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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

High-rate HMDSO-based coatings in open air using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work deals with the high-rate and dust-free formation of carbon-containing silicon oxide (SiOC) coatings in open air without substrate heating using an atmospheric-pressure (AP) plasma jet. The AP plasma was excited by a 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) power. Hexamethyldisiloxane and oxygen (O2) were used as the source gases. By optimizing the O2 flow rate and RF power, SiOC films were readily fabricated at deposition rates higher than 100 nm/s without suffering from particulate contaminations of the film surface. Additionally, an inorganic SiO2-like film exhibiting O/Si atomic ratio of approximately 2 was obtained at a deposition rate of ~ 13 nm/s, the value of which is still greater than those obtained in other AP plasma sources. Further systematic studies are needed to see if good-quality inorganic SiO2-like films can be obtained with higher rates.

H. Kakiuchi; K. Higashida; T. Shibata; H. Ohmi; T. Yamada; K. Yasutake

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

3

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the major operating and maintenance issues for parabolic trough plants are minimizing heat loss and the eventual replacement of coatings and receivers. The issues are expected...

4

HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High Temperature Oxidation Performance of Aluminide Coatings  

SciTech Connect

Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation resistance of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. Steam and exhaust gas environments are of particular interest because alumina is less susceptible to the accelerated attack due to hydroxide formation observed for chromia- and silica-forming alloys and ceramics. For water vapor testing, one ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and one austenitic alloy (304L) have been selected as substrate materials and CVD coatings have been used in order to have a well-controlled, high purity coating. It is anticipated that similar aluminide coatings could be made by a higher-volume, commercial process such as pack cementation. Previous work on this program has examined as-deposited coatings made by high and low Al activity CVD processes and the short-term performance of these coatings. The current work is focusing on the long term behavior in both diffusion tests16 and oxidation tests of the thicker, high Al activity coatings. For long-term coating durability, one area of concern has been the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between coating and substrate. This difference could cause cracking or deformation that could reduce coating life. Corrosion testing using thermal cycling is of particular interest because of this potential problem and results are presented where a short exposure cycle (1h) severely degraded aluminide coatings on both types of substrates. To further study the potential role of aluminide coatings in fossil energy applications, several high creep strength Ni-base alloys were coated by CVD for testing in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO{sub 2} environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Such alloys would be needed as structural and turbine materials in this concept. For Ni-base alloys, CVD produces a {approx}50{mu}m {beta}-NiAl outer layer with an underlying interdiffusion zone. Specimens of HR160, alloy 601 and alloy 230 were tested with and without coatings at 900 C and preliminary post-test characterization is reported.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High temperature solar selective coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

Kennedy, Cheryl E

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Rating underground pipeline tape and shrink sleeve coating systems  

SciTech Connect

A rating system was developed for several coating types used for underground pipeline systems. Consideration included soil stress, adhesion, surface preparation, cathodic protection (CP) shielding, CP requirements, handling and construction, repair, field joint system, bends and other components, and the application process. Polyethylene- and polyvinyl chloride-backed tapes, woven polyolefin geotextile fabric (WGF)-backed tapes, hot-applied tapes, petrolatum- and wax-based tapes, and shrink sleeves were evaluated. WGF-backed tapes had the highest rating.

Norsworthy, R.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Project Profile: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The University of California San Diego, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), is developing a new low-cost and scalable process for fabricating spectrally selective coatings (SSCs) to be used in solar absorbers for high-temperature CSP systems.

9

Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2...

11

High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Iron Aluminide Alloys and Coatings  

SciTech Connect

A multi-year effort has been focused on optimizing the long-term oxidation performance of ingot-processed (IP) and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe{sub 3}Al and iron aluminide-based coatings. Based on results from several composition iterations, a Hf-doped alloy (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05at.%Hf) has been developed with significantly better high temperature oxidation resistance than other iron aluminides. The scale adhesion is not significantly better; however, the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale grows at a slower rate, approximately a factor of 10 less than undoped iron aluminide. The benefit of Hf is greatest at 1100-1200 C. Long-term oxidation resistance of commercially fabricated ODS Fe{sub 3}Al has been determined and compared to commercially available ODS FeCrAl. Scale spallation rates for ODS Fe{sub 3}Al are higher than for ODS FeCrAl. To complement studies of iron-aluminide weld-overlay coatings, carbon steel was coated with Fe-Al-Cr by thermal spraying. These specimens were then exposed in air at 900 and 1000 C and in air-1%SO{sub 2} at 800 C. Most likely due to an inadequate aluminum concentration in the coatings, continuous protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} could not be maintained and, consequently, the corrosion performance was significantly worse than what is normally observed for Fe{sub 3}Al.

Pint, B.A.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

High temperature low friction surface coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Performance Nanostructured High-Performance Nanostructured Coating to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

14

Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

SciTech Connect

High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

Severs, Kevin

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Air quality rules boost high-solids coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air quality rules boost high-solids coatings ... It's been, on the horizon for a long time: Ever since California passed Rule 66, in 1966, limiting solvent emissions, and the Environmental Protection Agency tightened state requirements for air quality, industries using large quantities of coatings have known they would have to find substitutes for or ways to clean up solvent coatings emissions. ...

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

High repetition rate fiber lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Colored solar-thermal absorbing coatings with high absorptance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It's difficult to obtain different color appearance and keep high absorptance simultaneously. We introduced AR films into solar-thermal absorbing coatings to tune the color appearance...

Wang, Shao-Wei; Chen, Feiliang; Liu, Xingxing; Wang, Xiaofang; Yu, Liming; Lu, Wei

19

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. 2 figs.

Park, J.H.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers  

SciTech Connect

The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

High Temperature Thermal Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Magnetron-sputtered Homogeneous CrAlON Coatings on 430 Steel  

SciTech Connect

The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigated the performance of steel plates with homogenous coatings of CrAlON (oxynitrides). The coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering, with Ar as a sputtering gas. Oxygen in these coatings was not intentionally added. Oxygen might have come through contaminated nitrogen gas bottle, leak in the chamber or from the partial pressure of water vapors. Nitrogen was added during the growth process to get oxynitride coating. The Cr/Al composition ratio in the coatings was varied in a combinatorial approach. The coatings were subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 deg. C. The composition of the coated plates and the rate of oxidation were characterized using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From our results, we conclude that Al rich coatings are more susceptible to oxidation than Cr rich coatings.

Kayani, A.; Wickey, K. J.; Nandasiri, M. I.; Moore, A.; Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Gao, X. [Western Michigan University-Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Smith, R. J.; Buchanan, T. L.; Priyantha, W.; Kopczyk, M.; Gannon, P. E. [Montana State University-Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Gorokhovsky, V. I. [Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC-Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Copper coated carbon fiber reinforced plastics for high and ultra high vacuum applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used copper-coated carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CuCFRP) for the construction of high and ultra-high vacuum recipients. The vacuum performance is found to be comparable to typical stainless steel used for this purpose. In test recipients we have reached pressures of 2E-8 mbar and measured a desorption rate of 1E-11 mbar*liter/s/cm^2; no degradation over time (2 years) has been found. Suitability for baking has been found to depend on the CFRP production process, presumably on the temperature of the autoclave curing. Together with other unique properties of CuCFRP such as low weight and being nearly non-magnetic, this makes it an ideal material for many high-end vacuum applications.

Burri, F; Feusi, P; Henneck, R; Kirch, K; Lauss, B; Ruettimann, P; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Schnabel, A; Voigt, J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Current status and future development of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coated particles were first invented by Roy Huddle in Harwell 1957. Through five decades of development, the German UO2 coated particle and US LEU UCO coated particle represent the highly successful coated particle designs up to now. In this paper, current status as well as the failure mechanisms of coated particle so far is reviewed and discussed. The challenges associated with high temperatures for coated particles applied in future VHTR are evaluated. And future development prospects of advanced coated particle suited for higher temperatures are presented. According to the past coated fuel particle development experience, it is unwise to make multiple simultaneous changes in the coated particle design. Two advanced designs which are modifications of standard German UO2 coated particle (UO2? herein) and US UCO coated particle (TRIZO) are promising and feasible under the world-wide cooperations and efforts.

X.W. Zhou; C.H. Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution  

SciTech Connect

High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B., E-mail: Narendra.Dahotre@unt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle, 305310 Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Controlling the degradation rate of bioactive magnesium implants by electrophoretic deposition of akermanite coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to improve the corrosion resistance and the surface bioactivity of biodegradable magnesium alloys, a nanostructured akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) coating was grown on AZ91 magnesium alloy through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) assisted with micro arc oxidation (MAO) method. The crystalline structures, morphologies and compositions of samples were characterized by X–ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The in vitro bio–corrosion (biodegradability) and bioactivity behaviors of samples were investigated by electrochemical and immersion tests. The experimental results indicated that the nanostructured akermanite coating could slow down the corrosion rate and improve the in vitro bioactivity of biodegradable magnesium alloy. Thus, magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured akermanite may be a promising candidate to be used as biodegradable bone implants.

Mehdi Razavi; Mohammadhossein Fathi; Omid Savabi; Seyed Mohammad Razavi; Batoul Hashemi Beni; Daryoosh Vashaee; Lobat Tayebi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rate-dependent deformation behavior of Zr-based metallic-glass coatings examined by nanoindentation.  

SciTech Connect

Zr-based metallic-glass coatings with micrometer-scale thickness are prepared by the radio-frequency magnetron-sputtering technique on silicon substrates. Using the load- and displacement-sensing nanoindentation technique, we have examined the dependence of their deformation behavior, especially the indentation hardness, on the strain rate and maximum indentation depth. For shallow indentation in which the substrate effect can be neglected, the increase of the penetration rate leads to the decrease of the hardness. This seemingly "negative" strain-rate-sensitivity is actually a result of the dependence of the degree of elastic deformation on the effective strain rate. The coating interface will block the shear-band propagation and promote the shear-band multiplication, so that the plastic flow is much easier to occur as the increase of the maximum penetration depth from a few percent of, to that comparable to, the coating thickness. We use a power-law viscoplastic constitutive relationship to illustrate key issues related to the indentation response of rate-dependent materials, while a phenomenological viscoplastic model with strain softening behavior is used to understand the unique features of the inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses. The scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to examine the shear bands and pileup around the indents.

Liu, F. X. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microemulsification polymerization of styrene stabilized by a nonionic surfactant and reactive cosurfactant (E39), the measurement of ethoxylation in nonionic systems (E40), and the study of anionic polyurethane ionomer dispersants in water-soluble baking enamels (E41) were also reported during this period. ... Other applications of SEM included the characterization of paper coatings (J11), the degradation of epoxy aerosol can linings when exposed to fluorocarbon propellants (J12), the use of stainless steel as a protective pigment for steel structures (J13), the adhesion of an acrylic primer to pine (J14), and the wear behavior of coatings applied using accelerated electrospark deposition (J15). ...

Dennis G. Anderson

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications  

SciTech Connect

Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

Dillon, A. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Thermo-optic noise in coated mirrors for high-precision optical measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fluctuations in the coatings used to make high-reflectors are becoming significant noise sources in precision optical measurements and are particularly relevant to advanced gravitational wave detectors. There are two recognized sources of coating thermal noise, mechanical loss and thermal dissipation. Thermal dissipation causes thermal fluctuations in the coating which produce noise via the thermo-elastic and thermo-refractive mechanisms. We treat these mechanisms coherently, give a correction for finite coating thickness, and evaluate the implications for Advanced LIGO.

M. Evans; S. Ballmer; M. Fejer; P. Fritschel; G. Harry; G. Ogin

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates ... Figure 1 Bright-field transmission electron micrographs of the (a) uncoated and (b) W-coated alumina aerogel (6 ALD cycles), and the (c) uncoated and (b) W-coated germania aerogel (6 ALD cycles). ... For the alumina aerogel, the coating consists of crystalline W nanoparticles, ?2 nm in diameter, uniformly deposited on the surfaces of the nanoleaflets (Figure 1b). ...

Theodore F. Baumann; Juergen Biener; Yinmin M. Wang; Sergei O. Kucheyev; Erik J. Nelson; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.; Jeffrey W. Elam; Michael J. Pellin; Alex V. Hamza

2006-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

Chow, Robert (Livermore, CA); Loomis, Gary E. (Livermore, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Dry coating of micronized API powders for improved dissolution of directly compacted tablets with high drug loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by our recent study showing improved flow and dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) powders (20 ?m) produced via simultaneous micronization and surface modification through continuous fluid energy milling (FEM) process, the performance of blends and direct compacted tablets with high drug loading is examined. Performance of 50 ?m API powders dry coated without micronization is also considered for comparison. Blends of micronized, non-micronized, dry coated or uncoated API powders at 30, 60 and 70% drug loading, are examined. The results show that the blends containing dry coated API powders, even micronized ones, have excellent flowability and high bulk density compared to the blends containing uncoated API, which are required for direct compaction. As the drug loading increases, the difference between dry coated and uncoated blends is more pronounced, as seen in the proposed bulk density-FFC phase map. Dry coating led to improved tablet compactibility profiles, corresponding with the improvements in blend compressibility. The most significant advantage is in tablet dissolution where for all drug loadings, the t80 for the tablets with dry coated \\{APIs\\} was well under 5 min, indicating that this approach can produce nearly instant release direct compacted tablets at high drug loadings.

Xi Han; Chinmay Ghoroi; Rajesh Davé

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

High temperature erosion and fatigue resistance of a detonation gun chromium carbide coating for steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

Chromium carbide based detonation gun coatings have been shown to be capable of protecting steam turbine components from particle erosion. To be usable, however, erosion resistant coatings must not degrade the fatigue characteristics of the coated components. Recent studies of the fatigue properties of a detonation gun coated martensitic substrate at 538 C (1,000 F) will be presented with an emphasis on its long term performance. This study will show the retention of acceptable fatigue performance of coated substrates into the high cycle regime, and will include a discussion on the mechanism of fatigue.

Quets, J.M.; Walsh, P.N. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Srinivasan, V. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Tucker, R.C. Jr. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Simulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the deformation resistance of actual EB-PVD layers and its application to a range of thermal barrier materials [9Simulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are affected by their high temperature mechanical properties: especially

Hutchinson, John W.

40

High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production plants due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes have been shown to operate in high temperature gaseous environments that are similar to those found in fossil fuel combustors. ECR probes are rarely used in energy production plants at the present time, but if they were more fully understood, corrosion could become a process variable at the control of plant operators. Research is being conducted to understand the nature of these probes. Factors being considered are values selected for the Stern-Geary constant, the effect of internal corrosion, and the presence of conductive corrosion scales and ash deposits. The nature of ECR probes will be explored in a number of different atmospheres and with different electrolytes (ash and corrosion product). Corrosion rates measured using an electrochemical multi-technique capabilities instrument will be compared to those measured using the linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. In future experiments, electrochemical corrosion rates will be compared to penetration corrosion rates determined using optical profilometry measurements.

Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Corrosion behavior of zirconia-coated Hastelloy X in a high-temperature helium environment  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion behavior of Hastelloy X coated with (NiCrAl)/(ZrO/sub 2/-CaC/sub 2/) was examined, after serving as the liner tube of helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) hot gas duct. The Hastelloy X with the ceramic coating system was exposed to high-temperature helium gas for --6000 h. The compositions of oxide films formed on Hastelloy X were entirely different between the noncoated and ceramic-coated tubes.

Kondo, Y.; Fukaya, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at T>500 C. (NREL) * Annealing studies of Ti:Si films undertaken. 36:64 composition film stable up to T 1150 C. * Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) was calculated from...

43

Wear Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Aluminum Oxide Coating in Marine and High-Temperature Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide (Al2O3) coatings offer excellent wear resistance, corrosion resistance, heat, and thermal...1-6...). These coatings have to operate under severe conditions, such as high load, high s...

Anup Kumar Keshri; Arvind Agarwal

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials highmetalremovalprocessfactsheet.pdf More...

45

High-Frame-Rate Oil Film Interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video to which this abstract relates contains visualization of the response of a laminar boundary layer to a sudden puff from a small hole. The boundary layer develops on a flat plate in a wind tunnel; the hole is located at a streamwise Reynolds number of 100,000. The visualization of the boundary layer response is accomplished using interferometry of a transparent, thin film of oil placed on the surface immediately downstream of the hole and with its leading edge perpendicular to the direction of flow. Through lubrication theory, it is understood that the rate of change of the spacing of the interference fringes is proportional to the skin friction at any instant. For reference, a small disk-shaped protrusion of the type often used to trip the boundary layer in wind model tunnel testing is also shown. Three cases with different puff strengths are included. Using a high-speed commercial camera, frame rates in excess of 1000/sec have been recorded; the video shown here was taken at 24 frame...

White, Jonathan C; Chen, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is developing, characterizing, and refining advanced solar-selective coatings with high solar-weighted absorptivity (a > 0.95) and low emittance (e

48

High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

1983-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

A simple, high-yield, apparatus for NEG coating of vacuum beamline elements  

SciTech Connect

Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) materials are extremely useful in vacuum systems for achieving Ultra High Vacuum. Recently, these materials have been used to coat the inner surfaces of vacuum components, acting as an internal, passive, vacuum pump. We have constructed a low cost apparatus, which allows coating of very small diameter vacuum tubes, used as differential pumping stages. Despite the relative ease of construction, we are routinely able to achieve high coating yields. We further describe an improvement to our system, which is able to achieve the same yield, at an even lower complexity by using an easily manufactured permanent magnet arrangement. The designs described are extendible to virtually any combination of length and diameter of the components to be coated.

Ron, Guy; Oort, Ron; Lee, Daniel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Challenges Associated with High Burnup and High Temperature for UO2 TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The fuel service conditions for the DOE Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be challenging. All major fuel related design parameters (burnup, temperature, fast neutron fluence, power density, particle packing fraction) exceed the values that were qualified in the successful German UO2 TRISO-coated particle fuel development program in the 1980s. While TRISO-coated particle fuel has been irradiated at NGNP relevant levels for two or three of the design parameters, no data exist for TRISO-coated particle fuel for all five parameters simultaneously. Of particular concern are the high burnup and high temperatures expected in the NGNP. In this paper, where possible, we evaluate the challenges associated with high burnup and high temperature quantitatively by examining the performance of the fuel in terms of different known failure mechanisms. Potential design solutions to ameliorate the negative effects of high burnup and high temperature are also discussed.

David Petti; John Maki

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High Density Infrared (HDI) Transient Liquid Coatings for Improved Wear and Corrosion Resistance  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Materials Resources International and an industry team of participants to develop, evaluate and understand how high density infrared heating technology could be used to improve infiltrated carbide wear coatings and/or to densify sprayed coatings. The research included HDI fusion evaluations of infiltrated carbide suspensions such (BrazeCoat® S), composite suspensions with tool steel powders, thermally sprayed Ni-Cr- B-Si (self fluxing alloy) and nickel powder layers. The applied work developed practical HDI / transient liquid coating (TLC) procedures on test plates that demonstrated the ability to fuse carbide coatings for industrial applications such as agricultural blades, construction and mining vehicles. Fundamental studies helped create process models that led to improved process understanding and control. The coating of agricultural blades was demonstrated and showed the HDI process to have the ability to fuse industrial scale components. Sliding and brasive wear tests showed that high degree of wear resistance could be achieved with the addition of tool steel powders to carbide particulate composites.

Ronald W. Smith

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel  

SciTech Connect

A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Patterned Growth of High-quality Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes from Dip-coated Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Patterned Growth of High-quality Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes from Dip-coated Catalyst Rong the sintering of catalyst into Si at high temperature, the difference in surface wettability between Si and SiO2. The conventional way to pattern CNT growth involves selective sputtering (evaporation) of metal catalyst through

Maruyama, Shigeo

54

Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

water droplets falling on a flat, dust-covered surface. The research team is exploring materials with high melting temperatures, intrinsic oxidation resistance, high thermal...

55

Electrochemical corrosion rate probes for high temperature energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes were constructed and exposed along with mass loss coupons in a N2/O2/CO2/H2O environment to determine ECR probe operating characteristics. Temperatures ranged from 450 to 800 C and both ECR probes and mass loss coupons were coated with ash. Results are presented in terms of the probe response to temperature, the measured zero baseline, and the quantitative nature of the probes. The effect of Stern-Geary constant and the choice of electrochemical technique used to measure the corrosion rate are also discussed. ECR probe corrosion rates were a function of time, temperature, and process environment and were found to be quantitative for some test conditions. Measured Stern-Geary constants averaged 0.0141 V/decade and the linear polarization technique was found to be more quantitative than the electrochemical noise technique.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, M.S. (InterCorr International Inc.); Eden, D.A. (InterCorr International Inc.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

C/CrC nanocomposite coating deposited by magnetron sputtering at high ion irradiation conditions  

SciTech Connect

CrC with the fcc NaCl (B1) structure is a metastable phase that can be obtained under the non-equilibrium conditions of high ion irradiation. A nano-composite coating consisting of amorphous carbon embedded in a CrC matrix was prepared via the unbalanced magnetron sputtering of graphite and Cr metal targets in Ar gas with a high ionized flux (ion-to-neutral ratio Ji/Jn = 6). The nanoscale amorphous carbon clusters self-assembled into layers alternated by CrC, giving the composite a multilayer structure. The phase, microstructure, and composition of the coating were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The interpretation of the true coating structure, in particular the carbide type, is discussed.

Zhou, Z.; Rainforth, W. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Gass, M. H.; Bleloch, A. [SuperSTEM at Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Ehiassarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh. [Materials Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Low refractive index silicon oxide coatings at room temperature using atmospheric-pressure very high-frequency plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low refractive index silicon oxide films were deposited using atmospheric-pressure He/SiH4/CO2 plasma excited by a 150-MHz very high-frequency power. Significant increase in deposition rate at room temperature could prevent the formation of dense SiO2 network, decreasing refractive index of the resulting film effectively. As a result, a silicon oxide film with the lowest refractive index, n = 1.24 at 632.8 nm, was obtained with a very high deposition rate of 235 nm/s. The reflectance and transmittance spectra showed that the low refractive index film functioned as a quarter-wave anti-reflection coating of a glass substrate.

H. Kakiuchi; H. Ohmi; Y. Yamaguchi; K. Nakamura; K. Yasutake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

High-rate counting efficiency of VLPC  

SciTech Connect

A simple model is applied to describe dependencies of Visible Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics on temperature and operating voltage. Observed counting efficiency losses at high illumination, improved by operating at higher temperature, are seen to be a consequence of de-biasing within the VLPC structure. A design improvement to minimize internal de-biasing for future VLPC generations is considered. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Hogue, H.H. [Research and Technology Center, Boeing Electronic Systems and Missile Defense, 3370 Miraloma Ave M/S HB17, Anaheim, California 92803 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Suspension Spraying of Mullite Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mullite coatings (3Al2O3 · 2SiO2) were deposited by suspension thermal spraying of micron-sized (D50...= 1.8 ?m) feedstock powders, using a high-velocity oxy-fuel gun (HVOF) operated on propylene (DJ-2700) and .....

J. Oberste Berghaus; B.R. Marple

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of depleted uranium metal (less than 0.2% U-235). After sputtering, the uranium was allowed to oxidize1 Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV Richard L. Sandberg, David D. Allred.byu.edu ABSTRACT We present the measured reflectances (beamline 6.3.2, ALS at LBNL) of naturally oxidized uranium

Hart, Gus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effective three-dimensional superhydrophobic aerogel-coated channel for high efficiency water-droplet transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional superhydrophobic surfaces have been used effectively to optimize droplet transport efficiency in diverse fluidic systems. However the fabrication methods for superhydrophobic surfaces applicable to fluidic devices usually involve complicated process. Herein we report a simple but effective method of fabricating a superhydrophobic surface using organically modified silica aerogel. Superhydrophobic aerogel thin film having highly porous micro/nanostructured surface with methyl groups was realized inside a 3D channel by coating it. To demonstrate that the aerogel-coated surface effectively facilitates movement of water droplets the droplet-based flow characteristics regarding the triple line were conducted.

Hyungmo Kim; Joonwon Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SiC performance of coated fuel particles under high-temperature atmosphere of air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To better understand whether the SiC layer can withstand the corrosion given by the chemical reaction between SiC and O2, our experiments focused mainly on the effect of oxygen on SiC-coated fuel particles at high temperature. Tests were conducted on non-irradiated coated fuel particles in an atmosphere of air over a range of temperatures between 800 and 1600 °C. This paper summarizes the failure fractions, surface morphology and microstructure of the SiC coating, etc. The morphology of SiC-coated particles surfaces, optical and scanning electron micrographs and the oxygen distribution of polished SiC layers at 800, 1000 and 1200 °C for 200 h under air atmosphere showed that the features of SiC layers did not change in these cases. In contrast with the aforementioned cases, the behavior of SiC layers was deteriorated when the oxidation temperature was beyond 1400 °C. More serious the deterioration, higher the oxidation temperature is. The thickness of SiO2 layer from outside to inside SiC layers reached 6 ?8 ?m, and a large number of SiC-coated particles were broken into fragment at 1600 °C. The experiment results show that the oxidation of the SiC layer proceeds slowly at temperatures around 1400 °C and more rapidly as the temperature approaches 1600 °C.

