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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

2

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries Title Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon...

4

High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Redshift Supernova Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a sample of 42 supernovae detected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on-board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey to measure the rate of core collapse supernovae to z~0.7 and type Ia supernovae to z~1.6. This significantly increases the redshift range where supernova rates have been estimated from observations. The rate of core collapse supernovae can be used as an independent probe of the cosmic star formation rate. Based on the observations of 17 core collapse supernovae, we measure an increase in the core collapse supernova rate by a factor of 1.6 in the range 0.3rate. The increase in the rate in this redshift range in consistent with recent measurements of the star formation rate derived from UV-luminosity densities and IR datasets. Based on 25 type Ia supernovae, we find a SN Ia rate that is a factor 3-5 higher at z~1 compared to earlier estimates at lower redshifts (zrate traces a higher star formation rate at redshifts z>1 compared to low redshift. At higher redshift (z>1), we find a suggested decrease in the type Ia rate with redshift. This evolution of the Ia rate with redshift is consistent with a type Ia progenitor model where there is a substantial delay between the formation of the progenitor star and the explosion of the supernova. Assuming that the type Ia progenitor stars have initial main sequence masses 3-8 M_Sun, we find that 5-7% of the available progenitors explode as type Ia supernovae.

Tomas Dahlen; Louis-Gregory Strolger; Adam G. Riess; Bahram Mobasher; Ranga-Ram Chary; Christopher J. Conselice; Henry C. Ferguson; Andrew S. Fruchter; Mauro Giavalisco; Mario Livio; Piero Madau; Nino Panagia; John L. Tonry

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

7

Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

SciTech Connect

A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Performance Nanostructured High-Performance Nanostructured Coating to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

9

Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Effect of High Cooling Rate and Powder Composition on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coatings were deposited by applying different types of thermal spray systems. Influence of the heating and cooling rates on coating microstructure and ...

11

High compression rate text summarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on methods for condensing large documents into highly concise summaries, achieving compression rates on par with human writers. While the need for such summaries in the current age of information overload ...

Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

Severs, Kevin

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings  

SciTech Connect

This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

Thomas M. Lillo

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High-temperature Erosion Behavior of Aluminide-coated Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-temperature erosion behavior of an aluminide-coated turbine blade ... The Tensile Property Of A Gas Turbine Engine Fan Blade And Casing Material.

15

Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High Capacity Li-Ion Battery. Author(s), Indranil Lahiri, Wonbong Choi. On-Site ...

16

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Controlling the Lithiation-Induced Strain and Charging Rate in Nanowire Electrodes by Coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithiation-induced-strain (LIS) in electrode materials plagues the performance and lifetime of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Controlling the LIS is one of the ultimate goals for making better LIBs. Here we report that by carbon or aluminum coating, the charging rate and LIS of individual SnO2 nanowire electrodes can be altered dramatically: namely the carbon or aluminum coated nanowires can be charged about 10 times faster than the non-coated nanowires, and the radial expansion of the coated nanowires was completely suppressed, resulting little or no mismatch strain at the reaction front, as evidenced by the lack of dislocations near the reaction front. The improved charging rate and the suppression of the radial expansion were attributed to the mechanical confinement of the coatings. These studies demonstrate an effective route to control the charging rate and LIS, enabling the design of better LIBs.

Zhang, Li Q.; Liu, Xiao H.; Liu, Yang; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Gui, Liangjin; Mao, Scott X.; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Wang, Chong M.; Sullivan, J. P.; Huang, Jian Yu

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. This invention has applications to breeding blankets for fusion reactors as well as to alkali metal thermal to electric converters.

Park, J.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Preparing of High Silicon Coating by Composite Electrodeposition in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

23

Available Technologies: Super High Rate Sputter Deposition  

Andre’ Anders of Berkeley Lab has developed a very high deposition rate magnetron sputtering wherein the surface of a target and the race track zone area of the ...

24

Copper coated carbon fiber reinforced plastics for high and ultra high vacuum applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used copper-coated carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CuCFRP) for the construction of high and ultra-high vacuum recipients. The vacuum performance is found to be comparable to typical stainless steel used for this purpose. In test recipients we have reached pressures of 2E-8 mbar and measured a desorption rate of 1E-11 mbar*liter/s/cm^2; no degradation over time (2 years) has been found. Suitability for baking has been found to depend on the CFRP production process, presumably on the temperature of the autoclave curing. Together with other unique properties of CuCFRP such as low weight and being nearly non-magnetic, this makes it an ideal material for many high-end vacuum applications.

Burri, F; Feusi, P; Henneck, R; Kirch, K; Lauss, B; Ruettimann, P; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Schnabel, A; Voigt, J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low emissivity high-temperature tantalum thin film coatings for silicon devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors study the use of thin ( ? 230?nm) tantalum (Ta) layers on silicon (Si) as a low emissivity (high reflectivity) coating for high-temperature Si devices. Such coatings are critical to reduce parasitic radiation ...

Rinnerbauer, Veronika

26

Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image particles of a high-rate LiFePO4 sample containing a small amount of in situ carbon. The particle morphology is highly irregular, with a wide size distribution. Nevertheless, coatings, varying from about 5-10 nm in thickness, could readily be detected on surfaces of particles as well as on edges of agglomerates. Elemental mapping using Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM) indicates that these very thin surface layers are composed of carbon. These observations have important implications for the design of high-rate LiFePO4 materials in which, ideally, a minimal amount of carbon coating is used.

Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Coatings for Oxidation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our protective coatings were evaluated for thermal-shock performance at the ... that our coatings provide oxidation protection of C-C composites at temperature.

30

Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coatings for nickel up to 1,100 C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at...

31

Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot ...  

Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot Profiled with High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis and High Content Cellomics ...

32

High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

Dillon, A. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operators, especially those managing production from deepwater reservoirs, are striving to produce hydrocarbons at higher and higher rates without exposing the wells to completion failure risk. To avoid screen failures, recent studies have favored gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does not stop formation fines migration, and, over time, fines accumulation in the GP will lead to increasing completion skin. Although, and not always, the skin can be removed by acidizing, it is not practical to perform repeated acid treatments on deepwater wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful HPF is not a trivial exercise, and frequently, there is a steep learning curve for such a practice. This work explains the importance to HPF completions of the well trajectory through the interval to be hydraulically fractured, for production, not execution, reasons. A new model quantifies the effect of the well inclination on the connectivity between the fracture and the well via perforations. Guidelines based on the maximum target production rate, including forecasts of multiphase flow, are provided to size the HPF completion to avoid common completion failures that may result from high fluid rate and/or fines movement. Skin model will be developed for both vertical and deviated wells. Once the HPF is properly designed and executed, the operators should end up with a long term low skin good completion quality well. The well will be safely produced at the maximum flow rates, with no need for well surveillance and monitoring.

Tosic, Slavko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings. Presentation ...

35

High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a coating system meeting the requirements for photovoltaic module encapsulation.

Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

HIGH SURFACE AREA SILICON CARBIDE-COATED CARBON AEROGEL ...  

Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicon carbide, improving the thermal stability of the carbon ae ...

39

High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable batteries Title High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable batteries Publication Type...

40

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature Title Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Overcharge Protection for Lihium Batteries at High Rates and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overcharge Protection for Lihium Batteries at High Rates and Low Termperatures Title Overcharge Protection for Lihium Batteries at High Rates and Low Termperatures Publication Type...

42

Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures. 2 figs.

Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures.

Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications  

SciTech Connect

Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950/sup 0/C (1562 to 1742/sup 0/F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required.

Li, C.C.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Filters for High Rate Pulse Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a filter-construction method for pulse processing that differs in two respects from that in standard optimal filtering, in which the average pulse shape and noise-power spectral density are combined to create a convolution filter for estimating pulse heights. First, the proposed filters are computed in the time domain, to avoid periodicity artifacts of the discrete Fourier transform, and second, orthogonality constraints are imposed on the filters, to reduce the filtering procedure's sensitivity to unknown baseline height and pulse tails. We analyze the proposed filters, predicting energy resolution under several scenarios, and apply the filters to high-rate pulse data from gamma-rays measured by a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter.

B. K. Alpert; R. D. Horansky; D. A. Bennett; W. B. Doriese; J. W. Fowler; A. S. Hoover; M. W. Rabin; J. N. Ullom

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ceria-Based High-Temperature Coatings for Oxidation Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... over alloy additions with respect to their low cost, relative ease of application, ... using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis ... coating follow a general trend in their performance of 321 > 316 > 347 > 304.

47

High Performance Polymer Composite Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post Combustion CO 2 Capture and Separation From Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational...

48

High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

1983-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Insight into a Solid State Coating Process for High Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison with the coating produced via thermal spray, cold spray and arc cladding processes ... A Review of Metallic Systems Used in Offshore, Sour Environments: The Effect of ... High-temperature Foam-reinforced Thermal Insulation.

51

Dynamic Behavior of Polymer at High Strain Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Measurement and Modeling of High Strain-rate Deformation. Presentation Title ...

52

High Rate Performing lithium-ion Batteries - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Rechargeable Batteries and for Supercapacitors, II. Presentation Title, High Rate Performing lithium-ion Batteries.

53

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface ...  

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface Sampling Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

54

A simple, high-yield, apparatus for NEG coating of vacuum beamline elements  

SciTech Connect

Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) materials are extremely useful in vacuum systems for achieving Ultra High Vacuum. Recently, these materials have been used to coat the inner surfaces of vacuum components, acting as an internal, passive, vacuum pump. We have constructed a low cost apparatus, which allows coating of very small diameter vacuum tubes, used as differential pumping stages. Despite the relative ease of construction, we are routinely able to achieve high coating yields. We further describe an improvement to our system, which is able to achieve the same yield, at an even lower complexity by using an easily manufactured permanent magnet arrangement. The designs described are extendible to virtually any combination of length and diameter of the components to be coated.

Ron, Guy; Oort, Ron; Lee, Daniel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Intermediate-to-High-Rate Material Behavior - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... High-Strain-Rate & Shock Response of Lightweight Materials: How Dynamic Properties Influence the Future Design Landscape for ...

57

Multidimensional Signal Modulation Method for High Data-Rate ...  

Multidimensional Signal Modulation Method for High Data-Rate Transmission Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

58

Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights rss feed Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate LaserX-ray Methodologies FEBRUARY 11, 2012 Bookmark and Share X-ray absorption, emission...

59

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates ...  

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates ... chloroform and casting the solution onto a stainless steel mesh cur- ... Thermotron Industries, Inc. .

60

The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy?s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

Hunter, S. R. [ORNL] [ORNL; Daniel, A. [Southwire Company] [Southwire Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High Temperature Fatigue Life of Coated and Uncoated Valve ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Properties, Processing, and Performance of Steels and Ni-Based Alloys for Advanced Steam Conditions. Presentation Title, High Temperature ...

63

Titania Coated Silica Microspheres for High Efficiency Dye ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These microspheres, if used in DSSCs, can boost the efficiency of solar cell ... In- situ Characterization of Intercalation-induced Damage of High Purity Graphite ...

64

Progress Toward Developing a Durable High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing the operating temperature of parabolic trough solar fields from 400 C to >450 C will increase their efficiency and reduce the cost of electricity. Current coatings do not have the stability and performance necessary to move to higher operating temperatures. The objective is to develop new, more efficient selective coatings with both high solar absoprtance ({alpha} > 0.96) and low thermal emittance ({var_epsilon} < 0.07) that are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H. W.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High data-rate atom interferometer for measuring acceleration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a high data-rate light-pulse atom interferometer for measuring acceleration. The device is optimized to operate at rates between 50 Hz to 330 Hz with sensitivities of 0.57{mu}g/{radical}(Hz) to 36.7{mu}g/{radical}(Hz), respectively. Our method offers a dramatic increase in data rate and demonstrates a path to applications in highly dynamic environments. The performance of the device can largely be attributed to the high recapture efficiency of atoms from one interferometer measurement cycle to another.

