why Risk Assessment? Because ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    Why Risk Assessment? Because ... CORAS is committed to supporting international industry can take advantage of the CORAS technology in order to give their mission critical risk assessment assessment methodology integrating techniques and features from partly complementary risk assessment methods

  2. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  3. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  4. Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic Microscopy and Spectroscopy with High Spatial and Fast Temporal Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic, chemistry, and properties of energy storage materials Find general guiding principle for accelerated-situ chemical imaging and spectroscopic study of structure and chemical evolution of new energy storage

  5. Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk High Performance Materials for Energy Conversion Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

  6. Journal of Machine Learning Research 7 (2006) 2565-2583 Submitted 8/05; Revised 9/06; Published 12/06 Stability Properties of Empirical Risk Minimization over Donsker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    2006-01-01

    , stability, Donsker classes 1. Introduction The empirical risk minimization (ERM) algorithm has been studied); Koltchin- skii (2006) proved sharp bounds on the performance of ERM. Tools from empirical process theory averages play an important role in studying the behavior of the ERM algorithm. In this paper we

  7. Risk stratification of ICU patients using arterial blood pressure waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Mathura J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk for adverse events is very important to the practice of clinical medicine. Non-invasive ECG-based methods of risk stratification such as T wave Alterans, Morphological Variability, and ...

  8. RISK JOURNALS CATALOGUE 2015 www.risk.net/journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK JOURNALS CATALOGUE 2015 www.risk.net/journal #12;Risk Journals deliver academically rigorous accurately. DISCOVER RISK JOURNALS HOW CAN RISK JOURNALS HELP YOU? www.risk.net/journal Risk Journals deliver strategies, commodities, infrastructures, derivatives, regulation and more. Each quarter Risk Journals

  9. Risk Assessment Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or publicly owned treatment works) whose regulations and rule enforcement work to make sure that the risksRisk Assessment Sally Brown University of Washington Risk in our day to day routines One could argue that every thing that we do, every day is fraught with risks and that the safest approach is just

  10. Risk Assessment Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Risk Assessment ® Fact Sheet U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Building Strong ® Buffalo District June 2012 Risk Assessment A risk assessment is performed for hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites and chemicals in the environment. Information from the risk assessment is used to determine whether action

  11. Risk communications & emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, S.C. [EQUINOX Environmental, Inc., Shushan, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This talk outlines the interface between good risk communication and emergency planning. The major topics include the following: What is risk communication and how is it applied to emergency planning; crisis communication and the need to know and how to integrate crisis communication and risk communication; the face of the emergency: spokespersons, public information; The Media`s role in emergency Public information and risk communication; Developing the risk communication message; How to respond to continuing need for 24 hours communications; the EAS and Risk communication and Crisis communication; and finally where is risk communication heading and how it can help.

  12. Bacon butty cancer risk ONLINE REPORTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Bacon butty cancer risk ONLINE REPORTER Published: 31st October 2007 0 PROCESSED meats, including ham and bacon are such a high risk factor for bowel cancer they should be avoided completely, bacon, pastrami, salami, and frankfurters. However, not all minced meats and hamburgers were considered

  13. Results of a Quality Assurance Review of External Beam Radiation Therapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group's High-risk Neuroblastoma Trial: A SIOPEN Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaze, Mark N., E-mail: mark.gaze@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Dieckmann, Karin; Hoermann, Marcus [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria)] [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Gains, Jennifer E.; Sullivan, Kevin P. [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ladenstein, Ruth [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)] [Children's Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is important for local control in neuroblastoma. This study reviewed the compliance of plans with the radiation therapy guidelines of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group (SIOPEN) High-Risk Trial protocol. Methods and Materials: The SIOPEN trial central electronic database has sections to record diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy planning data. Individual centers may upload data remotely, but not all centers involved in the trial chose to use this system. A quality scoring system was devised based on how well the radiation therapy plan matched the protocol guidelines, to what extent deviations were justified, and whether adverse effects may result. Central review of radiation therapy planning was undertaken retrospectively in 100 patients for whom complete diagnostic and treatment sets were available. Data were reviewed and compared against protocol guidelines by an international team of radiation oncologists and radiologists. For each patient in the sample, the central review team assigned a quality assurance score. Results: It was found that in 48% of patients there was full compliance with protocol requirements. In 29%, there were deviations for justifiable reasons with no likely long-term adverse effects resulting. In 5%, deviations had occurred for justifiable reasons, but that might result in adverse effects. In 1%, there was a deviation with no discernible justification, which would not lead to long-term adverse events. In 17%, unjustified deviations were noted, with a risk of an adverse outcome resulting. Conclusions: Owing to concern over the proportion of patients in whom unjustified deviations were observed, a protocol amendment has been issued. This offers the opportunity for central review of radiation therapy plans before the start of treatment and the treating clinician a chance to modify plans.

  14. Risk stratification by analysis of electrocardiographic morphology following acute coronary syndromes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Philip Pohong

    2009-01-01

    Patients who have suffered an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at elevated risk of future adverse events, including fatal arrhythmias or myocardial infarction. Risk stratification--he identification of high-risk patients--s ...

  15. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-01

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  16. High Risk Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORK BREAKDOWNEnergy howBuilding America

  17. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  18. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  19. risk management annual report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    ____________________________________________________________________ 2 The ERM Process______________________________________________________________________ 28 The ERM Process in 2014 and Beyond and mitigating the risks that threaten its mission, the Office of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) was tasked

  20. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  1. Risk Management Guide Operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    01-05-15 Risk Management Guide Operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) The use of drones, model aircraft, and other UAV's pose a risk of injury and property damage and therefore, any flight of a UAV Canada Requirements UAV operations for University purposes are deemed by Transport Canada to be "non

  2. Learning and risk aversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  3. February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS By Joan S. Hash, Computer is the ability to iden tify and protect critical information assets. A sound risk management pro gram-30, Risk Management Guide For Information Technology Systems, by Gary Stoneburner, Alice Goguen, and Alexis

  4. NISTIR 8023 Risk Management for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with replication devices. Keywords 3D printers; 3D scanners; copiers; countermeasures; exploits; mitigation; multifunction devices; printers; replication devices; risk; risk assessment; risk management; scanners; security

  5. Sandia Energy - Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Probabilistic Risk Assessment Probabilistic...

  6. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  7. Investigation on the effects of ultra-high pressure and temperature on the rheological properties of oil-based drilling fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibeh, Chijioke Stanley

    2009-05-15

    Designing a fit-for-purpose drilling fluid for high-pressure, high-temperature (HP/HT) operations is one of the greatest technological challenges facing the oil and gas industry today. Typically, a drilling fluid is subjected to increasing...

  8. Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Risk, Coherency and Cooperative Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding 2011 1 / 30 #12;Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Outline 1 Risk Assessment Risk = Volatility? Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) Risk

  9. LONG-CHAIN POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID INTAKE AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO RED BLOOD CELL AND SERUM LONG-CHAIN POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS IN WOMEN AT HIGH RISK FOR BREAST CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Katherine

    2010-04-27

    A higher ratio of omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in breast tissue triglyceride (TG) has been correlated with increased risk of developing breast cancer. Before dietary recommendations can be made...

  10. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  11. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  12. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  13. High-Risk, High-Reward Simulations | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Koenig - November 06, 2013 Ramgen Power Systems is simulating equipment that will achieve carbon sequestration at a significantly lower cost than that offered by conventional...

  14. Personal Property

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-16

    This Guide provides non-regulatory guidance and information to assist DOE organizations and contractors in implementing the DOE-wide and site-specific personal property management programs. It supplements the policy, requirements, and responsibilities information contained in the DOE Order cited above and clarifies the regulatory requirements contained in the Federal Property Management Regulation (FMR) and specific contracts.

  15. Ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and dielectric properties of BiScO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3}-Pb(Cd{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} ternary high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Tianlong; Chen Jianguo; Dong Shuxiang; Wang Chunming; Yu Yang

    2013-07-14

    (0.95-x)BiScO{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3}-0.05Pb(Cd{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} (BS-xPT-PCN) high temperature piezoelectric ceramics near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) have been synthesized by traditional solid-state reaction methods. The microstructural morphology, phase structure, and electrical properties of BS-xPT-PCN ceramics were investigated in detail. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated BS-xPT-PCN ceramics have a pure perovskite structure. The coexistence of rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at MPB composition enhanced the polarizability by the coupling between two dynamically equivalent energy states, resulting in the improved piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties at MPB vicinity. The BS-xPT-PCN (x = 0.60) ceramics possess the optimal piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties with d{sub 33} = 505pC/N, k{sub p} = 55.9%, k{sub t} = 36.5%, strain = 0.23% (under the electric field 37.5 kV/cm), and P{sub r} = 39.7 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}. High temperature dielectric behaviors showed diffuse phase transition in BS-xPT-PCN ceramics. The Curie temperature T{sub c} was found to increase from 371 Degree-Sign C to 414 Degree-Sign C with x increasing from 0.58 to 0.62. All these results together with the good thermal stabilities make the BS-xPT-PCN ceramics promising candidates for high temperature piezoelectric applications.