Chunhe Tang; Bing Liu; Ziqiang Li; Ying Quan; Hongsheng Zhao; Youlin Shao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A View of Compatible Heat-Resistant Alloy and Coating Systems at High-Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Conventional and advanced coatings were reviewed, and it was pointed out that the coated Ni-base superalloys decreased their creep rupture life significantly at higher temperatures, and the advanced high strength superalloy became more remarkably. Concept of diffusion barrier coating system (DBC system) and their formation process was introduced, and the results obtained for several heat-resistant alloys, stainless steel (SUS310S), Ni-Mo base alloy (Hastelloy-X), and 4{sup th} generation single crystal superalloy (TMS-138) were given. It was noted that creep-rupture life of the SUS310S and Hastelloy-X with the DBC system became longer than those of the bare alloys with or without conventional {beta}-NiAl coatings. This is due to slow creep-deformation of the Re-base alloy layer as the diffusion barrier. A novel concept based on combination of superalloys and coatings was proposed, by taking both the materials science and corrosion science into consideration.

Narita, Toshio [Specially Promoted Research Laboratory of Advanced Coatings, Hokkaido University, Kite-13 Nishi-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized * Pyromark has a high solar...

65

Exploring the effect of Al2O3 ALD coating on a high gradient ILC single-cell cavity  

SciTech Connect

Encouraged by work at Argonne National Lab, we investigated atomic layer deposition technique (ALD) for high gradient superconducting RF cavities at JLab with an ALD coating system of Old Dominion University located on the JLab site. The goal of this study was to look into the possibility of coating a dielectric layer on top of RF niobium surface at a lower temperature of 120 C as compared to ANL coatings at 200 C to preserve niobium pentoxide on niobium surface. The initial coatings showed complete, but non-uniform coatings of the surface with several areas exhibiting discoloration, which was probably due to the temperature variation across the cavity surface. The initial coating showed a high RF losses, which were improved after discolored areas on the beam tubes were removed with HF rinse of the beam tubes only. The best result was 2 109 low field Q0 and Eacc = 18 MV/m limited by available power.

Grigory Eremeev, Anne-Marie Valente, Andy Wu, Diefeng Gu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems. Thanks to implementation of a high-repetition-rate (54 kHz-6.5 MHz), high-power (>10 W) laser system at the X-ray Science Division 7-ID-D beamline at the Advanced...

67

LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.  

SciTech Connect

Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive/thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit formation; and facilitating combustion rig testing of materials test coupons.

Mumm, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films prepared by metal catalytic etching of silicon wafers and pyrolyzing of carbon aerogel were used for lithium-ion battery anodes. The films exhibited an excellent first discharge capacity of 3344 ? mAh ? g ? 1 with a Coulombic efficiency of 84% at a rate of 150 ? mA ? g ? 1 between 2 and 0.02 V and a significantly enhanced cycling performance i.e. a reversible capacity of 1326 ? mAh ? g ? 1 was retained after 40 cycles. These improvements were attributed to the uniform and continuous carbon coatings which increased electronic contact and conduction and buffered large volume changes during lithium ion insertion/extraction.

Rui Huang; Xing Fan; Wanci Shen; Jing Zhu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effect of the Chemical Composition of Electrode Materials and deposition Parameters on the Properties of Electrospark-Deposited Coatings. I. Mass Transfer Rate and Coating Composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cermet coatings based on Ni–Al alloys and titanium–chromium diboride are electrospark-deposited onto 40Kh steel. It is analyzed ... phase ratio in the electrode material and the deposition parameters influence th...

V. P. Konoval; O. P. Umanskii; A. D. Panasyuk…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15??m thick. Using a 0.1?mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1?mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

Mueller, D., E-mail: dmueller@pppl.gov; Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Raman, P.; Ruzic, D. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, Center for Plasma Material Interaction, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nanoclay syntactic foam composites—High strain rate properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of nanoclay on the high strain rate mechanical properties of syntactic foam composites is studied. Nanoclay syntactic foam composites are fabricated with 10, 30 and 60% microballoon volume fractions, each having 0, 1, 2 and 5% volume fraction of nanoclay. High strain rate tests using split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus are performed on all types of composites. Quasi-static tests are also carried out on MTS-810 machine to compare the results with the dynamic SHPB results. It is found that inclusion of 1% nanoclay volume fraction gives the optimum enhancement in peak stress and modulus of nanoclay syntactic foam composites. In addition, specimens tested at high strain rate are shown to exhibit higher stress and modulus compared to those tested at low strain rate. Scanning electron microscopy is performed to study the fracture behavior under different loading rates.

Sameer Peter; Eyassu Woldesenbet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings  

SciTech Connect

New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Accelerated crevice corrosion tests are now being conducted to intentionally induce crevice corrosion, and to determine those environmental conditions where such localized attack occurs. Such materials are extremely hard, and provide enhanced resistance to abrasion and gouges (stress risers) from backfill operations, and possibly even tunnel boring. The hardness of Type 316L Stainless Steel is approximately 150 VHN, that of Alloy C-22 is approximately 250 VHN, and that of HVOF SAM2X5 ranges from 1100-1300 VHN. These new materials provide a viable coating option for repository engineers. SAM2X5 and SAM1651 coatings can be applied with thermal spray processes without any significant loss of corrosion resistance. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying. Containers for the transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) with corrosion resistant coatings are envisioned. For example, an enhanced multi-purpose container (MPC) could be made with such coatings, leveraging existing experience in the fabrication of such containers. These coating materials could be used to protect the final closure weld on SNF/HLW disposal containers, eliminate need for stress mitigation. Integral drip shield could be produced by directly spraying it onto the disposal container, thereby eliminating the need for an expensive titanium drip shield. In specific areas where crevice corrosion is anticipated, such as the contact point between the disposal container and pallet, HVOF coatings could be used to buildup thickness, thereby selectively adding corrosion life where it is needed. Both SAM2X5 & SAM1651 have high boron content which enable them to absorb neutrons and therefore be used for criticality control in baskets. Alloy C-22 and 316L have no neutron absorber, and cannot be used for such functions. Borated stainless steel and G

Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

High emissivity coatings on titanium alloy prepared by micro-arc oxidation for high temperature application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-arc oxidation coatings were prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy in...3PO4-based electrolyte with different additives such as FeSO4, Co(CH3COO)2, Ni(CH3COO)2, and K2ZrF6. The composition, structure, surface morphology...

H. Tang; Q. Sun; C. G. Yi; Z. H. Jiang; F. P. Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal Barrier Coatings Chemically and Mechanically Resistant to High Temperature Attack by Molten Ashes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used on component in the hottest sections of gas turbine engines, used for power generation and aviation.… (more)

Gledhill, Andrew Dean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inhomogeneous mechanical losses in micro-oscillators with high reflectivity coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the mechanical quality factor of micro-oscillators covered by a highly reflective coating. We test an approach to the reduction of mechanical losses, that consists in limiting the size of the coated area to reduce the strain and the consequent energy loss in this highly dissipative component. Moreover, a mechanical isolation stage is incorporated in the device. The results are discussed on the basis of an analysis of homogeneous and non-homogeneous losses in the device and validated by a set of Finite-Element models. The contributions of thermoelastic dissipation and coating losses are separated and the measured quality factors are found in agreement with the calculated values, while the absence of unmodeled losses confirms that the isolation element integrated in the device efficiently uncouples the dynamics of the mirror from the support system. Also the resonant frequencies evaluated by Finite-Element models are in good agreement with the experimental data, and allow the estimation of the Y...

Serra, E; Marin, F; Marino, F; Pontin, A; Prodi, G A; Bonaldi, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme  

SciTech Connect

The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt-pool oscillation may be the dominant factor governing the onset of unsteady thermal conditions accompanied by varying amounts of crystalline nucleation observed near the lower limit. At high quench-wheel velocities, the influence of these oscillations is minimal due to very short melt-pool residence times. However, microstructural evidence suggests that the entrapment of gas pockets at the wheel-metal interface plays a critical role in establishing the upper rate limit. An observed transition in wheel-side surface character with increasing melt-spinning rate supports this conclusion.

Halim Meco

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Evaluation of the Impact of Surface Coatings on the Heat Transfer in High Temperature Ceramic Recuperators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COATINGS Engineering ceramics, particular ly SiC, are being investigated for use as high temperature heat exchanger materials. ORNL has conducted exposure test in real and simulated high tempera ture corrosive flue gases and these have... indicated that SiC ceramics are sucepti ble to flue gases containing sodium and potassium, compounds such as sulfates, carbonates and halides. ORNL is current ly investigating whether commercially available ceramic coatings could be from 1500 0...

Guerrero, P. S.; Rebello, W. J.; Federer, J. I.

79

Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect

The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high strain-rate environment Christian Knipprath...of consideration by engineers. For example, high...high strain-rate environment. A finite-element...high strain-rate environment. | Biological materials...of consideration by engineers. For example, high...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ultra High-Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Modeling Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to develop a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can provide both the high resolution typical of germanium and high signal throughput. Such detectors may be beneficial for a variety of potential applications ranging from safeguards measurements of used fuel to material detection and verification using active interrogation techniques. This report describes some of the initial radiation transport modeling efforts that have been conducted to help guide the design of the detector as well as a description of the process used to generate the source spectrum for the used fuel application evaluation.

Warren, Glen A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

High frame rate CCD camera with fast optical shutter  

SciTech Connect

A high frame rate CCD camera coupled with a fast optical shutter has been designed for high repetition rate imaging applications. The design uses state-of-the-art microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPII) technology fostered/developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to support nuclear, military, and medical research requiring high-speed imagery. Key design features include asynchronous resetting of the camera to acquire random transient images, patented real-time analog signal processing with 10-bit digitization at 40--75 MHz pixel rates, synchronized shutter exposures as short as 200pS, sustained continuous readout of 512 x 512 pixels per frame at 1--5Hz rates via parallel multiport (16-port CCD) data transfer. Salient characterization/performance test data for the prototype camera are presented, temporally and spatially resolved images obtained from range-gated LADAR field testing are included, an alternative system configuration using several cameras sequenced to deliver discrete numbers of consecutive frames at effective burst rates up to 5GHz (accomplished by time-phasing of consecutive MCPII shutter gates without overlap) is discussed. Potential applications including dynamic radiography and optical correlation will be presented.

Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Turko, B.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

High repetition rate plasma mirror device for attosecond science  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an active solid target positioning device for driving plasma mirrors with high repetition rate ultra-high intensity lasers. The position of the solid target surface with respect to the laser focus is optically monitored and mechanically controlled on the nm scale to ensure reproducible interaction conditions for each shot at arbitrary repetition rate. We demonstrate the target capabilities by driving high-order harmonic generation from plasma mirrors produced on glass targets with a near-relativistic intensity few-cycle pulse laser system operating at 1 kHz. During experiments, residual target surface motion can be actively stabilized down to 47?nm (root mean square), which ensures sub-300-as relative temporal stability of the plasma mirror as a secondary source of coherent attosecond extreme ultraviolet radiation in pump-probe experiments.

Borot, A.; Douillet, D.; Iaquaniello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Lopez-Martens, R. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.-P. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

High Repetition Rate, High Energy Fiber CPA System for Material Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on a fiber based CPA system generating 100 µJ of ultra-short pulses at high repetition rates (56 kHz). In a first application, the pulses are used for high speed hole...

Schreiber, Thomas; Röser, Fabian; Limpert, Jens; Liem, Andreas; Höfer, Sven; Zellmer, Holger; Will, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

86

Generation of high power, high repetition-rate pulses using erbium-doped fiber ring laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results obtained from crographics. generation of high repetition rate, high peak power output pulses using an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). Two configurations were employed. The first setup used a linear cavity...

Hinson, Brett Darren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

SciTech Connect

High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

STANFORD IN-SITU HIGH RATE YBCO PROCESS: TRANSFER TO METAL TAPES AND PROCESS SCALE UP  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The materials science understanding of high rate low cost processes for Coated Conductor will benefit the application to power utilities for low loss energy transportation and power generation as well for DOD applications. The research in this program investigated several materials processing approaches that are new and original, and are not being investigated elsewhere. This work added to the understanding of the material science of high rate PVD growth of HTSC YBCO assisted by a liquid phase. A new process discovered uses amorphous glassy precursors which can be made at high rate under flexible conditions of temperature and oxygen, and later brought to conditions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature for rapid conversion to YBCO superconductor. Good critical current densities were found, but further effort is needed to optimize the vortex pinning using known artificial inclusions. A new discovery of the physics and materials science of vortex pinning in the HTSC system using Sm in place of Y came at growth at unusually low oxygen pressure resulting in clusters of a low or non superconducting phase within the nominal high temperature phase. The driving force for this during growth is new physics, perhaps due to the low oxygen. This has the potential for high current in large magnetic fields at low cost, applicable to motors, generators and transformers. The technical demands of this project were the motivation for the development of instrumentation that could be essential to eventual process scale up. These include atomic absorption based on tunable diode lasers for remote monitoring and control of evaporation sources (developed under DARPA support), and the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectivity (FTIR) for aid in the synthesis of complex thin film materials (purchased by a DURIP-AFOSR grant).

Malcolm R. Beasley; Robert H.Hammond

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Avalanche Photo-Detection for High Data Rate Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avalanche photo detection is commonly used in applications which require single photon sensitivity. We examine the limits of using avalanche photo diodes (APD) for characterising photon statistics at high data rates. To identify the regime of linear APD operation we employ a ps-pulsed diode laser with variable repetition rates between 0.5MHz and 80MHz. We modify the mean optical power of the coherent pulses by applying different levels of well-calibrated attenuation. The linearity at high repetition rates is limited by the APD dead time and a non-linear response arises at higher photon-numbers due to multiphoton events. Assuming Poissonian input light statistics we ascertain the effective mean photon-number of the incident light with high accuracy. Time multiplexed detectors (TMD) allow to accomplish photon- number resolution by photon chopping. This detection setup extends the linear response function to higher photon-numbers and statistical methods may be used to compensate for non-linearity. We investigated this effect, compare it to the single APD case and show the validity of the convolution treatment in the TMD data analysis.

H. B. Coldenstrodt-Ronge; C. Silberhorn

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Figure 3-1 IV curve of a UT fabricated triple cell, showing 12.7% initial, active-area efficiency. Figure1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual-junction a-Si Solar Cells with Heavily Doped Thin Interface Layers at the Tunnel Junctions Section 4 High

Deng, Xunming

92

High-temperature oxidation of an alumina-coated Ni-base alloy  

SciTech Connect

Alumina coatings were applied to Ni-20Cr (wt%) using combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD). Combustion CVD is an open air deposition technique performed in a flame. The oxidation kinetics of coated and uncoated specimens were measured by isothermal oxidation tests carried out in pure flowing air at temperatures of 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 C. The alumina coatings reduced the oxidation kinetics at all temperatures. The morphologies and compositions of the alumina coatings were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Hendrick, M.R.; Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing  

SciTech Connect

High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a production tool and process. The developed technique will have an reducing impact on product pricing. As efficiency has a substantial impact on the economics of solar cell production due to the high material cost content; in essence, improved efficiency through cost-effective texturing reduces the material cost component since the product is priced in terms of $/W. The project is a collaboration between Fraunhofer USA, Inc. and a c-Si PV manufacturer.

Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg (University of Texas-Austin)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbide coatings using an axially fed DC-plasmatron S. Sharafata,U , A. Kobayashib , S. Chena , N spraying; Nickel; Tungsten carbide 1. Introduction 1.1. General Since the mid-1990s, the market share of cemented Z .carbides has surpassed that of high-speed steels HSS , Z .with tungsten carbide WC having 50

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

96

Deposition of high-density silicon carbide coatings by fluidized-bed pyrolysis of chlorinated silane derivatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparative analysis of the processes for preparation of high-density silicon carbide coatings by the fluidized-bed pyrolysis of the SiCl4 + CH4 + H2 + Ar and CH3SiCl3 + H2 + Ar mixtures on pyrocarboncoated zirco...

S. D. Kurbakov; T. A. Mireev

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Final Report, Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-antimonide cathodes b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns and copper RF photoguns

Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook University

2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

Young, N. G., E-mail: ngyoung@engineering.ucsb.edu; Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Perl, E. E.; Keller, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

Dilmore, M.F. (AFRL/MNMW, Eglin AFB, FL); Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Deterministic Control over High-Z Doping of Polydicyclopentadiene-Based Aerogel Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(6) These targets consist of small spherical shells, called ablators, whose inside wall is coated with a thin layer of low density hydrocarbon (CH)-based foam that may be used either (i) to support and define the shape of cryogenic liquid or solid deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel for the fusion reaction or (ii) as a scaffold to bring dopants for diagnostics and nuclear physics experiments in direct contact with the DT fuel. ... To validate the use of the copolymerization approach for aerogel coatings, we prepared the coating of P(DCPD-r-NB-I2) (100/5 at 50 mg/cm3) on the inside of a spherical shell (2 mm diameter, 20 ?m shell thickness, and 30 ?m fill hole). ... level that simultaneously coats all surfaces of almost any material. ...

Sung Ho Kim; Swanee J. Shin; Jeremy M. Lenhardt; Tom Braun; John D. Sain; Carlos A. Valdez; Roald N. Leif; Sergei O. Kucheyev; Kuang Jen J. Wu; Juergen Biener; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.; Alex V. Hamza

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

SciTech Connect

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Corrosion behavior of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in a high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environment  

SciTech Connect

An iron aluminide (Fe3Al) intermetallic coating was deposited onto a F22 (2.25Cr-1Mo) steel substrate using a JP-5000 high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray system. The as-sprayed coating was examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and was characterized in terms of oxidation and adhesion. Fe3Al-coated steel specimens were exposed to a mixed oxidizing/sulfidizing environment at 500, 600, 700, and 800DGC for approximately seven days. The gaseous environment consisted of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S (by volume). All specimens gained mass after exposure to the environment and the mass gains were found to be inversely proportional to temperature increases. Representative specimens exposed at each temperature were cross-sectioned and subjected to examination under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray mapping. Results are presented in terms of corrosion weight gain and corrosion product formation. The purpose of the research presented here was to evaluate the effectiveness of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in protecting a steel substrate exposed to a fossil energy environment.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Shrestha, S. (TWI Ltd.); Harvey, D. (TWI Ltd.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

High-k (k=30) amorphous hafnium oxide films from high rate room temperature deposition  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) is deposited by sputtering while achieving a very high k{approx}30. Structural characterization suggests that the high k is a consequence of a previously unreported cubiclike short range order in the amorphous HfO{sub x} (cubic k{approx}30). The films also possess a high electrical resistivity of 10{sup 14} {Omega} cm, a breakdown strength of 3 MV cm{sup -1}, and an optical gap of 6.0 eV. Deposition at room temperature and a high deposition rate ({approx}25 nm min{sup -1}) makes these high-k amorphous HfO{sub x} films highly advantageous for plastic electronics and high throughput manufacturing.

Li, Flora M.; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hofmann, Stephan; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J. [Department of Engineering, Electrical Engineering Division, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Dutson, James D.; Wakeham, Steve J.; Thwaites, Mike J. [Plasma Quest Ltd., Unit 1B, Rose Estate, Osborn Way, Hook, Hampshire RG27 9UT (United Kingdom)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-temperature phase stability and tribological properties of laser clad Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicide coatings  

SciTech Connect

Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi wear-resistant metal silicide composite coatings consisting of Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and interdendritic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi eutectic were fabricated on substrate of an austenitic stainless steel AISI321 by laser cladding using Ni-Mo-Si elemental powder blends. The high-temperature structural stability of the coating was evaluated by aging at 800 deg. C for 1-50 h. High-temperature sliding wear resistance of the as-laser clad and aged coatings was evaluated at 600 deg. C. Results indicate that the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicides coating has excellent high temperature phase stability. No phase transformation except the dissolution of the eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and the corresponding growth of the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and no elemental diffusion from the coating into the substrate were detected after aging the coating at 800 deg. C for 50 h. Aging of the coating at 800 deg. C leads to gradual dissolution of the interdendritic eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and subsequent formation of a dual-phase structure with equiaxed Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary grains distributed in the NiSi single-phase matrix. Because of the strong covalent-dominated atomic bonds and high volume fraction of the ternary metal silicide Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si, both the original and the aged Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi coating has excellent wear resistance under pin-on-disc high-temperature sliding wear test conditions, although hardness of the aged coating is slightly lower than that of the as-clad coating.

Lu, X.D. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China); Wang, H.M. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China)]. E-mail: wanghuaming@263.net

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes for combustion environments  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical corrosion rate probes have been constructed and tested along with mass loss coupons in an air plus water vapor and a N2/O2/CO2 plus water vapor environment. Temperatures ranged from 200? to 700?C. Results show that electrochemical corrosion rates for ash-covered mild steel are a function of time, temperature and process environment. Correlation between the electrochemical and mass loss corrosion rates was poor.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Eden, David A. (Intercorr International Inc.); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Eden, Dawn C. (Intercorr International Inc.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

111

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

112

Method for synthesis of high T[sub c] superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J[sub c].

Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

114

Commercialization of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-300  

SciTech Connect

The goal for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies is to produce electricity at 15 cents/kilowatt-hour (kWh) with six hours of thermal storage in 2015 (intermediate power) and close to 10 cents/kWh with 12-17 hours of thermal storage in 2020 (baseload power). Cost reductions of up to 50% to the solar concentrator are targeted through technology advances. The overall solar-to-electric efficiency of parabolic-trough solar power plants can be improved and the cost of solar electricity can be reduced by improving the properties of the selective coating on the receiver and increasing the solar-field operating temperature to >450 degrees C. New, more-efficient selective coatings will be needed that have both high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance at elevated temperatures. Conduction and convection losses from the hot absorber surface are usually negligible for parabolic trough receivers. The objective is to develop new, more-efficient selective coatings with both high solar absorptance (..alpha.. > 0.95) and low thermal emittance (..epsilon.. < 0.08 @ 450 degrees C) that are thermally stable above 450 degrees C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

Gray, M. H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Versatile high rate plasma deposition and processing with very high frequency excitation  

SciTech Connect

The interest in plasma deposition using very high frequency (VHF) excitation arose after the preparation of a-Si:H at high growth rates was demonstrated. Subsequently the improved process flexibility and the control of material properties offered by the variation of the plasma excitation frequency was recognized. The preparation of amorphous and microcrystalline thin films in a VHF-plasma is described. The increased growth rates have been attributed to an enhancement of film precursor formation at VHF, to the decreased sheath thickness as well as to an enhancement of the surface reactivity by positive ions. Plasma diagnostic investigations show that the parameters mainly affected by the excitation frequency are the ion flux to the electrodes as well as the sheaths potentials and widths, rather than the plasma density. 55 refs., 13 figs.

Heintze, M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The effect of solids and dispersant loadings on the suspension viscosities and deposition rates of suspension plasma sprayed YSZ coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is a promising modification of traditional plasma spraying techniques that uses small (? 2 ?m) particles suspended in a liquid to fabricate coatings with fine microstructures and controlled porosity rapidly and without the need for post-deposition heat treatments. These qualities make SPS an interesting new technique to manufacture solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) active layers. However, in order to be able to manufacture layers with good microstructures, the properties of the feedstock suspension must be optimized to enhance particle dispersion and improve feedability. This study uses a pressurized gas delivery system to feed aqueous YSZ suspensions containing an organic dispersant to a Northwest Mettech Axial III axial injection suspension plasma spray system. Three different dispersant types (polyacrylic acid (PAA), polyethylene imine (PEI) and 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA)) were characterized and the effects of solid loadings, dispersant type, and dispersant concentration on suspension properties such as viscosity and feedability, and layer characteristics such as microstructure and deposited thickness were examined.

D. Waldbillig; O. Kesler

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Synthesis of carbon coated Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/reduced graphene oxide composite for high-performance lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Carbon coated LVP nanoparticles strongly anchored on rGO surface are prepared. ? LVP@C/rGO exhibits high electrical conductivity. ? LVP@C/rGO shows excellent cycleability and rate capability between 3.0 and 4.8 V. -- Abstract: The carbon coated Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/reduced graphene oxide (LVP@C/rGO) composite is successfully synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction, which is easily scaled up. LVP grains coated with a thin layer (?8 nm) of carbon are adhered to the surface of the rGO layer and/or enwrapped into the rGO sheets, which can facilitate the fast charge transfer within the whole electrode and to the current collector. As a cathode material, the LVP@C/rGO electrode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 177 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.5 C with capacity retention of 96% during the 50th cycle in a wide voltage range of 3.0–4.8 V. A superior rate capability is also achieved, e.g., exhibiting a discharge capacity of 96 mAh g{sup ?1} at a high C rate of 10 C.

Wu, Keliang, E-mail: linxin66@126.com [Department of Petroleum and Chemical, Bayingolin Vocational and Technical College, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region 841000 (China)] [Department of Petroleum and Chemical, Bayingolin Vocational and Technical College, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region 841000 (China); Yang, Jinpeng [Department of Petroleum and Chemical, Bayingolin Vocational and Technical College, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region 841000 (China)] [Department of Petroleum and Chemical, Bayingolin Vocational and Technical College, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region 841000 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content-Fueled Turbines - University of California, Irvine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content-Fueled Turbines-University of California, Irvine Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and components in the hot section of gas turbines are degraded by coal-derived high hydrogen content (HHC) synthesis gas (syngas). In this project the University of California, Irvine (UCI) will provide an improved mechanistic understanding of the degradation of critical turbine system materials in HHC-fueled

119

High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium  

SciTech Connect

The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

Schneibel, Joachim H [ORNL; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High-repetition-rate CF/sub 4/ laser  

SciTech Connect

A 16 ..mu..m CF/sub 4/ laser oscillator has operated at 1 kHz in a cooled static cell. Threshold pump energies required from the low pressure, Q-switched, cw discharge CO/sub 2/ laser were as low as 60 ..mu..J. The laser cavity employed the multiple-pass off-axis path resonator in a ring configuration. CF/sub 4/ laser power at 615 cm/sup -1/ and a 1 kHz repetition rate exceeded 300 ..mu..W.