McGuinness, Hayden J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Rakholia, Akash V.; Biedermann, Grant W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87131 (United States)

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films prepared by metal catalytic etching of silicon wafers and pyrolyzing of carbon aerogel were used for lithium-ion battery anodes. The films exhibited an excellent first discharge capacity of 3344 ? mAh ? g ? 1 with a Coulombic efficiency of 84% at a rate of 150 ? mA ? g ? 1 between 2 and 0.02 V and a significantly enhanced cycling performance

Rui Huang; Xing Fan; Wanci Shen; Jing Zhu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate Since FY2012, SSRL is now scheduling three to four three-day periods each year dedicated to running SPEAR3 in hybrid...

69

Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for Highly Supercooled Cirrus Cloud Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mixed-phase hydrometer growth model has been applied to determining the nucleation mode and rate responsible for the glaciation of a highly supercooled liquid cloud studied jointly by ground-based polarization lidar and aircraft in situ probes. ...

Kenneth Sassen; Gregory C. Dodd

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High Rate Resistive Plate Chamber for LHC detector upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detectors in the LHC experiments has prevented the use of such detectors in the high rate regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. One alternative to these detectors are RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates ($10^{10} {\\rm \\Omega .cm}$), a beam test at DESY has shown that such detectors can operate at few thousand Hz/cm$^2$ with high efficiency(> 90%)

Y. Haddad; G. Grenier; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; S. Cauwenbergh

2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evolution of Massive Protostars with High Accretion Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of massive stars by accretion requires a high accretion rate of > 10^-4 M_sun/yr to overcome the radiation pressure barrier of the forming stars. Here, we study evolution of protostars accreting at such high rates, by solving the structure of the central star and the inner accreting envelope simultaneously. The protostellar evolution is followed starting from small initial cores until their arrival at the stage of the Zero-Age Main Sequence (ZAMS) stars. An emphasis is put on evolutionary features different from those with a low accretion rate of 10^-5 M_sun/yr, which is presumed in the standard scenario for low-mass star formation. With the high accretion rate of 10^-3 M_sun/yr, the protostellar radius becomes very large and exceeds 100 R_sun. It is not until the stellar mass reaches 40 M_sun that hydrogen burning begins and the protostar reaches the ZAMS phase, and this ZAMS arrival mass increases with the accretion rate. At a very high accretion rate of > 3 x 10^-3 M_sun/yr, the total luminosity of the protostar becomes so high that the resultant radiation pressure inhibits the growth of the protostars under steady accretion before reaching the ZAMS stage. Therefore, the evolution under the critical accretion rate 3 x 10^-3 M_sun/yr gives the upper mass limit of possible pre-main-sequence stars at 60 M_sun. The upper mass limit of MS stars is also set by the radiation pressure onto the dusty envelope under the same accretion rate at 250 M_sun. We also propose that the central source enshrouded in the Orion KL/BN nebula has effective temperature and luminosity consistent with our model, and is a possible candidate for such protostars growing under the high accretion rate. (abridged)

Takashi Hosokawa; Kazuyuki Omukai

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development, Processing, and Testing of High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant HVOF Coatings  

SciTech Connect

New amorphous-metal and ceramic coatings applied by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process may reduce the waste package materials cost of the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository by over $4 billion (cost reduction of 27 to 42%). Two critical requirements that have been determined from design analysis are protection in brines that may evolve from the evaporative concentration of pore waters and protection for waste package welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Our efforts are directed towards producing and evaluating these high-performance coatings for the development of lower cost waste packages, and will leverage a cost-effective collaboration with DARPA for applications involving marine corrosion.

Farmer, J; Wong, F; Haslam, J; Estill, J; Branagan, D; Yang, N; Blue, C

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings  

SciTech Connect

New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Accelerated crevice corrosion tests are now being conducted to intentionally induce crevice corrosion, and to determine those environmental conditions where such localized attack occurs. Such materials are extremely hard, and provide enhanced resistance to abrasion and gouges (stress risers) from backfill operations, and possibly even tunnel boring. The hardness of Type 316L Stainless Steel is approximately 150 VHN, that of Alloy C-22 is approximately 250 VHN, and that of HVOF SAM2X5 ranges from 1100-1300 VHN. These new materials provide a viable coating option for repository engineers. SAM2X5 and SAM1651 coatings can be applied with thermal spray processes without any significant loss of corrosion resistance. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying. Containers for the transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) with corrosion resistant coatings are envisioned. For example, an enhanced multi-purpose container (MPC) could be made with such coatings, leveraging existing experience in the fabrication of such containers. These coating materials could be used to protect the final closure weld on SNF/HLW disposal containers, eliminate need for stress mitigation. Integral drip shield could be produced by directly spraying it onto the disposal container, thereby eliminating the need for an expensive titanium drip shield. In specific areas where crevice corrosion is anticipated, such as the contact point between the disposal container and pallet, HVOF coatings could be used to buildup thickness, thereby selectively adding corrosion life where it is needed. Both SAM2X5 & SAM1651 have high boron content which enable them to absorb neutrons and therefore be used for criticality control in baskets. Alloy C-22 and 316L have no neutron absorber, and cannot be used for such functions. Borated stainless steel and G

Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-speed real-time multi-rate simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research has focused on developing techniques that use digital signal processors (DSPs) and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to support real-time simulation with frame times of a few microseconds or less. These techniques can be used ... Keywords: FPGA, distributed, high-speed, multi-rate, real-time

Roy Crosbie; Dale Word; John Zenor; Richard Bednar; Wilfred Ghonsalves; Narain Hingorani

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Design considerations for high-data-rate chip interconnect systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, data rates for electrical interconnects in interchip communications systems have experienced a dramatic increase from <1 Gb/s to 10 Gb/s and beyond to keep up with ever increasing demands for more I/O bandwidth from modern high-capacity ...

Troy Beukema

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Development of UV-LED Phosphor Coatings for High Efficiency Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The University of Georgia, in collaboration with GE Global Research, is investigating the relevant quenching mechanism of phosphor coatings used in white light devices based on UV LEDs in a focused eighteen month program. The final goal is the design of high-efficacy white UV-LEDs through improved and optimized phosphor coatings. At the end of the first year, we have reached a fundamental understanding of quenching processes in UV-LED phosphors and have observed severe quenching in standard devices under extreme operating conditions. Relationships are being established that describe the performance of the phosphor as a function of photon flux, temperature, and phosphor composition. These relationships will provide a road map for the design of efficient white light LEDs during the final six months of the project.

U. Happek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a triple cell showing 10.7% stable efficiency. Figure 4-1 Schematic diagram of the Hot Wire CVD deposition. Task 7: High-rate deposition of a-Si based solar cells We have conducted extensive research using a hot1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual

Deng, Xunming

79

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007). R. Chistyakov, “High deposition rate sputtering,” USD. M. Mihut, and S. L. Rohde, Rate enhancement in high powerand often reduced normalized rates, it will find application

Anders, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

Sarin, V.K.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comparative Studies on C-coated and Uncoated LiFePO4 Cycling at Various Rates and Temperatures using Synchrotron Based in situ X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural changes of LiFePO{sub 4} and C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} during charging at various C-rates and temperatures are investigated using synchrotron based in situ X-ray diffraction technique. The XRD patterns collected during cycling show the structural evidence of the positive effects of carbon coating on LiFePO{sub 4} for the electrochemical performance improvements at different temperatures, especially at low temperatures. At -10 C, the C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} shows comparable capacities with the sample cycled at room temperature when cycled at C/5 rate with a slight shift of the plateau to a higher voltage during charging. The in situ XRD patterns collected simultaneously show a complete phase transformation from triphylite to heterosite. At -20 C, the C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} delivers 55.6% of its theoretical capacities at C/5 rate. However, the plateau in the charging curve becomes sloppy and shifts to a higher voltage. The in situ XRD patterns show that the phase transformation from triphylite to heterosite is not completed when charged to 4.5 V due to the larger polarization when charged at -20 C.

H Shin; K Nam; W Chang; B Cho; W Yoon; X Yang; K Chung

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electrochemical cell with high discharge/charge rate capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fully charged positive electrode composition for an electrochemical cell includes FeS/sub 2/ and NiS/sub 2/ in about equal molar amounts along with about 2 to 20 mole % of the reaction product Li/sub 2/S. Through selection of appropriate electrolyte compositions, high power output or low operating temperatures can be obtained. The cell includes a substantially constant electrode impedance through most of its charge and discharge range. Exceptionally high discharge rates and overcharge protection are obtainable through use of the inventive electrode composition.

Redey, L.

1986-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Gamma Ray Burst Rate at High Photon Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra exhibit high energy tails with the highest photon energy detected at 18 GeV. The spectral slope of the high-energy tails is sufficiently flat in nu F_nu to consider the possibility of their detection at still higher energies. We calculate how many bursts can reasonably be expected above a given energy threshold for a cosmological distribution of bursts satisfying the observed apparent brightness distribution. The crucial point is that the gamma-ray absorption by pair production in the intergalactic diffuse radiation field eliminates bursts from beyond the gamma-ray horizon tau ~ 1, thus drastically reducing the number of bursts at high energies. Our results are consistent with the non-detection of bursts by current experiments in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. For the earth-bound detector array MILAGRO, we predict a maximal GRB rate of ~ 10 events per year. The Whipple Observatory can detect, under favorable conditions, ~1 event per year. The event rate for the HEGRA array is ~ 0.01 per year. Detection of significantly higher rates of bursts would severely challenge cosmological burst scenarios.

Karl Mannheim; Dieter Hartmann; Burkhardt Funk

1996-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

STANFORD IN-SITU HIGH RATE YBCO PROCESS: TRANSFER TO METAL TAPES AND PROCESS SCALE UP  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The materials science understanding of high rate low cost processes for Coated Conductor will benefit the application to power utilities for low loss energy transportation and power generation as well for DOD applications. The research in this program investigated several materials processing approaches that are new and original, and are not being investigated elsewhere. This work added to the understanding of the material science of high rate PVD growth of HTSC YBCO assisted by a liquid phase. A new process discovered uses amorphous glassy precursors which can be made at high rate under flexible conditions of temperature and oxygen, and later brought to conditions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature for rapid conversion to YBCO superconductor. Good critical current densities were found, but further effort is needed to optimize the vortex pinning using known artificial inclusions. A new discovery of the physics and materials science of vortex pinning in the HTSC system using Sm in place of Y came at growth at unusually low oxygen pressure resulting in clusters of a low or non superconducting phase within the nominal high temperature phase. The driving force for this during growth is new physics, perhaps due to the low oxygen. This has the potential for high current in large magnetic fields at low cost, applicable to motors, generators and transformers. The technical demands of this project were the motivation for the development of instrumentation that could be essential to eventual process scale up. These include atomic absorption based on tunable diode lasers for remote monitoring and control of evaporation sources (developed under DARPA support), and the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectivity (FTIR) for aid in the synthesis of complex thin film materials (purchased by a DURIP-AFOSR grant).

Malcolm R. Beasley; Robert H.Hammond

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High rate 4. pi. beta. -. gamma. coincidence counting system  

SciTech Connect

A high count rate 4..pi.. ..beta..-..gamma.. coincidence counting system for the determination of absolute disintegration rates of short half-life radionuclides is described. With this system the dead time per pulse is minimized by not stretching any pulses beyond the width necessary to satisfy overlap coincidence requirements. The equations used to correct for the ..beta.., ..gamma.., and coincidence channel dead times and for accidental coincidences are presented but not rigorously developed. Experimental results are presented for a decaying source of /sup 56/Mn initially at 2 x 10/sup 6/ d/s and a set of /sup 60/Co sources of accurately known source strengths varying from 10/sup 3/ to 2 x 10/sup 6/ d/s. A check of the accidental coincidence equation for the case of two independent sources with varying source strengths is presented.