  16. Collapse of ferromagnetism in itinerant-electron system: A magnetic, transport properties, and high pressure study of (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diop, L. V. B. Isnard, O.; Kastil, J.; Arnold, Z.; Kamarad, J.

    2014-10-28

    The magnetism and transport properties were studied for Laves (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} itinerant-electron compounds, which exhibit a temperature-induced first-order transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state upon heating. At finite temperatures, the field-induced metamagnetic phase transition between the AFM and FM has considerable effects on the transport properties of these model metamagnetic compounds. A large negative magnetoresistance of about 14% is observed in accordance with the metamagnetic transition. The magnetic phase diagram is determined for the Laves Hf{sub 1?x}Ta{sub x}Fe{sub 2} series and its Ta concentration dependence discussed. An unusual behavior is revealed in the paramagnetic state of intermediate compositions, it gives rise to the rapid increase and saturation of the local spin fluctuations of the 3d electrons. This new result is analysed in the frame of the theory of Moriya. For a chosen composition Hf{sub 0.825}Ta{sub 0.175}Fe{sub 2}, exhibiting such remarkable features, a detailed investigation is carried out under hydrostatic pressure up to 1?GPa in order to investigate the volume effect on the magnetic properties. With increasing pressure, the magnetic transition temperature T{sub FM-AFM} from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order decreases strongly non-linearly and disappears at a critical pressure of 0.75?GPa. In the pressure-induced AFM state, the field-induced first-order AFM-FM transition appears and the complex temperature dependence of the AFM-FM transition field is explained by the contribution from both the magnetic and elastic energies caused by the significant temperature variation of the amplitude of the local Fe magnetic moment. The application of an external pressure leads also to the progressive decrease of the Néel temperature T{sub N}. In addition, a large pressure effect on the spontaneous magnetization M{sub S} for pressures below 0.45?GPa, dln(M{sub s})/dP?=??6.3?×?10{sup ?2?}GPa{sup ?1} was discovered. The presented results are consistent with Moriya's theoretical predictions and can significantly help to better understand the underlying physics of itinerant electron magnetic systems nowadays widely investigated for both fundamental and applications purposes.

  17. Iterative Security Risk Analysis for Network Flows Based on Provenance and Interdependency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Iterative Security Risk Analysis for Network Flows Based on Provenance and Interdependency Mohsen high risk network flows and hosts in a high throughput network is a challenging task of network malicious and high risk network activities within a huge number of monitored network flows. To address

  18. Transgender Female Youth and Sex Work: HIV Risk and a Comparison of Life Factors Related to Engagement in Sex Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Perceived risks and bene?ts of sex work among transgenderfemale youth engage in sex work. However, the cluster or co-2008). Drug use, high-risk sex behaviors, and increased risk

  19. Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor Long Beach, CA 90802 in this self-insured program. The Office of Risk Management in the Chancellor's Office administers the general liability, workers' compensation, property, and professional liability programs. The State Office of Risk

  20. Risk Evaluation for CO{sub 2} Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-01-31

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO{sub 2} plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO{sub 2}-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  1. Risk Evaluation for CO2 Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup, Illinois Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, Ken; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO2 plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO2-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  2. High moisture corn stover pelleting in a flat die pellet mill fitted with a 6 mm die: physical properties and specific energy consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar

    2015-06-15

    The quality and specific energy consumption (SEC) of the biomass pellets produced depend upon pelleting process conditions. The present study includes understanding the effect of feedstock moisture in the range of 28–38% (wet basis [w.b.]) and preheating in the range of 30–110°C at two die speeds of 40 and 60 Hz on the physical properties and SEC. A flat die pellet mill fitted with a 6 mm die was used in the present study. The physical properties of pellets such as moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density, durability, and expansion ratio and SEC of the pelleting process are measured.more »The results indicate that the pellets produced have durability values in the range of 87–98%, and unit bulk and tapped density in the range of 670–1100, 375–575, and 420–620 kg/m³. Increasing the feedstock moisture content from 33% to 38% (w.b) decreased the unit, bulk and tapped density by about 30–40%. Increasing feedstock moisture content increased the expansion ratio and decreased the density values. A higher feedstock moisture content of 38% (w.b.) and higher preheating temperature of 110°C resulted in lower density and a higher expansion ratio, which can be attributed to flash off of moisture as the material extrudes out of the die. The SEC was in the range of 75–275 kWh/ton. Higher feedstock moisture content of 38% (w.b.) and a lower die speed of 40 Hz increased the SEC, whereas lower to medium preheating temperature (30–70°C), medium feedstock moisture content of 33% (w.b.), and a higher die speed of 60 Hz minimized the SEC to « less

  3. PROPERTY MANUAL Berkeley Laboratory Property Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    B: Sensitive Item Policy · APPENDIX C: Glossary Property Management System Review Property Manual of Energy (DOE). The Property Management charter ensures the efficient and effective protection and controlPROPERTY MANUAL Issued by Berkeley Laboratory Property Management Lawrence Berkeley National

  4. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report (Complete all sections of this form and return within 24 hours of incident to the Office of Risk Management Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Unsafe Conditions or Actions (describe all contributing

  5. Personal Property

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-06-09

    This Guide provides non-regulatory guidance and information to assist DOE organizations and contractors in implementing the DOE-wide and site-specific personal property management programs. Supersedes DOE G 580.1-1.

  6. OPERATIONAL RISK RODNEY COLEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Rodney

    the business environment. These include terrorism, civil unrest, systems fail- ings including hacking RISKS ARISING FROM BUSINESS ACTIVITY You lose business opportunities while your computer systems a business beyond those from its money-making activities. This is operational risk, often shortened to oprisk

  7. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  8. Recognizing liability risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, C.; Zimmer, M.J.; Karas, J.L. (Reid Priest, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Project developers, owners, investors, and lenders face potential liability for environmental contamination and cleanup. Being aware of the risks is the first step in mitigating future concerns. Independent power participants are wise to be concerned with a range of risks arising from off- or on-site contamination, civil and criminal violations of rules and regulations, and future compliance costs.

  9. High-resolution ALMA Observations of SDP.81. II. Molecular Clump Properties of a Lensed Submillimeter Galaxy at z=3.042

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yuichi; Hayashi, Masao; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved properties of molecular gas and dust in a gravitationally-lensed submillimeter galaxy H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) at $z=3.042$ revealed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We identified 14 molecular clumps in the CO(5-4) line data, all with a spatial scale of $\\sim$50-300 pc in the source plane. The surface density of molecular gas ($\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$) and star-formation rate ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$) of the clumps are more than three orders of magnitude higher than those found in local spiral galaxies. The clumps are placed in the `burst' sequence in the $\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$-$\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ plane, suggesting that $z \\sim 3$ molecular clumps follow the star-formation law derived for local starburst galaxies. With our gravitational lens model, the positions in the source plane are derived for the molecular clumps, dust clumps, and stellar components identified in the {\\sl Hubble Space Telescope} image. The molecular and dust clumps coexist in a similar re...

  10. The Ideal Evaluation of a Risk Prediction Model: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    The Ideal Evaluation of a Risk Prediction Model: A Randomized Clinical Trial Holly Janes Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 1/25 #12;Context Often a risk prediction model is developed to identify high risk subjects who can benefit from preventative therapy E.g. Framingham risk model to identify

  11. Risk Management Steering Committee MINUTES OF THE MEETING of October 26, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Risk Management Steering Committee MINUTES OF THE MEETING of October 26, 2009 3:00 ­ 4:30 pm ASB scheduled for #12;Risk Management Steering Committee Minutes October 26, 2009 Page 2 November 2nd through 5 would like to include students in residence as a high risk group. 4.2 Risk Register Update and Review

  12. Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment Anurag Srivastava 1 an event tree risk model for dam safety risk assessment in a highly flexible manner. This paper describes and a summary of plans for its further development. Keywords: Event tree analysis, dam safety risk assessment

  13. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  14. Carroll County- Green Building Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Maryland permits Carroll County (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-308(e)) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if it chooses to do so.* Carroll County has exercised...

  15. Testability of linear-invariant properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Property Testing is the study of super-efficient algorithms that solve "approximate decision problems" with high probability. More precisely, given a property P, a testing algorithm for P is a randomized algorithm that ...

  16. Model Risk in Finance Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Robert A.

    worth taking Statistical issues Multiplicity Transformations to obtain "independence" Orthogonality Year Valueof$100Investment Case-Shiller Housing Total Stock Market 3 #12;Wharton default Correlation risk Regulatory risk Reputation risk Operational risk Systemic risk, market risk

  17. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  18. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C

    2012-08-14

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  19. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  20. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the...

  1. High-pressure stability relations, crystal structures, and physical properties of perovskite and post-perovskite of NaNiF{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirako, Y.; Shi, Y.G.; Aimi, A.; Mori, D.; Kojitani, H.; Yamaura, K.; Inaguma, Y.; Akaogi, M.