Telle, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Study of microvoids in high-rate a-Si:H using positron annihilation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the authors have carried out the positron annihilation measurement on high-rate and low-rate a-Si:H thin films deposited by PECVD. By means of the slow positron beam Doppler-broadening technique, the depth profiles of microvoids in a-Si:H have been determined. They have also studied the vacancy-type defect in the surface region in high-rate grown a-Si:H, making comparison between high-rate and low-rate a-Si:H. By plotting S and W parameters in the (S, W) plane, they have shown that the vacancies in all of the high-rate and low-rate deposited intrinsic samples, and in differently doped low-rate samples are of the same nature.

Zou, X.; Webb, D.P.; Lin, S.H.; Lam, Y.W.; Chan, Y.C.; Hu, Y.F.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

123

High stability electron field emitters made of nanocrystalline diamond coated carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

We report enhanced life-time stability for the electron field emitters prepared by coating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Upon overcoming the problem of poor stability in CNTs, the NCD-CNTs exhibit excellent life-time stability of 250 min tested at different applied voltages of 600 and 900?V. In contrast, the life-time stability of CNTs is only 33 min even at relatively low voltage of 360?V and starts arcing at 400?V. Hence, the NCD-CNTs with improved life-time stability have great potential for the applications as cathodes in flat panel displays and microplasma display devices.

Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Srinivasu, K.; Leou, K. C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Algae/Bacteria Ratio in High-Rate Ponds Used for Waste Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 573 1140 1120...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 575 and N is the...favorable operating conditions with high algal productivity, the algae...utilization in converted oil- fired boiler. Resource Recov. Conserv...

Gideon Oron; Gedaliah Shelef; Anna Levi; Arie Meydan; Yossef Azov

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

High rate heating driven decomposition of energetic materials: Diagnostics evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Combustion of energetic materials involves processes in both gas and condensed phases and is governed by coupled thermal, physical, and chemical phenomena. Development of reliable models for design, performance, stability, and hazard analyses requires detailed understanding of three general chemical reaction regimes: (1) initial condensed-phase decomposition, (2) subsequent interaction of decomposition products with the remaining condensed phase, and (3) gas-phase reaction of decomposition products to form the ultimate combustion products. The first two regimes are the least understood and most difficult to study, particularly the initial condensed-phase decomposition. The basic difficulty in studying condensed phase phenomena has been the inability to probe directly chemistry in the condensed phase under isothermal condition and with the spatial and temporal resolution needed at higher temperatures and reaction rates. Thin-film samples provide a means to study condensed-phase chemistry at isothermal conditions and with microsecond temporal resolution. We are developing an experiment system that employs rapidly heated thin- film samples and multiple diagnostics to examine condensed-phase chemistry and monitor evolved gas species. Results from our initial work have been encouraging. Thin-film samples of several energetic materials have been prepared and appear to be representative of bulk materials. Furthermore, preliminary experiments indicate that all the use of these samples with two chemical diagnostic techniques, time-of- flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and time-resolved infrared spectral photography (TRISP), is viable. 5 refs., 8 figs.

Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Skocypec, R.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

High rate heating driven decomposition of energetic materials: Diagnostics evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Combustion of energetic materials involves processes in both gas and condensed phases and is governed by coupled thermal, physical, and chemical phenomena. Development of reliable models for design, performance, stability, and hazard analyses requires detailed understanding of three general chemical reaction regimes: (1) initial condensed-phase decomposition, (2) subsequent interaction of decomposition products with the remaining condensed phase, and (3) gas-phase reaction of decomposition products to form the ultimate combustion products. The first two regimes are the least understood and most difficult to study, particularly the initial condensed-phase decomposition. The basic difficulty in studying condensed phase phenomena has been the inability to probe directly chemistry in the condensed phase under isothermal condition and with the spatial and temporal resolution needed at higher temperatures and reaction rates. Thin-film samples provide a means to study condensed-phase chemistry at isothermal conditions and with microsecond temporal resolution. We are developing an experiment system that employs rapidly heated thin- film samples and multiple diagnostics to examine condensed-phase chemistry and monitor evolved gas species. Results from our initial work have been encouraging. Thin-film samples of several energetic materials have been prepared and appear to be representative of bulk materials. Furthermore, preliminary experiments indicate that all the use of these samples with two chemical diagnostic techniques, time-of- flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and time-resolved infrared spectral photography (TRISP), is viable. 5 refs., 8 figs.

Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Skocypec, R.D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Benchmarking of the MIT High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel performance model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT has developed a Coated Particle Fuel Performance Model to study the behavior of TRISO nuclear fuels. The code, TIMCOAT, is designed to assess the mechanical and chemical condition of populations of coated particles and ...

Stawicki, Michael A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reconfigurable fuzzy logic system for high-frame rate stereovision object tracking.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??his study investigates the applicability of fuzzy logic control to high-frame rate stereovision object tracking. The technology developed in this work is based on utilizing… (more)

Samarin, Oleg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Enhancing harvestable algal biomass production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds by recycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) are an efficient and cost-effective system for wastewater treatment and produce algal biomass which could be converted to biofuels. However,… (more)

Park, Byung Kwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Application of the microwave technique for burning-rate measurement in high-energy composite materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A facility designed to determine the current burning rate of high-energy composite materials is described. Methodical aspects of processing the...

A. S. Zharkov; M. G. Potapov; V. P. Lushev…

131

Gamma-ray burst rate: high-redshift excess and its possible origins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gamma-ray burst rate: high-redshift...E-mail: virgilif@physics.unlv.edu (FJV...USA 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University...gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates and their relationship...an increase in GRB rate as (1 +z)delta...models are able to pass the L and z constraints......

Francisco J. Virgili; Bing Zhang; Kentaro Nagamine; Jun-Hwan Choi

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

132

The emerging role of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for prostate cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Follow-up PSA control rate/ Late toxicity Grade...HDR = high-dose-rate, PSA = prostate-specific...EQUIPMENT AND RADIATION PHYSICS Because the dose-rate of the radioactive source...holes for the needles to pass through, and their positions......

Yasuo Yoshioka; Ken Yoshida; Hideya Yamazaki; Norio Nonomura; Kazuhiko Ogawa

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Effects of High Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiations on Solutions of Iron and Cerium Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Effects of High Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiations on Solutions of Iron and Cerium...of 1.3 duration and over a range of dose rates from 0.5 to 20 000 rads/pulse. Radiation yields at constant dose rate...

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and LowRechargeable lithium batteries are known for their highBecause lithium ion batteries are especially susceptible to

Chen, Guoying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Short Communication High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these methods so far shown sufficient promise for economical production of hydrogen (Miyake et al., 1999; WoodShort Communication High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved

136

Analog Readout and Analysis Software for the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Project  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometers are needed for Safeguards applications such as spent fuel assay and uranium hexafluoride cylinder verification. In addition, these spectrometers would be applicable to other high-rate applications such as non-destructive assay of nuclear materials using nuclear resonance fluorescence. Count-rate limitations of today's HPGe technologies, however, lead to concessions in their use and reduction in their efficacy. Large-volume, very high-rate HPGe spectrometers are needed to enable a new generation of nondestructive assay systems. The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project is developing HPGe spectrometer systems capable of operating at unprecedented rates, 10 to 100 times those available today. This report documents current status of developments in the analog electronics and analysis software.

Fast, James E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Evans, Allan T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Wood, Lynn S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Spin coating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

SciTech Connect

In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

Luft, W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the status of high-rate deposition technologies associated with amorphous silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. The report lists (1) deposition rates for a-Si:H films according to source and method and (2) efficiencies and other parameters of a-Si:H solar cells. Two main deposition source materials, silane and disilane, are discussed, as well as effects of boron doping. The effects of various deposition parameters on film characteristics and on deposition rate are presented, as well as the effects of annealing on high-deposition-rate films. Light-induced effects are also discussed. Finally, progress and problems in this field of study are summarized.

Luft, W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

8 - Corrosion/Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents some tips and suggestions on corrosion and coatings used in pipelines. Corrosion failures at compressor stations result from carelessness on the part of the user, or poor choice of material/configuration by the designer. Thus, design engineers should coat everything underground, except ground rods, with a coating properly selected for the conditions; should use proper coating application and inspection; and should use ground rods anodic to steel and insulated (coated) ground wires. Coatings are one of the most important considerations for controlling underground corrosion. Generally, all underground metallic structures, except ground rods, should be coated. This includes gas piping, control lines, tubing, water lines, conduit, air lines, and braces. For gas discharge lines, temperature is a dominant consideration and so one has to make sure to get a coating that withstands gas discharge temperature and should be careful, as sag temperatures listed in coating literature are not maximum operating temperatures. Each water system should have corrosion monitoring provisions designed into the system, such as coupons or corrosion rate probes. If there is a gas treating plant in conjunction with the compressor station, corrosion monitoring provisions should be designed into that system also. Water treatment for corrosion control is considered, depending on individual circumstances and provisions should be considered for cathodic protection of the internal surfaces of storage tanks and water softeners. The Pearson survey is an aboveground technique used to locate coating defects on buried pipelines. In this technique, the defect may be recorded on a preprepared record sheet complete with a measured distance from a fixed reference point or indicated by a marker peg or non-toxic paint.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sorptive extraction using polydimethylsiloxane/metal–organic framework coated stir bars coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs, Al-MIL-53-NH2) were synthesized via the hydrothermal method, and novel polydimethylsiloxane/metal–organic framework (PDMS/MOFs, PDMS/Al-MIL-53-NH2)-coated stir bars were prepared by the sol–gel technique. The preparation reproducibility of the PDMS/MOFs-coated stir bar was good, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 4.8% to 14.9% (n = 7) within one batch and from 6.2% to 16.9% (n = 6) among different batches. Based on this fact, a new method of PDMS/MOFs-coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and ultrasonic-assisted liquid desorption (UALD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) was developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples. To obtain the best extraction performance for PAHs, several parameters affecting SBSE, such as extraction time, stirring rate, and extraction temperature, were investigated. Under optimal experimental conditions, wide linear ranges and good \\{RSDs\\} (n = 7) were obtained. With enrichment factors (EFs) of 16.1- to 88.9-fold (theoretical EF, 142-fold), the limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) of the developed method for the target \\{PAHs\\} were found to be in the range of 0.05–2.94 ng/L. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of \\{PAHs\\} in Yangtze River and East Lake water samples.

Cong Hu; Man He; Beibei Chen; Cheng Zhong; Bin Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Triclosan-loaded with high encapsulation efficiency into PLA nanoparticles coated with ?-cyclodextrin polymer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose was to prepare triclosan-loaded polylactic acid nanoparticles containing ?-cyclodextrin polymer shell, evaluate triclosan release from the particles using Franz diffusion ... high encapsulation effici...

Amani El Fagui; Pierre Dubot…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cryogenic measurements of mechanical loss of high-reflectivity coating and estimation of thermal noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on low-frequency measurements of the mechanical loss of a high-quality (transmissivity T<5??ppm at ?0=1064??nm, absorption...

Granata, Massimo; Craig, Kieran; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Carcy, Cécile; Cunningham, William; Degallaix, Jérôme; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Hart, Martin; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Hough, James; MacLaren, Ian; Martin, Iain William; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Otmani, Salim; Pinard, Laurent; Rowan, Sheila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Enhanced rate capability of LiMn0.9Mg0.1PO4 nanoplates by reduced graphene oxide/carbon double coating for Li-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2014 Available online 12 March 2014 Keywords: Li-ion battery LiMnPO4 Reduced graphene oxide ChargeEnhanced rate capability of LiMn0.9Mg0.1PO4 nanoplates by reduced graphene oxide/carbon double coating for Li-ion batteries Sungun Wi a , Jaewon Kim a , Seunghoon Nam a , Joonhyeon Kang a , Sangheon

Park, Byungwoo

145

High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements  

SciTech Connect

Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain {beta}-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified {gamma}-Ni + {gamma}-Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase {gamma}-Ni and {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both {gamma}-Ni and {gamma}{prime}Ni{sub 3}Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures ({approx}970 C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It was also inferred that Pt enhances the diffusive flux of aluminum from the substrate to the scale/alloy interface. Relatively low levels of hafnium addition to Pt-free {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al increased the extent of external NiO formation due to non-protective HfO{sub 2} formation. Accordingly, this effect intensified with increasing Hf content from 0.2 to 0.5 at.%.

Nan Mu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

High-Q Hybrid Plasmon-Photon Modes in a Bottle Resonator Realized with a Silver-Coated Glass Fiber with a Varying Diameter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate that hybrid plasmon-photon modes exist in a silver-coated glass bottle resonator. The bottle resonator is realized in a glass fiber with a smoothly varying diameter, which is subsequently coated with a rhodamine 800-dye doped acryl-glass layer and a 30 nm thick silver layer. We show by means of photoluminescence experiments supported by electromagnetic simulations that the rhodamine 800 photoluminescence excites hybrid plasmon-photon modes in such a bottle resonator, which provide a plasmon-type field enhancement at the outer silver surface and exhibit quality factors as high as 1000.

Andreas Rottler; Malte Harland; Markus Bröll; Matthias Klingbeil; Jens Ehlermann; Stefan Mendach

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Workshop: Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Saturday, October 22, 2011 - 8:30am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 In conjunction with the 2011 LCLS/SSRL User Meeting, SSRL and the APS will jointly host a two-day workshop focused on opportunities with short-pulse, high-repetition rate X-ray Science. The workshop will feature international speakers and panel experts presenting the scientific basis, preliminary results and future potential of high rep-rate picosecond x-rays beams from storage rings. The workshop will be broadly focused on topics in materials science, chemistry, biology and catalysis. The workshop agenda will also include presentations on accelerator operational modes, precision timing issues, detector challenges and the relation of storage ring science with

148

High-strain-rate nanoindentation behavior of fine-grained magnesium alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of temperature and alloying elements on deformation in the high-strain-rate regime were investigated by testing fine-grained magnesium alloys with an average grain size of 2 ? 3 ?m by a nanoindentation technique. ...

Somekawa, Hidetoshi

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-optical high-bit-rate digital Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OCTOBER 2005 3321 All-Optical Variable Buffering Strategies Summary: - parison of hot-potato and single-buffer deflection routing in very high bit rate optical mesh networks......

150

Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Industrial Technology Institute, Roorkee (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Much simplified ion-beam assisted deposition-TiN template for high-performance coated conductors  

SciTech Connect

A much simplified template, i.e., two nonsuperconducting layers between the superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) and the polycrystalline metal substrate, has been developed for high-performance coated conductors by using biaxially aligned TiN as a seed layer. A combination of a thin TiN ({approx}10 nm by ion-beam assisted deposition) layer and an epitaxial buffer LaMnO{sub 3} layer ({approx}120 nm) allows us to grow epitaxial YBCO films with values of full width at half-maximum around 3.5 deg. and 1.7 deg. for the {phi}-scan of (103) and rocking curve of (005) YBCO, respectively. The YBCO films grown on electropolished polycrystalline Hastelloy using this two-layer template exhibited a superconducting transition temperature of 89.5 K, a critical current density of 1.2 MA/cm{sup 2} at 75.5 K, and an {alpha} value (proportional factor of critical current density J{sub c}{approx}H{sup -}{alpha}) of around 0.33, indicating a high density of pinning centers and an absence of weak links.

Xiong, J. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Matias, V.; Zhai, J. Y.; Maiorov, B.; Trugman, D.; Jia, Q. X. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Tao, B. W.; Li, Y. R. [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high1 alkaline conditions2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high1 alkaline conditions2 3 replaced by18 chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions. In our study, olivine replacement19 between olivine and chrysotile-brucite minerals. Coupled dissolution-precipitation21 led to the alteration

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions Romain grains were replaced by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions. In our study, olivine at the interface between olivine and chrysotile­brucite minerals. Coupled dissolution­precipitation led

Montes-Hernandez, German

154

High performance hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells made at a high deposition rate by glow discharge of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The deposition rate, electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared from rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) diluted in helium have been measured. These films show excellent electrical and optical properties and, most importantly, a high deposition rate coupled with satisfactory solar cell application was realized for the first time. At a deposition rate of 11 A/s, 5.47% and 6.5% conversion efficiencies were obtained with a first trial of n-i-p type solar cells deposited on SnO/sub 2//ITO glass and metal substrates, respectively.

Ohashi, Y.; Kenne, J.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

A conversion coating on carbon steel with good anti-wax performance in crude oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wax deposition on pipeline from crude oil is a prevalent problem that petroleum industry has always been suffered. In this paper, a conversion coating on carbon steel with good anti-wax performance was constructed to solve this problem through a simple coating and heat treatment process. The conversion coating is composed of pyrophosphate with a flower-like microstructure. After wax deposition test, the conversion coating has low wax deposition weight which is 2.9 mg/cm2 and high wax deposition reduction rate (80% in average). The conversion coating has a special wettability which is superoleophobic with low oil-adhesion in water (oil contact angle is 162° and rolling angle is 7°) and hydrophilic in oil. The anti-wax mechanism is discussed and it may be attributed to the polar hydrophilic component and micro-structure of the conversion coating.

Zhiwei Wang; Liqun Zhu; Huicong Liu; Weiping Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

157

Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High-Performance Membranes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet describing project that will leverage research and materials from a previously developed, low-cost coating process and apply the re¬search to lower cost polymer membranes

158

High deposition rate preparation of amorphous silicon solar cells by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane diluted in helium (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6//He = 1/9) have been studied while systematically varying the film deposition rate. The properties and composition of the films were monitored by measuring the optical band gap, IR vibrational spectrum, dark conductivity, and the photoconductivity as a function of the deposition rate. The photoluminescence of the high deposition rate films gave a peak at 1.33 eV. These films, whose properties are rather similar to those of the conventional a-Si:H films prepared from monosilane, have been used to fabricate nip-type a-Si:H solar cells. At a deposition rate of 11 A/sec, a conversion efficiency of 6.86% was obtained. This high efficiency shows that disilane is applicable for mass production fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells.

Kenne, J.; Ohashi, Y.; Matsushita, T.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations Ron Armstrong* (and Qizhen Li**)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations Ron Armstrong* (and Qizhen Li**) *University/dt) = (1/m)b (1/m)(d/dt)bxd 8 charts 1.a. TASRA, Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) and Johnson-Cook relations 1.b) (Hall-Petch) Twinning: T = 0T + kT-1/2 ; kT > k R.W. Armstrong, "Thermal Activation ­ Strain Rate

Maryland at College Park, University of

160

Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 /Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Localized Amorphism after High-Strain-Rate Deformation in TWIP Steel  

SciTech Connect

The microstructural features of shear localization, generated by a high strain rate (~105 s-1) deformation, of a twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel containing about 17.5 wt. % Mn were well characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and electron back scatter diffraction. The high deformation rate was obtained by a ballistic impact penetration test on a TWIP steel sheet. In addition to the deformation twins observed as the domain microstructural characterization of high-strain-rate deformation outside shear bands, some shear bands consisting of complex microstructures were also evidenced in the highly-deformed area. Inside the shear band, there exist a large region of amorphous phase and a smooth transition zone containing nano-crystalline (NC) phase. The grain size decreased gradually in the transition zone, changing from coarse-scale (> 100 nm) next to the fully amorphous zone to fine-scale (<10nm) adjacent to the amorphous region. The coexistence of amorphous state and fine-grained nano-crystalline phase obviously suggests that melting occurred inside the shear bands, which is corroborated by calculations showing a very high temperature rise due to the localized plastic deformation and the extremely rapid cooling rate through heat dissipation to the rest of the specimen.

Li, Nan; Wang, Y. D.; Peng, R. Lin; Sun, Xin; Liaw, Peter K.; Wu, G. L.; Wang, L.; Cai, H. N.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition system for high-rate deposition of functional materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric pressure plasmachemical vapor deposition(CVD) system has been developed to fabricate functional thin films at very high deposition rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma in which high-density radicals are created has been effectively used to depositthin films. Combination of the newly designed rotary electrode and the 150 MHz very high frequency power supply makes it possible not only to generate the high-density atmospheric pressure plasma but also to avoid ion bombardment against the film. By virtue of these noble characteristics of the system high quality films can be fabricated at an unprecedented high deposition rate. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the atmospheric pressure plasmaCVD system hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a- Si:H ) films were prepared in gas mixtures containing He H 2 and SiH 4 . The results showed that homogeneous a- Si:H films grew when substrates were heated at 200?°C. Extremely high deposition rate which was more than 100 times faster than that of the conventional low-pressure plasma CVD technique was realized.

Y. Mori; K. Yoshii; H. Kakiuchi; K. Yasutake

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines  

SciTech Connect

In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

High-rate chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films by radio frequency thermal plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-rate chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films by radio frequency Semiconductor, Eden Prairie, MN, USA Received 10 July 2002; accepted 14 July 2002 Abstract Silicon carbide films; Nanomaterials; Silicon carbide; Thermal plasmas; Thin films; Si tetrachlorine precursor Silicon carbide has

Zachariah, Michael R.

166

System Design Considerations for High data Rate Communications Over Multi-wire Overhead Power-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Design Considerations for High data Rate Communications Over Multi-wire Overhead Power communications, multi-wire overhead lines, capacity, OFDM, coding. I. INTRODUCTION The increasing interest, and severe narrowband interference [1]. The channel characteristics of medium voltage overhead power-line

Kavehrad, Mohsen

167

The impact of school facilities on student achievement, attendance, behavior, completion rate and teacher turnover rate in selected Texas high schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determines reporting criteria and validity. School Facilities: Defined through the use of the Total Learning Environment Assessment (TLEA), developed for a prior study of Texas public schools (O’Neill, 2000). It is an instrument that rates facility..., discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate. School facility condition for the participating schools was determined by the Total Learning Environment Assessment (TLEA) as completed by the principal or principal’s designee on high school campuses...

McGowen, Robert Scott

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

High-Purity Germanium Spectroscopy at Rates in Excess of 10^{6} Events/s  

SciTech Connect

Abstract—In gamma spectroscopy, a compromise must be made between energy resolution and event-rate capability. Some foreseen nuclear material safeguards applications require a spectrometer with energy resolution typical of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, operated at rates up to and exceeding 106 events per second. We report the performance of an HPGe spectrometer adapted to run at such rates. Our system consists of a commercial semi-coaxial HPGe detector, a modified high-voltagerail, resistive-feedback, charge-sensitive preamplifier and a continuous waveform digitizer. Digitized waveforms are analyzed offline with a novel time-variant trapezoidal filter algorithm. Several time-invariant trapezoidal filters are run in parallel and the slowest one not rejected by instantaneous pileup conditions is used to measure each pulse height. We have attained full-widthat- half-maximum energy resolution of less than 8 keV measured at 662 keV with 1:08*106 per second incoming event rate and 38% throughput. An additional constraint on the width of the fast trigger filter removes a significant amount of edge pileup that passes the first pileup cut, reducing throughput to 26%. While better resolution has been reported by other authors, our throughput is over an order of magnitude higher than any other reported HPGe system operated at such an event rate.

VanDevender, Brent A.; Dion, Michael P.; Fast, James E.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Wilen, Christopher D.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wright, Michael E.

2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High-Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh PIs: F. S. Pettit, G. H. Meier Subcontractor: J. L. Beuth SCIES Project 02- 01- SR101 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration + 6 mo No-Cost Extension) $ 458,420 Total Contract Value ($ 412,695 DOE) Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology For Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High- Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines University of Pittsburgh - Carnegie Mellon University University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh In the next generation gas turbine, resistance to thermal cycling damage may be as important as resistance to long isothermal exposures. Moreover, metallic coatings and Thermal Barrier

170

A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

Dinesh, P. [Department of Electronics and Communication, Nagarjuna College of Engineering and Technology, Bangalore-562 110 Karnataka (India); Department of Electronics and Communication, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Renukappa, N. M. [Department of Electronics and Communication, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Siddaramaiah [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore-570 006, Karnataka (India); Lee, J. H. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeevananda, T. [R and D Centre, Department of Chemistry, R.N.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore-560 061, Karnataka (India)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

Short Metal Capillary Columns Packed with Polymer-Coated Fibrous Materials in High-Temperature Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......along with the subsequent commercialization. However, only a limited...After the deac- tivation process, a bundle of heat-resistant...followed by the polymer-coating process onto the packed filaments...capillary The metal deactivation process was carried out according......

Yoshihiro Saito; Mitsuhiro Ogawa; Motohiro Imaizumi; Kazuhiro Ban; Akira Abe; Tsutomu Takeichi; Hiroo Wada; Kiyokatsu Jinno

172

High-performance organic solar cells based on a low-bandgap poly-thienothiophene-benzodithiophene polymer and fullerene composite prepared by using the airbrush spray-coating technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, we have demonstrated high-performance organic solar cells with spray coated active layers. The influence ... butyric acid (PC71BM) methyl ester bulk heterojunction solar cells is presented. A...

Palanisamy Kumar; Santhakumar Kannappan…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Compact X-ray Source using a High Repetition Rate Laser and Copper Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The accelerator is a novel high-efficiency standing-wave linac and RF photoinjector powered by a single ultrastable RF transmitter at x-band RF frequency. The high efficiency permits operation at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, which is further boosted to 100 kHz by operating with trains of 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns. The 100 kHz repetition rate is orders of magnitude beyond existing high brightness copper linacs. The entire accelerator is approximately 1 meter long and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The colliding laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 1030 nm, 100 mJ pulses at the same 1 kHz repetition rate as the accelerator. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and stored for m...

Graves, W S; Brown, P; Carbajo, S; Dolgashev, V; Hong, K -H; Ihloff, E; Khaykovich, B; Lin, H; Murari, K; Nanni, E A; Resta, G; Tantawi, S; Zapata, L E; Kärtner, F X; Moncton, D E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy...

Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Consolidation and high strain rate mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline tantalum powder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High ductility and strength exhibited in nanograined materials can potentially be exploited in explosively formed penetrator liner applications. Both coarse and nanocrystalline tantalum powder were consolidated by Plasma Pressure Compaction (P2C) to study the effect of grain size on dynamic compression properties. The powders were consolidated rapidly with 1 minute of isothermal holding time to retain initial microstructure. The P2C consolidated specimens were cut by electric discharge machining (EDM), polished for SEM characterization, and tested in dynamic compression using a Kolsky apparatus. The effect of grain size on yield stress and strain was investigated at various strain rates for a coarse grained and a nanograined specimen. Especially, the high strain rate response of nanocrystalline tantalum is discussed in this paper.

Sang H. Yoo; T.S. Sudarshan; Krupa Sethuram; Ghatu Subhash; R.J. Dowding

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of high strain rates on peak stress in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical behavior of Zr{sub 41.25}Ti{sub 13.75}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} (LM-1) has been extensively characterized under quasistatic loading conditions; however, its mechanical behavior under dynamic loading conditions is currently not well understood. A Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and a single-stage gas gun are employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of LM-1 in the strain-rate regime of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5}/s. The SHPB experiments are conducted with a tapered insert design to mitigate the effects of stress concentrations and preferential failure at the specimen-insert interface. The higher strain-rate plate-impact compression-and-shear experiments are conducted by impacting a thick tungsten carbide (WC) flyer plate with a sandwich sample comprising a thin bulk metallic glass specimen between two thicker WC target plates. Specimens employed in the SHPB experiments failed in the gage-section at a peak stress of approximately 1.8 GPa. Specimens in the high strain-rate plate-impact experiments exhibited a flow stress in shear of approximately 0.9 GPa, regardless of the shear strain-rate. The flow stress under the plate-impact conditions was converted to an equivalent flow stress under uniaxial compression by assuming a von Mises-like material behavior and accounting for the plane strain conditions. The results of these experiments, when compared to the previous work conducted at quasistatic loading rates, indicate that the peak stress of LM-1 is essentially strain rate independent over the strain-rate range up to 10{sup 5}/s.

Sunny, George; Yuan Fuping; Prakash, Vikas [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222 (United States); Lewandowski, John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes  

SciTech Connect

High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length {proportional_to}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=(1.90{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1705{+-}56 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=(1.86{+-}0.24) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1513{+-}123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=(2.02{+-}0.19) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1799{+-}96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=(2.55{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1824{+-}114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779}exp(97 K/T)cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=3.169 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.679}exp(119 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148}exp(536 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325}exp(602 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three reactions in order to provide reliable extrapolations of the rate constants from 250-2000 K. The results of the theoretical predictions for OH + cyclohexane and OH + methylcyclopentane were sufficient to make a theoretical prediction for OH + methylcyclohexane. The present recommended rate expressions for OH with cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane, give rate constants that are 15-25% higher (over the T-range 800-1300 K) than the rate constants utilized in recent modeling efforts aimed at addressing the oxidation of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The current measurements reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for the primary cycloalkane consumption channel in a high temperature oxidation environment. (author)

Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J.V. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, D-193, Bldg. 200, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Device for testing closure disks at high rates of change of pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A means is also disclosed for transmitting a tensile load from a piston to a hollow notched plug and for sealing the means for transmitting load within a hole in a piston. 5 figures.

Merten, C.W. Jr.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tribology and coatings  

SciTech Connect

The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries A. Jaiswal 1 , C. R. Hornenext generation of Li-ion batteries for consumer electronics

Jaiswal, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

SciTech Connect

Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The High Shear Rheological Properties of Dispersions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extremely high shear rates are applied to pigment dispersions during various scale-up and manufactring processes in several industries. As reported in ... responsible for failures in coating processes. Several additives

V. Ribitsch; J. Pfragner

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Improving Switching Performance of Power MOSFETs Used in High Rep-Rate, Short Pulse, High-Power Pulsers  

SciTech Connect

As their switching and power handling characteristics improve, solid-state devices are finding new applications in pulsed power. This is particularly true of applications that require fast trains of short duration pulses. High voltage (600-1200V) MOSFETs are especially well suited for use in these systems, as they can switch at significant peak power levels and are easily gated on and off very quickly. MOSFET operation at the shortest pulse durations is not constrained by the intrinsic capabilities of the MOSFET, but rather by the capabilities of the gate drive circuit and the system physical layout. This project sought to improve MOSFET operation in a pulsed power context by addressing these issues. The primary goal of this project is to improve the switching performance of power MOSFETs for use in high rep-rate, short pulse, high-power applications by improving the design of the gate drive circuits and the circuit layouts used in these systems. This requires evaluation of new commercial gate drive circuits and upgrading the designs of LLNL-developed circuits. In addition, these circuits must be tested with the fastest available high-voltage power MOSFETs.

Cook, E G

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Calcium orthophosphate coatings on magnesium and its biodegradable alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodegradable metals have been suggested as revolutionary biomaterials for bone-grafting therapies. Of these metals, magnesium (Mg) and its biodegradable alloys appear to be particularly attractive candidates due to their non-toxicity and as their mechanical properties match those of bones better than other metals do. Being light, biocompatible and biodegradable, Mg-based metallic implants have several advantages over other implantable metals currently in use, such as eliminating both the effects of stress shielding and the requirement of a second surgery for implant removal. Unfortunately, the fast degradation rates of Mg and its biodegradable alloys in the aggressive physiological environment impose limitations on their clinical applications. This necessitates development of implants with controlled degradation rates to match the kinetics of bone healing. Application of protective but biocompatible and biodegradable coatings able to delay the onset of Mg corrosion appears to be a reasonable solution. Since calcium orthophosphates are well tolerated by living organisms, they appear to be the excellent candidates for such coatings. Nevertheless, both the high chemical reactivity and the low melting point of Mg require specific parameters for successful deposition of calcium orthophosphate coatings. This review provides an overview of current coating techniques used for deposition of calcium orthophosphates on Mg and its biodegradable alloys. The literature analysis revealed that in all cases the calcium orthophosphate protective coatings both increased the corrosion resistance of Mg-based metallic biomaterials and improved their surface biocompatibility.

Sergey V. Dorozhkin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ICON, a current model preamplifier in CMOS technology for use with high rate particle detectors  

SciTech Connect

The ICON current mode preamplifier is intended for use in experiments at high rate hadron colliders. The transient response and noise performance have been analyzed. One chip has been made using an ICON circuit with resistive feedback to produce a preamplifier with a peaking time of below 10 ns. This fast preamplifier has a gain of 870 mV/pC and a power dissipation of around 1 mW. Another chip was made which uses the ICON circuit as the front-end to a dual port analog memory. The noise measured is between 2,400 e[sup [minus

Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Jarron, P.; Meddeler, G.; Santiard, J.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Comment on ``High Temperature Fermion Propagator -- Resummation and Gauge Dependence of the Damping Rate''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baier et al. have reported the damping rate of long-wavelength fermionic excitations in high-temperature QED and QCD to be gauge-fixing-dependent even within the resummation scheme due to Braaten and Pisarski. It is shown that this problem is caused by the singular nature of the on-shell expansion of the fermion self-energy in the infra-red. Its regularization reveals that the alleged gauge dependence pertains to the residue rather than the pole of the fermion propagator, so that in particular the damping constant comes out gauge-independent, as it should.

Anton Rebhan

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

190

The compressive response of porcine adipose tissue from low to high strain rate Kerstyn Comley, Norman Fleck*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engi- neering models for tissue damage due to dynamic loading, such as air blast and sand blast, sports pressure bar Constitutive testing Ogden model a b s t r a c t Subcutaneous adipose tissue has been tested injury and high rate needle-free drug delivery, there is a need to measure the high strain rate response

Fleck, Norman A.

191

High Growth Rate of Epitaxial Silicon-Carbon Alloys by High-Order Silane Precursor and Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates typically achieved by disilane and silane, respectively, at 575o C. The rate at present is limited precursor HOS than disilane in CVD, even at lower temperatures. Our current growth rates of Si1-yCy alloys

192

Coatings on reflective mask substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

Tong, William Man-Wai (Oakland, CA); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Mangat, Pawitter J. S. (Gilbert, AZ); Stivers, Alan R. (San Jose, CA); Kofron, Patrick G. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, Matthew A. (Austin, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Enhancing DNA binding rate using optical trapping of high-density gold nanodisks  

SciTech Connect

We present the dynamic study of optical trapping of fluorescent molecules using high-density gold nanodisk arrays. The gold nanodisks were fabricated by electron beam lithography with a diameter of 500 nm and a period of 1 ?m. Dark-field illumination showed ?15 times enhancement of fluorescence near edges of nanodisks. Such enhanced near-field generated an optical trapping force of ?10 fN under 3.58 × 10{sup 3} W/m{sup 2} illumination intensity as calculated from the Brownian motions of 590 nm polystyrene beads. Kinetic observation of thiolated DNA modified with Cy5 dye showed different binding rates of DNA under different illumination intensity. The binding rate increased from 2.14 × 10{sup 3} s{sup ?1} (I = 0.7 × 10{sup 3} W/m{sup 2}) to 1.15 × 10{sup 5} s{sup ?1} (I = 3.58 × 10{sup 3} W/m{sup 2}). Both enhanced fluorescence and binding rate indicate that gold nanodisks efficiently improve both detection limit and interaction time for microarrays.

Lin, En-Hung; Pan, Ming-Yang [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China) [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529 (China); Lee, Ming-Chang [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China)] [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Wei, Pei-Kuen, E-mail: pkwei@sinica.edu.tw [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529 (China) [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529 (China); Institute of Biophotonics, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cavity-enhanced field-free molecular alignment at high repetition rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet frequency combs are a versatile tool with applications including precision measurement, strong-field physics, and solid-state physics. Here we report on an application of extreme ultraviolet frequency combs and their driving lasers to studying strong-field effects in molecular systems. We perform field-free molecular alignment and high-order hamonic generation with aligned molecules in a gas jet at 154 MHz repetition rate using a high-powered optical frequency comb inside a femtosecond enhancement cavity. The cavity-enhanced system provides means to reach suitable intensities to study field-free molecular alignment and enhance the observable effects of the molecule-field interaction. We observe modulations of the driving field, arising from the nature of impulsive stimulated Raman scattering responsible for coherent molecular rotations. We foresee impact of this work on the study of molecule-based strong-field physics, with improved precision and a more fundamental understanding of the int...

Benko, Craig; Allison, Thomas K; Labaye, François; Ye, Jun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Heat Flux Calculation and Problem of Flaking of Boron Carbide Coatings on the Faraday Screen of the ICRH Antennas During Tore Supra High Power, Long Pulse Operation  

SciTech Connect

Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions issues during high RF power, long pulse operation. Safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load are presented in the paper.

Corre, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Lipa, M. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain] [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Basiuk, V. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Courtois, X. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Dumont, R. J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Gardarein, J. L. [University of Aix, Marseille, France] [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL] [ORNL; Martin, V. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Moncada, V. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Portafaix, C. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Rigollet, F. [University of Aix, Marseille, France] [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Tawizgant, R. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Travere, J. M. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Valliez, K. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

SciTech Connect

The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

Jeffrey W. Fergus

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conformal Deep Trench Coating with both Conducting and InsulatingMaterials  

SciTech Connect

A thin film coating system has been developed for deposition of both conductive and insulating material. The system employs an RF discharge plasma source with four straight RF antennas, which is made of or covered with the deposition material, thus serving simultaneously as a sputtering target. The average deposition rate of the copper thin film can be as high as 500 nm/min when operated in CW mode. Film properties under different plasma conditions have been investigated experimentally. By adjusting RF power, gas pressure, duty factor, and substrate biasing conditions, several thin film coating schemes can be achieved, one of which has been demonstrated to be suitable for conformal deep trench coating. Conformal coating over trenches of high aspect ratio (>6:1) has been demonstrated at both micron and submicron scales.

Ji, Lili; Kim, Jung-Kuk; Ji, Qing; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Chen, Ye; Gough, Rick A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Diamond Jet Hybrid HVOF Thermal Spray:? Rule-Based Modeling of Coating Microstructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the computational modeling and simulation of the microstructure of coatings produced by an industrial high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process (Diamond Jet hybrid gun, Sulzer Metco, Westbury, NY). ... 1 Featured with a high gas/particle velocity and a relatively low gas/particle temperature when compared with plasma spraying, HVOF thermal spray is a powerful tool for the fabrication of coatings of metals, cermets, and composites. ... To improve coating repeatability and process performance, much experimental work has been done in the past decade to study the effects of key process parameters, such as the gas flow rate, fuel/oxygen ratio, and spray distance, on the physical and mechanical properties of HVOF thermally sprayed coatings. ...

Dan Shi; Mingheng Li; Panagiotis D. Christofides

2004-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

High-frame-rate intensified fast optically shuttered TV cameras with selected imaging applications  

SciTech Connect

This invited paper focuses on high speed electronic/electro-optic camera development by the Applied Physics Experiments and Imaging Measurements Group (P-15) of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Physics Division over the last two decades. The evolution of TV and image intensifier sensors and fast readout fast shuttered cameras are discussed. Their use in nuclear, military, and medical imaging applications are presented. Several salient characteristics and anomalies associated with single-pulse and high repetition rate performance of the cameras/sensors are included from earlier studies to emphasize their effects on radiometric accuracy of electronic framing cameras. The Group`s test and evaluation capabilities for characterization of imaging type electro-optic sensors and sensor components including Focal Plane Arrays, gated Image Intensifiers, microchannel plates, and phosphors are discussed. Two new unique facilities, the High Speed Solid State Imager Test Station (HSTS) and the Electron Gun Vacuum Test Chamber (EGTC) arc described. A summary of the Group`s current and developmental camera designs and R&D initiatives are included.

Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Olivine mineral replacement by serpentine is one major alteration reaction of oceanic hydrothermalism. In the present experimental study, olivine grains were replaced by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions. In our study, olivine replacement implied a spatial and temporal coupling of dissolution and precipitation reactions at the interface between olivine and chrysotile–brucite minerals. Coupled dissolution–precipitation led to the alteration of starting olivine grains (so-called primary or parent mineral) to a porous mineral assemblage of chrysotile and brucite with preservation of the initial olivine morphology. This mineral replacement reaction of olivine (serpentinization) has been characterized using XRD, FESEM and FTIR measurements. Moreover, a simple and novel method is here proposed to quantify the mineral replacement rate (or serpentinization rate) of olivine using thermogravimetric (TG) and differential TG (DTG) analyses. Serpentinization extent depends on the grain size: it is complete after 30 days of reaction for the smallest olivine grains (<30 ?m), after 90 days of reaction for the intermediate olivine grains (30 ?m–56 ?m). For the largest fraction (56–150 ?m), 55% of serpentinization extent was reached after 90 days. Based on the fitting of the serpentinization extent (?t) versus time (t) using a kinetic pseudo-second-order model, the serpentinization rates vary from 3.6×10?6 s?1 to 1.4×10?7 s?1 depending on the olivine grain size. An additional correlation between FTIR spectra analysis and TG measurements is proposed. The mineral replacement reactions frequently observed in natural alteration processes could be a powerful synthesis route to design new porous and/or nanostructured materials.

Romain Lafay; German Montes-Hernandez; Emilie Janots; Rodica Chiriac; Nathaniel Findling; Francois Toche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quantifying fatigue generated in high strain rate cyclic loading of Norway spruce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Papermaking especially mechanical pulping consumes much energy. To reduce this energy consumption one has to understand and exploit the phenomena present during the pulping. An important phenomenon to understand is wood fatigue. We quantitatively measure the fatigue generated during high strain rate cyclic loading of spruce wood performed under conditions resembling those present during mechanical pulping. We impacted the samples with 5% strain pulses at 500 Hz. The radial direction stiffness drop in the samples was quantified by 500 kHz ultrasonic through-transmission postimpacting. The depth profile of the generated fatigue was also determined. A dependency of the amount of fatigue generated during cyclic straining on the moisture content was detected. A hypothesis about the temporal and spatial evolution of the fatigue during the process is presented. The results supporting the hypothesis provide insight into wood behavior under mechanical pulping conditions.

Ari Salmi; Lauri Salminen; Edward Hæggström

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Crystal Orientation Tuning of LiFePO4 Nanoplates for High Rate Lithium Battery Cathode Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For an electrochemical cell to deliver capacity at high rate, all parts of the Li+-electron path between the anode and the cathode active material have to be capable of sustaining this rate. ... Materials with the olivine LixMPO4 structure form an important class of rechargeable battery cathodes. ...

Li Wang; Xiangming He; Wenting Sun; Jianlong Wang; Yadong Li; Shoushan Fan

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spatially resolved measurements of kinematics and flow-induced birefringence in worm-like micellar solutions undergoing high rate deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worm-like micellar solutions are model non-Newtonian systems on account of their well understood linear viscoelastic behavior. Their high deformation rate, non-linear rheological response, however, remains inadequately ...

Ober, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effect Of False Alarm Rate On Pilot Use And Trust Of Automation Under Conditions Of Simulated High Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to investigate the relationships between automation false alarm rate, human trust in automation, and human use of automation, specifically under conditions of simulated high risk. The ...

Cafarelli, Deborah

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Thompson, Karen G. (Orlando, FL); Bryan, Coleman J. (Merritt Island, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Composite coatings improve engines  

SciTech Connect

About 40% of the power loss in engine systems is attributed to the adverse effects of friction in reciprocating engine components. Over half of this power loss is caused by friction between pistons, piston rings, and cylinder bores. In addition, engine parts may be attacked by corrosive gasoline substitutes such as liquid propane gas and alcohol/gasoline mixtures. To solve both friction and corrosion problems, Nihon Parkerizing Co. has improved the nickel-phosphorus based ceramic composite (NCC) plating technology that was developed for cylinder bores and pistons by Suzuki Motor Co. in the mid 1970s. Iron and nickel-based composite plating technologies have been investigated since the early 1970s, and a few have been used on small two-stroke motorcycle, outboard marine, snowmobile, and some luxury passenger car engine components. Both nickel- and iron-base plating processes are used on cylinders and pistons because they offer excellent wear and corrosion resistance. Nickel-base films have higher corrosion resistance than those based on iron, and are capable of withstanding the corrosive conditions characteristic of high methanol fuels. Unfortunately, they experience a decrease in hardness as operating temperatures increase. However, NCC coatings with phosphorus additions have high hardness even under severe operating conditions, and hardness increases upon exposure to elevated temperatures. In addition to high hardness and corrosion resistance, NCC coatings provide a low friction coefficient, which contributes to the reduction of friction losses between sliding components. When used in low-quality or alcohol fuels, the corrosion resistance of NCC coatings is far higher than that of Fe-P plating. Additionally, the coatings reduce wall and piston temperature, wear of ring groove and skirt, and carbon deposit formation, and they improve output power and torque. These advantages all contribute to the development of light and efficient engines with better fuel mileage.

Funatani, K.; Kurosawa, K. (Nihon Parkerizing Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Room-Temperature Silicon Nitrides Prepared with Very High Rates (>50 nm/s) in Atmospheric-Pressure Very High-Frequency Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the structure and stability of SiN x ...films deposited with very high rates (>50 nm/s) in atmospheric-pressure (AP) He-based plasma excited by a 150 MHz ver...

Hiroaki Kakiuchi; Hiromasa Ohmi; Kei Nakamura…

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Study demonstrates high NOx conversion with SCR coated on DPF. Optimization of catalyst washcoat and coating process minimizes back-pressure while maintaining good performance.

211

Evolution of microstructure and residual stress in disc-shape EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings and temperature profile of high pressure turbine blade.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A detailed understanding of failure mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) can help develop reliable and durable TBCs for advanced gas turbine engines. One of… (more)

Mukherjee, Sriparna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

213

An intelligent approach to non-constant feed rate determination for high-performance 2D CNC milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optimal machining parameters (spindle speed, feed rate, and depth of cut) are crucial to high-performance CNC pocketing and profiling, which is concerned with shorter machining time, higher surface quality, and longer tool life. However, the feed rates are often conservatively fixed, obviously un-optimised, for different geometries of a curved profile. In this work, an intelligent approach to determining non-constant feed rates is proposed. First, the geometric features of this profile are identified, and the corresponding effective radial depths of cut are calculated. Second, based on a database of these machining parameters, a fuzzy rule-based system is established to predict various cutting forces along this profile. Then the feed rates are adjusted so that the cutting forces always remain high and chatter is still prevented. Thus the high-performance machining can be realised by using this approach, which can also be readily implemented in production process planning to benefit the manufacturing industry.

Zezhong C. Chen; Zhibin Miao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Monte Carlo method for estimating backflashover rates on high voltage transmission lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a novel Monte-Carlo based model for the analysis of backflashover rate (BFOR) on high voltage transmission lines. The proposed model aims to take into the account following aspects of the BFOR phenomenon: transmission line (TL) route keraunic level(s), statistical depiction of lightning-current parameters (including statistical correlation), electrogeometric model of lightning attachment, frequency-dependence of TL parameters and electromagnetic coupling effects, tower geometry and surge impedance, tower grounding impulse impedance (with soil ionization), lightning-surge reflections from adjacent towers, non-linearity of the insulator strings flashover characteristic, distribution of lightning strokes along the TL span and power frequency voltage. In the analysis of the BFOR, special attention is given to the influences emanating from the insulator strings flashover characteristic and lightning statistics. The model could be applied to the transmission line as a whole or some of its portions, e.g. first several towers emanating from the substation or several towers crossing a mountain ridge.

Petar Sarajcev

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Design and implementation of a high data rate wireless system using Low-Density Parity-Check codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this research is to design a high performance, high data rate, low cost wireless communications system for use in a typical outdoor environment. The use of Low-Density Parity-check (LDPC) codes as the forward error correction scheme...

Bhatt, Tejas Maheshbhai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Morphological and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Zn–Ag nanoparticle composite coatings  

SciTech Connect

Silver nanoparticles with an average size of 23 nm were chemically synthesized and used to fabricate Zn–Ag composite coatings. The Zn–Ag composite coatings were generated by electrodeposition method using a simple sulfate plating bath dispersed with 0.5, 1 and 1.5 g/l of Ag nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and texture co-efficient calculations revealed that Ag nanoparticles appreciably influenced the morphology, micro-structure and texture of the deposit. It was also noticed that agglomerates of Ag nanoparticles, in the case of high bath load conditions, produced defects and dislocations on the deposit surface. Ag nanoparticles altered the corrosion resistance property of Zn–Ag composite coatings as observed from Tafel polarization, electrochemical impedance analysis and an immersion test. Reduction in corrosion rate with increased charge transfer resistance was observed for Zn–Ag composite coatings when compared to a pure Zn coating. However, the particle concentration in the plating bath and their agglomeration state directly influenced the surface morphology and the subsequent corrosion behavior of the deposits. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ag nanoparticles with an average size of 23 nm • Fabrication of Zn/nano Ag composite coating on mild steel • Composite coatings showed better corrosion resistance. • Optimization of particle concentration is necessary.

Punith Kumar, M.K.; Srivastava, Chandan, E-mail: csrivastava@materials.iisc.ernet.in

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of hot corrosion resistant coatings for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission reductions are being sought worldwide to mitigate climate change. These need to proceed in parallel with optimisation of thermal efficiency in energy conversion systems on economic grounds to achieve overall sustainability. The use of renewable energy is one strategy being adopted to achieve these needs; with one route being the burning of biomass and waste derived fuels in the gas turbines of highly efficient, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electricity generating units. A major factor to be taken into account with gas turbines using such fuels, compared with natural gas, is the potentially higher rates of hot corrosion caused by molten trace species which can be deposited on hot gas path components. This paper describes the development of hot corrosion protective coatings for such applications. Diffusion coatings were the basis for coating development, which consisted of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) trials, using aluminising and single step silicon-aluminising processes to develop new coating structures on two nickel-based superalloys, one conventionally cast and one single crystal (IN738LC and CMSX-4). These coatings were characterised using SEM/EDX analysis and their performance evaluated in oxidation and hot corrosion screening tests. A variant of the single step silicon-aluminide coating was identified as having sufficient oxidation/hot corrosion resistance and microstructural stability to form the basis for future coating optimisation.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Understanding the operation and use of high temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical corrosion rate probes were constructed and tested along with mass loss coupons in a N2/O2/CO2 plus water vapor environment. Temperatures ranged from 450 to 600 C. Corrosion rates for ash-covered mild steel, 304L SS, and 316L SS probes using electrochemical techniques were a function of time, temperature, and process environment. Correlation between electrochemical and mass loss corrosion rates was good.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S. (InterCorr International Inc.); Eden, David A. (InterCorr International Inc.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermodynamic Characteristic Study of a High-temperature Flow-rate Control Valve for Fuel Supply of Scramjet Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic characteristics are of great importance for the performance of a high-temperature flow-rate control valve, as high-temperature environment may bring problems, such as blocking of spool and increasing of leakage, to the valve. In this paper, a high-temperature flow-rate control valve, pilot-controlled by a pneumatic servo system is developed to control the fuel supply for scramjet engines. After introducing the construction and working principle, the thermodynamic mathematical models of the valve are built based on the heat transfer methods inside the valve. By using different boundary conditions, different methods of simulations are carried out and compared. The steady-state and transient temperature field distribution inside the valve body are predicted and temperatures at five interested points are measured. By comparing the simulation and experimental results, a reasonable 3D finite element analysis method is suggested to predict the thermodynamic characteristics of the high-temperature flow-rate control valve.