Johnson, L.O.; Gehrke, R.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

Hanson, James A. (Madison, WI); Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coatings to Prevent Diffusion of Fission Products into Turbine Materials Used in High Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Electric Genera ting Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes EPRI activities relating to turbine blade coatings to prevent diffusion of fission products into turbine materials used in high temperature gas cooled nuclear electric generating stations. Specifically, this report describes activities that have identified candidate coatings and methodologies for evaluating the effectiveness of these coatings.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

High-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide alloys and coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr alloy doped with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed improved scale adhesion relative to a dispersion-free form of the same composition. However, doping with CeO{sub 2} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detrimental to oxidation behavior. A study of weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings showed that, those with sufficiently high aluminum concentrations had sulfidation resistance in H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar at 800 C equivalent to the most resistant bulk iron aluminides. These corrosion-resistant coatings have the potential to be effective barriers in high-temperature sulfidizing environments provided the appropriate combinations of filler metal, process parameters, and substrate are used to produce adequate aluminum concentrations and minimal chromium contents. Exposures in an oxidizing/sulfidizing environment containing varying amounts of HCI at 450 and 550 C showed that Fe{sub 3}Al alloys had good corrosion resistance.

Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Saunders, S.R.J. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing  

SciTech Connect

High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a production tool and process. The developed technique will have an reducing impact on product pricing. As efficiency has a substantial impact on the economics of solar cell production due to the high material cost content; in essence, improved efficiency through cost-effective texturing reduces the material cost component since the product is priced in terms of $/W. The project is a collaboration between Fraunhofer USA, Inc. and a c-Si PV manufacturer.

Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Searching for optimal mitigation geometries for laser resistant multilayer high reflector coatings  

SciTech Connect

Growing laser damage sites on multilayer high reflector coatings can limit mirror performance. One of the strategies to improve laser damage resistance is to replace the growing damage sites with pre-designed benign mitigation structures. By mitigating the weakest site on the optic, the large aperture mirror will have a laser resistance comparable to the intrinsic value of the multilayer coating. To determine the optimal mitigation geometry, the finite difference time domain method (FDTD) was used to quantify the electric-field intensification within the multilayer, at the presence of different conical pits. We find that the field intensification induced by the mitigation pit is strongly dependent on the polarization and the angle of incidence (AOI) of the incoming wave. Therefore the optimal mitigation conical pit geometry is application specific. Furthermore, our simulation also illustrates an alternative means to achieve an optimal mitigation structure by matching the cone angle of the structure with the AOI of the incoming wave, except for the p-polarization wave at a range of incident angles between 30{sup o} and 45{sup o}.

Qiu, S R; Wolfe, J E; Monterrosa, A M; Feit, M D; Pistor, T V; STolz, C J

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings for use in high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of iron-aluminide weld overlay coatings for high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation resistance critically depends on the determination of the aluminum concentration range for which good corrosion behavior and weldability coexist. This study demonstrated that a sound weld overlay composition with about 30 at.% Al has relatively low corrosion rates in a highly aggressive oxidizing/sulfidizing (H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar) environment at 800 C. Its corrosion resistance was superior to alloys with compositions like that of type 310 stainless steel and Fecralloy. The results with this overlay composition can be explained on the basis of what is known about the effects of variations in aluminum and chromium concentrations on high-temperature oxidation/sulfidation from studies with bulk iron aluminides. While higher aluminum concentrations are even better for long-term corrosion resistance, the ability to reliably produce weld overlays of such compositions without hydrogen cracking is problematical and is the subject of continuing development.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lipon Coatings for High Voltage and High Temperature Li-Ion ...  

use of high-capacity and high-voltage cathode materials, but charging to voltages approaching 4.5-5V invariably causes rapid loss of capacity with cycling.

100

The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly.

Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C.; McMahon, R.R.; Haire, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Novel Neutron Detector for High Rate Imaging Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II period performance was May 30, 2002 through May 29, 2004. This development effort was successfully completed within the period and budget allotted. The proposed design was successfully fabricated from B{sub 4}C-coated aluminum and copper film, slit and wound to form 4 mm diameter straws, cut to 100 cm in length, and threaded with resistive anode wires (20 {micro}m in diameter). This paper reports testing done with two 50-straw detector modules at the reactor of the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University (TAMU NSC).

Lacy, Jeffrey, L.

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

010- High Temperature Mechanical Properties of CVD-SiC Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nuclear coated fuel particles is to maintain the strength of the whole particle. .... on Thermal Energy Storage Materials - Tris(Hydroxymethyl)Aminomethane ...

104

High-temperature oxidation of an alumina-coated Ni-base alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina coatings were applied to Ni-20Cr (wt%) using combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD). Combustion CVD is an open air deposition technique performed in a flame. The oxidation kinetics of coated and uncoated specimens were measured by isothermal oxidation tests carried out in pure flowing air at temperatures of 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 C. The alumina coatings reduced the oxidation kinetics at all temperatures. The morphologies and compositions of the alumina coatings were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Hendrick, M.R.; Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

106

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

107

ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Windsor, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Hiller, Larry J. (Livermore, CA); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

110

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North ...

111

Predicting Crack Growth Rate of Pipeline Steel in High Ph ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling Internal Corrosion Rates of Pipelines which Carry Wet or Dry Natural Gas · Modeling Oxidation-Limited Lifetime of Alumina- and Chromia-Forming ...

112

Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig7.jpg (43335 bytes) Source...

114

Studies of the CMS tracker at high trigger rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the latter months of 2006 and the first half of 2007, the CMS Tracker was assembled and operated at the Tracker Integration Facility at CERN. During this period the performance of the tracker at trigger rates up to ...

Chan, M.

115

Design and analysis of a high-rate acoustic link for underwater video transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high bit rate acoustic link for underwater video transmission is examined. Currently, encoding standards support video transmission at bit rates as low as 64 kbps. While this rate is still above the limit of commercially ...

Pelekanakis, Konstantinos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal efficiencies of 54% have been demonstrated by single cylinder engine testing of advanced diesel engine concepts developed under Department of Energy funding. In order for these concept engines to be commercially viable, cost effective and durable systems for insulating the piston, head, ports and exhaust manifolds will be required. The application and development of new materials such as thick thermal barrier coating systems will be key to insulating these components. Development of test methods to rapidly evaluate the durability of coating systems without expensive engine testing is a major objective of current work. In addition, a novel, low cost method for producing thermal barrier coated pistons without final machining of the coating has been developed.

M. B. Beardsley; P. G. Happoldt; K.C. Kelley; E. F. Rejda; D. F. Socie

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

High-Tc Superconducting Thin- and Thick-Film-Based Coated Conductors for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the first epitaxial films of YBCO with high Tc were grown nearly 20 years ago, the understanding and control of the nanostructures responsible for the dissipation-free electrical current transport in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is quite recent. In the last six to seven years, major advances have occurred in the fundamental investigation of low angle grain boundaries, flux-pinning phenomena, growth mode, and atomic-level defect structures of HTS epitaxial films. As a consequence, it has been possible to map and even engineer to some extent the performance of HTS coatings in large regions of the operating H, T, J phase space. With such progress, the future of high temperature superconducting wires looks increasingly promising despite the tremendous challenges offered by these brittle and anisotropic materials. Nevertheless, further performance improvements are necessary for the superconducting technology to become cost-competitive against copper wires and ultimately succeed in revolutionizing the transmission of electricity. This can be achieved by further diminishing the gap between theoretical and experimental values of the critical current density Jc, and/or increasing the thickness of the superconductive layer as much as possible without degrading performance. In addition, further progress in controlling extrinsic and/or intrinsic nano-sized defects within the films is necessary to significantly reduce the anisotropic response of HTS and obtain a nearly constant dependence of the critical current on the magnetic field orientation, which is considered crucial for power applications. This chapter is a review of the challenges still present in the area of superconducting film processing for HTS wires and the approaches currently employed to address them.

Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electrical resistance measurements of highly inhibited SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of oxidation damage at 900'C of highly inhibited, SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates on shear modulus, mass loss, and electrical resistance are studied. The approach taken enabled the interpretation of the shear modulus and electrical resistance values to the mass loss. In-situ electrical resistance measurements are taken at 900'C and shear modulus measurements are obtained at room temperature prior to and following oxidation. Initial oxidation damage is incurred preferentially along both transverse and longitudinal fiber bundles as well as creating some matrix cracks. Mass loss results revealed that the oxidation reaction is diffusion controlled at this temperature. The shear modulus decreased whereas the electrical resistance increased with increasing exposure time. Electrical resistance calculations based on the experimental results showed that the electrical resistance is a matrix dominated property. The analytical simulations used in conjunction with experimental data provided the relationships between shear modulus, electrical resistance, and mass loss. Examples are given which show the correlation of mass loss to both the electrical resistance and the shear modulus. Analytical predictions from the electrical resistance simulations are shown to predict the shear modulus for different oxidation times within 5% of experimental values.

Parker, Paul Albert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at High Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the rates of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) over a wide range of redshifts using a complete sample from the IfA Deep Survey. This sample of more than 100 SNIa is the largest set ever collected from a single survey, and therefore uniquely powerful for a detailed supernova rate (SNR) calculation. Measurements of the SNR as a function of cosmological time offer a glimpse into the relationship between the star formation rate (SFR) and Type Ia SNR, and may provide evidence for the progenitor pathway. We observe a progressively increasing Type Ia SNR between redshifts z~0.3-0.8. The Type Ia SNR measurements are consistent with a short time delay (t~1 Gyr) with respect to the SFR, indicating a fairly prompt evolution of SNIa progenitor systems. We derive a best-fit value of SFR/SNR 580 h_70^(-2) M_solar/SNIa for the conversion factor between star formation and SNIa rates, as determined for a delay time of t~1 Gyr between the SFR and the Type Ia SNR. More complete measurements of the Type Ia SNR at z>1 are necessary to conclusively determine the SFR--SNR relationship and constrain SNIa evolutionary pathways.

Brian J. Barris; John L. Tonry

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

Schneibel, Joachim H [ORNL; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Impact of High School Curriculum on College Enrollment Rates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines how the mandated curriculum, specifically, "rigorous" curriculum, is associated with the percentage of a high school's graduating class that chooses to enroll… (more)

Blosveren, Kate R.

123

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) with Silicon-Carbide-Matrix Coated-Particle Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FHR is a new reactor concept that uses coated-particle fuel and a low-pressure liquid-salt coolant. Its neutronics are similar to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The power density is 5 to 10 times higher because of the superior cooling properties of liquids versus gases. The leading candidate coolant salt is a mixture of {sup 7}LiF and BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe) possessing a boiling point above 1300 C and the figure of merit {rho}C{sub p} (volumetric heat capacity) for the salt slightly superior to water. Studies are underway to define a near-term base-line concept while understanding longer-term options. Near-term options use graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel where the graphite is both a structural component and the primary neutron moderator. It is the same basic fuel used in HTGRs. The fuel can take several geometric forms with a pebble bed being the leading contender. Recent work on silicon-carbide-matrix (SiCm) coated-particle fuel may create a second longer-term fuel option. SiCm coated-particle fuels are currently being investigated for use in light-water reactors. The replacement of the graphite matrix with a SiCm creates a new family of fuels. The first motivation behind the effort is to take advantage of the superior radiation resistance of SiC compared to graphite in order to provide a stable matrix for hosting coated fuel particles. The second motivation is a much more rugged fuel under accident, repository, and other conditions.

Forsberg, C. W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method for synthesis of high T.sub.c superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J.sub.c.

Gao, Wei (Somerville, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method for synthesis of high T[sub c] superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J[sub c].

Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

High rates of nonbreeding adult bald eagles in southeastern Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Present knowledge of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) demography is derived primarily from populations in environments that have been drastically altered by man. Most reproductive studies were done in the 1960's and 1970's when chemical toxins were inhibiting bald eagle productivity. Earlier, the removal of old-growth forests and decimation of anadromous fish runs by Euro-Americans may have greatly reduced bald eagle abundance from presettlement levels. Historical trends in this species are of interest because fundamental differences may exist between populations in pristine and man-altered environments. One difference may be breeding rate. Surpluses of nonbreeding adult bald eagles during the nesting season are rarely mentioned in the literature. Most surveys of reproductive success focus exclusively on eagles at nest sites, which assumes nearly all adults attempt to breed each year. The authors report that a majority of adults in the relatively pristine habitats of southeastern Alaska do not breed annually. This finding is important because if surpluses of non-breeding adults are a natural feature of the population, then hypotheses on density dependent population regulation and the evolution of delayed maturation are suggested. If, on the other hand, the abundance of nonbreeders is an artifact of recent environmental perturbations, serious population declines may occur in southeastern Alaska.