    2012-07-15

    NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite was found to transform to post-perovskite at 16-18 GPa and 1273-1473 K. The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 Multiplication-Sign T (K). Structure refinements indicated that NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite have almost regular NiF{sub 6} octahedra consistent with absence of the first-order Jahn-Teller active ions. Both NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite are insulators. The perovskite underwent a canted antiferromagnetic transition at 156 K, and the post-perovskite antiferromagnetic transition at 22 K. Magnetic exchange interaction of NaNiF{sub 3} post-perovskite is smaller than that of perovskite, reflecting larger distortion of Ni-F-Ni network and lower dimension of octahedral arrangement in post-perovskite than those in perovskite. - Graphical abstract: Perovskite-post-perovskite transition in NaNiF{sub 3} at high pressure Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite (Pv) transforms to post-perovskite (pPv) at 16 GPa and 1300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 T (K). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antiferromagnetic transition occurs at 156 K in Pv and 22 K in pPv.

  2. Global Asteroid Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumpf, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Potentially impacting asteroids were analysed for their impact risk on the Earth. To this end, the Asteroid Risk Mitigation Optimization and Research (ARMOR) tool is currently being developed. The tool's modules are described and their validation is documented. Based on the asteroid ephemeris, the tool calculates the impact location probability distribution on the surface of the Earth (in the literature, occasionally referred to as risk corridor). NASA's Near Earth Object (NEO) risk list served as the source for asteroid ephemerides. The Line of Variation (LOV) method was employed to find virtual impactors. While offering a simple and fast way of identifying virtual impactors, the method provides a low impactor identification rate. This is because the search space is tightly constricted to the LOV and thus excludes virtual impactors located elsewhere in the asteroid position uncertainty region. The method's performance was evaluated and suggestions for improvements are provided. Application of the tool showed...

  3. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-7.

  4. Livestock Risk Protection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21

    Livestock risk protection (LRP) insurance policies protect producers from adverse price changes in the livestock market. This publication explains how LRP works, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these polices, and gives examples...

  5. Risk and Machine Protection for Stored Magnetic and Beam Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, B

    2015-01-01

    Risk is a fundamental consideration when designing electronic systems. For most systems a view of risk can assist in setting design objectives, whereas both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of risk is mandatory when considering protection systems. This paper gives an overview of the risks due to stored magnetic and beam energies in high-energy physics, and shows how a risk-based approach can be used to design new systems mitigating these risks, using a lifecycle inspired by IEC 61508. Designing new systems in high-energy physics can be challenging as new and novel techniques are difficult to quantify and predict. This paper shows how the same lifecycle approach can be used in reverse to analyse existing systems, following their operation and first experiences.

  6. Electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric SrTiO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findikoglu, A.T.; Reagor, D.W.; Rasmussen, K.O.; Bishop, A.R.; Gro Jia, Q.X.; Fan, Y.; Kwon, C.; Ostrovsky, L.A.

    1999-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of broadband (0{endash}2 GHz) electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting thin-film YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric single-crystal SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The waveguides exhibit strong dielectric nonlinearities, in addition to temperature-, dc-bias-, and frequency-dependent dissipation and refractive index. By using parameters determined from small-signal (linear) transmission characteristics of the waveguides as a function of dc bias, we develop a model equation that successfully predicts and describes large-signal (nonlinear) behavior. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique le Bihan Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique Le Bihan, Sophie Pardo, Patrice and their businesses contribute to defining their degree of risk perception and reliance on management tools. Beyond

  8. THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION AND STATISTICAL ESTIMATION1 R be confronted in numerous situations. Dealing with them systematically for purposes in risk management Statistical estimation is inevitably a partner with risk management in handling hazards, which may be known

  9. Optimal risk allocation for convex risk functionals in general domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Optimal risk allocation for convex risk functionals in general domains Swen Kiesel and Ludger R of cash invariant, strictly convex risk functionals on Ed the uniqueness of Pareto optimal allocations up¨uschendorf University of Freiburg Abstract In this paper we extend the classical optimal risk allocation problem

  10. Locke, Stock, and Peril: Natural Property Rights, Pollution, Peter Railton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    1 Locke, Stock, and Peril: Natural Property Rights, Pollution, and Risk* Peter Railton INTRODUCTION rightfully take it from him or hinder him in his enjoyment of it. His right entitles him to exclude others

  11. Property Claim Packet Instructions CONTACT UVAPD -security assistance & crime reporting; Facilities Management -building damage and clean up;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    all items until Property & Liability Risk Management approval to surplus or discard is obtained items until you seek and receive approval from Property & Liability Risk Management to surplus: FEMA requires additional forms and information. Property Claim Packet ­ Labor Spreadsheet (tab 3

  12. Risk Management Policy and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Risk Management Policy and Procedures #12;Risk Management Policy and Procedures Queen's University Belfast Updated January 2014 1. PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT 1.1 This Risk Management Policy (the policy explains the University's underlying approach to risk management, documents the roles and responsibilities

  13. Model-Driven Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    1 123 Model-Driven Risk Analysis The CORAS Approach | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | >springer.com ISBN 978-3-642-12322-1 Model-DrivenRiskAnalysis Mass Soldal Lund Bjørnar Solhaug Ketil Stølen Lund·Solhaug Stølen Lund · Solhaug · Stølen Model-Driven Risk Analysis The term"risk"is known from many

  14. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT January 2008 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT CP-320 714-278-7346 #12;2006 ­ 2007 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  15. Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference Risk Management Amidst Global Rebalancing 10 ­ 11 July 2014, Singapore The Risk Management Institute (RMI) at the National University of Singapore invites submissions for its 8th annual conference on risk management in Singapore on 10 and 11 July 2014. We

  16. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2006 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2005 ­ 2006 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  17. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2005 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Introduction The Office of University Risk Management provides resources, advice and training that allow

  18. Information Security Office Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Information Security Office Risk Management Exception Template #12;Risk Management Exception or Approved) 6/01/2013 CISO Jason Pufahl, CISO Approved 6/01/2013 RMAC Risk Management Advisory Council Reviewed #12;Risk Management Exception Template 2 | P a g e Please check one of the following: Requester

  19. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high-pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; H. Al-Ta'ani; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; P. Castera; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; D. Danley; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; P. B. Diss; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; H. F. Hamilton; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; S. Hasegawa; T. O. S. Haseler; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; N. Hotvedt; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kanda; M. Kaneta; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; G. W. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; M. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; B. Kimelman; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; R. Kitamura; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klatsky; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; S Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; S. Mohapatra; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; T. Nagae; S. Nagamiya; K. Nagashima; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; C. Nattrass; A. Nederlof

    2015-09-22

    Measurements of the fractional momentum loss ($S_{\\rm loss}\\equiv{\\delta}p_T/p_T$) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy ion collisions are presented. Using $\\pi^0$ in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$ and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb$+$Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of $S_{\\rm loss}$ as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, the number of quark participants, $N_{\\rm qp}$, the charged-particle density, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$. We find that the $p_T$ where $S_{\\rm loss}$ has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, $S_{\\rm loss}$ tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV, for sufficiently high particle densities, have a common scaling of $S_{\\rm loss}$ with $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$ and $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$, lending insight on the physics of parton energy loss.

  20. ITER risk workshop facilitator guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  1. Resources for global risk assessment: The International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) and Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullenweber, Andrea Kroner, Oliver; Kohrman, Melissa; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Rak, Andrew; Wexler, Philip; Tomljanovic, Chuck

    2008-11-15

    The rate of chemical synthesis and use has outpaced the development of risk values and the resolution of risk assessment methodology questions. In addition, available risk values derived by different organizations may vary due to scientific judgments, mission of the organization, or use of more recently published data. Further, each organization derives values for a unique chemical list so it can be challenging to locate data on a given chemical. Two Internet resources are available to address these issues. First, the International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) database ( (www.tera.org/iter)) provides chronic human health risk assessment data from a variety of organizations worldwide in a side-by-side format, explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations, and links directly to each organization's website for more detailed information. It is also the only database that includes risk information from independent parties whose risk values have undergone independent peer review. Second, the Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is a database of in progress chemical risk assessment work, and includes non-chemical information related to human health risk assessment, such as training modules, white papers and risk documents. RiskIE is available at (http://www.allianceforrisk.org/RiskIE.htm), and will join ITER on National Library of Medicine's TOXNET ( (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/)). Together, ITER and RiskIE provide risk assessors essential tools for easily identifying and comparing available risk data, for sharing in progress assessments, and for enhancing interaction among risk assessment groups to decrease duplication of effort and to harmonize risk assessment procedures across organizations.