Wen ZENG; Zhizhong TONG; Songjing LI; Hongzhou LI; Liang ZHANG

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Triggering, front-end electronics, and data acquisition for high-rate beauty experiments  

SciTech Connect

The working group explored the feasibility of building a trigger and an electronics data acquisition system for both collider and fixed target experiments. There appears to be no fundamental technical limitation arising from either the rate or the amount of data for a collider experiment. The fixed target experiments will likely require a much higher rate because of the smaller cross section. Rates up to one event per RF bucket (50 MHz) appear to be feasible. Higher rates depend on the details of the particular experiment and trigger. Several ideas were presented on multiplicity jump and impact parameter triggers for fixed target experiments. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Johnson, M.; Lankford, A.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Rapid micromachining of high aspect ratio holes in fused silica glass by high repetition rate picosecond laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 2 shows examples of top and side view images of a series of laser modification tracks formed for the case of dynamic up scanning at various scan speeds, v s, and repetition rates, R..., (...

Samira Karimelahi; Ladan Abolghasemi; Peter R. Herman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pulsed Helium Ion Beam Induced Deposition: A Means to High Growth Rates  

SciTech Connect

The sub-nanometer beam of a helium ion microscope was used to study and optimize helium-ion beam induced deposition of PtC nanopillars with the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(CPCH{sub 3}) precursor. The beam current, beam dwell time, precursor refresh time, and beam focus have been independently varied. Continuous beam exposure resulted in narrow but short pillars, while pulsed exposure resulted in thinner and higher ones. Furthermore, at short dwell times the deposition efficiency was very high, especially for a defocused beam. Efficiencies were measured up to 20 times the value for continuous exposure conditions. The interpretation of the experimental data was aided by a Monte Carlo simulation of the deposition. The results indicate that two regimes are operational in ion beam induced deposition (IBID). In the first one, the adsorbed precursor molecules originally present in the beam interaction region decompose. After the original precursor layer is consumed, further depletion is averted and growth continues by the supply of molecules via adsorption and surface diffusion. Depletion around the beam impact site can be distinguished from depletion on the flanges of the growing pillars. The Monte Carlo simulations for low precursor surface coverage reproduce measured growth rates, but predict considerably narrower pillars, especially at short dwell times. Both the experiments and the simulations show that the pillar width rapidly increases with increasing beam diameter. Optimal writing strategy, good beam focusing, and rapid beam positioning are needed for efficient and precise fabrication of extended and complex nanostructures by He-IBID.

Alkemade, Paul F. A. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Miro, Hozanna [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Van Veldhoven, Emile [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Maas, Diederick [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Smith, Daryl [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dosimetric Impact of Interfraction Catheter Movement in High-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of interfraction catheter movement on dosimetry in prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients were treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy. Implants were performed on day 1 under transrectal ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed. Inverse planning simulated annealing was used for treatment planning. The first fraction was delivered on day 1. A cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed on day 2 before the second fraction was given. A fusion of the CBCT and CT was performed using intraprostatic gold markers as landmarks. Initial prostate and urethra contours were transferred to the CBCT images. Bladder and rectum contours were drawn, and catheters were digitized on the CBCT. The planned treatment was applied to the CBCT dataset, and dosimetry was analyzed and compared to the initial dose distribution. This process was repeated after a reoptimization was performed, using the same constraints used on day 1. Results: Mean interfraction catheter displacement was 5.1 mm. When we used the initial plan on day 2, the mean prostate V100 (volume receiving 100 Gy or more) decreased from 93.8% to 76.2% (p < 0.01). Rectal V75 went from 0.75 cm{sup 3} to 1.49 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.01). A reoptimization resulted in a mean prostate V100 of 88.1%, closer to the initial plan (p = 0.05). Mean rectal V75 was also improved with a value of 0.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no significant change in bladder and urethra dose on day 2. Conclusions: A mean interfraction catheter displacement of 5.1 mm results in a significant decrease in prostate V100 and an increase in rectum dose. A reoptimization before the second treatment improves dose distribution.

Foster, William, E-mail: fosterw@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Hsu, I.-Chow; Weinberg, Vivan; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications  

SciTech Connect

Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

Shwetha, Bondel [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Ravikumar, Manickam, E-mail: drravikumarm@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Lokesh, Vishwanath [Department of Radiotherapy, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Keshava, Subbarao L. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tri-material multilayer coatings with high reflectivity and wide bandwidth for 25 to 50 nm extreme ultraviolet light  

SciTech Connect

Magnesium/silicon carbide (Mg/SiC) multilayers have been fabricated with normal incidence reflectivity in the vicinity of 40% to 50% for wavelengths in the 25 to 50 nm wavelength range. However many applications, for example solar telescopes and ultrafast studies using high harmonic generation sources, desire larger bandwidths than provided by high reflectivity Mg/SiC multilayers. We investigate introducing a third material, Scandium, to create a tri-material Mg/Sc/SiC multilayer allowing an increase the bandwidth while maintaining high reflectivity.

Aquila, Andrew; Salmassi, Farhad; Liu, Yanwei; Gullikson, Eric M.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Special Coating Emission Control System At Goulds Pumps ITT Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required significant changes for users of industrial paints and coatings. New York State requires users of highly volatile coatings to meet additional regulations, and apply for special permits and variances...

Caropolo, B.; Evans, T.

228

The Effect of Oxygen Contamination on the Amorphous Structure of Thermally Sprayed Coatings of Cu47Ti33Zr11Ni8Si1  

SciTech Connect

this research has shown that it is possible to deposit coatings of gas atomized Cu{sub 47}Ti{sub 33}Zr{sub 11}Ni{sub 8}Si{sub 1} powders containing various levels of oxygen contamination using plasma arc spray methods. The structure of the coating was found to depend primarily on the spray environment, with an argon atmosphere producing the most amorphous samples for a given starting powder. The oxygen content of the coatings reflected the relative levels of the oxygen contamination in the starting powders. The analysis of the starting powders displayed oxygen contents ranging from 0.125-0.79 wt.%. It was shown that higher oxygen levels lead to more crystalline structure in the starting powders as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This trend was found to be true for both the starting powders and for the plasma sprayed coatings. Chemical composition for all starting powders was very close to the nominal alloy composition. Chemical changes in the coatings involved the loss of Cu in coatings where high levels of oxidation were found. Cavitation erosion testing of selected coatings showed a weak trend that coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) had lower damage rates, but there was no clear data to indicate which coating parameters were superior. The range of data produced from testing duplicate coating was too wide to provide a good statistical measure of cavitation erosion resistance. of interest was the fact that when coatings began to show damage from cracking, all samples of a group showed similar damage and usually the damage pattern was somewhat unique to that group of samples. Failure of the coatings was due to features inherent to plasma arc spray (PAS) coating (i.e., pores, splat boundaries, oxide inclusions) rather than the mechanical characteristics of the amorphous alloy.

Matthew Frank Besser

2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

229

Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Dual-chamber plasma deposition of A-Si:H solar cells at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect

The use of a separated chamber deposition system for the fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells from disilane at high deposition rates results in a substantial improvement in short circuit current compared to that obtained from a single-chamber system. The spectral responses of cells fabricated in the dual-chamber mode are compared to those made in the single-chamber mode. The results are interpreted by assuming that the rate of removal of boron contaminants from the chamber is independent of deposition rate.

Rajeswaran, G.; Vanier, P.E.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Laterally confined graphene nanosheets and graphene/SnO2 composites as high-rate anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-rate anode materials for lithium-ion batteries are desirable for applications that require high ... demonstrate the advantageous rate capability of few-layered graphene nanosheets, with widths of 100–200 nm,...

Zhiyong Wang; Hao Zhang; Nan Li; Zujin Shi; Zhennan Gu; Gaoping Cao

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-rate penetration of a striker into SiC ceramic with different void content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of penetration of deformable striking rods into SiC ceramics with different void content is studied. The penetration may be viewed as a two-stage process. At the first stage, the penetration rate is ...

A. S. Vlasov; E. L. Zil’berbrand; A. A. Kozhushko; A. I. Kozachuk…

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Stabilization techniques and silicon-germanium saturable absorbers for high repetition rate mode-locked lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monolithic integration of passively mode-locked solid-state lasers at highest repetition rates has been prevented by Q-switching instabilities and the lack of integrable saturable absorbers to date. In this thesis we ...

Grawert, Felix Jan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An investigation of evaluation methods for internal FBE pipe coatings  

SciTech Connect

The corrosivity of CO{sub 2}-containing water used for injection into formations is very high. One of the means for mitigating this corrosion is through the use of internal Fusion Bonded Epoxy (FBE) pipe coatings. However, these are very demanding services for coatings. Pressures and temperatures are high enough in some cases to severely stress the coating. Most FBE coatings are permeated by CO{sub 2}, and when pressures are released, blistering of the coating may occur. This compromises the integrity of the coating which may result in premature failure of the coating followed by corrosion of the pipe metal. The identification of coatings with good performance is absolutely essential. The failure of the coating alone can result in great losses due to the initial cost of the coating application, plus potential operating problems. When corrosive penetrations of the pipe occur, the costs escalate even higher as a result of required maintenance and down time. This paper describes the test work conducted to determine how to evaluate coatings for such services, and to determine which coatings will give successful, long-term performance. Test methods contained in an industry standard have been validated, and suitable coatings identified. Future test work needed to add to these findings has also been recommended. Although this work was designed for CO{sub 2} services, it does give valuable insight into tests that are required to properly qualify FBE coatings for non-CO{sub 2} services.

Thompson, S.P. [Thompson (Stanley P.), Paris, TX (United States); Varughese, K. [Al-Qahtani Pipe Coating Terminal, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessment of applied pipeline coating system in the U.A.E. corrosive soil condition  

SciTech Connect

Severe corrosion conditions along many section of the under ground pipeline are evident in the United Arab Emirates due to the hot humid weather and the presence of salty soil beds (Sabkha) associated with high surface water tables. These lines are usually operated at high temperatures (40-60{degrees}C) which accelerate pipe corrosion rates and incorporate potential risks to the pipe coating at Sabkha areas. ADCO experienced several pipeline external corrosion leaks within 3-7 years period of time postline commissioning. Several on-line inspections have been carried out and followed by comprehensive pipeline rehabilitation programmes with significant replacements of corroded pipe sections. Reported external corrosion was mainly due to pipeline coating failure and poor performance of applied CP system. Different cold applied coating repair systems were field tested during 1982-1983 on the main oil lines which were originally coated with hot applied coal tar enamel. The successful types of wrapping were selected for continued implementations. This paper summarises causes of pipeline coating failures and assesses the performance of applied repair coatings which have been in service for more than ten years.

Gharra, A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Impact of Star Formation and Gamma-Ray Burst Rates at High Redshift on Cosmic Chemical Evolution and Reionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations in the total luminosity density have led to significant progress in establishing the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift. Concurrently observed gamma-ray burst rates have also been used to extract the SFR at high redshift. The SFR in turn can be used to make a host of predictions concerning the ionization history of the Universe, the chemical abundances, and supernova rates. We compare the predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on three recently proposed SFRs: two based on extracting the SFR from the observed gamma-ray burst rate at high redshift, and one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift. Using the WMAP/Planck data on the optical depth and epoch of reionization, we find that only the SFR inferred from gamma-ray burst data at high redshift suffices to allow a single mode (in the initial mass function) of star formation which extends from z = 0 to redshifts > 10. For the case of the more conservative SFR based on...

Vangioni, E; Prestegard, T; Silk, J; Petitjean, P; Mandic, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures  

SciTech Connect

Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K–400K) and pressures (0.10MPa–0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter ? proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p–p{sub v} (p{sub v}: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ?c (?: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter ?, suppression pressure p–p{sub v} and acoustic impedance ?c.

Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fuku-shi, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi [IHI Corperation, TOYOSU IHI BUILDING, 1-1, Toyosu 3-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 1358710 (Japan)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

SciTech Connect

Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flow coating apparatus and method of coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Carbonaceous film coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

Maya, L.

1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

Apparatus for coating powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE ESTIMATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES AND STELLAR POPULATION AGES OF HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES FROM BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY  

SciTech Connect

We explore methods to improve the estimates of star formation rates and mean stellar population ages from broadband photometry of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We use synthetic spectral templates with a variety of simple parametric star formation histories to fit broadband spectral energy distributions. These parametric models are used to infer ages, star formation rates, and stellar masses for a mock data set drawn from a hierarchical semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution. Traditional parametric models generally assume an exponentially declining rate of star formation after an initial instantaneous rise. Our results show that star formation histories with a much more gradual rise in the star formation rate are likely to be better templates, and are likely to give better overall estimates of the age distribution and star formation rate distribution of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). For B- and V-dropouts, we find the best simple parametric model to be one where the star formation rate increases linearly with time. The exponentially declining model overpredicts the age by 100% and 120% for B- and V-dropouts, on average, while for a linearly increasing model, the age is overpredicted by 9% and 16%, respectively. Similarly, the exponential model underpredicts star formation rates by 56% and 60%, while the linearly increasing model underpredicts by 15% and 22%, respectively. For U-dropouts, the models where the star formation rate has a peak (near z {approx} 3) provide the best match for age-overprediction is reduced from 110% to 26%-and star formation rate-underprediction is reduced from 58% to 22%. We classify different types of star formation histories in the semi-analytic models and show how the biases behave for the different classes. We also provide two-band calibration formulae for stellar mass and star formation rate estimations.

Lee, Seong-Kook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wiklind, Tommy [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro, E-mail: joshua@pha.jhu.ed [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Variable firing rate power burner for high efficiency gas furnaces. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One method for increasing the efficiency of residential furnaces and boilers is to retrofit a burner capable of firing rate (FR) modulation. While maximum FR is still attainable, the average FR is significantly lower, resulting in more effective heat exchanger performance. Equally important is the capability for continuous firing at a very low rate (simmering) which eliminates off-cycle loss, a heavy contributor to inefficiency. Additional performance can be gained by reducing the excess air required by a burner. Based on its previous experience, Foster-Miller Associates, Inc. has designed and tested a low excess air (about 15%) variable firing rate (VFR) burner. The theory of operation and the construction of the test burner are described. Test results are given along with a conclusion/recommendation. A Phase II plan is outlined which suggests methods and steps for fabrication and field testing of a number of prototype units.

Fuller, H.H.; Demler, R.L.; Poulin, E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fabrication of highly transparent diamond-like carbon anti-reflecting coating for Si solar cell application  

SciTech Connect

ARC grade highly transparent unhydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were produced, directly from a-C target, using RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique, for optoelectronic applications. Optical band gap, transmittance, reflectance, sp{sup 3} fraction, I{sub D}/I{sub G}, density, and refractive index of the films have been estimated with the help of optical tools like Uv-vis spectrophotometer, ellipsometer and micro-Raman. Optimum ARC-qualities have been identified in low-temperature grown DLC films at an Ar pressure of 4 mTorr in the reactor, accomplishing its key requirements for use in silicon solar cells.

Banerjee, Amit, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in; Das, Debajyoti, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in [Nano-Science Group, Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-Shear-Rate Behavior of Radial Hydrogenated Styrene-Isoprene and Block Ethylene-Propylene Copolymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Shear-Rate Behavior of Radial Hydrogenated Styrene-Isoprene and Block Ethylene additives (an ethylene-propylene block copolymer and a radial hydrogenated styrene-isoprene copolymer-isoprene copolymer and 1.5% for the ethylene-propylene additive, the viscosity was measured over a range of shear

Erickson, David

247

Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the computation time decrease with the number of points and that no effects were observed on the dosimetric indices when varying the number of sampling points and the number of iterations, they were respectively fixed to 2500 and to 100. The computation time to obtain ten complete treatments plans ranging from 9 to 18 catheters, with the corresponding dosimetric indices, was 90 s. However, 93% of the computation time is used by a research version of IPSA. For the breast, on average, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations would be satisfied down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of V100, dose homogeneity index, and D90.Conclusions: The authors have devised a simple, fast and efficient method to optimize the number and position of catheters in interstitial HDR brachytherapy. The method was shown to be robust for both prostate and breast HDR brachytherapy. More importantly, the computation time of the algorithm is acceptable for clinical use. Ultimately, this catheter optimization algorithm could be coupled with a 3D ultrasound system to allow real-time guidance and planning in HDR brachytherapy.

Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)] [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)] [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Feasibility analysis of ultra high frame rate visual servoing on FPGA and SIMD processor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Visual servoing has been proven to obtain better performance than mechanical encoders for position acquisition. However, the often computationally intensive vision algorithms and the ever growing demands for higher frame rate make its realization very ... Keywords: FPGA, reconfiguration, visual servoing, wide SIMD

Yifan He; Zhenyu Ye; Dongrui She; Bart Mesman; Henk Corporaal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

This work addresses the high-rate session scheduling problem in Fractional Lambda Switching (FS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiplexing (such as SONET/SDH) and Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). Yet, Non-Immediate Forwarding (NIF-rate NIF session. An efficient scheduling algorithm, eSSM, is proposed to explore all possibilities in two modes: (1) immediate forwarding (IF) or (2) non-immediate forwarding (NIF). NIF is more

Baldi, Mario

250

High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition ra...

BingQing Zhou; MeiFang Zhu; FengZhen Liu…

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Vapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings The rare earth zirconates (M2Zr2O7, M=LaGd) have a low intrinsic thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability making them attractive candidates for thermal barrier coating conditions and the coating composition, structure, texture, pore morphology, and thermal conductivity

Wadley, Haydn

252

Reaction, transformation and delamination of samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycling between 100 and 1100 °C. This cycling eventually led to delamination of the coatings, with failure thick (50­100 m) metallic "bond coat" applied to the turbine airfoil alloy to slow the kinetics of oxidation and promote TGO adherence. The bond coat has a high aluminum concentration to promote slow

Wadley, Haydn

253

Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Benthic nutrient regeneration and high rate of primary production in continental shelf waters (reply)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... bottom regeneration is important. Also we have had the opportunity of studying the New York Bight, the area from which our original data were obtained, on two more recent occasions6 ... on KNORR cruise 68 in August, 1977.) In a silty clay of the Christiaensen Basin we measured a regeneration rate of 24mgNm2d1 (ref. 6), whereas in the coarse ...

G. T. ROWE

1978-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and scattering environment of the actual radiation exposure.

L. A. Braby; W. D. Reece; W. H. Hsu

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Declining Rates of High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Young Women in Connecticut, 2008–2011  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Young Women in Connecticut, 2008-2011 Linda M. Niccolai 1 Pamela...1 Yale School of Public Health and Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, New Haven; and 2 Connecticut Department of Public Health, Hartford...

Linda M. Niccolai; Pamela J. Julian; James I. Meek; Vanessa McBride; James L. Hadler; Lynn E. Sosa

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

High-repetition Rate Wakefield Electron Source Driven by Few-millijoule Ultrashort Laser Pulses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

10 mJ ultrafast laser pulses acting on gas flow from capillary nozzles generate stable 100 keV electron beams at 500 Hz. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that slow high amplitude...

He, Zhaohan; Hou, Bixue; Easter, James; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John A; Thomas, Alexander

258

Findings in seal coat design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Africa (NITRR) and its members Dr. Claude P. Marais, Dr. Alex T. Visser and Dr. C. J. Semmelink for furnishing the relevant data and figures presented in this report. Finally this thesis and accomplishments are dedicated to my project Principal... Volume. 1. Embedment 2. Wear and Degradation. 3. Skid Resistance. 35 40 41 43 44 V SOUTH AFRICANS' RATIONAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF SEAL COATS AND SURFACE TREATMENT. . 50 A. Background. B. Marais' Rational Approach. 1. Aggregate Spread Rate...

Gonzalez Palmer, Miguel Angel

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The impact of school facilities on student achievement, attendance, behavior, completion rate and teacher turnover rate in selected Texas high schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship between school facility conditions and school outcomes such as student academic achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate. School facility...

McGowen, Robert Scott

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

F1 - An Eight Channel Time-to-Digital Converter Chip for High Rate Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new TDC chip has been developed for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The resulting ASIC offers an unprecedented degree of flexibility and functionality. Its capability to handle highest hit and trigger input rates as well as its low power consumption makes it an ideal tool for future collider and fixed target experiments. First front-end boards equipped with the F1 chip have been used recently at testbeam experiments at CERN. A functional description and specification for this new TDC chip is presented.

G. Braun; H. Fischer; J. Franz; A. Grunemaier; F. H. Heinsius; L. Hennig; K. Konigsmann; M. Niebuhr; M. Schierloh; T. Schmidt; H. Schmitt; H. J. Urban

1999-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electrospun carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) nanofiber for high rate lithium-ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cellulose derivative CMCAB was synthesized, and nanometer fiber composite material was obtained from lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4, LFP)/CMCAB by electrospinning. Under the protection of inert gas, modified LFP/carbon nanofibers (CNF) nanometer material was obtained by carbonization in 600 °C. IR, TG-DSC, SEM and EDS were performed to characterize their morphologies and structures. LFP/CNF composite materials were assembled into lithium-ion battery and tested their performance. Specific capacity was increased from 147.6 mAh g?1 before modification to 160.8 mAh g?1 after modification for the first discharge at the rate of 2 C. After 200 charge–discharge cycles, when discharge rate was increased from 2 C to 5 C to 10 C, modified battery capacity was reduced from 152.4 mAh g?1 to 127.9 mAh g?1 to 106 mAh g?1. When the ratio was reduced from 10 C to 5 C to 2 C, battery capacity can be quickly approximate to the original level. Cellulose materials that were applied to lithium battery can improve battery performance by electrospinning.

Lei Qiu; Ziqiang Shao; Mingshan Yang; Wenjun Wang; Feijun Wang; Long Xie; Shaoyi Lv; Yunhua Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water  

SciTech Connect

Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

2003-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

Exploring new W–B coating materials for the aqueous corrosion–wear protection of austenitic stainless steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The material loss of metallic surfaces through corrosion–wear is a serious concern in many application sectors, ranging from bio-medical implants to marine, oil and gas field components to transport vehicle and nuclear reactor devices. In principle, self-passivating alloys, like stainless steels, can be protected from surface degradation caused by corrosion–wear through the application of protective thin, hard surface coatings. In this work the suitability of using W matrix coating materials supersaturated with varying levels of boron were applied to austenitic stainless steel substrates (Ortron 90) and assessed for this purpose. These materials were compared to a highly corrosion–wear resistant “datum” surface engineered material (CrN coated Ti–6Al–4V) in sliding contact tests against a chemically inert aluminium oxide ball, whilst immersed in 0.9% NaCl solution at 37 °C. The work demonstrated that all the coated materials to be very much more resistant to material loss through corrosion–wear (by nearly an order of magnitude) compared to uncoated stainless steel, and two coatings, W–13%B and W–23%B coated Ortron 90 were similarly resistant as CrN coated Ti–6Al–4V. Three fundamental types of corrosion–wear were discovered that represented differing levels of passive film durability. The total material loss rate (TMLR) during corrosion–wear testing showed linear proportionality with the change in open circuit potential ?OCP which obeyed the governing equation: TMLR = m ?OCP + C.

B. Mallia; P.A. Dearnley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...line is a (1/4) power relationship developed...obtained in quasi-ICE gas gun tests performed...39] where n is a power exponent for the...shock-induced dislocation generation as compared with...dimensional scale by generation of a high dislocation...into explosively fired projectiles. Agreement...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...information was employed by Pappu Murr [50] to model the...05.002 ) 4 Gerlach, R , C Kettenbeil, and N...high-striking velocities. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 194...explosive by impact. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 338...1063/1.346636 ) 50 Pappu, S , and LE Murr. 2002...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Microstructure and nanohardness distribution in a polycrystalline Zn deformed by high strain rate impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Munitions, 7 route de Guerry, 18023 Bourges Cedex, France c Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös Loránd grain size of 20 m surrounded by a fine-grained rim with an average grain size of 6 m. Transmission in high purity polycrystal- line Zn. The evolution of the microstructure due to the impact loading

Gubicza, Jenõ

269

Modeling and optimization of single-pass laser amplifiers for high-repetition-rate laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

We propose a model for a continuously pumped single-pass amplifier for continuous and pulsed laser beams. The model takes into account Gaussian shape and focusing geometry of pump and seed beam. As the full-wave simulation is complex we have developed a largely simplified numerical method that can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries. With the tapered-shell model we treat (focused) propagation and amplification of an initially Gaussian beam in a gain crystal. The implementation can be done with a few lines of code that are given in this paper. With this code, a numerical parameter optimization is straightforward and example results are shown. We compare the results of our simple model with those of a full-wave simulation and show that they agree well. A comparison of model and experimental data also shows good agreement. We investigate in detail different regimes of amplification, namely the unsaturated, the fully saturated, and the intermediate regime. Because the amplification process is affected by spatially varying saturation and exhibits a nonlinear response against pump and seed power, no analytical expression for the expected output is available. For modeling of the amplification we employ a four-level system and show that if the fluorescence lifetime of the gain medium is larger than the inverse repetition rate of the seed beam, continuous-wave amplification can be employed to describe the amplification process of ultrashort pulse trains. We limit ourselves to this regime, which implies that if titanium:sapphire is chosen as gain medium the laser repetition rate has to be larger than a few megahertz. We show detailed simulation results for titanium:sapphire for a large parameter set.

Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Haensch, Theodor W.; Hommelhoff, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

Cunnington, G.R.; Clark, R.K.; Robinson, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Spinel LiMn(2)O(4)/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

A well-crystallized and nano-sized spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide hybrid cathode material for high rate lithium-ion batteries has been successfully synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method at 200 C for 30 min without any post heat-treatment. The nano-sized LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles were evenly dispersed on the reduced graphene oxide template without agglomeration, which allows the inherent high active surface area of individual LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the hybrid. These unique structural and morphological properties of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} on the highly conductive reduced graphene oxide sheets in the hybrid enable achieving the high specific capacity, an excellent high rate capability and stable cycling performance. An analysis of the cyclic voltammogram data revealed that a large surface charge storage contribution of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide hybrid plays an important role in achieving faster charge/discharge.