Hansen, A.J.; Hodges, J.I. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Protective Coatings Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes assessments of ceramic and thermal spray coatings that have advanced significantly or recently been marketed for use in the utility boiler industry to reduce slagging, mitigate fireside corrosion and potentially, circumferential cracking due to cyclic temperature variations. These innovations promise to enhance coating quality as well as reduce time and labor required to protect large areas of the boiler waterwalls. Coatings may also enable plants to improve production rates; thereb...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content-Fueled Turbines - University of California, Irvine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content-Fueled Turbines-University of California, Irvine Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and components in the hot section of gas turbines are degraded by coal-derived high hydrogen content (HHC) synthesis gas (syngas). In this project the University of California, Irvine (UCI) will provide an improved mechanistic understanding of the degradation of critical turbine system materials in HHC-fueled

130

Program on Technology Innovation: Liquid Precursor High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray Process for Making Fine Structured and Highly Bonded Alloy Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray processes are used in applications requiring the highest density and adhesion strength, which is not achievable in most other thermal spray processes. Like other thermal spray processes, however, a normal HVOF process is not able to apply fine powders less than 10m via a conventional powder feeder like other thermal spray processes. The advantages of using smaller nano-sized particles in a HVOF process include uniform coating, uniform microstructure, higher ...

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cyclability Study of Si/TiN/C Composite Anode with High Rate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cyclability Study of Si/TiN/C Composite Anode with High Rate Capability for Lithium-Ion Batteries. Author(s), Jiguo Tu, Shuqiang Jiao, ...

133

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys  

SciTech Connect

High interfacial stresses and coating failure are expected when a hard coating protects a more-compliant substrate in applications involving high-stress wear contact. Assuming that small differences in stiffness (or modulus) between the coating and substrate are required for a wear-resistant coating in such applications, four approaches have been taken to develop such coatings for cobalt-base alloys. Hardness, scratch adhesion, and nano-indentation testing identified the most promising candidates for cobalt-base alloys: A thin coating with hard Cr{sub 2}N and less-stiff Cr-N(ss) layers; a thick, four-layered coating with a 4{mu}m inner layer of Cr-N(ss)/ 1 {mu}m layer of Cr{sub 2}N/4 {micro}m layer of Cr-N(ss)/1 {micro} outer layer of Cr{sub 2}N; a duplex approach of ion nitriding to harden the subsurface,followed by application of a dual-layered Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating; and ion nitriding alone. The low scratch adhesion values and high modulus/hardness values indicate that ZrN, TiN, and plasma carburized coatings represent less beneficial approaches. Two different cobalt-base alloys were studied in this work: Haynes 25 and Stellite 3 (Stoody Deloro Stellite). Based on weight change, profilometry measurements, and metallographic and SEM examinations after four-ball wear testing, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/CrN(ss) coated coupons exhibited a significantly lower wear rate than the uncoated Haynes 25 coupons. Of greater importance, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coatings were adherent on the Stellite 3 intermediate balls and Haynes 25 cups, and prevented the wear of the cobalt-base substrate. based on these results, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating was the best coating candidate, and this coating could result in a reduced wear rate and less cobalt wear debris. The ion nitrided coupons exhibited slightly higher wear than the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coated coupons, while the wear of the thin duplex coated coupons was the highest. However, the nitride layer was adherent and protected the Haynes 25 substrate. Therefore, modification of the ion nitriding conditions or surface lapping after nitriding are approaches that may improve the wear resistance of the ion nitriding and duplex coatings.

Cockeram, B.V.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Analog Readout and Analysis Software for the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometers are needed for Safeguards applications such as spent fuel assay and uranium hexafluoride cylinder verification. In addition, these spectrometers would be applicable to other high-rate applications such as non-destructive assay of nuclear materials using nuclear resonance fluorescence. Count-rate limitations of today's HPGe technologies, however, lead to concessions in their use and reduction in their efficacy. Large-volume, very high-rate HPGe spectrometers are needed to enable a new generation of nondestructive assay systems. The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project is developing HPGe spectrometer systems capable of operating at unprecedented rates, 10 to 100 times those available today. This report documents current status of developments in the analog electronics and analysis software.

Fast, James E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Evans, Allan T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Wood, Lynn S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2007 ... This brief article covers the uses of abradable coatings, their development and their function. Wear at high speed, effect of tip width and coating ...

137

RECENT PROGRESS IN FABRICATION OF HIGH-STRENGTH GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS BY OPTIMIZATION OF COATING PARAMETERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK A271 RECENT PROGRESS IN FABRICATION OF HIGH-STRENGTH GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS BY OPTIMIZATION OF COATING PARAMETERS. In this paper, the authors report the progress they have made in fabrication of high-strength thin-walled glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA. They have investigated a number of different parameters involved in making such shells. Optimization of hydrogen to hydrocarbon precursor flow has been observed to be critical in obtaining strong shells. They can routinely make high-strength shells of OMEGA size (900 {micro}m in diameter) with thicknesses in the range of 1.0 to 1.5 {micro}m. The permeabilities of these shells to various gases have been found to be as much as three times higher than those of lower strength shells. Run to run variability and other batch statistics are discussed.

NIKROO, A; CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; PONTELANDOLFO, JM

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Benchmarking of the MIT High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel performance model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT has developed a Coated Particle Fuel Performance Model to study the behavior of TRISO nuclear fuels. The code, TIMCOAT, is designed to assess the mechanical and chemical condition of populations of coated particles and ...

Stawicki, Michael A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

SciTech Connect

In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

Luft, W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status of high-rate deposition technologies associated with amorphous silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. The report lists (1) deposition rates for a-Si:H films according to source and method and (2) efficiencies and other parameters of a-Si:H solar cells. Two main deposition source materials, silane and disilane, are discussed, as well as effects of boron doping. The effects of various deposition parameters on film characteristics and on deposition rate are presented, as well as the effects of annealing on high-deposition-rate films. Light-induced effects are also discussed. Finally, progress and problems in this field of study are summarized.

Luft, W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Competition among Life Insurance Companies: The Driving Force of High Policy Rates?,” Working Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the effect competition has on the decisions of life insurance companies. In particular, we are interested in the companies ’ choices of policy rates and investment strategies given that they have issued contracts with a minimum rate of return guarantee. Our modeling framework is a one-period Cournot model of duopoly. We find policy rates and investment strategies that sustain a Nash equilibrium. We compare the results to the cooperative solution, that is, the case where the companies operate as a monopoly company and share the profits. Our model illustrates how competition between companies drives companies to offer relatively high policy rates, in particular rates above the risk free rate of return. Special thanks to Peter Ove Christensen and Kristian Miltersen. Claus Munk, and Martin Skovgaard Hansen were highly appreciated.

Mette Hansen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14 Compositions of unmelted frit batches for high-temperature service silicate-based coatings...Sodium nitrate 5.0 4.0 4.4 . . . 3.8 . . . . . . Fluorspar 4.5 3.2 2.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . . . Tricobalt tetroxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.5 . . . . . . Nickel oxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.6 . . . . . . Manganese dioxide 1.8 . . . 1.1 . . . 1.1 . . . . . . Barium carbonate . . . . . . . . . 26.3 . . . 56.6 56.6...

144

Workshop: Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Saturday, October 22, 2011 - 8:30am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 In conjunction with the 2011 LCLS/SSRL User Meeting, SSRL and the APS will jointly host a two-day workshop focused on opportunities with short-pulse, high-repetition rate X-ray Science. The workshop will feature international speakers and panel experts presenting the scientific basis, preliminary results and future potential of high rep-rate picosecond x-rays beams from storage rings. The workshop will be broadly focused on topics in materials science, chemistry, biology and catalysis. The workshop agenda will also include presentations on accelerator operational modes, precision timing issues, detector challenges and the relation of storage ring science with

145

An implementation of a 5.25 GHz transceiver for high data rate wireless applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The desire for transmission of high data rate information across wireless channels has grown immensely over the past decade. Wireless devices available today including mobile phones, wireless local area networks (WLANs) ...

Matalon, Nir

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

High repetition rate mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with complete electric field control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in fully-stabilized mode-locked laser systems are enabling many applications, including optical arbitrary waveform generation (OAWG). In this thesis work, we describe the development of high repetition-rate ...

Sickler, Jason William, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nontoxic foul-release coatings  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at Daytona Beach, Florida. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced High-Temperature Reactor for Production of Electricity and Hydrogen: Molten-Salt-Coolant, Graphite-Coated-Particle-Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is to provide the very high temperatures necessary to enable low-cost (1) efficient thermochemical production of hydrogen and (2) efficient production of electricity. The proposed AHTR uses coated-particle graphite fuel similar to the fuel used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), such as the General Atomics gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). However, unlike the MHTGRs, the AHTR uses a molten salt coolant with a pool configuration, similar to that of the PRISM liquid metal reactor. A multi-reheat helium Brayton (gas-turbine) cycle, with efficiencies >50%, is used to produce electricity. This approach (1) minimizes requirements for new technology development and (2) results in an advanced reactor concept that operates at essentially ambient pressures and at very high temperatures. The low-pressure molten-salt coolant, with its high heat capacity and natural circulation heat transfer capability, creates the potential for (1) exceptionally robust safety (including passive decay-heat removal) and (2) allows scaling to large reactor sizes [{approx}1000 Mw(e)] with passive safety systems to provide the potential for improved economics.

Forsberg, C.W.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

A low temperature process of applying high strength metal coatings to a substrate and article produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method of applying a dense (about 99% of theoretical density) metal coating to a substrate using a converging/diverging nozzle to nebulize metal into a plume with uniform mass and thermal fluxes and a metal droplet size distribution of about 5--15 microns. Coatings may be deposited on substrates which thermally degrade at temperatures far below the melting point of the metals deposited thereon. Coated articles having strong mechanical bonds are also disclosed.

Ploger, S.A.; Watson, L.D.

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

SciTech Connect

Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to advance the knowledge of ceramic coatings for components in the hot gas-path of advanced, low-emission gas-fired turbine engines. The ceramic coating systems being studied by NDE include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades and combustor liners to allow hotter gas path temperatures and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Data provided by NDE methods will be used to: (a) provide data to assess reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages (c) track growth rates of defects during use in engines and (d) allow rational judgement for replace/repair/re-use decisions of components.

Sun, J. G. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

High performance hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells made at a high deposition rate by glow discharge of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The deposition rate, electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared from rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) diluted in helium have been measured. These films show excellent electrical and optical properties and, most importantly, a high deposition rate coupled with satisfactory solar cell application was realized for the first time. At a deposition rate of 11 A/s, 5.47% and 6.5% conversion efficiencies were obtained with a first trial of n-i-p type solar cells deposited on SnO/sub 2//ITO glass and metal substrates, respectively.

Ohashi, Y.; Kenne, J.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Spin coating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrogen generation rates in Savannah River Site high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste (HLW) is stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as alkaline, high-nitrate slurries in underground carbon steel tanks. Hydrogen is continuously generated in the waste tanks as a result of the radiolysis of water. Hydrogen generation rates have recently been measured in several waste tanks containing different types of waste. The measured rates ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 cubic feet per million Btu of decay heat. The measured rates are consistent with laboratory data which show that the hydrogen generation rate depends on the nitrate concentration and the decay heat content of the waste. Sampling at different locations indicated that the hydrogen is uniformly distributed radially within the tank.