  2. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  3. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  4. Intellectual Property

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenryInhibiting IndividualIntegrating Information,Intellectual Property

  5. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  6. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  7. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing founda/ons and advancing fundamental understanding #12;The High Energy Density developing innovative techniques to study the properties of instabilities in magnetized-high-energy-density

  8. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Structuring for technology risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klapper, M. (Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, New York, NY (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The Colver Power Project in Cambria County, PA, looked good in nearly all aspects, but lenders had concerns about startup problems encountered by earlier waste coal circulating fluidized bed projects. Nevertheless, a closer look at the operating history of the earlier plants showed possible risks could be handled.

  10. Effective risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, C.J. [Corpfinance International Ltd., Toronto (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    Most independent power financial proposals contain one or more elements of a non-recourse nature. Traditionally, this means prospective lenders will not have a substantial corporate credit or state guarantee standing behind a project loan, which forces attention to be focused on a single asset as the security and debt repayment source. While this major risk remains present, if properly understood, uncertainty can be mitigated and managed, including financial and development hazards inherent in hydropower projects. The specific risk points that a project developer or sponsor must satisfy from the lender`s purposes are numerous. However, they can be grouped primarily into seven key risk areas: project profile, site securing, power sales agreements, government agreements, in-service management, construction and insurance. While a developer strives for a minimum internal rate of return of at least 20 percent, the lender`s expectations are much more modest. Often, developers need to place themselves in the proverbial shoes of the other entity, namely the independent lender, whose only attraction may be some interest, fee income and placement of capital in a safe investment which provides a return in an orderly and uninterrupted manner. Only then is it possible to objectively view and effectively manage the risks mentioned earlier.

  11. Risk assessment meta tool LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a risk analysis meta tool--a tool that enables security analysts both to combine and analyze data from multiple other risk assessment tools on demand. Our approach was based on the innovative self-assembling software technology under development by the project team. This technology provides a mechanism for the user to specify his intentions at a very high level (e.g., equations or English-like text), and then the code self-assembles itself, taking care of the implementation details. The first version of the meta tool focused specifically in importing and analyzing data from Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) force-on-force simulation. We discuss the problem, our approach, technical risk, and accomplishments on this project, and outline next steps to be addressed with follow-on funding.

  12. Risk management with residential real estate derivatives : strategies for home builders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddins, Quinn W. (Quinn William)

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines why and how publicly-traded home builders might use index-based residential property derivatives to manage risk. After describing a number of alternative reasons for hedging, I argue for a paradigm for ...

  13. BSDES IN UTILITY MAXIMIZATION WITH BMO MARKET PRICE OF RISK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Christoph

    BSDES IN UTILITY MAXIMIZATION WITH BMO MARKET PRICE OF RISK By Christoph Frei, Markus Mocha This article studies quadratic semimartingale BSDEs arising in power utility max- imization when the market as important properties of the utility maximization BSDE. 1. Introduction. In this article we study quadratic

  14. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  15. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  16. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high-pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the fractional momentum loss ($S_{\\rm loss}\\equiv{\\delta}p_T/p_T$) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy ion collisions are presented. Using $\\pi^0$ in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$ and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb$+$Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of $S_{\\rm loss}$ as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, the number of quark participants, $N_{\\rm qp}$, the charged-particle density, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$. We find that the $p_T$ where $S_{\\rm loss}$ has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, $S_{\\rm loss}$ tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and ...

  17. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP and Chris Strickland. Energy Derivatives: Pricing and Risk Management (London: Lacima Publications, 2000). Chapter 4: Energy Forward Curves ­ Steven Errera and Stewart L. Brown. Fundamentals

  18. Financial Innovation and Portfolio Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simsek, Alp

    I illustrate the effect of financial innovation on portfolio risks by using an example with risk-sharing needs and belief disagreements. I consider two types of innovation: product innovation, formalized as an expansion ...

  19. A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1997-05-01

    Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

  20. A Qualitative Risk Analysis for the GPRS Technology Christos Xenakis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    A Qualitative Risk Analysis for the GPRS Technology Christos Xenakis1 , Danae Apostolopoulou2 a qualitative risk analysis of the General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) technology. GPRS presents several. The understanding gained from the analysis is used to classify the threats in low and high risk threats and define

  1. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low doseRadiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought Hongning Zhou*, Masao to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear

  2. Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehani, Ashish

    Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management Ashish Gehani1 , Lee Zaniewski2 , and K. Subramani2 1 SRI International 2 West Virginia University Abstract. Risk analysis has been used to manage the security of sys configuration. This allows risk management to occur in real time and reduces the window of exposure to attack

  3. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  4. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY 2009 ANNUAL REPORTS #12;2009 Annual Report Page 2 RISK MANAGEMENT I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management program is to compare the annual cost

  5. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2003-04 ANNUAL REPORT OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT #12;2 I. Introduction "Of course you have to go out on a limb sometimes, that's where the best outcome in a changing environment, is the essence of risk management.3 This Report was developed

  6. Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management 1600 Holloway Avenue, ADM 252 San Francisco, California OF RISK AND AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS Activity: San Francisco State University Campus Recreation Department participating in this Activity. I am aware of the risks associated with traveling to/from and participating

  7. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2010 Annual Report Page 2 I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management,538 $ 197,196 TOTAL Risk Management Costs $ 4,675,390 $ 4,541,975 $ 3,764,749 $ 3,703,959 $ 4

  8. Risk perception in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Rayner, S.F.

    1985-02-15

    The paper briefly reviews: (1) what risk perception means to most people in developing countries; (2) some of the modern-technology-related risks to which people in these countries are exposed; and (3) some research evidence about risk perception that gives hints about how such perceptions will evolve in developing countries. (ACR)

  9. Regulatory cost-risk study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This study is intended to provide some quantitative perspective by selecting certain examples of criteria for which estimates of risks and costs can be obtained, and the balance of the various risks, (i.e., internal versus external risks), can be put into perspective. 35 refs., 39 tabs. (JDB)

  10. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  11. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  12. Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-27

    This article examines the science-policy interface in volcanic risk assessment. It analyses empirical data from research on Montserrat, where new volcanic risk assessment methodologies were pioneered. We discuss the ways in which these methods...

  13. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Risk Analysis Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01

    BPA's operating environment is filled with numerous uncertainties, and thus the rate-setting process must take into account a wide spectrum of risks. The objective of the Risk Analysis is to identify, model, and analyze the impacts that key risks have on BPA's net revenue (total revenues less total expenses). This is carried out in two distinct steps: a risk analysis step, in which the distributions, or profiles, of operating and non operating risks are defined, and a risk mitigation step, in which different rate tools are tested to assess their ability to recover BPA's costs in the face of this uncertainty. Two statistical models are used in the risk analysis step for this rate proposal, the Risk Analysis Model (RiskMod), and the Non-Operating Risk Model (NORM), while a third model, the ToolKit, is used to test the effectiveness of rate tools options in the risk mitigation step. RiskMod is discussed in Sections 2.1 through 2.4, the NORM is discussed in Section 2.5, and the ToolKit is discussed in Section 3. The models function together so that BPA can develop rates that cover all of its costs and provide a high probability of making its Treasury payments on time and in full during the rate period. By law, BPA's payments to Treasury are the lowest priority for revenue application, meaning that payments to Treasury are the first to be missed if financial reserves are insufficient to pay all bills on time. For this reason, BPA measures its potential for recovering costs in terms of probability of being able to make Treasury payments on time (also known as Treasury Payment Probability or TPP).

  14. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  15. On the Effect of Local Grain-Boundary Chemistry on the Macroscopic Mechanical Properties of a High Purity Y2O3-Al2O3-Containing Silicon Nitride Ceramic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of oxidizing heat treatments and sintering additives, was found to result in a transition in fracture mechanism-sintering heat treatments have invariably been found to improve the strength, creep and toughness properties the mechanical properties, in terms of the effect of (i) post-sintering heat treatments and (ii) slight

  16. Disaster risk management in prospect mining area Blitar district, East Java, using microtremor analysis and ANP (analytical network processing) approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parwatiningtyas, Diyan E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Ambarsari, Erlin Windia E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Marlina, Dwi E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Wiratomo, Yogi E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com

    2014-03-24

    Indonesia has a wealth of natural assets is so large to be managed and utilized, either from its own local government and local communities, especially in the mining sector. However, mining activities can change the state of the surface layer of the earth that have a high impact disaster risk. This could threaten the safety and disrupt human life, environmental damage, loss of property, and the psychological impact, sulking to the rule of law no 24 of 2007. That's why we strive to manage and minimize the risk of mine disasters in the region, how to use the method of calculation of Amplification Factor (AF) from the analysis based microtremor sulking Kanai and Nakamura, and decision systems were tested by analysis of ANP. Based on the amplification factor and Analytical Network Processing (ANP) obtained, some points showed instability in the surface layer of a mining area include the site of the TP-7, TP-8, TP-9, TP-10, (Birowo2). If in terms of structure, location indicated unstable due to have a sloping surface layer, resulting in the occurrence of landslides and earthquake risk is high. In the meantime, other areas of the mine site can be said to be a stable area.