Bak, S.M.; Nam, K.; Lee, C.-W.; Kim, K.-H.; Jung, H.-C.; Yang, X-Q.; Kim, K.-B.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens  

SciTech Connect

Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

Stockel, Ivar H. (Bangor, ME)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Facile synthesis of mesoporous lithium titanate spheres for high rate lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium titanate is synthesized from titanium isopropoxide and lithium acetate solution under hydrothermal environment and calcinations. Introducing acidized carbon black during synthesis can produce mesoporous Li4Ti5O12. The crystalline structure and morphological observation of the as-synthesized mesoporous Li4Ti5O12 are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The mesoporous structure can be directly observed through BEI images of the cross-section sample. Besides, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm also displays a hysteresis loop, implying the beneficial evidence of mesoporous structure. The pore size distribution of mesoporous lithium titanate evaluated by BJH model is narrow, and the average size of voids is around 4 nm. It is demonstrated that the electrochemical performance is significantly improved by the mesoporous structure. The mesoporous lithium titanate exhibits a stable capacity of 140 mAhg?1 at 0.5 C. Besides, the reversible capacity at 30 C remains over half of that at 0.5 C. The superior C-rate performance is associated with the mesoporous structure, facilitating lithium transportation ability during cycling.

Yu-Sheng Lin; Jenq-Gong Duh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

Stockel, I.H.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Limitations on High Data Rate Optical Fiber Transmission Systems Due to Transmission Impairment  

SciTech Connect

This project supplemented our regular DOE grant from the Basic Energy Sciences organization with the goal of fostering industrial partnerships and student internships. During the project period, we have interacted with between 15 and 20 companies in the optical fiber telecommunications equipment industry, and our students have participated in a number of highly visible projects with companies such as Ciena, Science Applications International Corporation, KDD, ATT, Virtual Photonics, Inc., Phaethon Telecommunications, PhotonEx, and others. The project led to many successful interactions and numerous job offers for our students.

Menyuk, Curtis R.

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cathodes manufacturing processes for high-rate Li/SOCl/sub 2/ batteries  

SciTech Connect

Influence of type of carbon black, wetting agent, teflon content (up to 50 %), and carbon paste processing on cathodes characteristics and performances were evaluated. Single cell tests at 30 mA/cm/sup 2/ indicated that high cathode efficiencies could be achieved with various cathode formulations, even with a teflon content of 50 %. Discharge performances on glassy carbon cathodes and analysis of pores size distribution in the porous cathode provided baselines for the interpretation of the above-mentioned results as well as a better understanding of carbon cathode behaviour in Li/SOCl/sub 2/ cells.

Danel, V.; Descroix, J.P.; Petit, A.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Efficient 3D characterization of raised topological defects in smooth specular coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many smooth, highly specular coatings, such as automotive paints and appliance coatings, are subjected to considerable performance demands and manufacturers spend significant sums each year to monitor and repair coating surface quality. Additionally, ... Keywords: Camera calibration, Defect characterization, Surface quality of specular coatings, Surface reflectance model

Pradeep Gnanaprakasam; Johné M. Parker; Subburengan Ganapathiraman; Zhen Hou

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

High-Rate Seafood Consumers near Sellafield: Comparison of Conventional Assessments of 137Cs Intakes with the Results of Whole-Body Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article High-Rate Seafood Consumers near Sellafield: Comparison of Conventional Assessments of 137Cs Intakes with the Results of Whole-Body Monitoring......

G.J. Hunt; D.R.P. Leonard; F.A. Fry

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

SciTech Connect

The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High Strain-Rate Mechanical Behaviour of a Copper Matrix Composite for Nuclear Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aim of this work is the investigation of mechanical behaviour of an alumina dispersion strengthened copper, known by the trade name GLIDCOP®, subjected to dynamic loads: it is a composite material with a copper matrix strengthened with aluminium oxide ceramic particles. Since the particle content is quite small the material keeps the OFE copper physical properties, such as thermal and electrical conductivity, but with a higher yield strength, like a mild-carbon steel. Besides, with the addition of aluminium oxide, the good mechanical properties are retained also at high temperatures and the resistance to thermal softening is increased: the second phase blocks the dislocation movement preventing the grain growth. Thanks to these properties GLIDCOP® finds several applications in particle accelerator technologies, where problems of thermal management, combined with structural requirements, play a key role. Currently, it is used for the construction of structural and functional parts of the particle beam collim...

Peroni, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Binder-free Ge-three dimensional graphene electrodes for high-rate capacity Li-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

A binder-free, high-rate Ge-three dimensional (3D) graphene composite was synthesized by directly depositing Ge film atop 3D graphene grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on Ni substrate. The Ge-3D graphene structure demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode with a reversible capacity of 1140 mAh g{sup ?1} at 1/3C over 100 cycles and 835 mAh g{sup ?1} at 8C after 60 cycles, and significantly a discharge capacity of 186 mAh g{sup ?1} was still achieved at 32C. The high capacity and outstanding stability of the Ge-3D graphene composite propose it as a promising electrode in high-performance thin film LIBs.

Wang, C. D.; Chui, Y. S.; Chen, X. F., E-mail: xianfeng.chen@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apwjzh@cityu.edu.hk; Zhang, W. J., E-mail: xianfeng.chen@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apwjzh@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Li, Y. [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China) [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Binder-free Ge-three dimensional graphene electrodes for high-rate capacity Li-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A binder-free high-rate Ge-three dimensional (3D) graphene composite was synthesized by directly depositing Ge film atop 3D graphene grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on Ni substrate. The Ge-3D graphene structure demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode with a reversible capacity of 1140 mAh g?1 at 1/3C over 100 cycles and 835 mAh g?1 at 8C after 60 cycles and significantly a discharge capacity of 186 mAh g?1 was still achieved at 32C. The high capacity and outstanding stability of the Ge-3D graphene composite propose it as a promising electrode in high-performance thin film LIBs.

C. D. Wang; Y. S. Chui; Y. Li; X. F. Chen; W. J. Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

2 - Products Using Vacuum Deposited Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Most of the vacuum coating done is thin metal coating for packaging applications covering many aspects of packaging. The metal coatings can be bright and highly reflective providing more advertising impact than metallic inks, which are duller. The metalized polymer webs can be used directly by heat sealing, laminated to other webs, or have the metallic layer transferred onto other surfaces by a stamping process. These and other variations make the aluminized film very versatile as a packaging material. The more important feature of the metal coating is that it provides a barrier performance against oxygen, water, and light. The barrier performance of the metal thin film depends on the thickness of the coating and the cleanliness of the coating. The use of lacquers or transparent colored inks enables metalized papers to be overprinted and used to make more reflective printed products than can be achieved by metallic inks. Many of these applications of metalized paper are purely esthetic. Holograms are bright, usually reflective, patterns or images that are used as decorative packaging and/or as security devices. Where holograms are used for packaging, they can be in the form of a small area integrated into the pack design or as a patterned background to the whole pack. This chapter provides examples of a large variety of products that make use of vacuum deposited coatings onto flexible substrates. Some of these may not be obvious to the users. The products range from flexible packaging, capacitors, pyrotechnics, flake fillers for paints and inks, holographic devices, transparent conducting coatings, thin film batteries, electronic circuits through to the current high market growth products such as displays, photovoltaics (solar cells), and high barrier coatings.

Charles A. Bishop

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

C-rate and temperature dependence of electrochemical performance of Li[Co0.1Ni0.15Li0.2Mn0.55]O2 cathode materials before and after Co3(PO4)2 coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Li[Co0.1Ni0.15Li0.2Mn0.55]O2 was synthesized, as a cathode material with high capacity, by a simple combustion...0.1Ni0.15Li0.2Mn0.55]O2 cathode materials were coated with lithium-active Co3(PO4)2 to improve the ...

Chul-Hyun Yo; Jeong-Hun Ju; Gyeong-Ok Kim; Moon-Jin Hwang; Kwang Sun Ryu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Tag: coat drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 287

    An X-ray study of residual macrostresses in protective coatings for gas-turbine blades  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The x-ray method is used to determine residual macrostresses in the surface layer of protective coatings on high-temperature alloys. Coatings deposited by the high-energy vacuum-plasma (HEVP) method were subje...

    Yu. D. Yagodkin; K. M. Pastukhov; E. V. Milyaeva…

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    288

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    289

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    290

    Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to study the use of ceramic coatings on components in the hot-gas path of advanced low-emission gas-fired turbines. The types of ceramic coatings include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades, and combustor liners to allow hotter gas-path temperatures, and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high-temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites. The NDE methods will be used to (a) provide data to assess the reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages, (c) track growth rates of defects during component use in engines, and (d) allow rational judgment for replace/repair/re-use decisions regarding components. Advances in TBC application, both electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS), are allowing higher temperatures in the hot-gas path. However, as TBCs become ''prime reliant,'' their condition at scheduled or unscheduled outages must be known. NDE methods are under development to assess the condition of the TBC for pre-spall conditions. EB-PVD test samples with up to 70 thermal cycles have been studied by a newly developed method involving polarized laser back-scatter NDE. Results suggest a correlation between the NDE laser data and the TBC/bond-coat topography. This finding is important because several theories directed toward understanding the pre-spall condition suggest that the topography in the thermally grown oxide layer changes significantly as a function of the number of thermal cycles. Tests have also been conducted with this NDE method on APS TBCs. Results suggest that the pre-spall condition is detected for these coatings. One-sided, high-speed thermal imaging also has shown promise for NDE of APS coatings. Testing of SiC/SiC composites for combustor liners has demonstrated that environmental EBCs are required to reduce oxidation-induced recession rates. NDE technologies, primarily one-sided and through-thickness thermal imaging, are under development to detect delaminations and degradation of EBCs. Recent results have demonstrated that NDE thermal image data correctly detected pre-spall regions of a barium-strontium-alumino-silicate coating on melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC. The NDE data were verified with field test data from a combustor liner in a 4.5 MW(e) natural-gas-fired turbine. The shape of the spalled EBC region and the growth of the spalled EBC region after various engine run times were correlated with boroscope image data from field tests. An effort has recently been started to address NDE development for oxide/oxide ceramic composites with an EBC. We will discuss the NDE methods under development for TBCs, recent NDE test results from thermally cycled TBCs, NDE results from EBCs on SiC/SiC, and the new effort directed toward oxide/oxide materials.

    Ellingson, W. A.; Deemer, C.; Sun, J. G.; Erdman, S.; Muliere, D.; Wheeler, B.

    2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    291

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    292

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    293

    Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    294

    Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Roof Coating Procedures and their Productivity Gains John Bonaby and Dr. Diane Schaub, University of Florida As building envelope improvements are realized in organizations as ways to insulate businesses from high energy costs, the relative... benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially...

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    295

    High rate (?3 nm/s) deposition of dense silicon nitride films at low substrate temperatures (plasma and substrate biasing  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The deposition of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) films at high deposition rates (?3 nm/s) and at low substrate temperatures (plasma technique operated on an Ar–NH3–SiH4 reactant mixture. To increase the atomic density of the films by ion bombardment, low frequency (lf, 400 kHz) and radio-frequency (rf, 13.6 MHz) substrate biasing has been employed during deposition such that the ions are accelerated towards the substrate up to energies of ?250 eV. From spectroscopic ellipsometry and Rutherford backscattering measurements, it is demonstrated that the film density increases with increasing substrate bias even under these high deposition rate conditions. An increase in film atomic density from 7.6×1022 cm?3 to 8.8×1022 cm?3 has been observed for rf biasing when going from almost zero substrate bias to a bias voltage of ?250 V. It is shown that this increased film density reduces the oxygen content in the a-SiNx:H caused by post-deposition oxygen and/or moisture permeation by more than 50%.

    F.J.H. van Assche; W.M.M. Kessels; R. Vangheluwe; W.S. Mischke; M. Evers; M.C.M. van de Sanden

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    Electrical performance of RTV silicone rubber coating of different thicknesses on porcelain  

    SciTech Connect

    A study of the effects of coating thickness of room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber on its electrical performance in salt-fog of 250 {micro}S/cm and 1,000 {micro}S/cm at 0.5 kV{sub rms}/cm is presented. Porcelain rods coated with RTV silicone rubber to a thickness from 0.17 to 0.99 mm were studied. The dependence of current pulse rate and cumulative number of current pulses on coating thickness were determined as a function of time of exposure to combined electric stress and salt-fog. The surface roughness and the total content of low molecular weight (LMW) silicone fluid in the coating were measured before and after the salt-fog test as a function of coating thickness. The effects of heating the RTV in an electric oven on the production and loss of LMW silicone fluid were investigated in order to elucidate the influence of the heat generated by dry band discharges. The loss of weight of RTV at high temperatures (370 C) due to the decomposition of the alumina trihydrate filler into alumina and water was measured and found to be close to the theoretical value.

    Deng, H.; Hackam, R. [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    297

    Coated ceramic breeder materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Thermal barrier coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    299

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    300

    Thermally sprayed coatings for boiler protection  

    SciTech Connect

    FBC boilers are large, expensive installations which suffer enormously from wear caused by corrosion, aggravated by high temperatures. The exact type of wear experienced varies from one part of a boiler to another and is influenced by the overall design of the boiler and the type of fuel burnt in it. Boiler manufacturers and users face a difficult choice in selecting materials to fight these problems. Inexpensive and easily worked metals, unfortunately, offer little resistance to the types of wear experienced in boilers, while alloys which are resistant to erosion and corrosion are very costly as well as being difficult to form and join. This paper presents a number of ways in which these material losses and related costs in boiler systems can be reduced by application of thermally sprayed coatings which lead to significant increases in service life. The selection of the coating material and of the correct deposition process can, today, be based on the results of laboratory tests (elevated temperature corrosion and erosion), small scale in-situ test coatings and on full scale FBC boiler protection coating utilization. Practical examples are given of thermal spray coatings which have been successfully applied to different kinds of FBC boilers including those burning coal, waste (chemical, industrial, household) and wood chips. The paper describes the procedures for applying coatings to boiler components, the properties of the resulting coatings and how best to select coating materials for use in some specific wear and corrosion environmentals. In addition, future trends in the utilization of thermally sprayed coatings are discussed.

    Gustafsson, S.; Steine, H.T. [Eutectic and Castolin, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ridgway, W.F. [Eutectic and Castolin, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

    SciTech Connect

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    302

    Hot corrosion tests on corrosion resistant coatings developed for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract This paper reports on results of hot corrosion tests carried out on silicon–aluminide coatings developed for hot components of gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases. The corrosion tests of the silicon–aluminide coatings, applied to superalloys IN738LC and CMSX-4, each consisted of five 100 h periods; at 700 °C for the type II tests and at 900 °C for the type I tests. Deposits of Cd + alkali and Pb + alkali were applied before each exposure. These deposits had been previously identified as being trace species produced from gasification of biomass containing fuels which after combustion had the potential to initiate hot corrosion in a gas turbine. Additionally, gases were supplied to the furnace to simulate the atmosphere anticipated post-combustion of these biomass derived fuel gases. Results of the type I hot corrosion tests showed that these novel coatings remained in the incubation stage for at least 300 h, after which some of the coating entered propagation. Mass change results for the first 100 h confirmed this early incubation stage. For the type II hot corrosion tests, differences occurred in oxidation and sulphidation rates between the two substrates; the incubation stages for CMSX-4 samples continued for all but the Cd + alkali high salt flux samples, whereas, for IN738LC, all samples exhibited consistent incubation rates. Following both the type I and type II corrosion tests, assessments using BSE/EDX results and XRD analysis confirmed that there has to be remnant coating, sufficient to grow a protective scale. In this study, the novel silicon–aluminide coating development was based on coating technology originally evolved for gas turbines burning natural gas and fossil fuel oils. So in this paper comparisons of performance have been made with three commercially available coatings; a CoCrAlY overlay, a platinum-aluminide diffusion, and triple layer nickel–aluminide/silicon–aluminide-diffusion coatings. These comparisons showed that the novel single-step silicon–aluminide coatings provide equal or superior type II hot corrosion resistance to the best of the commercial coatings.

    A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD  

    SciTech Connect

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H{sub 2}, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are reduced; (3) surface hydrogen removal--heavier and more energetic helium ions break the Si-H much easier than hydrogen ions. The preferential attachment of Si-H to Ge-H is reduced. They also found that with the small amount of hydrogen put into the plasma, the superior properties of a-(Si,Ge):H made from pure hydrogen dilution plasma were still maintained. These hydrogen ions help to remove the subsurface weakly bonded hydrogen and buried hydrogen. They also help to passivate the Ge-dangling bond.

    Yong Liu

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    304

    From metallurgical coatings to surface engineering  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The history of the Vacuum Metallurgy Division (VMD) which is now the Advanced Surface Engineering Division (ASED) of the American Vacuum Society is reviewed briefly. The focus of the VMD moved from vacuum melting of materials to metallurgical coatings. The division sponsored two conferences the Conference on Vacuum Metallurgy and the International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings. As the interest in vacuum metallurgy eventually subsided interest grew in the deposition of metallurgical coatings. However the emphasis at the Metallurgical Coatings conference has changed from just depositingcoatings to surface engineering of a component. Today the challenge is to use the tools of surface engineering with advances in deposition technology such as high-power pulsed sputtering. To align itself with the changing interests of the majority of its members the VMD changed its name to the ASED.

    William D. Sproul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    305

    Hot hollow cathode and its applications in vacuum coating: A concise review  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    A concise description of the hollow cathode (HC) effect is given to clarify the confusing terminology and their diverse applications. The cold and hot types of HC’s are then discussed. It is followed by a summary of the behavior of the hot HC as an arc generating device with emphasis on its use for vacuum coating purposes. Two major coating devices one developed by Ulvac Corp. (Japan) and the other at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of Rockwell International (USA) are then reviewed with their respective applications. Review of the latter includes recent results of plume effect upon both the unusual deposition rate distribution and the extremely high substrate (ion) current. The coating morphology and microstructure can be best explained using the Krikorian concept and when optimized can help to render very high bonding strength (as high as 90 ksi for 304 stainless steel substrates) with the coatings used as the bonding interlayer. Finally comments are made concerning the directions of future technology development based on the system features reviewed.

    Y. S. Kuo; R. F. Bunshah; D. Okrent

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    306

    Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles Itai Cohen,1 Hui Li,2 James L. Hougland,2 Milan Mrksich,2 Sidney R. Nagel1 We report a method that uses the process of selective withdrawal of one fluid a tube with its orifice slightly above a water-oil interface. Upon increasing the flow rate

    Mrksich, Milan

    307

    High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates  

    SciTech Connect

    Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Physics and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 560-0047 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    308

    Computed Tomography-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Safety, Efficacy, and Effect on Survival  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: To determine the saftety and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients were recruited, presenting with 140 HCC- lesions. Treatment was performed by CT-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints included local tumor control and overall survival (OS). A matched-pair analysis with patients not receiving brachytherapy was performed. Match criteria included the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score, alpha-fetoprotein, presence, and extent of multifocal disease. For statistical analysis, Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were performed. Results: Mean and median cumulative TTP for all patients (n = 75) were 17.7 and 10.4 months. Five local recurrences were observed. The OS after inclusion reached median times of 19.4 months (all patients), 46.3 months (CLIP score, 0), 20.6 months (CLIP score, 1) 12.7 months, (CLIP score, 2), and 8.3 months (CLIP score, {>=}3). The 1- and 3-year OS were 94% and 65% (CLIP score, 0), 69% and 12% (CLIP score, 1), and 48% and 19% (CLIP score, 2), respectively. Nine complications requiring intervention were encountered in 124 interventions. Matched-pair analysis revealed a significantly longer OS for patients undergoing CT-guided brachytherapy. Conclusion: Based on our results the study treatment could be safely performed. The study treatment had a beneficial effect on OS in patients with advanced HCC, with respect to (and depending on) the CLIP score and compared with OS in a historical control group. A high rate of local control was also observed, regardless of applied dose in a range of 15 to 25 Gy.

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wieners, Gero; Schwartz, Franziska; Seidensticker, Max; Pech, Maciej; Ruehl, Ricarda [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Wust, Peter [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Martin-Luther-Krankenhaus, Berlin (Germany); Gademann, Guenther; Peters, Nils [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Berg, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Hepato-Gastroenterologie, Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Malfertheiner, Peter [Klinik fuer Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Ricke, Jens, E-mail: ricke@med.ovgu.d [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    309

    Numerical simulations of thermomagnetic instability in high-Tc superconductors: Dependence on sweep rate and ambient temperature  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    We report the results of numerical simulations of flux jumps on the basis of dynamic process of thermomagnetic interaction to the nonisothermal and nonadiabatic high-Tc superconductors in the regime of thermally activated flux creep when an applied magnetic field is parallel to a slab of the high-Tc superconductors. The simulations for the samples of BiSrCaCuO show that the flux jumps may occur only in the region of low ambient temperature, which is dependent upon the heat contact, and the sweep rate is greater than a lower critical value of about 20G?s and lesser than a large one up to the order of 1–10T?s. It is found that the predictions of the first flux-jump field Bfj1 are quantitatively in good agreement with the existing experimental data, and the temperature jumps are observed in the superconductors, corresponding to each flux jump in the magnetization loop. When the field sweep rate exceeds the large critical value for the case of the superconductor at 4.2K, the phenomenon of experimental observations without flux jump is successfully predicted by the theoretical simulation, where the thermomagnetic interaction is smoothly circulated at a new dynamic equilibrium state in the temperature region of about 10.6–16.4K higher than the ambient one, which is mainly dependent on the tradeoff of speeds of the dissipation energy in the slab and the heat removed into the coolant. After that, the sensitivity of the thermomagnetic instability to the parameters, such as critical current density, heat conductivity, heat transfer coefficient, critical geometrical scale, etc. is also discussed.

    You-He Zhou and Xiaobin Yang

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    310

    Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

    SciTech Connect

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    311

    Tribological Behaviors of Self-lubricating Coating Prepared by Electrospark Deposition  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...Cu/h-BN self-lubricating coating was prepared on AISI1045 steel by electrospark deposition. The friction coefficient and wear rates were...

    Tongkun Cao; Zhijian Xiao

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    312

    A novel hohlraum with ultrathin depleted-uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    An ultra-thin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of the depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proved by our experiment can prevent the oxidization of Uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on Shenguang III prototype laser facility. Under the laser intensity of 6*10^14 W/cm2, we observe that, the hard x-ray (> 1.8 keV) fraction of this uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of total x-ray flux (0.1 keV ~ 5 keV) increases by 5%. Two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED are exploited to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantage of the UN-coated DUH in generating the uniform x-ray field with a quasi Planckian spectrum and thus has important implications in optimizing the ignition hohlraum design.

    Guo, Liang; Xing, Peifeng; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Taimin; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Li, Renguo; Wu, Zheqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Bobi; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    313

    Gas Phase Diagnosis of Disilane/Hydrogen RF Glow Discharge Plasma and Its Application to High Rate Growth of High Quality Amorphous Silicon  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Gas phase diagnosis of disilane/hydrogen plasma was carried out using mass spectrometry. At high growth rate (20 Å/s) conditions using pure disilane as a source gas, the partial pressure of disilane molecules measured by mass spectrometry was more than one order of magnitude higher than in the case when mono-silane was used as a source gas. The stability of amorphous silicon films prepared from disilane was improved by the hydrogen dilution technique, although the disilane partial pressure in this condition was much higher than in the case when mono-silane was used as a source gas for device quality films. The relation between the gas phase species and the stability of the resulting films is studied. It was found that increase in disilane related signal intensity do not decrease film stability directly.

    Wataru Futako; Tomoko Takagi; Tomonori Nishimoto; Michio Kondo; Isamu Shimizu; Akihisa Matsuda

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    314

    High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths  

    SciTech Connect

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    315

    Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications  

    SciTech Connect

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2,000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Complimentary modeling work using a mathematic model from Heckel et al. also was conducted. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles, particularly for aluminide coatings on Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. In Task II, the research focused on the CVD aluminide bond coats for thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The martensitic phase transformation in single-phase {beta}-NiAl and (Ni,Pt)Al coatings was studied and compared. After isothermal exposure to 1150 C for 100 hours, the {beta} phase in both types of coatings was transformed to a martensite phase during cooling to room temperature. Martensitic transformation also was observed in the (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat with and without the ceramic top layer after thermal cycling at 1150 C (700 1-h cycles). Such transformation resulted from Al depletion in the coating due to the formation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on coating surface and interdiffusion between the coating and superalloy substrate. The volume changes associated with the martensitic transformation could affect the coating surface stability (''rumpling'') and thus contributing to TBC failure. To elucidate the effect of Hf levels in the superalloy substrate on the oxidation performance, directionally-solidified Rene 142 superalloys containing three different Hf contents with and without aluminide coatings were cyclically oxidized at 1100 and 1150 C in air. Poor scale adhesion was observed for all bare and NiAl-coated Rene 142 superalloys, as compared with single-crystal superalloys such as Rene N5. Spallation occurred at relatively early stages disregarding the Hf contents in the superalloys. Finally, a platinum plating system has been set up at Tennessee Technological University to carefully control the Pt pla

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    316

    Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    317

    Tribological behavior of plasma spray coatings for marine diesel engine piston ring and cylinder liner  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    High-temperature wear characteristics between plasma spray coated piston rings and cylinder liners were investigated to find the optimum combination of coating materials using the disc-on-plate reciprocating w...