Hobbs, D.T.; Norris, P.W.; Pucko, S.A.; Bibler, N.E.; Walker, D.D.; d'Entremont, P.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

High deposition rate preparation of amorphous silicon solar cells by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane diluted in helium (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6//He = 1/9) have been studied while systematically varying the film deposition rate. The properties and composition of the films were monitored by measuring the optical band gap, IR vibrational spectrum, dark conductivity, and the photoconductivity as a function of the deposition rate. The photoluminescence of the high deposition rate films gave a peak at 1.33 eV. These films, whose properties are rather similar to those of the conventional a-Si:H films prepared from monosilane, have been used to fabricate nip-type a-Si:H solar cells. At a deposition rate of 11 A/sec, a conversion efficiency of 6.86% was obtained. This high efficiency shows that disilane is applicable for mass production fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells.

Kenne, J.; Ohashi, Y.; Matsushita, T.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Deflagration Rate Measurements of Three Insensitive High Explosives: LLM-105, TATB, and DAAF  

SciTech Connect

The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105, DAAF and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. One DAAF formulation, two different formulations of LLM-105, and four formulations of TATB were studied; results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating DAAF and TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

Glascoe, E A; Maienschein, J L; Lorenz, K T; Tan, N; Koerner, J G

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

CONCEPTS FOR SMART PROTECTIVE HIGH-TEMPERATURE COATINGS P.F. Tortorelli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in oxidizing-sulfidizing and sulfidizing environments and in air/oxygen at very high temperatures.3 the formation of a protective borosilicate or silica layer that grows laterally to seal the remaining Mo

157

Development of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel chemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first portion of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the chemical environment in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO fuel particle. Fission product inventory versus burnup is calculated. Based on those ...

Diecker, Jane T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect

High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high rate, low temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be 5 performed at less than 100C, including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 at% fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of 10 refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within 15% of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

Stafford, B.L.; Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Nelson, A.J.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

Stafford, Byron L. (Arvada, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Nelson, Arthur J. (Longmont, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High-repetition-rate femtosecond optical parametric oscillator–amplifier system near 3 mm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultrafast laser system for the chemically important 3-mm spectral region has been constructed by means of noncritically phased-matched KTiOPO4 optical parametric gain elements. An optical parametric oscillator, synchronously pumped by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator, generates high-quality seed pulses for an optical parametric amplifier. The optical parametric amplifier, pumped by a high-repetition-rate Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier, amplifies the seed pulses by a factor of 520. Pulses with an energy of 550 nJ and a pulse width of 160 fs are produced at a 250-kHz repetition rate in the 3-mm region. 1.

Gary R. Holtom; Robert A. Crowell; X. Sunney Xie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A flexible high-rate USB2 data acquisition system for PET and SPECT imaging  

SciTech Connect

A new flexible data acquisition system has been developed to instrument gamma-ray imaging detectors designed by the Jefferson Lab Detector and Imaging Group. Hardware consists of 16-channel data acquisition modules installed on USB2 carrier boards. Carriers have been designed to accept one, two, and four modules. Application trigger rate and channel density determines the number of acquisition boards and readout computers used. Each channel has an independent trigger, gated integrator and a 2.5 MHz 12-bit ADC. Each module has an FPGA for analog control and signal processing. Processing includes a 5 ns 40-bit trigger time stamp and programmable triggering, gating, ADC timing, offset and gain correction, charge and pulse-width discrimination, sparsification, event counting, and event assembly. The carrier manages global triggering and transfers module data to a USB buffer. High-granularity time-stamped triggering is suitable for modular detectors. Time stamped events permit dynamic studies, complex offline event assembly, and high-rate distributed data acquisition. A sustained USB data rate of 20 Mbytes/s, a sustained trigger rate of 300 kHz for 32 channels, and a peak trigger rate of 2.5 MHz to FIFO memory were achieved. Different trigger, gating, processing, and event assembly techniques were explored. Target applications include >100 kHz coincidence rate PET detectors, dynamic SPECT detectors, miniature and portable gamma detectors for small-animal and clinical use.

J. Proffitt, W. Hammond, S. Majewski, V. Popov, R.R. Raylman, A.G. Weisenberger, R. Wojcik

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

High-repetition-rate femtosecond optical parametric oscillator based on periodically poled lithium niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-repetition-rate femtosecond optical parametric oscillator based on periodically poled lithium periodically poled lithium niobate is described. This optical parametric oscillator is continuously tunable American Institute of Physics. S0003-6951 97 04325-8 Periodically poled lithium niobate PPLN has emerged

Fejer, Martin M.

164

Battery-Supercapacitor Hybrid System for High-Rate Pulsed Load Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery-Supercapacitor Hybrid System for High-Rate Pulsed Load Applications Donghwa Shin, Younghyun layer capacitors, or simply supercapacitors, have extremely low internal resistance, and a battery-supercapacitor architecture comprising a simple parallel connection does not perform well when the supercapacitor capacity

Pedram, Massoud

165

Progress towards a low-cost high-speed real-time multi-rate simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research has focused on developing techniques that use field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to support real-time simulation with frame times of a few microseconds or less. These techniques can be used to simulate, for example, modern power electronic ... Keywords: FPGA, distributed, high-speed, multi-rate, real-time

John Zenor; Dale Word; Richard Bednar; Roy Crosbie; Narain Hingorani

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A method to quench and recharge avalanche photo diodes for use in high rate situations  

SciTech Connect

We present a new method of using Avalanche Photo Diodes (APDS) for low level light detection in Geiger mode in high rate situations such as those encountered at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The new technique is readily adaptable to implementation in CMOS VLSI.

Regan, T.O.; Fenker, H.C.; Thomas, J. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Oliver, J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). High Energy Physics Lab.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A ?/4-shifted differential 8PSSK modulation for high data rate WBAN system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new modulation scheme for high data rate WBAN in-body communication systems. We propose a ?/4-shifted differential 8-PSSK scheme that includes its architectures for the transmitter and receiver. Simulation results are presented ... Keywords: PSSK, QPSK, WBAN, component

Jung-Yeol Oh; Jae-Hwan Kim; Hyung-Soo Lee; Jae-Young Kim

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines  

SciTech Connect

In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Vapor-Phase-Deposited Organosilane Coatings as "Hardening" Agents for High-Peak-Power Laser Optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayer-dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings are used in high-power laser systems to compress laser-energy pulses. The peak power deliverable on target for these short-pulse petawatt class systems is limited by the laser-damage resistance of the optical components in the system, especially the MLD gratings. Recent experiments in our laboratory have shown that vapor treatment of MLD gratings at room temperature with organosilanes such as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) produces an increase in their damage threshold as compared to uncoated MLD grating control samples.

Marshall, K.L.; Culakova, Z.; Ashe, B.; Giacofei, C.; Rigatti, A.L.; Kessler, T.J.; Schmid, A.W.; Oliver, J.B.; Kozlov, A.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

On the oxidation of high-temperature alloys, and its role in failure of thermal barrier coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are applied to superalloy turbine blades to provide thermal insulation and oxidation protection. A TBC system consists of (a) an outer oxide layer that imparts thermal insulation, and ...

Loeffel, Kaspar Andreas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bioactive Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Tailoring the Surface Properties of Parylene Biocompatible Coating: Martina Cihova1; Quoc Nguyen2; Varshni Singh2; 1Karlsruhe Institute of ...

172

Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-structured vanadium oxide (V2O5) is fabricated via facile thermal-decomposition of a vanadium precursor and vanadyl oxalate produced by reacting micro-sized V2O5 with oxalic acid. The V2O5 nanorods produced by this method exhibit much better electrochemical performance than commercial micro-sized V2O5. The optimized-nanorod electrodes with a high density of (001) planar defects give the best specific discharge capacities of 270 mAh g-1 at C/2 (147 mA g-1) coupled with good cycle stability with only 0.32% fading per cycle. Even at a high rate of 4C (1176 mA g-1), the nanorod electrode still delivers 198 mAh g-1. These results suggest that the nanostructured V2O5 is a good cathode for high-rate, lithium-ion battery applications.

Pan, Anqiang; Zhang, Jiguang; Nie, Zimin; Cao, Guozhong H.; Arey, Bruce W.; Li, Guosheng; Liang, Shu-quan; Liu, Jun

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

High-Strain-Rate Forming of Aluminum and Steel Sheets for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

The formability of aluminum alloy AA5182-O and DP600 steel sheets at high-strain-rates was investigated using an electrohydraulic forming (EHF) setup. Test sheets, ~150 mm diameter x 1 mm thick, were clamped around their circumference and subjected to a pressure-pulse (several 100 ?s duration) generated by a high-energy (up to ~34 kJ) under-water electrical discharge. The real-time strain and strain-rate of the deforming sheets were quantified by the digital image correlation (DIC) technique using a pair of high-speed cameras (~15 ?s per frame). Strain-rate amplification was observed when the sheets were deformed into a conical die, with the maximum in-plane strain-rate and strain for aluminum measured as ~1200 /s and ~0.2, respectively. The deformation behavior of the sheets was modeled using ABAQUS/finite element explicit code and better correlation, between the predicted and the experimental sheet deformation behavior, was observed when an alternate pressure-profile was used instead of the one available from the literature.

Rohatgi, Aashish; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Soulami, Ayoub; Davies, Richard W.; Smith, Mark T.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

Neev, Joseph (Laguna Beach, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Glinsky, Michael E. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Rubenchik, Alexander M. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Identifying the effect of monetary policy shocks on exchange rates using high-frequency data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new approach to identifying the effects of monetary policy shocks in an international vector autoregression.Using high-frequency data on the prices of Fed Funds futures contracts,we measure the impact of the surprise component of the FOMC-day Federal Reserve policy decision on financial variables, such as the exchange rate and the foreign interest rate. We show how this information can be used to achieve identification without having to make the usual strong assumption of a recursive ordering.

Jon Faust; John H. Rogers; Eric Swanson; Jonathan H. Wright

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

METAL COATING BATHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

Robinson, J.W.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations for high-field electron transport  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that in the framework of balance-equation approach, the coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations can be used as a complete set of equations to determine the high-field transport of semiconductors in both strong and weak electron-electron interaction limits. We call to attention that the occupation rate equation conserves the total particle number and maintains the energy balance of the relative electron system, and there is no need to introduce any other term in it. The addition of an energy-drift term in the particle-occupation rate equation [Phys. Rev. B 71, 195205 (2005)] is physically inadequate for the violation of the total particle-number conservation and the energy balance. It may lead to a substantial unphysical increase of the total particle number by the application of a dc electric field.

Lei, X. L. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes  

SciTech Connect

High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length {proportional_to}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=(1.90{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1705{+-}56 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=(1.86{+-}0.24) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1513{+-}123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=(2.02{+-}0.19) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1799{+-}96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=(2.55{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1824{+-}114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779}exp(97 K/T)cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=3.169 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.679}exp(119 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148}exp(536 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325}exp(602 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three reactions in order to provide reliable extrapolations of the rate constants from 250-2000 K. The results of the theoretical predictions for OH + cyclohexane and OH + methylcyclopentane were sufficient to make a theoretical prediction for OH + methylcyclohexane. The present recommended rate expressions for OH with cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane, give rate constants that are 15-25% higher (over the T-range 800-1300 K) than the rate constants utilized in recent modeling efforts aimed at addressing the oxidation of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The current measurements reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for the primary cycloalkane consumption channel in a high temperature oxidation environment. (author)

Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J.V. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, D-193, Bldg. 200, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes.  

SciTech Connect

High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length 4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm3 molecule-1 s-1, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = (1.90 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1705 {+-} 156 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = (1.86 {+-} 0.24) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1513 {+-} 123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = (2.02 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1799 {+-} 96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = (2.55 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1824 {+-} 114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = 1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779} exp(97 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = 3.169 x 10{sup -16} T{sup 1.679} exp(119 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = 6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148} exp(536 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = 2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325} exp(602 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three reactions in order to provide reliable extrapolations of the rate constants from 250-2000 K. The results of the theoretical predictions for OH + cyclohexane and OH + methylcyclopentane were sufficient to make a theoretical prediction for OH + methylcyclohexane. The present recommended rate expressions for OH with cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane, give rate constants that are 15-25% higher (over the T-range 800-1300 K) than the rate constants utilized in recent modeling efforts aimed at addressing the oxidation of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The current measurements reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for the primary cycloalkane consumption channel in a high temperature oxidation environment.

Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

TWINNING AND DYNAMIC STRENGTH OF COPPER DURING HIGH?RATE STRAIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of a study of the conditions under which microstructural changes involving the formation of complex bi?periodic twin structures occurs in copper during shock wave and high strain rate (??>10 7 ? s ?1 ) shock?less loading. We have observed that the formation of these bi?periodic twin structures results in an initial loss of shear strength that is significant over a time period of about 0.2 to 0.4 ?s.

O. N. Aprelkov; O. N. Ignatova; V. V. Igonin; A. I. Lebedev; S. S. Nadezhin; A. M. Podurets; V. A. Raevsky; V. P. Solovyev; G. A. Salishchev; M. A. Zocher; A. M. Kaul; J. M. McNaney; B. A. Remington

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Addendum to High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a small follow-on study, the burn rate of the ammonium perchlorate (AP) based material TAL-1503 was studied at a relatively mild pressure. The goal of this final experiment was to burn TAL-1503 at the lowest pressures possible using the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner (LLNL-HPSB). The following is a description of the experiment and the results with a brief discussion of data and a comparison to the higher pressure data. This is not meant to be a stand-alone report and readers should refer to the main report for experimental details and discussion. High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique AP/HTPB based material (TAL-1503) were performed using the LLNL high pressure strand burner apparatus. The material burns in a well behaved, laminar fashion between 20 and 300 MPa with a burn law of B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} that was calculated based on the best data available from the experiments. In the pressure range of 2 and 10 MPa the material burned laminarly with a burn law of B = (2.0 {+-} 0.2) x P{sup (0.66{+-}0.05)}. In these results, B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Comparison of the TAL-1503 results with similar propellants that contain micrometer sized aluminum indicate that the burn rates are relatively unaffected by the aluminum. However, the pressure change is significantly larger when aluminum is present, most likely due to the high temperatures achieved from burning aluminum.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980`s and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data.

McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Accelerated crevice corrosion tests are now being conducted to intentionally induce crevice corrosion, and to determine those environmental conditions where such localized attack occurs. Such materials are extremely hard, and provide enhanced resistance to abrasion and gouges (stress risers) from backfill operations, and possibly even tunnel boring. The hardness of Type 316L Stainless Steel is approximately 150 VHN, that of Alloy C-22 is approximately 250 VHN, and that of HVOF SAM2X5 ranges from 1100-1300 VHN. These new materials provide a viable coating option for repository engineers. SAM2X5 and SAM1651 coatings can be applied with thermal spray processes without any significant loss of corrosion resistance. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying. Containers for the transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) with corrosion resistant coatings are envisioned. For example, an enhanced multi-purpose container (MPC) could be made with such coatings, leveraging existing experience in the fabrication of such containers. These coating materials could be used to protect the final closure weld on SNF/HLW disposal containers, eliminate need for stress mitigation. Integral drip shield could be produced by directly spraying it onto the disposal container, thereby eliminating the need for an expensive titanium drip shield. In specific areas where crevice corrosion is anticipated, such as the contact point between the disposal container and pallet, HVOF coatings could be used to buildup thickness, thereby selectively adding corrosion life where it is needed. Both SAM2X5 & SAM1651 have high boron content which enable them to absorb neutrons and therefore be used for criticality control in baskets. Alloy C-22 and 316L have no neutron absorber, and cannot be used for such functions. Borated stainless steel and G

Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

186

Comparative Study of Aluminide Coatings on Mild Steel by Different ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by Release on Demand ... High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications .

187

Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

SciTech Connect

Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dynamic compressive behavior of Pr-Nd alloy at high strain rates and temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on compressive tests, static on 810 material test system and dynamic on the first compressive loading in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens at high strain rates and temperatures, this study determined a J-C type [G. R. Johnson and W. H. Cook, in Proceedings of Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics (The Hague, The Netherlands, 1983), pp. 541-547] compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. It was recorded by a high speed camera that the Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens fractured during the first compressive loading in SHPB tests at high strain rates and temperatures. From high speed camera images, the critical strains of the dynamic shearing instability for Pr-Nd alloy in SHPB tests were determined, which were consistent with that estimated by using Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion [R. C. Batra and Z. G. Wei, Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] and the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. The transmitted and reflected pulses of SHPB tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens computed with the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy and Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion could be consistent with the experimental data. The fractured Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens of compressive tests were investigated by using 3D supper depth digital microscope and scanning electron microscope.

Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian [Mechanics and Materials Science Research Center, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Ma Dongfang [Mechanics and Materials Science Research Center, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); School of Civil Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan 454000 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal external radiotherapy and long-term ADT. High-quality implants can be achieved by a trained specialized team at a high-turnover center using transrectal ultrasound-based treatment plans with acceptable morbidity and complication rates.

Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009... thermal cycle lifetime when compared to conventional EB-PVD coatings. ... widely used on turbine engine blades/vanes as stand-alone overlayers. .... thin film provides a flexible, low-cost platform for surface engineering.

191

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High-Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh PIs: F. S. Pettit, G. H. Meier Subcontractor: J. L. Beuth SCIES Project 02- 01- SR101 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration + 6 mo No-Cost Extension) $ 458,420 Total Contract Value ($ 412,695 DOE) Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology For Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High- Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines University of Pittsburgh - Carnegie Mellon University University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh In the next generation gas turbine, resistance to thermal cycling damage may be as important as resistance to long isothermal exposures. Moreover, metallic coatings and Thermal Barrier

192

Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials  

SciTech Connect

A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

High Rate Plasticity under Pressure using a Windowed Pressure-Shear Impact Experiment  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technique has been developed to study the strength of materials under conditions of moderate pressures and high shear strain rates. The technique is similar to the traditional pressure-shear plate-impact experiments except that window interferometry is used to measure both the normal and transverse particle velocities at a sample-window interface. Experimental and simulation results on vanadium samples backed with a sapphire window show the utility of the technique to measure the flow strength under dynamic loading conditions. The results show that the strength of the vanadium is 600 MPa at a pressure of 4.5 GPa and a plastic strain of 1.7%.

Florando, J N; Jiao, T; Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Ferranti, L; Becker, R C; Minich, R W; Bazan, G

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

195

High Growth Rate of Epitaxial Silicon-Carbon Alloys by High-Order Silane Precursor and Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates typically achieved by disilane and silane, respectively, at 575o C. The rate at present is limited precursor HOS than disilane in CVD, even at lower temperatures. Our current growth rates of Si1-yCy alloys

196

Characteristics of the high-rate discharge capability of a nickel/metal hydride battery electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high rate discharge capability of the negative electrode in a Ni/MH battery is mainly determined by the charge transfer process at the interface between the metal hydride (MH) alloy powder and the electrolyte, and the mass transfer process in the bulk MH alloy powder. In this study, the anodic polarization curves of a MH electrode were measured and analyzed. An alloy of nominal composition Mm{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}Ni{sub 3.85}Co{sub 0.45}Mn{sub 0.35}Al{sub 0.35} was used as the negative electrode material. With increasing number of charge/discharge cycles, the MH alloy powders microcrack into particles several micrometers in diameter. The decrease in the MH alloy particle size results in an increase in both the activation surface area and the exchange current density of the MH alloy electrode. The electrode overpotentials of the MH electrode decreases with increasing number of cycles at a large value of anodic polarization current. The decrease in electrode overpotential leads to an increase in the high rate discharge capability of the MH electrode. By using the limiting current, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the MH alloy was estimated to be 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}11}cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} assuming an average particle radius of 5 {micro}m.

Geng, M.; Han, J.; Feng, F.; Northwood, D.O.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design philosophy for high-resolution rate and throughput spectroscopy systems  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the philosophy behind the design of a pulse processing system used in a semiconductor detector x-ray spectrometer to be used for plasma diagnostics at the Princeton TFTR facility. This application presents the unusual problems of very high counting rates and a high-energy neutron background while still requiring excellent resolution. To meet these requirements three specific new advances are included in the design: (i) A symmetrical triangular pulse shape is employed in the main pulse-processing channel. A new simple method of generating a close approximation to the symmetrical triangle has been developed. (ii) To cope with the very wide dynamic range of signals while maintaining a constant fast resolving time, approximately symmetical triangular pulse shaping is also used in the fast pulse pile-up inspection channel. (iii) The demand for high throughput has resulted in a re-examination of the operation of pile-up rejectors and pulse stretchers. As a result a technique has been developed that, for a given total pulse shaping time, permits approximately a 40% increase in throughput in the system. Performance results obtained using the new techniques are presented.

Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.; Madden, N.W.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization  

SciTech Connect

The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100-300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

Tang Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen Zhiyong, E-mail: czysh@netease.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Cai Hongnian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

SciTech Connect

Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Producing ultrashort Terahertz to UV photons at high repetition rates for research into materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on a Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power (see G. P. Williams, this conference). The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser vapor deposition, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the opportunities provided by this unique light source for modifying and studying materials.

G. R. Neil; C. Behre; S. V. Benson; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M. J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; N. Nishimori; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; G. P. Williams; and S. Zhang

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Performance of Ultra Hard Carbon Wear Coatings on Microgears Fabricated by Liga  

SciTech Connect

Stiction and friction are of concern for the reliable, long-term application of Ni-alloy micromachines. We have found that the application of a 30-70 nm hard carbon coating produces a significant reduction in the friction coefficient and wear rate of electroformed Ni substrates in reciprocating sliding contact under simulated MEMS operating conditions. To evaluate the performance of coated components, a series of 70-pm-thick microgears ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 2.2 mm were fabricated from electroformed Ni via standard LIGA processes and fixtured on posts in preparation for the coating procedure. A pulsed vacuum- arc deposition process was used to deposit a carbon coating on the gears with the plasma incident at a shallow angle to the gears' top surface. A sample bias of -2 keV was used in order to produce a coating with relatively low stress and good adhesion while maintaining high hardness. This coating process is known to be somewhat comformal to the component surfaces. The coating uniformity, particularly in the high-aspect-ratio areas between the gear teeth, was evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the coating can be applied uniformly on the top gear surface. Between the gear teeth the coating was the same thickness as on top of the gear down to a point 50 ~m below the top surface. Below that point (i.e. between 50 and 70 Lm), the coating thickness is somewhat thinner, but is still present. These results demonstrate that it is possible to a deposit hard carbon coating on microgears to reduce friction and wear in micromachines.

Ager III, J.W.; Brown, I.G.; Christenson, T.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Monteiro, O.R.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spatially resolved measurements of kinematics and flow-induced birefringence in worm-like micellar solutions undergoing high rate deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worm-like micellar solutions are model non-Newtonian systems on account of their well understood linear viscoelastic behavior. Their high deformation rate, non-linear rheological response, however, remains inadequately ...

Ober, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Relationships between Radar Properties at High Elevations and Surface Rain Rate: Potential Use for Spaceborne Rainfall Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based radar data have been used to investigate the relationship between reflectivity at high elevations and surface rain rates. Such relations are useful for rainfall measurements by spaceborne radars at attenuating wavelength such as the ...

Eyal Amitai

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Comparative Study of the Rates of Development of Potential Graupel and Hail Embryos in High Plains Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rates of development of graupel and hail in High Plains storms are calculated based on mechanisms for the growth of particles of various types. In the first part of this study, planar crystals, aggregates, graupel particles and frozen drops ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Molten Salt Synthesis and High Rate Performance of the ‘‘Desert-Rose’’ form of LiCoO2  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis of a novel nanostructure of LiCoO{sub 2}, and its performance as a cathode for a high-rate lithium ion battery, is described. The LiCoO{sub 2} nanostructure resembles the morphology of a known natural mineral: 'desert rose' gypsum. A range of measurement techniques are used to investigate the growth mechanism of this structure and the origin of its high rate charge/discharge properties.