  17. University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report #12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk into strategic UW Enterprise Risk Management Framework . . . . . . . . . 6 Illustration of ERM Components

  18. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE risk assessments, the authors performed a probabilistic aquatic ecological risk assessment. The present study is the first ecological risk assessment for pyrethroids to quantitatively integrate

  19. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  20. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements ReportEESEcological Risk

  1. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-08-12

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation conditions.

  2. DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May...

  3. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  4. Promotion Of Physical activity through structured Education with differing Levels of ongoing Support for people at high risk of type 2 diabetes (PROPELS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Tom; Griffin, Simon; Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Brierly, Gwen; Dallosso, Helen; Davies, Melanie J.; Eborall, Helen; Edwardson, Charlotte; Gillett, Mike; Gray, Laura; Hardeman, Wendy; Hill, Sian; Morton, Katie; Sutton, Stephen; Troughton, Jacqui; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2015-07-02

    Away Plus Group, rep Time point from education attendance Type of contact and frequency Content (behavio 0 months First group session (3 hrs) • As the ‘Walking follow-on suppo pedometer supp • One week of se prompting partic 1 week First telephone call... activity associated with their current employment, and commuting assesses four modes of usual transport: walking, cycling, car, and public transport. It has shown moderate-to-high reliability for physical activity energy expenditure, and good validity...

  5. Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management 1. PURPOSE To support the University will be encouraged to speak openly and honestly. (iii) Managers will monitor risk and will disclose risks identified's risk appetite. 2.3. Risk management standards 2.3.1 The University's risk management framework

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  8. Alerting device and method for reminding a person of a risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Gunter, Wayne M. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-27

    An alerting device and method to remind personnel of a risk is disclosed. The device has at least two sensors, a logic controller, a power source, and an annunciator that delivers a visual message, with or without an audible alarm, about a risk to a person when the sensors detect the person exiting a predetermined space. In particular, the present invention reminds a person of a security, safety, or health risk upon exiting a predetermined space. More particularly, the present invention reminds a person of an information security risk relating to sensitive, proprietary, confidential, trade secret, classified, or intellectual property information.

  9. Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

  10. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Niobium for SRF Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Accelerator Division, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia (United States)

    2007-08-09

    Optimized mechanical and physical properties of high purity niobium are crucial for obtaining high performance SRF particle beam accelerator structures consistently. This paper summarizes these important material properties for both high purity polycrystalline and single crystal niobium.

  11. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Niobium for SRF Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2006-10-31

    Optimized mechanical and physical properties of high purity niobium are crucial for obtaining high performance SRF particle beam accelerator structures consistently. This paper summarizes these important material properties for both high purity polycrystalline and single crystal niobium.

  12. A critical look at risk assessments for global catastrophes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Kent

    2015-07-24

    Recent papers by Busza et al. (BJSW) and Dar et al. (DDH) argue that astrophysical data can be used to establish small bounds on the risk of a "killer strangelet" catastrophe scenario in the RHIC and ALICE collider experiments. DDH and other commentators (initially including BJSW) suggested that these empirical bounds alone do give sufficient reassurance. This seems unsupportable when the bounds are expressed in terms of expected cost -- a good measure, according to standard risk analysis arguments. For example, DDH's main bound, $p_{\\rm catastrophe} risk bounds by comparing risk policy in other areas. For example, it is noted that, even if highly risk tolerant assumptions are made and no value is placed on the lives of future generations, a catastrophe risk no higher than $\\approx 10^{-15}$ per year would be required for consistency with established policy for radiation hazard risk minimization. It is concluded that the costs of small risks of catastrophe have been significantly underestimated by BJSW (initially), by DDH and by other commentators. Lessons for future policy are proposed.

  13. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas 27 March 2014 ABSTRACT: Leon Creek is an important riverine system located on the western side of San Antonio in Bexar County Texas. The high flood that result in extremely rapid but relatively short-duration flood peaks and high velocity stream flows

  15. Managing risk in software systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, S.K.; Jansma, R.M.; Murphy, M.D. [and others

    1995-07-01

    A methodology for risk management in the design of software systems is presented. It spans security, safety, and correct operation of software within the context of its environment, and produces a risk analysis and documented risk management strategy. It is designed to be iteratively applied, to attain appropriate levels of detail throughout the analysis. The methodology and supporting tools are discussed. The methodology is critiqued relative to other research in the field. Some sample applications of the methodology are presented.

  16. Modeling Capacity Reservation in High-Tech Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    by rapid innovation and volatile demands. Capacity reservation provides a risk sharing mechanism, manufacturers are confronted with capital intensive facilities and highly skilled labor, operating under long. Physical expansion of manufacturing capacity involves enormous risk. This involves building new facil

  17. Section 10: Risk Management Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-04

    Dec 2, 2014 ... In this lesson we will discuss some concepts from risk management and insurance. We will go over the basic definitions and discuss some ...

  18. R00475--FM Risk Mgmt

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to project success. The risk identification process on a project is typically one of brain- storming, and the usual rules of brainstorming apply: * The full project team should...

  19. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  20. GAO-12-645, FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY: National Strategy and Better...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    employee work space to use space more efficiently. However, they still face long-standing challenges to managing these properties, including the high cost of property...

  1. Cascading Failure Risk Variation with Generator Dispatch and System Load Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezaei, Pooya

    2013-01-01

    Industry reliability rules increasingly require utilities to study and mitigate cascading failure risk in their system. Motivated by this, this paper describes how cascading failure risk, in terms of expected blackout size, varies with power system load level and pre-contingency dispatch. We used Monte Carlo sampling of random branch outages to model contingencies, and a model of cascading failure to estimate blackout sizes. The risk associated with different blackout sizes is separately estimated in order to separate small, medium, and large blackout risk. Results from N-1 secure models of the IEEE RTS case and a 2383 bus case indicate that blackout risk does not always increase with load level, particularly for large blackout risk. The results also show that risk is highly dependent on the method used for generator dispatch. Minimum cost methods of dispatch can result in larger long distance power transfers, which can increase cascading failure risk.

  2. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen; Norberg, Stefan T.; Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G.; Mohn, Chris E.

    2011-11-15

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  3. Composite Multilinearity, Epistemic Uncertainty and Risk Achievement Worth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Borgonovo; C. L. Smith

    2012-10-01

    Risk Achievement Worth is one of the most widely utilized importance measures. RAW is defined as the ratio of the risk metric value attained when a component has failed over the base case value of the risk metric. Traditionally, both the numerator and denominator are point estimates. Relevant literature has shown that inclusion of epistemic uncertainty i) induces notable variability in the point estimate ranking and ii) causes the expected value of the risk metric to differ from its nominal value. We obtain the conditions under which the equality holds between the nominal and expected values of a reliability risk metric. Among these conditions, separability and state-of-knowledge independence emerge. We then study how the presence of epistemic uncertainty aspects RAW and the associated ranking. We propose an extension of RAW (called ERAW) which allows one to obtain a ranking robust to epistemic uncertainty. We discuss the properties of ERAW and the conditions under which it coincides with RAW. We apply our findings to a probabilistic risk assessment model developed for the safety analysis of NASA lunar space missions.

  4. Author's personal copy Mechanical and electrical properties of aligned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T.

    Author's personal copy Mechanical and electrical properties of aligned carbon nanotube/C) composites rivaling or exceeding the mechanical and electrical properties of current carbon fiber fabricated CNT/ polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor composites with high degree of CNT alignment, and car

  5. Systemic risk analysis in reconstructed economic and financial networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of fundamental properties for economic and financial systems, such as systemic risk, is systematically hindered by privacy issues$-$that put severe limitations on the available information. Here we introduce a novel method to reconstruct partially-accessible networked systems of this kind. The method is based on the knowledge of the fitnesses, $i.e.$, intrinsic node-specific properties, and of the number of connections of only a limited subset of nodes. Such information is used to calibrate a directed configuration model which can generate ensembles of networks intended to represent the real system, so that the real network properties can be estimated within the generated ensemble in terms of mean values of the observables. Here we focus on estimating those properties that are commonly used to measure the network resilience to shock and crashes. Tests on both artificial and empirical networks shows that the method is remarkably robust with respect to the limitedness of the information available...