    Jong-Hyun Hwang; Myoung-Seoup Han…

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    Formation of composite coatings based on titanium carbide via electrospark alloying  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    This work concerns studying the coatings prepared via electrospark alloying. To deposit the coatings, we used STIM-2/30 electrodes derived from a combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS...

    F. I. Panteleenko; V. V. Sarantsev…

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    319

    Heat Resistance of Electric Arc Coatings Made of Fe–Cr–B–Al Powder Wire  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Electric metallized coatings made of Fe–Cr–B–Al powder wire possess a high heat resistance at 700–800°C at the level ... the base material. To obtain heat-resistant electric metallized coatings of powder wire, it...

    V. Pokhmurs'kyi; M. Student; B. Formanek; V. Serivka; Yu. Dz'oba…

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    320

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    SiPMs coated with TPB : coating protocol and characterization for NEXT  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are the photon detectors chosen for the tracking readout in NEXT, a neutrinoless {\\beta}{\\beta} decay experiment which uses a high pressure gaseous xenon time projection chamber (TPC). The reconstruction of event track and topology in this gaseous detector is a key handle for background rejection. Among the commercially available sensors that can be used for tracking, SiPMs offer important advantages, mainly high gain, ruggedness, cost-effectiveness and radio-purity. Their main drawback, however, is their non sensitivity in the emission spectrum of the xenon scintillation (peak at 175 nm). This is overcome by coating these sensors with the organic wavelength shifter tetraphenyl butadienne (TPB). In this paper we describe the protocol developed for coating the SiPMs with TPB and the measurements performed for characterizing the coatings as well as the performance of the coated sensors in the UV-VUV range.

    Álvarez, V; Ball, M; Batallé, M; Bayarri, J; Borges, F I G; Bolink, H; Brine, H; Cárcel, S; Carmona, J M; Castel, J; Catalá, J M; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Chan, D; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Ferrando, J; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; García, S A; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, E; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González, K; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Hernando-Morata, J A; Herrera, D C; Herrero, V; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kalinnikov, V; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martin-Albo, J; Méndez, A M; Miller, T; Moisenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Monzó, J M; Mora, F J; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Pérez, J; Radicioni, E; Quinto, M; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodriguez, A; Rodriguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Soriano, A; Spieler, H; Toledo, J F; Collell, J Torrent; Tomás, A; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Velicheva, E; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; Weber, T; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    High Temperature Oxidation Resistance and Surface Electrical...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    plates with oxidation resistant coatings. Candidate coatings must exhibit chemical and thermal-mechanical stability and high electrical conductivity during long-term...

    324

    Combinatorial Materials Research Applied to the Development of New Surface Coatings I:? A Multiwell Plate Screening Method for the High-Throughput Assessment of Bacterial Biofilm Retention on Surfaces  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The screening process involves (1) multiwell plate modifications for coating deposition, (2) deposition of combinatorial coating libraries via an automated liquid dispensing robot, (3) coating thickness measurements of cured coatings, (4) preconditioning of coatings via immersion in deionized water, (5) bacterial incubation, (6) plate processing, and (7) data analysis for identification of promising candidates. ... This clearly perceptible increase recorded since 1982, may be attributable to the growing use of copper paints subsequent to the antifouling paint regulations adopted in 1982. ... that can be applied with both lethal and sublethal effect criteria for the detn. of toxic stress from leaches of painted surfaces. ...

    Shane J. Stafslien; James A. Bahr; Jason M. Feser; Jonathan C. Weisz; Bret J. Chisholm; Thomas E. Ready; Philip Boudjouk

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

    Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    327

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    328

    Stress analysis of aspherical coated particle with inner pressure  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Coated particles used in HTR fuel element sustain the inner pressure during irradiation as a pressure vessel. In actually the coated particle is not real spherical but with some asphericity, the stress distribution in the vessel is not uniform, coated layer in aspherical particle sustain more additional stress due to the asphericity. In this paper, the geometric shape distribution is summarized based on actual coated particle statistic. A mechanical analysis model is proposed for SiC layer by geometric combinations, and stress distribution of coated particle with a flat is calculated. The results show that the local maximum stress of aspherical particle increased two times than that of ideal spherical coated particle, which increase the failure probability under irradiation and high temperature.

    Bing Liu; Lin Yang; Tongxiang Liang; Chunhe Tang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Erosion of hard material coating systems  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The use of coating systems to protect structural metal surfaces from elevated temperature, small solid particle erosion and erosion-corrosion can extend component life and permit operation in more severe environments. The room and elevated temperature erosion behavior of several hard material coating systems, i.e. carbides, borides and nitrides, were determined over a range of test conditions. Particle velocities from 70 to 150 m s?1 and test temperatures from 25 to 540°C were used. Mechanisms of erosion were established and related to erosion rates in a manner that defined the requirements of composition, morphology and defect levels of coating systems for long-term performance. It was determined that small grain size, low porosity and absence of cracks were the microstructural features that enhanced erosion resistance. Hardness levels and the composition and distribution of second phase, hard particles had less effect on coating performance. Angular SiC particles were considerably more erosive than either Al2O3 or chromite-mixed oxide round-shaped particles and the rankings of the coatings' performance were different for each erodent and set of test conditions.

    Alan V. Levy; Wang Buqian

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    330

    A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters has been developed for patient dosimetry in high-dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: The necessary calibration and correction factors for MOSFET measurements in {sup 192}Iridium source were determined in a water phantom. With the detector placed inside a custom-made nasopharyngeal applicator, the actual dose delivered to the tumor was measured in vivo and compared to the calculated values using a commercial brachytherapy planning system. Results: Five MOSFETs were independently calibrated with the HDR source, yielding calibration factors of 0.48 {+-} 0.007 cGy/mV. The maximum sensitivity variation was no more than 7% in the clinically relevant distance range of 1-5 cm from the source. A total of 70 in vivo measurements in 11 NPC patients demonstrated good agreement with the treatment planning. The mean differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose within a single treatment fraction were -0.1%{+-} 3.8% and -0.1%{+-} 3.7%, respectively, for right and left side assessments. The maximum dose deviation was less than 8.5%. Conclusions: In vivo measurement using the real-time MOSFET dosimetry system is possible to evaluate the actual dose to the tumor received by the patient during a treatment fraction and thus can offer another line of security to detect and prevent large errors.

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Cao Xinping; Huang Shaomin; Lerch, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    331

    'Smart Coatings' Research Shows The Virtues of Superficiality  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...rich—high-tech protective paints and varnishes look poised to become...into the fabric. Microscopic robots that make repairs with tools...looks and behaves like a normal paint or varnish at room temperature...become as common as a coat of paint. * Fourth Annual Smart Coatings...

    John Bohannon

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    332

    Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions  

    SciTech Connect

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    Dosimetric Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy as a Boost to the Prostate  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: We compared the dose conformity of two radiation modalities: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to deliver a boost to the prostate after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Ten successive patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with a single 10-Gy HDR BT boost after EBRT were investigated. Four theoretical IMRT plans were computed: (a) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (b) 26 Gy IMRT with CTV-PTV expansions, doses corresponding to the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) of one 10-Gy fraction calculated with a prostate alpha/beta ratio of respectively 1.5 and 3 Gy; and (c) 32.85 Gy IMRT and (d) 26 Gy IMRT without CTV-PTV expansions. The dose-volume histogram values converted in EQD2 with an alpha/beta ratio of 3 Gy for the organs at risk were compared. Results: The HDR BT plan delivered higher mean doses to the PTV compared with IMRT plans. In all, 33% of the rectal volume received a mean dose of 5.32 +- 0.65 Gy and 20% of bladder volume received 4.61 +- 1.24 Gy with HDR BT. In comparison, doses delivered with IMRT were respectively 13.4 +- 1.49 Gy and 10.81 +- 4 Gy, even if only 26 Gy was prescribed to the PTV with no CTV-PTV expansion (p < 0.0001). The hot spots inside the urethra were greater with HDR BT but acceptable. Conclusions: Use of HDR BT produced a more conformal plan for the boost to the prostate than IMRT even without CTV-PTV expansions.

    Hermesse, Johanne, E-mail: jhermesse@chu.ulg.ac.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Liege University Hospital, Liege (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    334

    The surface coating industries try on new coats  

    SciTech Connect

    Some of the best pollution prevention information is available from state industry-education projects. The preferred pollution prevention method is eliminating or reducing the need for surface coating, often by using coating-free materials such as titanium and aluminum alloys, pultruded fiberglass reinforced plastics and weathering steel. Although it is not feasible to completely eliminate coatings for many applications, the need for coating surfaces often can be minimized by preventing deterioration of the coating. Since surface coatings do not deteriorate uniformly or completely, only small portions of a surface may require recoating. Commercially available alternative coating systems that generate fewer air emissions can be applied in specific applications, although there are inevitable trade-offs. In addition, emerging technologies may offer alternatives to traditional coating systems.

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    335

    Coatings for performance retention  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Performance and performance retention are becoming increasingly important in today’s gas turbine engines. The military aircraft engine operator wants the flexibility and flight envelope that increased performance will give and the commercial user—aircraft utility generation or pumper—demands the long term fuel economy that improved performance retention will provide. Materials advances have provided the intrinsic strength and temperature increases to push the capability of today’s engines and coatings have been an integral part of that advancement. Specifically in the performance retention area coatings and seal systems have become increasingly important in both compressor and turbine components. It is the intent of this overview paper to present a brief review of the coating systems presently in use and in development and to consider areas in which the technology might be heading.

    R. V. Hillery

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    336

    Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman Spectroscopy and XPS  

    SciTech Connect

    Laser Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the evolution of composition of oxide films in the presence of zirconia coatings on miniature HT-9 alloy specimens subjected to elevated temperature in air. The experiments expanded on previous efforts to develop a quick-screening technique for candidate alloys for cladding materials (HT-9) and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures (represented by the zirconia coating) by investigating the effect of both coating composition and alloy pretreatment conditions on the high temperature reactions. In particular, the presence of the element Ga (a potential impurity in mixed oxide fuel) in the initial zirconia coating was found to accelerate the rate of oxide growth relative to that of yttria-stabilized zirconia studied previously. In addition, HT-9 samples that were subjected to different thermal pretreatments gave different results. The results suggest that the presence of Ga in a mixed oxide fuel will enhance the corrosion of HT-9 cladding under the conditions of this study, although the extent of enhancement is influenced by thermal pretreatment of the cladding material. The results also demonstrate the need to combine Raman spectroscopy with other techniques, particularly photoelectron spectroscopy, for optimizing composition and/or fabrication conditions of both cladding and oxide fuels for advanced nuclear reactors.

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    337

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    338

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    339

    detonation rate  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    detonation rate, detonation velocity, velocity of detonation, V.O.D., detonating velocity, rate of detonation, detonating rate ? Detonationsgeschwindigkeit f

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    340

    Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

    SciTech Connect

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    342

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    SciTech Connect

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    343

    Development of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coating on ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and to improve area specific resistance (ASR), Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 is thermally grown on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS) and 4-probe ASR tests. The results show that the coating not only decreases the ASR considerably, but also acts as a barrier to mitigate the sub-scale growth and to prevent chromium migration through the coating and the cathode. The EDS analysis reveals that a mixed spinel region is formed between the coating and oxide scale after 500 h oxidation at 750 °C causing a noticeable decrease in oxygen diffusivity through this layer and subsequent decline in sub-scale growth rate. The ASR of uncoated sample is measured to be 63.5 m? cm2 after 500 h oxidation, while the Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coated sample shows a value of 19.3 m? cm2 representing ?70% reduction compared to the uncoated sample. It is proposed that the high electrical conductivity of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 (140 S cm?1), reduction of oxide scale growth, and good bonding between the coating and substrate contribute to the substantial ASR reduction for the coated sample.

    N. Hosseini; M.H. Abbasi; F. Karimzadeh; G.M. Choi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    TiO2-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for high-rate application of lithium ion batteries  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    TiO2-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite has been synthesized by a...2 nanoparticle homogenously dispersed onto the reduced graphene oxide sheets. The electrochemistry performance has been...?1 at the rate of 10...

    Chuchun Zheng; Chunhua He; Haiyan Zhang; Wenguang Wang; Xinling Lei

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    345

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    346

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    347

    HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    348

    Parameter optimization for spray coating  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The aim of planning path-oriented spray-coating processes is to find a time-dependent continuous sequence of spray gun configurations so that a coating of desired thickness is achieved when executing the sequence. A novel approach to solving the planning ... Keywords: Optimization, Robot path planning, Thermal spray coating

    Alexander Kout; Heinrich Müller

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    350

    Spatial distribution of average charge state and deposition rate in high power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    was ¼ inch (6. 25 mm) thick copper disk. The diameter of thevery high power de nsity. Copper was selected for this studythe high stability of HIPIMS copper discharges ( copper can

    Horwat, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Coatings for improved corrosion resistance  

    SciTech Connect

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    352

    Plastic coating of microsphere substrates  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Microsphere coating techniques and results are described together with the criteria that must be met for successful production of targets. An overview of the work at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics KMS Fusion Inc. Sandia Laboratory and Rockwell–Rocky Flats Division is presented. A detailed overview of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory work describes thick coatings smooth?surface coatings organometallic graded?density and graded?Z coatings; as well as difficult to deposit metal?upon?plastic coatings.

    R. Liepins; M. Campbell; J. S. Clements; J. Hammond; R. J. Fries

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    353

    Development and Characterization of Hard and Wear Resistant MMC Coating on Ti-6Al-4V Substrate by Laser Cladding  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Ti-6Al-4V, due to its high specific strength and resistance to corrosion, is one of the highly useful materials in aerospace, automobile and chemical industries. Poor hardness and wear resistance properties restrict its further applications. So surface modification of Ti-6Al-4V is necessary surface to enhance its tribological properties. Multi-phase and multi component coating development is one of the present research trends in surface engineering arena. In the present study it was attempted to develop a multi-component coating by laser cladding process using a pre-placed powder mixture containing Ni5Al (50 vol%) + hBN (10 vol%) + B4C (20 vol%) + SiC (20 vol%) on substrate of Ti-6Al-4V to improve its tribological performance. A nano-structured coating was formed with micro hardness (780 HV0.05). X-ray diffraction (XRD) identified the presence of compounds like TiC, BN, TiB2, SiC, and intermetallics of Ni-Ti in the coating. The wear behaviour of the composite coating was assessed by ball on disc type wear and friction monitor at 10 N load at 300 RPM taking a track diameter of 5 mm. Specific wear rate and coefficient of friction (?) were found to vary from 0.6E-12 to 2.2E-12 m3/N-m and from 0.15 to 0.45, respectively, due to rubbing of coated surface against tungsten carbide ball. The microstructure was explored by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    Mandeep Dhanda; Barun Haldar; P. Saha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    354

    Preparation and oxidation resistance of mullite/SiC coating for carbon materials at 1150 °C  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    To protect carbon materials from oxidation, mullite/SiC coatings were prepared on graphite by chemical vapor reaction (CVR) and slurry sintering. The XRD analyses show that the phase of the outer-layer coating is composed of SiO2 and mullite, and the inner-layer coating is mainly composed of ?-SiC. The anti-oxidation behavior of the coating and the Rockwell hardness (HRB) of the coating after oxidation were investigated. The oxidation test shows that the as-prepared multi-layer coating exhibits excellent anti-oxidation and thermal shock resistance at high temperature. After oxidation at 1150 °C for 109 h and thermal shock cycling between 1150 °C and room temperature for 12 times, the mass gain of the coated sample is 0.085%. Meanwhile, the indentation tests also demonstrate that the as-prepared coating has good bonding ability between the layers.

    Xin YANG; Zhe-an SU; Qi-zhong HUANG; Li-yuan CHAI

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    355

    Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam Supported Fe3O4 Lithium Battery Anodes with Long Cycle Life and High Rate Capability  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam Supported Fe3O4 Lithium Battery Anodes with Long Cycle Life and High Rate Capability ... Ge Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide as an Advanced Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries ...

    Jingshan Luo; Jilei Liu; Zhiyuan Zeng; Chi Fan Ng; Lingjie Ma; Hua Zhang; Jianyi Lin; Zexiang Shen; Hong Jin Fan

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    356

    Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

    Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    358

    Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    359

    High Average Power, 100 Hz Repetition Rate, Table-top EUV/Soft X-ray Lasers  

    SciTech Connect

    Compact =13.9 nm and =18.9 nm lasers with >0.1 mW average power at 100 Hz repetition rate driven by a diode-pumped, 1 J, CPA laser were demonstrated. Wavelength scaling to =10.9 nm will be discussed.

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Durivage, Leon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Furch, Federico [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Curtis, Alden [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Salsbury, Chase [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Patel, Dinesh [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Menoni, Carmen [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...under acutely changing temperature conditions (heating...the lower vertical distribution of these snails were...exposed to laboratory temperatures (22C) during manipulation...and maximum rate of temperature change recorded on...and orienting to the sun, this was not observed...

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Glow discharge pretreatment tools for vacuum web coating  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    In the last few years plasma pre-treatment has been established as a powerful tool to increase the quality in vacuum web coating whereas, the effect of web pre-treatment under atmospheric conditions is declining due to several reasons, glow discharge assisted in line–in vacuo pre-treatment is much more reliable. Two tools for plasma pre-treatment are presented here. Both are easily scalable as to comply with the needs of large area web coating with a typical coating width of over 2 m, and they operate in a pressure range that is compatible with sputtering and evaporation processes taking place in the same vacuum system. The effect of the glow discharge on polymeric web depends on electron temperature (typically a few electron volts), electron density (ranging typically from 10?9 to 10?11 cm?3), ion energy, and chemical composition. The mentioned electron density range is indispensable to meet the demands of satisfactory production speeds, in particular with evaporation. By means of the so-called Treatmag®, an abnormal glow discharge enhanced by a closed loop tunnel shaped magnetic field is generated in the 10?2 mbar pressure range. This tool is widely used for the improvement of metallic coatings on polymeric web. The ion energies typically range well below 70 eV. Indeed, water vapor and oxygen permeation rates through OPP have been quartered respectively, third. The so-called RF hollow anode described herein next is comprising a capacitively coupled, asymmetric 13.56 \\{MHz\\} radio frequency glow discharge driven in a hollow life electrode, operated in the 10?2 mbar pressure range. The easily scaleable RF hollow anode is dedicated to the dynamic pre-treatment or coating of either dielectric or metal web (or rigid sheet), and can be used in conjunction either with sputtering or, at line speeds of typical 5–10 m/s, with evaporation processes. The RF hollow anode renders ion fluxes of up to 1 mA/cm2 at energies between 100 and several hundred electron volts. So far it complements the Treatmag®, which yields ions with considerably lower energies. The adhesion improvement by the RF hollow anode we attribute to a pronounced increase of the cross-link density (amorphization) in the near surface region of in-plane oriented polymeric web commonly used. Ex situ XPS spectra taken 3 days after venting from PET samples treated at high web speeds are given. It is mentioned that the industrial application of the RF hollow anode is based on the surface modification as yielded in-situ/in-vacuo almost immediately after treatment. In case the RF hollow anode is operated with hydrocarbon, silane or other gases, it can also be employed for thin base-coatings or top-coatings on web material.

    M. Geisler; G. Hoffmann; R. Ludwig; G. Steiniger

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    362

    Effects of Annealing on the Microstructure and Properties of 6FeNiCoCrAlTiSi High-Entropy Alloy Coating Prepared by Laser Cladding  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The content of each constituent element in the newly developed high-entropy alloys is always restricted in equimolar or near-equimolar ratios to avoid the formation of complex brittle phases during the solidifica...

    Hui Zhang; Ye Pan; Yizhu He

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    363

    Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    364

    Wear resistance optimisation of composite coatings by computational microstructural modelling  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract The wear resistance of components can be changed remarkably by surface coatings. New processing methods offer many possibilities to tailor the wear resistance of surfaces to match design criteria. Computational modelling and simulation is a systematic approach to optimise the wear performance. Modelling of physical surface phenomena can be carried out on all spatial scale levels, from sub-atomic one to macrolevel and for the various stages in material development, from material processing to structures, properties and performance. The interactions between the coating matrix, the reinforced particles, degraded material phases and defects like pores, cracks and voids are of crucial importance for the wear performance of composite coatings. This has been modelled by synthetic artificial models to find general design rules and by real image based models to find out the wear behaviour of specific coatings. The effect of particle size, morphology, clusters, mean free path and porosity was simulated for thermal spray WC–CoCr coatings. Four main very typical mechanisms for crack initiation resulting in surface failure have been identified: brittle carbide fracture, ductile binder cracking, interface failure, and cracking from pre-existing porosities and defects. The most important coating properties having a crucial effect on coating wear resistance are defects in the coating structure as they can create detrimental stress peaks and high strain levels, particle clustering is most critical for the durability of the structure, the elasticity of the particle is of great importance as well as matrix hardness and particle morphology.

    Kenneth Holmberg; Anssi Laukkanen; Erja Turunen; Tarja Laitinen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    365

    Sex education in Connecticut high schools| Teachers' reports of content and importance ratings according to the SIECUS Guidelines.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ?? The purpose of this study was to examine Connecticut teachers’ reports of the sex education content taught to high school students as well as… (more)

    Wallace Obloj, Donna Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    366

    In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC Core-Shell Nanoparticles for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Storage. In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings...

    367

    Use of very-high-frequency plasmas to prepare a-Si:H-based triple-junction solar cells at high deposition rates: Annual technical status report, 11 March 1998--11 March 1999  

    SciTech Connect

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during this phase of this subcontract. ECD researchers have made significant progress in advancing the very high frequency (VHF), high-rate technology. They demonstrated that 8.0% stable efficiencies can be achieved for a-Si:H cells whose i-layers are prepared at rates near 10 {angstrom}/s using the VHF technique. Presently, there is not a great difference in the performance of a-Si:H cells made using the VHF technique and i-layer deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s and that for cells made using the standard 13.56 MHz technique and rates near 1 {angstrom}/s in the same deposition system. In terms of the a-SiGe:H cells, researchers have completed a number of studies of devices with properties appropriate for middle-junction cells-that is, cells without Ag/ZnO back-reflectors having Voc values near 0.75V and Jsc values near 8.0 mA/cm{sup 2} when measured using AM1.5 light filtered using a 530-nm, low-band-pass filter. The stabilized proper ties for these cells prepared at i-layer rates near 10 {angstrom}/s are again similar to a-SiGe:H cells made using the same deposition hardware and the low-rate 13.56 MHz method. Establishing an initial 10.5% for a triple-junction cell whose i-layers are prepared at the high rates sets the baseline for ECD's future studies. The triple-junction cell degradation (10%--13%) with prolonged light soaking is similar to that regularly obtained for cells prepared at low i-layer deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s). This is important because the use of high-rate methods to prepare i-layers typically leads to less-stable materials and cells. Increasing the buffer-layer deposition rate to 6 {angstrom}/s leads to nearly a 15-min decrease in the total deposition time, whereas the increase in the n-layer and p-layer deposition rates both decrease the total time by 5 and 5.8 min, respectively. Thus, besides the i-layer growth rates, increasing the buffer layer growth rate has the strongest effect on the deposition time of the triple-junction semiconductor structures.

    Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Tsu, D.; Izu, M.

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    368

    Absorber coatings' degradation  

    SciTech Connect

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    369

    Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates  

    SciTech Connect

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

    Tarasenko, Victor F. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634021, pr. Akademicheskii 2/3 (Russian Federation)

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis lipid harvest and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10–40?kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1?MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34?cm and an active diameter of 6.36?cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

    Timothy A. Bigelow; Jin Xu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation This project derives innovative new coatings by modifying high surface-area nano-structured silica particles with self-assembled low surface energy monolayers. The...

    372

    Wear-resistant coatings formed on Zircaloy-2 by plasma electrolytic oxidation in sodium aluminate electrolytes  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Zircaloy-2 has been investigated in dilute and concentrated aluminate electrolytes, under a pulsed-bipolar current regime, in order to develop coatings of high wear resistance. Coating growth kinetics, cell potential-time responses and discharging behaviours depend significantly on the electrolyte concentration. The coatings formed in dilute aluminate electrolyte reveal a three-layered structure, with pancake structures at the coating surfaces. “Soft sparks” occur during PEO in dilute aluminate electrolyte, causing a relatively fast growth of the inner layer and resulting in a large amount of alumina-enriched material beneath the pancake structures, and hence an increased wear resistance of the coating. In contrast, more homogenous coatings, free of pancakes, result with the concentrated electrolyte. The main phase in the coatings is t-ZrO2, with ?-Al2O3 also present in coatings formed in the latter electrolyte. The coatings formed in the concentrated electrolyte display a high wear resistance, even for thin coatings formed for short times, which is attributed to the relatively high alumina content of the coatings.

    Yingliang Cheng; Jinhui Cao; Zhaomei Peng; Qun Wang; E. Matykina; P. Skeldon; G.E. Thompson

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    373

    Interface behavior study of WC92–Co8 coating produced by electrospark deposition  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    WC92–Co8 coating produced by electrospark deposition effectively improves the surface performance of the substrate. The behavior of the interface between the WC92–Co8 coating and the substrate is studied in this paper. The high-melting-point WC92–Co8 was deposited onto the surface of Ti alloy, and the coating was usually more than 50 ?m thick. The surface of the coating is mainly composed of TiC and W2C besides a small amount of W, and its micro hardness reaches HV1129. The coating dramatically improves the performance of the substrate.

    Wang Ruijun; Qian Yiyu; Liu Jun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    374

    Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

    SciTech Connect

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications.