H Chen; C Grey

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating device quality, thin-film a-Si:H for use as semiconductor material in photovoltaic and other devices, comprising in any order; positioning a substrate in a vacuum chamber adjacent a plurality of heatable filaments with a spacing distance L between the substrate and the filaments; heating the filaments to a temperature that is high enough to obtain complete decomposition of silicohydride molecules that impinge said filaments into Si and H atomic species; providing a flow of silicohydride gas, or a mixture of silicohydride gas containing Si and H, in said vacuum chamber while maintaining a pressure P of said gas in said chamber, which, in combination with said spacing distance L, provides a P.times.L product in a range of 10-300 mT-cm to ensure that most of the Si atomic species react with silicohydride molecules in the gas before reaching the substrate, to thereby grow a a-Si:H film at a rate of at least 50 .ANG./sec.; and maintaining the substrate at a temperature that balances out-diffusion of H from the growing a-Si:H film with time needed for radical species containing Si and H to migrate to preferred bonding sites.

Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Molenbroek, Edith C. (Rotterdam, NL); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO); Nelson, Brent P. (Golden, CO); Iwaniczko, Eugene (Lafayette, CO); Xu, Yueqin (Golden, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The impact of school facilities on student achievement, attendance, behavior, completion rate and teacher turnover rate in selected Texas high schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship between school facility conditions and school outcomes such as student academic achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate. School facility condition for the participating schools was determined by the Total Learning Environment Assessment (TLEA) as completed by the principal or principal's designee on high school campuses in Texas with enrollments between 1,000 and 2000 and economically disadvantaged enrollments less than 40%. Each school in the study population was organized by grades nine through twelve. Data for achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate were collected through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) managed by the Texas Education Agency. Student achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate and their relation to school facilities were investigated using multiple regression models to compare sections and subsections of the TLEA with each of the five dependent variables. Major research findings of this study included the following: first, student achievement, attendance and completion rate measures were not found to be statistically significant in relation to school facility conditions as measured by the TLEA at the 0.05 level; second, discipline, or behavior, was found to be significantly related to the TLEA. This indicates that the subsections of the TLEA could be used to predict discipline factors for schools in the study population; third, teacher turnover rate was found to be related to the TLEA subsections of Specialized Learning Space and Support Space, with the correlation to Support Space being indirect. Literature from prior studies infers that relationships do exist between all five of the study's dependent variables. However, this study only yielded significant findings in the areas of student discipline and teacher turnover. The researchers recommendations based upon this study include the following: administrators and designers should take into account factors such as interior environment and academic learning space when planning schools to positively impact student discipline; school design and construction should focus on specialized learning spaces and other academic areas more than administrative support spaces when striving to increase teacher satisfaction with physical working conditions.

McGowen, Robert Scott

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The impact of school facilities on student achievement, attendance, behavior, completion rate and teacher turnover rate in selected Texas high schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship between school facility conditions and school outcomes such as student academic achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate. School facility condition for the participating schools was determined by the Total Learning Environment Assessment (TLEA) as completed by the principal or principal’s designee on high school campuses in Texas with enrollments between 1,000 and 2000 and economically disadvantaged enrollments less than 40%. Each school in the study population was organized by grades nine through twelve. Data for achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate were collected through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) managed by the Texas Education Agency. Student achievement, attendance, discipline, completion rate and teacher turnover rate and their relation to school facilities were investigated using multiple regression models to compare sections and subsections of the TLEA with each of the five dependent variables. Major research findings of this study included the following: first, student achievement, attendance and completion rate measures were not found to be statistically significant in relation to school facility conditions as measured by the TLEA at the 0.05 level; second, discipline, or behavior, was found to be significantly related to the TLEA. This indicates that the subsections of the TLEA could be used to predict discipline factors for schools in the study population; third, teacher turnover rate was found to be related to the TLEA subsections of Specialized Learning Space and Support Space, with the correlation to Support Space being indirect. Literature from prior studies infers that relationships do exist between all five of the study’s dependent variables. However, this study only yielded significant findings in the areas of student discipline and teacher turnover. The researchers recommendations based upon this study include the following: administrators and designers should take into account factors such as interior environment and academic learning space when planning schools to positively impact student discipline; school design and construction should focus on specialized learning spaces and other academic areas more than administrative support spaces when striving to increase teacher satisfaction with physical working conditions.

McGowen, Robert Scott

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

Jeffrey W. Fergus

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

High-Rate Quantum Key Distribution with Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the potential for 1.85 Mbit/s secure key rates over 101 km of fiber, >100 times faster than previously demonstrated, using the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and superconducting ...

Spellmeyer, Neal W.

215

a-Si:H Grown by Hot-Wire CVD at Ultra-High Deposition Rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We increase the deposition rate of growing hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H) by the hot-wire chemical vapor depositon (HWCVD) technique by adding filaments (two) and decreasing the filament(s) to substrate distance.

Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Williamson, D. L.; Crandall, R. S.; Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC Core-Shell Nanoparticles for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Storage  

SciTech Connect

A simple ball-milling method is used to synthesize a tin oxide-silicon carbide/few-layer graphene core-shell structure in which nanometer-sized SnO2 particles are uniformly dispersed on a supporting SiC core and encapsulated with few-layer graphene coatings by in situ mechanical peeling. The SnO2-SiC/G nanocomposite material delivers a high reversible capacity of 810 mA h g?1 and 83% capacity retention over 150 charge/discharge cycles between 1.5 and 0.01 V at a rate of 0.1 A g?1. A high reversible capacity of 425 mA h g?1 also can be obtained at a rate of 2 A g?1. When discharged (Li extraction) to a higher potential at 3.0 V (vs. Li/Li+), the SnO2-SiC/G nanocomposite material delivers a reversible capacity of 1451 mA h g?1 (based on the SnO2 mass), which corresponds to 97% of the expected theoretical capacity (1494 mA h g?1, 8.4 equivalent of lithium per SnO2), and exhibits good cyclability. This result suggests that the core-shell nanostructure can achieve a completely reversible transformation from Li4.4Sn to SnO2 during discharging (i.e., Li extraction by dealloying and a reversible conversion reaction, generating 8.4 electrons). This suggests that simple mechanical milling can be a powerful approach to improve the stability of high-performance electrode materials involving structural conversion and transformation.

Chen, Zhongxue; Zhou, Min; Cao, Yuliang; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Liu, Jun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dual-chamber plasma deposition of A-Si:H solar cells at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect

The use of a separated chamber deposition system for the fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells from disilane at high deposition rates results in a substantial improvement in short circuit current compared to that obtained from a single-chamber system. The spectral responses of cells fabricated in the dual-chamber mode are compared to those made in the single-chamber mode. The results are interpreted by assuming that the rate of removal of boron contaminants from the chamber is independent of deposition rate.

Rajeswaran, G.; Vanier, P.E.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

Kennedy, C. E.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Molecular dynamics simulation of high strain-rate void nucleation and growth in copper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotropic tension is simulated in nanoscale polycrystalline copper with 10 nm grain size using large-scale molecular dynamics. The nanocrystalline copper is fabricated on the computer by growing randomly oriented grains from seed sites in simulations cell. Constant volume strain rates of 10-8 to 10-10 are considered for systems ranging from 10-5 to 10-6 atoms using EAM interatomic potential for copper. The spacing between voids for room temperature single crystal simulations is found to scale approximately as l{approximately}0. 005 Cs/gamma, where Cs is the sound speed and gamma is the strain rate. Below strain rates of about 10-9, only one void is observed to nucleate and grow in the 10 nm polycrystalline simulation cell. The growth of small voids is simulated by cutting a void out of the simulation cell and repeating the isotropic expansion.

Belak, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Delta-Sigma digital-RF modulation for high data rate transmitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low power, wideband wireless transmitter utilizing [Delta]-[Sigma] direct digital modulation of an RF carrier is presented. The transmitter architecture replaces high dynamic range analog circuits with high speed digital ...

Jerng, Albert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Applications and source development for high-repetition rate x-ray lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications in material science, chemistry, and atomic physics require an x-ray source that has a repetition rate of 1 Hz to a few kHz. In these fields, a very wide range of photon energies is of interest. One application is time-resolved surface photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy where low energy (energies below 100 eV are very good with higher energy capabilities expected in the future. In addition, prospects of table-top size x-ray lasers with kHz repetition rates are presented.

Eder, D.C.; Amendt, P.; Bolton, P.R. [and others

1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

224

Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

This work addresses the high-rate session scheduling problem in Fractional Lambda Switching (FS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiplexing (such as SONET/SDH) and Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). Yet, Non-Immediate Forwarding (NIF-rate NIF session. An efficient scheduling algorithm, eSSM, is proposed to explore all possibilities in two modes: (1) immediate forwarding (IF) or (2) non-immediate forwarding (NIF). NIF is more

Baldi, Mario

227

Self-Constructive High-Rate System Energy Modeling for Battery-Powered Mobile Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Lin Zhong Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University 6100 Main St., TX 77005 for the great diversity in the hardware and usage of mobile systems. Moreover, existing system energy models intervals of at least 10 ms, or at a rate no lower than 100 Hz. Per-application energy accounting is useful

Zhong, Lin

228

Paint Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Test requirements and time to failure of various coatings...20â??30 0.8â??1.2 150 200â??500 Light zinc phosphate+lacquer paint 23â??28 0.9â??1.1 120 150â??250 Dry film lubrication, air cured 8â??13 0.3â??0.5 â?¦ 50â??100 Heavy zinc phosphate+dry film lubrication, baked 12â??25 0.5â??1.0 100 500â??1000 CARC topcoat 46â??56 1.8â??2.2 â?¦ 25â??50 Light zinc phosphate+CARC primer+topcoat 76â??127 3â??5...

229

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES OF ENHANCED WASTE LOADING AND IMPROVED MELT RATE FOR HIGH ALUMINA CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to determine the impacts of glass compositions with high aluminum concentrations on melter performance, crystallization and chemical durability for Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford waste streams. Glass compositions for Hanford targeted both high aluminum concentrations in waste sludge and a high waste loading in the glass. Compositions for SRS targeted Sludge Batch 5, the next sludge batch to be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which also has a relatively high aluminum concentration. Three frits were selected for combination with the SRS waste to evaluate their impact on melt rate. The glasses were melted in two small-scale test melters at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The results showed varying degrees of spinel formation in each of the glasses. Some improvements in melt rate were made by tailoring the frit composition for the SRS feeds. All of the Hanford and SRS compositions had acceptable chemical durability.

Fox, K; David Peeler, D; James Marra, J

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

231

High Strain Rate Shear Zone Properties in an Inertia Friction Weld  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of Dissimilar Metal Welds During High Temperature Service.

232

High Rate Oxygen Reduction in Non-aqueous Electrolytes with the Addition of Perfluorinated Additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discharge rate capability of Li-air batteries is substantially increased by using perfluorinated compounds as oxygen carriers. The solubility of oxygen in a non-aqueous electrolyte can be significantly increased by the introduction of such compounds, which leads to the increase in the diffusion-limited current of oxygen reduction on the gas diffusion electrode in a Li-air battery. The perfluorinated compound is found to be stable within the electrochemical window of the electrolyte. A powder microelectrode and a rotating disk electrode were used to study the gas diffusion-limited current together with a rotating disk electrode. A 5 mA cm{sup -2} discharge rate is demonstrated in a lab Li-O{sub 2} cell.

Wang, Y.; Yang, X.; Zheng, D.; Qu, D.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Relativistic calculation of the two-photon decay rate of highly-excited ionic states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on quantum electrodynamics, we reexamine the two-photon decay of one-electron atoms. Special attention is paid to the calculation of the (two-photon) total decay rates which can be viewed as the imaginary part of the two-loop self-energy. We argue that our approach can easily be applied to the cases with a virtual state having an intermediate energy between the initial and the final state of the decay process leading, thus, to the resonance peaks in the two-photon energy distribution. In order to illustrate our approach, we obtain fully relativistic results, resolved into electric and magnetic multipole components, for the two-photon decay rates of the 3S_{1/2} -> 1S_{1/2} transition in neutral hydrogen as well as in various hydrogen-like ions.