  6. Property Variability Stochastic Multiscale Analysis and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    Property Variability Stochastic Multiscale Analysis and Design of Engine Disks N. Zabaras, B. Wen in nickel-based superalloy turbine disks. Issues: Property variability of turbine disk due to high-dimensional multiscale sources Rolls-Royce RB211- 535 turbofan Nickel-base superalloy turbine disk Superalloy

  7. About the relevance ofthe concept of risk acceptability in the risk analysis and risk management process: A decisional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    About the relevance ofthe concept of« risk acceptability » in the risk analysis and risk management analysis and risk management are taken. This can be introduced by: ft) giving an image ofwhat are involved and participate to the risk management process. In France, the Toulouse disaster has revealed

  8. Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment_Form_Aug-2012 Workstation Risk Assessment Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment_Form_Aug-2012 Workstation Risk No Is the noise level acceptable? Yes No Notes: #12;Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment Assessment Form Workstation user: Location: Assessor: Date of assessment: COMPUTER Screen: Are the characters

  9. READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cina, Jeff

    READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management: riskmanagement ___________________________________________ (name/title of department supervisor) and the Office of Risk Management, (541) 346-8316, within 24 hours

  10. Therisk management-risk assessmentinterface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Therisk management- risk assessmentinterface Lastin afve-pan seies oncancernskassessmznt Paul.Evenso,Fuly sat- isfactorysolutioDsto the risk manage- menlDr.blemsof cancerafributableto industrialy relardE Dislc.,Jr. Hoqston,Tet:nO24 Everyonpracticesrisk management daily to rcduccrisksof nl3ny khds

  11. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  12. Climate risk Learning from practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Climate risk management in Africa: Learning from practice ClimateandSocietyNo.1 #12;The Climate and Society series is devoted to providing authoritative and accessible information on climate risk management of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI). IRI aims to contribute to sustainable living

  13. RMI 357e spring 2013 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    RMI 357e ­ spring 2013 1 Risk Management R M 357e Professor: Christopher McClellan Office: CBA 3 thomaspjacob@utexas.edu Syllabus ­ spring 2013 Textbook Risk Management for Enterprises and Individuals, v.1://students.flatworldknowledge.com/course/1112649 Risk Management: 357E. Risk Management - Upper-Division Course Principles of risk management

  14. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS the dynamic decision structure appropriately. In energy risk management, which is typically carried out ex, for integrating risk management into a stochastic optimization framework, risk has to be quantified in a definite

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100 Draft #12;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;11/20/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  3. Livestock Risk Protection Insurance for Fed Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    G2257 Livestock Risk Protection Insurance for Fed Cattle Jim Jansen, Beef Systems ExtensionNebGuidediscussestheuseofLivestockRisk Protection (LRP) Insurance as a price risk tool for fed cattle producers. The USDA's Risk Management Agency) Insurance. LRPis a price-risk manage- ment tool available to feeder and fed cattle producers as well

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/22/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/21/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  9. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Phillip, Bradley L. (20976 Fairmount Blvd., Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga County, OH 44120)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  10. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Phillip, Bradley L. (Shaker Heights, OH)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  11. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  12. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  13. Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non-destructive Borehole Logging Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

    2014-08-29

    Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1: Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2: Develop a correlation between field flow-property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow-properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3: Establish a method that uses the flow-property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in-situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased-hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predicteffective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

  14. PRA and Risk Informed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has introduced a risk based approach into Section XI that covers Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. The risk based approach requires application of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Because no industry consensus standard existed for PRAs, ASME has developed a standard to evaluate the quality level of an available PRA needed to support a given risk based application. The paper describes the PRA standard, Section XI application of PRAs, and plans for broader applications of PRAs to other ASME nuclear codes and standards. The paper addresses several specific topics of interest to Section XI. Important consideration are special methods (surrogate components) used to overcome the lack of PRA treatments of passive components in PRAs. The approach allows calculations of conditional core damage probabilities both for component failures that cause initiating events and failures in standby systems that decrease the availability of these systems. The paper relates the explicit risk based methods of the new Section XI code cases to the implicit consideration of risk used in the development of Section XI. Other topics include the needed interactions of ISI engineers, plant operating staff, PRA specialists, and members of expert panels that review the risk based programs.

  15. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  16. Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P.

    1998-12-01

    Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. This paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.

  17. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Risk Analysis Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01

    The Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), operated on behalf of the ratepayers of the PNW by BPA and other Federal agencies, faces many uncertainties during the FY 2007-2009 rate period. Among these uncertainties, the largest revolve around hydro conditions, market prices and river operations for fish recovery. In order to provide a high probability of making its U.S. Treasury payments, BPA performs a Risk Analysis as part of its rate-making process. In this Risk Analysis, BPA identifies key risks, models their relationships, and then analyzes their impacts on net revenues (total revenues less expenses). BPA subsequently evaluates in the ToolKit Model the Treasury Payment Probability (TPP) resulting from the rates, risks, and risk mitigation measures described here and in the Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS). If the TPP falls short of BPA's standard, additional risk mitigation revenues, such as PNRR and CRAC revenues are incorporated in the modeling in ToolKit until the TPP standard is met. Increased wholesale market price volatility and six years of drought have significantly changed the profile of risk and uncertainty facing BPA and its stakeholders. These present new challenges for BPA in its effort to keep its power rates as low as possible while fully meeting its obligations to the U.S. Treasury. As a result, the risk BPA faces in not receiving the level of secondary revenues that have been credited to power rates before receiving those funds is greater. In addition to market price volatility, BPA also faces uncertainty around the financial impacts of operations for fish programs in FY 2006 and in the FY 2007-2009 rate period. A new Biological Opinion or possible court-ordered change to river operations in FY 2006 through FY 2009 may reduce BPA's net revenues included Initial Proposal. Finally, the FY 2007-2009 risk analysis includes new operational risks as well as a more comprehensive analysis of non-operating risks. Both the operational and non-operational risks will be described in Section 2.0 of this study. Given these risks, if rates are designed using BPA's traditional approach of only adding Planned Net Revenues for Risk (PNRR), power rates would need to recover a much larger ''risk premium'' to meet BPA's TPP standard. As an alternative to high fixed risk premiums, BPA is proposing a risk mitigation package that combines PNRR with a variable rate mechanism similar to the cost recovery adjustment mechanisms used in the FY 2002-2006 rate period. The proposed risk mitigation package is less expensive on a forecasted basis because the rates can be adjusted on an annual basis to respond to uncertain financial outcomes. BPA is also proposing a Dividend Distribution Clause (DDC) to refund reserves in excess of $800M to customers in the event net revenues in the next rate period exceed current financial forecasts.

  18. Property rights, negotiating power and foreign investment: An international and comparative law study on Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotula, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Property rights are crucial in shaping foreign investment and its socio?economic outcomes. Their allocation, protection and regulation influence the way the risks, costs and benefits of an investment are shared. For ...

  19. Financial Policy Manual RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES 2601 Departmental Scope & Responsibility;Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2601 DEPARTMENTAL SCOPE & RESPONSIBILITY Subject: Risk Management & Insurance Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2011 Last Reviewed: March 2014 Resp. Office: Risk Management

  20. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY & PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY & PROCEDURES 1 INTRODUCTION This document sets out the policy and procedures for risk management within the University and replaces earlier documentation. The risk management process is formally integrated with the University's strategic planning process

  1. Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Yangbo

    We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

  2. Assessing Coronary Risk Assessment: What's Next?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    KZ, Steinman MA. Coronary risk assessment by point-based vs.Educa- tion Program risk assessment and potential for riskrecord-based cardiac risk assessment and identification of

  3. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built

  4. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS production and trading based on probabilistic knowledge about future uncertainties such as demands and spot- called polyhedral risk functionals which, though being non-linear mappings, preserve linearity structures

  5. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01

    carbon sequestration risk assessment, in Carbon Dioxidecarbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy Procedia,Risk Assessment Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

  6. Financial Risk Analysis and Heavy Tails 1 Historical Discussion of Risk and Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taqqu, Murad

    Financial Risk Analysis and Heavy Tails 1 Historical Discussion of Risk and Return ffl Brief history of financial risk ffl Mean­Variance Portfolio Theory by Markowitz ffl Risk and Factor models ffl Value at Risk 2 More on Value at Risk ffl Historical Simulation ffl Parametric VaR -- present different

  7. Financial Risk Analysis and Heavy Tails 1 Historical Discussion of Risk and Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taqqu, Murad

    Financial Risk Analysis and Heavy Tails 1 Historical Discussion of Risk and Return Brief history of nancial risk Mean-Variance Portfolio Theory by Markowitz Risk and Factor models Value at Risk 2 More on Value at Risk Historical Simulation Parametric VaR present di erent distributional models give overview

  8. Development of a Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

    2014-06-01

    The safety-goal policy of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has never included a true societal-risk goal. The NRC did acknowledge that the original goal for the risk of latent cancer facilities “was an individual risk goal not related to the number of people involved,” and stated that “a true societal risk goal would place a limit on the aggregate number of people affected.” However, this limitation was never satisfactorily addressed. Moreover, the safety goal has historically focused primarily on fatalities and latent health effects, while experience with actual nuclear accidents has shown that societal disruption can be significant even in accidents that yield only small to modest numbers of fatalities. Therefore, we have evaluated the social disruption effects from severe reactor accidents as a basis to develop a societal-risk goal for nuclear power plants, considering both health effects and non-health concerns such as property damage and land interdiction. Our initial analysis considered six different nuclear power plant sites in the U.S. for Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. The accident sequences considered for these two reactor types were station blackout sequences (both short-term and long-term SBO) as well as an STSBO with RCIC failure for the BWR and a Steam Generator Tube Rupture for the PWR. The source term release was an input in a RASCAL calculation of the off-site consequences using actual site-based weather data for each of the six plant sites randomly selected over a two-year period. The source term release plumes were then compared to Geographical Information System data for each site to determine the population affected and that would need to be evacuated to meet current emergency preparedness regulations. Our results to date suggest that number of people evacuated to meet current protective action guidelines appears to be a good proxy for disruption -- and, unlike other measures of disruption, has the advantage of being relatively straightforward to calculate for a given accident scenario and a given geographical location and plant site. Revised safety goals taking into account the potential for societal disruption could in principle be applied to the current generation of nuclear plants, but could also be used in evaluating and siting new technologies, such as small modular light water reactors, advanced Gen-IV high-temperature reactors, as well as reactor designs with passive safety features such as filtered vented containments.