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Cathodic ALD V2O5 thin films for high-rate  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    passivation layers and more recently active storage material. Here we report a detailed study of ALD V2O5 as a high capacity cathode material, using vanadium tri-isopropoxide (VTOP) precursor with both O3 and H2O in electrochemical energy storage by Li-ion batteries, materials which actively store the ionic charge must

    Ghodssi, Reza

    376

    Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices  

    SciTech Connect

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

    Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    377

    High-precision {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction to determine {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction rates  

    SciTech Connect

    The rise time of stellar x-ray bursts is a signature of thermonuclear runaway processes in the atmosphere of neutron stars and is highly sensitive to a series of ({alpha},p) reactions via high-lying resonances in sd-shell nuclei. Lacking data for the relevant resonance levels, the stellar reaction rates have been calculated using statistical, Hauser-Feshbach models, assuming a high-level density. This assumption may not be correct in view of the selectivity of the ({alpha},p) reaction to natural parity states. We measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with a high-resolution spectrometer to identify resonance levels in {sup 26}Si above the {alpha}-emission threshold at 9.164 MeV excitation energy. These resonance levels are used to calculate the stellar reaction rate of the {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction and to test the validity of the statistical assumption.

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Beard, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Physics and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 560-0047 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, PO Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    378

    Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    379

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    SciTech Connect

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    380

    Ultraviolet antireflection coatings for use in silicon detector design  

    SciTech Connect

    We report on the development of coatings for a charged-coupled device (CCD) detector optimized for use in a fixed dispersion UV spectrograph. Because of the rapidly changing index of refraction of Si, single layer broadband antireflection (AR) coatings are not suitable to increase quantum efficiency at all wavelengths of interest. Instead, we describe a creative solution that provides excellent performance over UV wavelengths. We describe progress in the development of a coated CCD detector with theoretical quantum efficiencies (QEs) of greater than 60% at wavelengths from 120 to 300 nm. This high efficiency may be reached by coating a backside-illuminated, thinned, delta-doped CCD with a series of thin film AR coatings. The materials tested include MgF{sub 2} (optimized for highest performance from 120-150 nm), SiO{sub 2} (150-180 nm), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (180-240 nm), MgO (200-250 nm), and HfO{sub 2} (240-300 nm). A variety of deposition techniques were tested and a selection of coatings that minimized reflectance on a Si test wafer were applied to functional devices. We also discuss future uses and improvements, including graded and multilayer coatings.

    Hamden, Erika T.; Greer, Frank; Hoenk, Michael E.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    A Prospective Cohort Study to Compare Treatment Results Between 2 Fractionation Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in Patients With Cervical Cancer  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.

    Huang, Eng-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Sun, Li-Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lan, Jen-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chanchien, Chan-Chao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chong-Jong, E-mail: cjw1010@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    382

    Laser ablation analysis of novel perfluoroalkyl-coated aluminum nanocomposites  

    SciTech Connect

    The evolution and decay of aluminum and aluminum monoxide emission signatures following a laser ablation event were used to compare the relative reaction rates of three aluminum based materials. Time-resolved emission results of oxide-free, C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H-passivated materials were compared with uncoated, oxide passivated aluminum nanoparticles and those coated with the same acid used in for passivation C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H. Excited state Al and AlO emission is reduced in time for the oxide free material when compared to coated, 50 nm, oxide passivated particles mixed on an equal active Al: C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H ratio. This is interpreted as an increase in the reaction rate afforded by the elimination of the oxide coating and proximity of oxidizing species in the SAM-based nanocomposite.

    Jouet, R. Jason; Carney, Joel R.; Lightstone, James M.; Warren, Andrea D. [Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, IHDIV, Naval Surface Warfare Center 4104 Evans Way, Suite 102 Indian Head MD 20640-5102 (United States)

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    383

    Deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells at high rates by glow discharge of disilane. Final subcontract report, January 1985-July 1986  

    SciTech Connect

    This report summarizes the results of recent a-Si:H thin-film photovoltaic (PV) materials research. The work reported here concerned the fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells at high deposition rates using disilane. This task required the construction of a new, dual-chamber deposition system to control the dopant profile between the heavily doped p-type layer and the undoped (intrinsic) layer in the solar cell structure. Conditions were sought that would produce high-quality films at a high deposition rate. Complete photovoltaic devices were fabricated. In disilane-deposited material, the optimum substrate temperature is much higher than in silane material, presumably because it is harder to eliminate the excess hydrogen in the former. The efficiency of the best disilane cell was about 7%, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.80 V, a short-circuit current density of 14.7 mA cm/sup -2/ and a fill factor of 0.59. The most likely area for improvement is in the voltage, where values as high as 0.9 V should be possible with careful adjustment of the cell structure.

    Vanier, P.E.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    384

    Microcrystalline Si films grown at low temperatures (90-220 deg. C) with high rates in atmospheric-pressure VHF plasma  

    SciTech Connect

    This work deals with the structural properties of microcrystalline silicon (muc-Si:H) films grown at low temperatures (90-220 deg. C) with high rates in atmospheric-pressure He/H{sub 2}/SiH{sub 4} plasma, which is excited by a 150 MHz very high frequency power using a porous carbon electrode. This plasma permits to enhance the chemical reactions both in gas phase and on the film-growing surface, while suppressing ion impingement upon the surface. Raman crystalline volume fractions of the muc-Si:H films are studied in detail as functions of film thickness and substrate temperature (T{sub sub}). The results show that the muc-Si:H film deposited with 50 (SCCM) (SCCM denotes standard cubic centimeters per minute at STP) SiH{sub 4} has no amorphous transition layers at the film/substrate interface in spite of the high deposition rate of 6.4 nm/s, which is verified by the cross sectional observations with a transmission electron microscope. In addition, the T{sub sub} dependence of Raman crystallinity of the muc-Si:H films indicates that a highly crystallized muc-Si:H film grows even when T{sub sub} is reduced to 90 deg. C. Further systematic studies are needed for both device applications and deposition on thermally sensitive plastic materials.

    Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Ouchi, Kentaro; Tabuchi, Keita; Yasutake, Kiyoshi [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    385

    Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

    SciTech Connect

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    386

    Rate Schedules  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

    387

    High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for 95Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for 95Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of 95Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to En = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

    P. E. Koehler; J. A. Harvey; K. H. Guber; D. Wiarda

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    388

    SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

    TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    389

    Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    390

    Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    391

    Mechanism of heat-modification inside a glass after irradiation with high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses  

    SciTech Connect

    Accumulation of thermal energies by highly repeated irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses inside a glass induces the heat-modification whose volume is much larger than that of the photoexcited region. It has been proposed that the heat-modification occurs in the region in which the temperature had overcome a threshold temperature during exposure of laser pulses. In order to understand the mechanism of the heat-modification, we investigated the temperature distribution during laser exposure and the threshold temperature by analyzing the volume of the modification based on a thermal diffusion model. We found that the threshold temperature becomes lower with increasing laser exposure time. The dependence of the threshold temperature on the laser exposure time was explained by the deformation mechanism based on the temperature-dependent viscosity and viscoelastic behavior of a glass under a stress loading by thermal expansion. The deformation mechanism also could simulate a tear-drop shape of a heat-modification by simultaneous double-beams' irradiation and the distribution of birefringence in a heat-modification. The mechanism proposed in this study means that the temperature-dependence of the viscosity of a glass should be essential for predicting and controlling the heat-modification.

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki [Department of Material Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko [Innovative Collaboration Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan); Ohnishi, Masatoshi [Qualtec Co., Ltd., 4-230 Sanbocho, Sakai-ku, Sakai-shi, Osaka 590-0906 (Japan); Nakaya, Takayuki [NJC Institute of Technology, Namiki Precision Jewel Co., Ltd., 8-22 Shinden 3-Chome, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 123-8511 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    392

    Advances in the electrospark deposition coating process  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a pulsed?arc microwelding process using short?duration high?current electrical pulses to deposit an electrode material on a metallic substrate. It is one of the few methods available by which a fused metallurgically bonded coating can be applied with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperatures. The short duration of the electrical pulse allows an extremely rapid solidification of the deposited material and results in an exceptionally fine?grained homogeneous coating that approaches (and with some materials actually is) an amorphous structure. This structure is believed to contribute to the good tribological and corrosion performance observed for hardsurfacing materials used in the demanding environments of high temperatures liquid metals and neutron irradiation. A brief historical review of the process is provided followed by descriptions of the present state of the art and of the performance and applications of electrospark deposition coating in liquid–metal?cooled nuclear reactors.

    Roger N. Johnson; G. L. Sheldon

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    393

    Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    394

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    High rates of police detention among recently released HIV-infected prisoners in Ukraine: Implications for health outcomes  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    AbstractBackground Ukraine's HIV epidemic, primarily affecting people who inject drugs (PWID), is expanding and transitioning despite free opioid substitution therapy (OST) and antiretroviral therapy (ART), two effective ways to reduce HIV transmission. Police detention of PWID not resulting in a formal charge or imprisonment is common, but its prevalence and impact on health are not known. Method HIV-infected individuals (N = 97) released from prison within one year were recruited and surveyed in two HIV-endemic Ukrainian cities about post-release police detention experiences. Data on the frequency of police detention, related adverse events, and impact on OST and ART continuity were collected, and correlates of detention were examined using logistic regression. Results Detention responses were available for 94 (96.9%) participants, of which 55 (58.5%) reported police detentions (mean = 9.4 per person-year). For those detained while prescribed OST (N = 28) and ART (N = 27), medication interruption was common (67.9% and 70.4%, respectively); 23 of 27 participants prescribed OST (85.2%) were detained en route to/from OST treatment. Significant independent correlates of detention without charges included post-release ART prescription (AOR 4.98, p = 0.021), current high-risk injection practices (AOR 5.03, p = 0.011), male gender (AOR 10.88, p = 0.010), and lower lifetime months of imprisonment (AOR 0.99, p = 0.031). Conclusions HIV-infected individuals recently released from prison in Ukraine experience frequent police detentions, resulting in withdrawal symptoms, confiscation of syringes, and interruptions of essential medications, including ART and OST. Structural changes are urgently needed to reduce police detentions in order to control HIV transmission and improve both individual and public health.

    Jacob M. Izenberg; Chethan Bachireddy; Michael Soule; Tetiana Kiriazova; Sergey Dvoryak; Frederick L. Altice

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    396

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    397

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    398

    Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

    399

    Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

    SciTech Connect

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    400

    Slepian-Wolf coded nested quantization (SEC-NQ) for Wyner-Ziv coding: high-rate performance analysis, code design, and application to cooperative networks  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    exploits the correlation between two signals (one is the source and the other is the side information) and thus makes it possible to encode the source signal alone and to decode it jointly with the help of the side information at the decoder. Nested lattice... quantization provides a practical scheme for Wyner-Ziv cod- ing. We examine the high-rate performance of nested lattice quantizers and give the theoretical performance for general continuous sources. Based on our analysis, a new practical Wyner-Ziv coding...

    Liu, Zhixin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Assessing thermal barrier coatings by eddy-current inversion  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of high-temperature coatings is one of the important factors in achieving a high level of structural integrity in advanced gas turbines. In this paper we demonstrate that sophisticated eddy-current techniques can be utilized to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. We discuss the difficult in-service case in which the time-temperature exposure of the combustion turbine blade has created a four-layered system in addition to the base metal.

    Harold A. Sabbagh; Elias H. Sabbagh; R. Kim Murphy; John Nyenhuis

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying  

    SciTech Connect

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

    Helminiak, M. A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yanar, N. M. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pettit, F. S. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Taylor, T. A. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Meier, G. H. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    403

    High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    of semiconductor alloy. (b) Semiconductor material charges in a shaker pot container cell for spark erosion process. (a) (b) Pulsed power source Charge Electrode Screen Spark...

    404

    High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

    405

    OGMS: A Facility to Measure Out-gassing Rate of Materials  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract OGMS, the OutGassing Measurement System, is a facility to measure the outgassing rates of materials. The rate is highly important factor in vacuum science dealing with systems working at pressures below 10-6 mbar. In ultra- high vacuum range it plays role in system pressure at given pumping speed. For standard materials the data is available in literature but at times not under condition of specific application. Many application use very specific materials under vacuum conditions. Cryoadsorption Cryopump a project at Institute for plasma Research uses steel samples coated with activated carbon as sorbents. Various kinds of sorbents were used. Necessity to measure the outgassing rate of such unique materials established the OGMS. The OGMS facility has a known conductance of 2.46 l/s and base outgassing rate of ? 3x10-12 mbar-ltr/s-cm2. An ultimate vacuum of < 5 x10-9 mbar was achieved in a sample chamber of volume ?7.5 liters. This paper describes OGMS, its calibration, experiments to find outgassing rate of steel samples and comparison with reported data to establish authenticity for new materials. It also reports results of outgassing rates of cryo-adhesives and activated charcoal coated steel samples.

    Ranjana Gangradey; Samiran Mukherjee; Paresh Panchal; N. Ravi Prakash

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    406

    Silicon nucleation and film evolution on silicon dioxide using disilane: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of very smooth silicon at high deposition rates  

    SciTech Connect

    An investigation of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon on SiO{sub 2} has been performed at temperatures ranging from 590 to 900 C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 Torr. Deposition at 590 C yields amorphous silicon films with the corresponding ultrasmooth surface with a deposition rate of 68 nm/min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of a sample deposited at 625 C and 1 Torr reveals a bilayer structure which is amorphous at the growth surface and crystallized at the oxide interface. Higher temperatures yield polycrystalline films where the surface roughness depends strongly on both deposition pressure and temperature. Silane-based amorphous silicon deposition in conventional systems yields the expected ultrasmooth surfaces, but at greatly reduced deposition rates unsuitable for single-wafer processing. However, disilane, over the process window considered here, yields growth rates high enough to be appropriate for single-wafer manufacturing, thus providing a viable means for deposition of very smooth silicon films on SiO{sub 2} in a single-wafer environment.

    Violette, K.E.; Oeztuerk, M.C.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    407

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    408

    3.07 - TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel Performance  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel is used in all current and planned high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The robustness of this fuel, coupled with the high heat capacity of graphite, has led to the development of modular \\{HTGRs\\} with a high degree of passive safety. In this chapter, the irradiation and accident performance of modern TRISO-coated particle fuel around the world are reviewed. For all HTGRs, TRISO-coated particle fuel forms the heart of the concept. Such fuels have been studied extensively over the past four decades around the world, for example, in countries including the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, the United States, Russia, China, and more recently, South Africa.

    D.A. Petti; P.A. Demkowicz; J.T. Maki; R.R. Hobbins

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    409

    Molybdenum Coatings with Filtration of Plasma Flow  

    SciTech Connect

    Deposition of molybdenum coatings in arc discharge with assistance of HF one is analyzed in this paper. To avoid substrate heating to high temperature and micro-arc formation during cleaning process, the surface cleaning was carried out with HF plasma only. For reduction of droplet fraction in plasma the 'freestanding' filter was utilized. As a filter a solenoid was used, which generated a curvilinear (with the angle of 90 deg.) transportation magnetic field. The effective crosssectional area of the plasma flow at which was observed the uniform distribution of the thickness of the applied coating, was equal to 113 sm{sup 2}. The coating on the base of arc discharge, filter and HF-biasing of substrate were deposited on different substrates, including glass and stainless steel.The optical (refractive index) properties of molybdenum films are presented. The reflective characteristics of the obtained molybdenum films in the range of wavelengths from 200 to 700 nm were measured.Molybdenum films were also investigated under the effect of the plasma emission, using an ECR discharge in a simple double-mirror magnetic trap. The time varying negative potential was supplied to sample holder what provided a wide energy distribution of ions bombarded the sample surface in range 30...1500V.

    Gasilin, V. V.; Nezovibat'ko, Y. N.; Shvets, O. M.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.; Timoshenko, A. I.; Zavaleev, V. A. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Method of measuring metal coating adhesion  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

    Roper, John R. (Northglenn, CO)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    411

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    412

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    414

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS  

    SciTech Connect

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    416

    Developing TiAIN Coatings for Intermediate Temperature-Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect Applications  

    SciTech Connect

    TiN-type coatings have potential to be used as SOFC interconnect coatings SOFC because of their low resistance and high temperature stability. In this research, various (Ti,Al)N coatings were deposited on stainless steels by filtered-arc method. ASR and XRD tests were conducted on these coatings, and SEM/EDAX analysis were conducted after ASR and XRD tests. SEM/EDAX analyses show that (Ti,Al)N remains stable at temperature up to 700°C. It is also indicated that Al has beneficial effect on the stability of TiN type coatings. At 900°C, (Ti-30Al)N is fully oxidized and some of (Ti-50Al)N coating still remains as nitride. The analyses on cross-sectional samples show that these coatings are effective barrier to the Cr migration. In summary, (Ti.Al)N coatings are good candidates for the SOFC interconnect applications at 700°C. The future directions of this research are to improve the stability of these coatings by alloy-doping and to develop multi-layer coatings.

    Liu, X. (West Virginia University); Johnson, C.D.; Li, C. (West Virginia University); Xu, J. (West Virginia University); Cross, C.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    DLC coating on stainless steel by pulsed methane discharge in repetitive plasma focus  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H)/diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been achieved on AISI 304 stainless steel (SS) substrates by employing energetic ions emitted from a repetitive plasma focus operated in CH4 discharge. The Raman spectroscopy of the coatings exhibits the evolution of a-C:H/DLC coatings with clearly observed D and G peaks centered about 1320–1360 and 1560–1620 cm?1 respectively. The diamond character of the coatings is influenced by the ion flux and repetition rate of the focus device. The repetitive discharge mode of plasma focus has led to the formation of a-C:H/DLC coatings in short duration of time. The coatings transform from a-C to a-C:H depending upon substrate angular position. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirms the formation of DLC coating owing to stress-induced restructuring in SS. The estimated crystallite size is found to be ?40–50 nm. Field emission scanning electron micrographs exhibit a layered granular surface morphology of the coatings. The Vickers surface hardness of the DLC coated SS samples has been significantly improved.

    M. Hassan; A. Qayyum; S. Ahmad; S. Mahmood; M. Shafiq; M. Zakaullah; P. Lee; R.S. Rawat

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Development of Low-Oxide MCrAlY Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Advanced high-energy plasma systems are being used to achieve the benefits of the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) system without losing the inherent advantages of plasma for coating of gas turbine parts. MCrAlY ...

    Bharat K. Pant; Vivek Arya; B. S. Mann

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    Click Synthesis of Monolithic Silicon Carbide Aerogels from Polyacrylonitrile-Coated 3D Silica Networks  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Monolithic highly porous (70% v/v) SiC aerogels are synthesized carbothermally from X-PAN-SiO2, i.e., monolithic silica aerogels are prepared and coated in one pot with a conformal poly acrylonitrile coating via a surface-initiated free radical process. ... Conformal PAN coatings would be obtained with other surface-confined initiators, including monodentate ones. ... An aerogel-like composite material was synthesized by casting a conformal 4-6 nm diisocyanate-derived polymer coating on the bird-nest like skeletal framework of mesoporous vanadia consisting of entangled 100-200 nm long, 30-40 nm thick worm-like objects. ...

    Nicholas Leventis; Anand Sadekar; Naveen Chandrasekaran; Chariklia Sotiriou-Leventis

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Composition, morphology and mechanical properties of sputtered TiAlN coating  

    SciTech Connect

    TiAlN coating was deposited on the tungsten carbide cutting tool by using DC magnetron sputtering system to study the influence of substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate on the composition, morphology and mechanical properties. The negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate was varied from about ?79 to ?221 V and 30 sccm to 72 sccm, respectively. The coating composition and roughness were characterized by using SEM/EDX and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. The dynamic ultra micro hardness tester was used to measure the mechanical properties. The coating hardness increases to about 10-12 GPa with an increase of the negatively substrate bias up to ? 200 V and it tend to decrease with an increase in nitrogen flow rate up to 70 sccm. The increase of hardness follows the increase of Ti and N content and rms coating roughness.

    Budi, Esmar, E-mail: esmarbudi@unj.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda No. 10, Jakarta 13220 (Indonesia); Razali, M. Mohd. [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Karung Berkunci No. 1752 Pejabat Pos Durian Tunggal 76109 Melaka (Malaysia); Nizam, A. R. Md. [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, UniversitiTeknikal Malaysia Melaka, Karung Berkunci No. 1752 Pejabat Pos Durian Tunggal 76109 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    3: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw 3: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw September 9, 2011 - 10:47am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Reporter. A remote user can view files on the target system and gain full control of the target application. PLATFORM: All pre-9.3 versions of Reporter installed on a Windows server are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Full Control. reference LINKS: Blue Coat Security Advisory ID: SA60 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026023 About Path Traversal IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Reporter installed on a Windows server is vulnerable to an HTTP directory traversal attack. An unauthenticated user can browse the file system and read any file. Data from these files can be used by an attacker to gain

    423

    Materials for advanced turbine engines (MATE). Project 4: erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating  

    SciTech Connect

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

    Rashid, J.M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Rate schedule  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

    425

    Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

    SciTech Connect

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    427

    Long-life and high-rate LiVPO4F/C nanocrystals modified with graphene as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Graphene modified LiVPO4F/C nanocomposite has been firstly investigated as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The LiVPO4F/C nanocrystals embedded on reduced graphene oxide sheets are synthesized via a sol–gel method. The obtained sample of graphene modified LiVPO4F/C is studied comparatively with LiVPO4F/C by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectra and various electrochemical tests. The results reveal that the modification of LiVPO4F/C nanocrystals with graphene can form an effective conducting network, which can greatly improve the electronic conductivity and lithium ion transport. Thus, the as-synthesized nanocomposite exhibits excellent high-rate capability and cycling stability. In the voltage range of 3.0–4.5 V, the graphene modified LiVPO4F/C delivers a reversible discharge capacity of 151.6 (nearly to its theoretical capability of 156 mAhg? 1) and 147.8 mAhg? 1 at 0.1 and 0.5 C, respectively. It also achieves an improved cyclability with capacity retention ratio of 91.4% after 300 cycles at a higher rate of 10 C. Therefore, it is of great potential use as a cathode material in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries for hybrid-electric vehicles and electric vehicles.

    Yongli Wang; Haixiang Zhao; Yongfeng Ji; Lihua Wang; Zhen Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    428

    On the use of a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to prove the feasibility of using a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector (mPSD) as an in vivo verification tool during {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments.Methods: A three-point detector was built and inserted inside a catheter-positioning template placed in a water phantom. A hyperspectral approach was implemented to discriminate the different optical signals composing the light output at the exit of the single collection optical fiber. The mPSD was tested with different source-to-detector positions, ranging from 1 to 5 cm radially and over 10.5 cm along the longitudinal axis of the detector, and with various integration times. Several strategies for improving the accuracy of the detector were investigated. The device's accuracy in detecting source position was also tested.Results: Good agreement with the expected doses was obtained for all of the scintillating elements, with average relative differences from the expected values of 3.4 {+-} 2.1%, 3.0 {+-} 0.7%, and 4.5 {+-} 1.0% for scintillating elements from the distal to the proximal. A dose threshold of 3 cGy improved the general accuracy of the detector. An integration time of 3 s offered a good trade-off between precision and temporal resolution. Finally, the mPSD measured the radioactive source positioning uncertainty to be no more than 0.32 {+-} 0.06 mm. The accuracy and precision of the detector were improved by a dose-weighted function combining the three measurement points and known details about the geometry of the detector construction.Conclusions: The use of a mPSD for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dosimetry is feasible. This detector shows great promise for development of in vivo applications for real-time verification of treatment delivery.

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie and Centre de Recherche du CHU de Quebec, CHU de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    Hydroxyalkylated xylans – Their synthesis and application in coatings for packaging and paper  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    This paper demonstrates opportunities for wood-based xylan derivatives to be used in coating applications. A route for extraction and purification of white and pure xylan from bleached birch kraft pulp is described as a part of the production of high adsorption and high crystalline pulp. Derivatization of the xylan during the extraction step was also demonstrated. Efficient derivatization of xylan to water soluble derivatives was achieved and promising results were obtained in primary application tests as a coating component in barrier coatings on board and as a binder component in pigment coating of offset paper. With the best xylan derivate coating, the barrier properties were better than with a commercial biopolymer coating, while oxygen permeability was roughly one third of that for a polyethylene terephthalate coating. Likewise, surface strength close to the reference latex as a binder in pigment coatings was achieved by a xylan derivative. This work is part of a platform of hemicellulose derivatives enabling novel application for this medium to high molar mass hemicellulose of high purity.

    Christiane Laine; Ali Harlin; Jonas Hartman; Sari Hyvärinen; Kari Kammiovirta; Björn Krogerus; Heikki Pajari; Hille Rautkoski; Harri Setälä; Jenni Sievänen; Johanna Uotila; Mika Vähä-Nissi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    Modeling and the Adaptive Solution of CVD Fiber-Coating Processes  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    guidance for improving the process. 1 Introduction Ceramic composites are designed for use in high permeate the matrix and react with the bers to weaken the composite. Coating the bers can protect them from, New York 12180, USA Abstract We develop a mathematical model for the coating of ceramic bers

    Adjerid, Slimane

    433

    Coatings for hot section gas turbine components  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Components in the hot section of gas turbines are protected from the environment by oxidation-resistant coatings while thermal barrier coatings are applied to reduce the metal operating temperature of blades and vanes. The integrity of these protective coatings is an issue of major concern in current gas turbine designs. Premature cracking of the protective layer in oxidation-resistant coatings and of the interface in thermal barrier coating systems has become one of the life limiting factors of coated components in gas turbines. Following a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of coated material systems with respect to coating types and their status of application, the fracture mechanisms and mechanics of coated systems are presented and discussed.

    J. Bressers; S. Peteves; M. Steen

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z