  9. Spatial Analysis of Health Risk Perception, Agenda and Position Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science

    2003-01-01

    Risk perception. Ch 5 of Risk Analysis, Perception andworkplace methodology. Risk Analysis, 23, 311-324. Henwood,classic dilemmas in risk analysis. The perception of health

  10. Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk,...

  11. Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromiley, P; McShane, M; Nair, A; Rustambekov, E

    2015-01-01

    include enterprise-wide risk management, risk contingencyvalue of enterprise risk management has been accepted forAS/NZS, 1995. 4360 Risk Management Standard. from. http://

  12. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes trainings in risk management, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  13. Probabilistic risk analysis of building contamination Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    Probabilistic risk analysis of building contamination Introduction Accurate and verifiable, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Key words: Ventilation contaminant; Risk analysis; Probabilistic

  14. Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline - Final (May 2012) This electricity subsector...

  15. A brief discourse on credit risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiser, Georg Johannes

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews existing models for credit risk. Different approaches for credit risk for fixed interest investments and for derivatives are discussed....

  16. Risk Aversion in Inventory Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

  17. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO), ORISE provides crisis and risk communication support through the management of its Joint Information Center (JIC)...

  18. ESSAYS ON INTERNATIONAL RISK SHARING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Huy Quoc

    2014-12-31

    on consumption. Measuring the extent of international risk sharing (IRS) remains an open empirical question. This dissertation provides a new approach to measuring the extent of IRS for countries and conditions for the measure of consumption correlation to hold...

  19. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  20. Risk and Realities | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    knowledge of what is going to happen. We look to the newspapers as one source of the risk analysis. I and our representatives also visit with our congressional representatives...

  1. Inherited risk for common disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banava, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

  2. Utility View of Risk Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickham, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

  3. Risk Management In Major Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Scott William

    The integration of risk management in major projects within the construction and oil and gas industries has never been more significant especially as these projects are becoming larger and more complex. The increased ...

  4. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  5. Follow the money: how does industry pay programmers' salaries when the required intellectual property is offshored?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Gio

    discussions is the offshoring of intellectual property (IP), the capital complement of the labor and capital not address the risk of misappropriation of IP when offshoring, a related but orthogonal issue; it only covers processes that are legal. That risk is addressed throughout the ACM report [ACM:06, pp.11+25]. Tax

  6. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Alexander Studenikin

    2010-06-08

    A short review on electromagnetic properties of neutrinos is presented. In spite of many efforts in the theoretical and experimental studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties, they still remain one of the main puzzles related to neutrinos.

  7. INVENTOR'S GUIDE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    INVENTOR'S GUIDE TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER © 2002 UMBC #12;2 Inventor..................................................................................................................................14 #12;3 This "Inventor's Guide to Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer" is intended

  8. A Comprehensive Procedural Credentialing System / Curriculum for High Risk Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, R.; Atkinson, S.; Hughes, P.; Cepeda, J.; Southern, A.; Jwayyed, S.

    2015-01-01

    procedural credentialing curriculum at a large academicprocedure credentialing curriculum is generalizable to otherprocess standardized the curriculum for residency programs

  9. High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the work recently completed by the U.S. Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack (U.S. EMP Commission) 14 , the...

  10. United States General Accounting Office GAO High-Risk Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Financial Management 62 GAO/HR-97-2 Quick Reference GuidePage 4 #12;Contents Asset Forfeiture Programs 67 of the Office of Management and Budget, and the heads of major departments and agencies. James F. Hinchman-2 Quick Reference GuidePage 3 #12;Contents Defense Financial Management 8 Defense Contract Management 12

  11. Ensemble Procedures for Finding High Risk Prison Inmates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Berk; Jong-Ho Baek

    2011-01-01

    Handbook for Evaluating Prison Clas- si?cations Systems. SanDi?erences in Predictors of Prison Violence: Assessing theInstitute of Corrections Prison Classi?cation Peer Training

  12. Risk mapping of highly pathogenic avian influenza distribution and spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Williams, Richard A.J.

    2008-01-01

    . 2005, Kwon et al. 2005, OIE 2005). Recent inoculation experiments have indicated that landbirds can be infected and can become viremic to the point of being infective to other individuals, albeit not commonly (Boon et al. 2007). Particularly of concern.... Movements of birds and avian influenza from Asia into Alaska. Emerging Infectious Diseases 13:547-552. World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). 2005. Rapport de mission: mission to Russia to assess the avian influenza situation in wildlife...

  13. High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORK BREAKDOWNEnergy howBuildingMapcompressor rack

  14. SPRU Removes High-Risk Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIXAllegations Related to theDoeSPRU Removes

  15. NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power...

  16. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow: Johnson@dcs.gla.ac.uk; http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson Keywords: Safety; Composite Risk Management, ERAM, Risk Assessment; Military Systems Engineering. Abstract Risk management provides the most important

  17. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

    2006-01-01

    High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

  18. An Introduction to Risk with a Focus on Design Diversity in the Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C

    2012-08-13

    The maintenance and security of nuclear weapons in the stockpile involves decisions based on risk analysis and quantitative measures of risk. Risk is a factor in all decisions, a particularly important factor in decisions of a large scale. One example of high-risk decisions we will discuss is the risk involved in design diversity within the stockpile of nuclear weapons arsenal. Risk is defined as 'possibility of loss or injury' and the 'degree of probability of such loss' (Kaplan and Garrick 12). To introduce the risk involved with maintaining the weapons stockpile we will draw a parallel to the design and maintenance of Southwest Airlines fleet of Boeing 737 planes. The clear benefits for cost savings in maintenance of having a uniform fleet are what historically drove Southwest to have only Boeing 737s in their fleet. Less money and resources are need for maintenance, training, and materials. Naturally, risk accompanies those benefits. A defect in a part of the plane indicates a potential defect in that same part in all the planes of the fleet. As a result, safety, business, and credibility are at risk. How much variety or diversity does the fleet need to mitigate that risk? With that question in mind, a balance is needed to accommodate the different risks and benefits of the situation. In a similar way, risk is analyzed for the design and maintenance of nuclear weapons in the stockpile. In conclusion, risk must be as low as possible when it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk, and to help balance options in stockpile stewardship.

  19. Numerical Convergence Properties of Option Pricing PDEs with Uncertain Volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    is then simply the cost of this hedge. The principal source of risk is the price of the underlying assetNumerical Convergence Properties of Option Pricing PDEs with Uncertain Volatility D. M. Pooley , P, 2001 Abstract The pricing equations derived from uncertain volatility models in finance are often cast

  20. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and vendor technical or business problems. HPC, by its very nature, is an exercise in multi-level risk management. Every aspect of stewarding HPCCs into the petascale era, from identification of the program drivers to the details of procurement actions and simulation environment component deployments, represents unprecedented challenges and requires effective risk management. The fundamental purpose of this workshop was to go beyond risk management processes as such and learn how to weave effective risk management practices, techniques, and methods into all aspects of migrating HPCCs into the next generation of leadership computing systems. This workshop was a follow-on to the Petascale System Integration Workshop hosted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)/NERSC last year. It was intended to leverage and extend the risk management experience of the participants by looking for common best practices and unique processes that have been especially successful. This workshop assessed the effectiveness of tools and techniques that are or could be helpful in HPCC risk management, with a special emphasis on how practice meets process. As the saying goes: 'In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is'. Finally, the workshop brought together a network of experts who shared information as technology moves into the petascale era and beyond.

  1. PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    historically reliant on overseas imports are facing high feedstock prices and restricted access to crude oil or anticipated needs: > Transportation bottlenecks in the US Midwest are driving down North American oil pricesPIPEOR PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013 MICHAEL HOLDEN, SENIOR ECONOMIST #12;The

  2. Truck transport of RAM: Risk effects of avoiding metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1997-11-01

    In the transport of radioactive material (RAM), e.g., spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stakeholders are generally most concerned about risks in high population density areas along transportation routes because of the perceived high consequences of potential accidents. The most significant portions of a transcontinental route and an alternative examined previously were evaluated again using population density data derived from US Census Block data. This method of characterizing population that adjoins route segments offers improved resolution of population density variations, especially in high population density areas along typical transport routes. Calculated incident free doses and accident dose risks for these routes, and the rural, suburban and urban segments are presented for comparison of their relative magnitudes. The results indicate that modification of this route to avoid major metropolitan areas through use of non-Interstate highways increases total risk yet does not eliminate a relatively small urban component of the accident dose risk. This conclusion is not altered by improved resolution of route segments adjoining high density populations.

  3. Retail risk management pricing electricity to manage customer risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauldin, M.G.

    1997-06-01

    In the environment of direct customer access and supplier choice that is coming, experience teaches that customers will value the opportunity to control their price risk in a variety of ways. Suppliers that are sensitive to this desire and the varied ways of meeting it will have a distinct advantage. Large electricity customers are clearly awaiting the day the monopoly floodgates open because they believe cheap electricity from alternate suppliers will become available to them. But access and choice will mean more to utility retail customers than just the potential availability of low cost power. It will mean that customers will have the purchasing power to demand exactly what they want from their electricity provider. Some customers will want the lowest cost power available, which may mean that they purchase directly from the spot market. Others will want to use their new-found clout to purchase power of a certain guaranteed quality or reliability level, or to purchase on a pricing plan that fits their needs. For instance, business customers that sell goods under fixed price contracts may want to purchase electricity at a price that is fixed for a certain period - perhaps a quarter of a year. This article focuses on products that protect customers from the price risk they would face if they purchased directly from the spot market. First, it will address examples of products that are used to protect against price risk in the gas market, because these products indicate the type of offerings that may help electric customers manage price risks. Next, the article will highlight findings on desires of customers in the electricity market, and provide an overview of utility tariffs that can help customers control their price risk. Finally, it will discuss approaches that can be used to price these retail risk management products.

  4. A Risk Management Plan for Katharine Brumbaugh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    A Risk Management Plan for CubeSats Katharine Brumbaugh Ph.D. Student, Aerospace Engineering Review in Jan. 2013 · Selected for ELaNa in Spring 2012 (to be manifested) · Risk Management never truly Steps of a Detailed Risk Management Plan Main Step Sub-steps A. Identify Risks 1. Start with the mission

  5. Enterprise Risk Management Plan December 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Enterprise Risk Management Plan FY 2015 December 2014 #12;2 Enterprise Risk Management Plan, FY 2015 Introduction Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI/or the continuing operation of the Institute's research program. TTI is committed to the management of risk in order

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/18/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Pot. Ground. Oil OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & OB HE100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100% of Base;11/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW

  16. ECE/ENGR 531 Engineering Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Edwin K. P.

    ECE/ENGR 531 Engineering Risk Analysis Learning Objectives After Session 1, the student should process: Risk analysis. - Describe in detail what is involved in this step. - Provide practical pointers to support risk management: sticky density, spreadsheets, decision analysis, risk simulation, and design

  17. A Graphical Approach to Security Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    A Graphical Approach to Security Risk Analysis Doctoral Dissertation by Ida Hogganvik Submitted to security risk analysis i Acknowledgements First of all, I would like to thank my supervisor Ketil Stølen to security risk analysis #12;A graphical approach to security risk analysis iii List of Original Publications

  18. RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document # 04 to LBNL #12;RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document.03.001.000, Rev. 3 Issue Management Program Application 11-30-13 IMPACT Impact is determined by considering what

  19. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellekens, Michel P.

    1 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY 1. Risk Management 1.1 Responsibility of accountability, probity and compliance. Risk management is an essential element of the process of governance. 1.2 The HEA Code of Governance of Irish Universities emphasises the importance of Risk Management to good

  20. MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management About Queens College Often referred to as "the jewel.92$4#"!,&&%"*)0&$(.&/$6):,$)$-#")5,#$)*5$5,,4,#$&'%00$ &,/$%!$/6,7$6"4,$/"$&/)7$"*$/"4$"!$/6,%#$3,05&; Queens College master's degrees in Risk Management will help Master's Degrees in Risk Management Queens College offers 30credit MS in Risk Management degrees

  1. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  2. Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts ETH-Z¨urich 1. Basel II and its risk management consequences 2. An overview of credit risk models 3. Modelling extremes: use and limitations 4@math.ethz.ch Homepage: http://www.math.ethz.ch/embrechts #12;Lecture 1: Basel II and its risk management consequences

  3. Controlling risk prior to offshore application development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Controlling risk prior to offshore application development Cor-Jan Jager, Stefan Vos, Michiel;Controlling risk prior to offshore application development 2 Controlling risk prior to offshore application This master thesis investigates operational risk occurrence in offshore (custom) application development

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max. Speed-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  9. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT "Gateway to Excellence" U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District WHAT IS A RISK ASSESSMENT? The risk assessment is a method used to quantify threats). By examining the potential adverse effects caused by a hazardous substance, the risk assessment can help decide

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION FREQUENCY - PCF Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  12. Hidden Risks In The CDO - Squared Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Andrew T; Clunie, James; Bhatt, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    We show that there are risks (default location risk and overlap risk) unique to CDO-squared structures. These risks may not be well-understood by investors and credit rating agencies. As a result, the tranche of a CDO-squared ...

  13. SPACE WEATHER RISKS FROM AN INSURANCE PERSPECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    SPACE WEATHER RISKS FROM AN INSURANCE PERSPECTIVE 26.04.2011 Jan Eichner ­ Geo Risks Research #12, including geophysical hazards, weather-related hazards and potential consequences of climate change weather). · Linking geo-scientific research with business expertise in risk assessment, risk modeling

  14. Overview of the Hanford risk management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, T.G.

    1998-03-26

    The Project Hanford Management Contract called for the enhancement of site-wide decision processes, and development of a Hanford Risk Management Plan to adopt or develop a risk management system for the Hanford Site. This Plan provides a consistent foundation for Site issues and addresses site-wide management of risks of all types. It supports the Department of Energy planning and sitewide decision making policy. Added to this requirement is a risk performance report to characterize the risk management accomplishments. This paper presents the development of risk management within the context of work planning and performance. Also discussed are four risk elements which add value to the context.

  15. Recovery from Shared Risk Link Group Failures using IP Fast Reroute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    and randomly generated topologies. Index Terms--routing, failure recovery, shared risk link group (SRLG), fastRecovery from Shared Risk Link Group Failures using IP Fast Reroute Kang Xi, H. Jonathan Chao}@poly.edu, cguo01@students.poly.edu Abstract--Failure recovery in IP networks is critical to high- quality service

  16. A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

  17. Risk management in concurrent engineering in presence of intelligent agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    Risk management in concurrent engineering in presence of intelligent agents Taner Bilgi describe how a specific facet of systems engineering (risks) can be managed for large, concurrent with risks. Risk management has three stages to it: 1. Risk assessment 2. Risk analysis 3. Risk handling Risk

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;S: DP 415 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & LOW GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  7. Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Biomass Program works with industry, academia and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. Through research, development, and demonstration efforts geared at the development of integrated biorefineries, the Biomass Program is helping transform the nation's renewable and abundant biomass resources into cost competitive, high performance biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower.(From the Biomass Program's home page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/) The Biomass Feedstock Composition and Property Database allows the user to choose from more than 150 types of biomass samples. The specialized interface then guides the user through choices within the sample (such as "Ash" as a choice in the "Hardwood" sample and displays tables based on choice of composition properties, structure properties, elemental properties, extractive properties, etc.

  8. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives Ð To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process Ð To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying ¥ Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk ¥ Risk management

  9. On the Aggregation of Local Risk Models for Global Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Aggregation of Local Risk Models for Global Risk Management Greg Anderson Vice President: portfolio risk, total risk, optimization, positive definite. 2 #12;1 Introduction Portfolio managers is a revised version of an article written in 2003 under the title "Forecasting Total Risk". #12;Abstract Given

  10. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed Military Personnel After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated

  11. UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan -Page 1 of 9 Project Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page 1 of 9 Project Risk Assessment Plan Risk & Safety Office, and Crew member (1). #12;UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page 2 of 9 3. LOCATIONS IDENTIFIED to identify with this project #12;UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page

  12. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  13. Initial Decision and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-29

    Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

  14. SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Threat scenariobased security risk analysis using use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Threat scenariobased security risk analysis using use case modeling & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS security risk analysis; qualitative risk analysis; scenario method; use case the risks posed by security threats and prevent them effectively. Security Risk Analysis (SRA

  15. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  16. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  17. Reducing the risks of telehealthcare expansion through the automation of efficiency evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandru, Cristina Adriana

    2015-06-29

    Several European countries, including the UK, are investing in large-scale telehealthcare pilots, to thoroughly evaluate the benefits of telehealthcare. Due to the high level of risk associated with such projects, it ...

  18. Industrial Property Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will administer the property management program and establish policies, regulations and procedures. Verify that sound internal processes and good business...

  19. TJNAF Property Manual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANAGED BY JEFFERSON SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC FOR THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY May 2014 S UBMIITED By'...

  20. Properties of Biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials Academic Resource Center #12;Determining Biomaterial during testing. #12;Compression Testing · Performed mainly for biomaterials subjected to compressive