Jentschura, Ulrich D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Role of surface coating on cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface coating of cathode materials has been widely investigated to enhance the life and rate capability of lithium-ion batteries. The surface coating discussed here was divided into three different configurations which are rough coating, core shell structure coating and ultra thin film coating. The mechanism of surface coating in achieving improved cathode performance and strategies to carry out this surface modification is discussed. An outlook on atomic layer deposition for lithium ion battery is also presented.

Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Amine, K.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Hanyang Univ.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of an open non-Markovian GI -- (GI| ?)K queueing network with high-rate renewal arrival process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze an open non-Markovian queueing network with high-rate renewal arrival process, Markovian routing, arbitrary service policy, and unlimited number of servers at nodes. We obtain mean values for the number of busy servers at nodes of the queueing ...

A. A. Nazarov; A. N. Moiseev

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tunas are apex predators renowned for their thunniform swimming mode, high metabolic rates and ability to conserve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

881 Tunas are apex predators renowned for their thunniform swimming mode, high metabolic rates such as yellowfin tuna maintain only a small elevation above ambient temperatures while young and mature bluefin al., 2001). Measurements of metabolic performance in vivo have been made in tropical tunas

Block, Barbara A.

237

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia, Indonesia Introduction Sulawesi Island, eastern Indonesia, is at the triple junction of the Paci®c (through- ABSTRACT In eastern Indonesia, the Central Sulawesi fault system consists of complex left-lateral strike

Vigny, Christophe

238

Acceleration of the rate of ethanol fermentation by addition of nitrogen in high tannin grain sorghum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this communication, the authors show that accelerated rates of ethanol production, comparable to sorghum varieties containing low levels of tannins and to corn, can occur without the removal of the tannins. The basis of the inhibition appears to be a lack of sufficient nitrogen in the mash for protein synthesis required to support an accelerated fermentative metabolism in Saccharomyces. No inhibition of the enzymes used for starch hydrolysis was found.

Mullins, J.T.; NeSmith, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A High-Rate, Heterogeneous Data Set from the Darpa Urban Challenge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a data set collected by MIT’s autonomous vehicle Talos during the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge. Data from a high-precision navigation system, five cameras, 12 SICK planar laser range scanners, and a ...

Huang, Albert S.

240

Noisy matrix decomposition via convex relaxation: Optimal rates in high dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze a class of estimators based on convex relaxation for solving high-dimensional matrix decomposition problems. The observations are noisy realizations of a linear transformation [bar through "X" symbol] of the sum ...

Agarwal, Alekh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. First technical progress report for the fourth quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

High-Rate Oxygen Reduction in Mixed Nonaqueous Electrolyte Containing Acetonitrile  

SciTech Connect

A mixed nonaqueous electrolyte that contains acetonitrile and propylene carbonate (PC) was found to be suitable for a LiO2 battery with a metallic Li anode. Both the concentration and diffusion coefficient for the dissolved O2 are significantly higher in the mixed electrolyte than those in the pure PC electrolyte. A powder microelectrode was used to investigate the O2 solubility and diffusion coefficient. A 10 mA?cm-2 discharge rate on a gas-diffusion electrode is demonstrated by using the mixed electrolyte in a LiO2 cell.

Zheng D.; Yang X.; Qu D.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

243

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and particularly to the surface of the coating. The pinning action keeps the oil from leeching out of the coating, even when the ...

244

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005  

SciTech Connect

The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

Deng, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Self-constructive high-rate system energy modeling for battery-powered mobile systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System energy models are important for energy optimization and management in mobile systems. However, existing system energy models are built in a lab setting with the help from a second computer. Not only are they labor-intensive; but also they do not adequately account for the great diversity in the hardware and usage of mobile systems. Moreover, existing system energy models are intended for energy estimation for time intervals of one second or longer; they do not provide the required rate for fine-grain use such as per-application energy accounting. In this work, we study a self-modeling paradigm in which a mobile system automatically generates its energy model without any external assistance. Our solution, Sesame, leverages the possibility of self power measurement through the smart battery interface and employs a suite of novel techniques to achieve accuracy and rate much higher than that of the smart battery interface. We report the implementation and evaluation of Sesame on a laptop and a smartphone. The experiment results show that Sesame is able to generate system energy models of 95 % accuracy at one estimation per second and of 88 % accuracy at one estimation per 10 ms, without any external assistance. Two fiveday field studies with four laptop and four smartphones users further demonstrate the effectiveness, efficiency, and noninvasiveness of Sesame.

Mian Dong; Lin Zhong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Instantaneous Rainfall Rate: Its Measurement and Its Influence on High-Voltage Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a high-voltage transmission line is exposed to rain there is generally a small amount of corona activity at the surface of the conductors. This activity usually results in a power loss and the generation of audible and radio noise. While the ...

Harold Kirkham

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Demonstration of High Current Density YBCO Coated Conductors on RE2O3-Buffered Ni Substrates with Two New Alternative Architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In continuation of our effort to develop single buffer layer architectures for YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-g) coated tape conductors, we have studied RE2O3 (RE = Y, and rare earths) as candidate materials. Three types of crystal structures including the preferred cubic phase are known for the rare earth oxides. High quality simple cubic RE2O3 buffer layers were grown epitaxiahy on {100} textured Ni substrates using both reactive evaporation and sol-gel processing. Detailed X-ray studies have shown that the Y2O3, Eu2O3, Gd2O3, and Yb2O3 were grown with a single epitaxial orientation. SEM micrographs indicated that both e-beam and sol-gel grown films were dense, continuous and crack free. High Jc YBCO films were grown on RE2O3-buffered Ni substrates with sputtered cap layers. Two new alternative buffer layer architectures were developed. A high Jc of 1.8 MA/cm2 at 77 K and self-field was obtained on YBCO films with a layer sequence of YBCO (pulsed laser deposition)/Yb2O3 (sputtered)/Y2O3 (e-beam)/Ni. Also, a high Jc of over 1 MA/cm2 at 77 K and self-field was obtained on YBCO films with a layer sequence of YBCO (ex-situ BaF2 process)/CeO2 (sputtered)YSZ sputtered)/RE2O3 (sol-gel or e-beam)Ni. The performance of sol-gel grown buffers approached the quality of e-beam grown buffers.

Beach, D.B.; Chirayil, T.G.; Christen, D.K.; Cui, X.; Feenstra, R.; Goyal, A.; Kroeger, D.M.; Lee, D.F.; Martin, P.M.; Mathis, J.E.; Morrell, J.S.; Norton, D.P.; Paranthaman, M.; Specht, E.D.; Verebelyi, D.T.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

(Ni-P) Coatings on AISI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... investigation shows that Electroless Nickel coated AISI 1040 steel has high potential to replace hard chrome plated AISI ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray ... New Developments in High Velocity Air-Fuel Spraying.

249

HyperCP: A high-rate spectrometer for the study of charged hyperon and kaon decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HyperCP experiment (Fermilab E871) was designed to search for rare phenomena in the decays of charged strange particles, in particular CP violation in $\\Xi$ and $\\Lambda$ hyperon decays with a sensitivity of $10^{-4}$. Intense charged secondary beams were produced by 800 GeV/c protons and momentum-selected by a magnetic channel. Decay products were detected in a large-acceptance, high-rate magnetic spectrometer using multiwire proportional chambers, trigger hodoscopes, a hadronic calorimeter, and a muon-detection system. Nearly identical acceptances and efficiencies for hyperons and antihyperons decaying within an evacuated volume were achieved by reversing the polarities of the channel and spectrometer magnets. A high-rate data-acquisition system enabled 231 billion events to be recorded in twelve months of data-taking.

HyperCP collaboration; R. A. Burnstein; A. Chakravorty; A. Chan; Y. C. Chen; W. -S. Choong; K. Clark; E. C. Dukes; C. Durandet; J. Felix; R. Fuzesy; G. Gidal; P. Gu; H. R. Gustafson; C. Ho; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; C. James; C. M. Jenkins; T. D. Jones; D. M. Kaplan; L. M. Lederman; N. Leros; M. J. Longo; F. Lopez; L. C. Lu; W. Luebke; K. -B. Luk; K. S. Nelson; H. K. Park; J. -P. Perroud; D. Rajaram; H. A. Rubin; P. K. Teng; B. Turko; J. Volk; C. G. White; S. L. White; P. Zyla

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reproducible Preparation of Au/TS-1 with High Reaction Rate for Gas Phase Epoxidation of Propylene  

SciTech Connect

A refined and reliable synthesis procedure for Au/TS-1(Si/Ti molar ratio {approx}100) with high reaction rate for the direct gas phase epoxidation of propylene has been developed by studying the effects of pH of the gold slurry solution, mixing time, and preparation temperature for deposition precipitation (DP) of Au on TS-1 supports. Au/TS-1 catalysts prepared at optimal DP conditions (pH {approx} 7.3, mixing for 9.5 h, room temperature) showed an average PO rate {approx} 160 g{sub PO} h{sup -1} kg{sub Cat}{sup -1} at 200 C at 1 atm. A reproducibility better than {+-}10% was demonstrated by nine independent samples prepared at the same conditions. These are the highest rates yet reported at 200 C. No visible gold particles were observed by the HRTEM analysis in the fresh Au/TS-1 with gold loading up to {approx}0.1 wt%, indicating that the gold species were smaller than 1 nm. Additionally, the rate per gram of Au and the catalyst stability increased as the Au loading decreased, giving a maximum value of 500 g{sub PO} h{sup -1} g{sub Au}{sup -1}, and Si/Ti molar ratios of {approx}100 gave the highest rates.

Lee W. S.; Stach E.; Akatay, M.C.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, N.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating. An alternative manufacturing route is to coat the sheet metal first before forming. The change in the manufacturing sequence can potentially improve cost and reduce environmental impact. This approach, however, requires the coating to survive the deformation process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull-off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet by using a uniaxial tensile tester. Experimental results from two selected polymer coated sheet metals show that coating adhesion was affected by plastic deformation. An analytical model based on a virtual interface crack concept was developed to indicate the adhesion potential of the coating-substrate interface. From interfacial fracture mechanics, the initial adhesion potential is defined as the energy release rate characterized by the virtual interface crack and the initial pull-off stress. The analytical model was used to predict coating adhesion loss after deformation in uniaxial tension mode. The analytical model predictions agreed well with experimental results. Finite element analysis tool was applied to simulate more complex deformation modes in stamping of coated sheet meals. The stress field near the interface crack tip was used to calculate the energy release rate and predict the adhesion loss under different deformation modes. The predictions obtained from numerical method are also in good agreements with the experimental results in biaxial tension and tension-compression modes. The research has led to a better understanding of the effects of plastic deformation on coating adhesion. The developed adhesion test methods can be used to generate useful information on coating durability for diverse practical use. It is also expected that the results of the research will facilitate the development of better polymer coated sheet metal to be used in sheet metal forming processes.

Huang, Yu-Hsuan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High Risk Interventional Settings is Driven by Stent Design and Deployment, and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background—Stent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. Concern has been raised about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings, yet clinical and animal ...

Kolandaivelu, Kumaran

253

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting device using indium-free transparent anode Ga:ZnO with scalability for large area coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of economically-produced and environmentally-stable transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings is critical for the development of a variety of electronic devices requiring transparent electrodes. Such devices include liquid crystal display pixels and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs),[1, 2] solar cell applications,[3, 4] and electrically heated windows.[5, 6] The materials fulfilling these requirements are usually wide band gap inorganic transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). Tin-doped indium oxide, or ITO, has traditionally been used for electronic TCO applications because of its low resistivity, high work function and transparency. Due to the increasing cost and limited supply of indium and its tendency to migrate in to the device, there has been increasing research interest to substitute ITO with an indium-free material. A number of alternative metal oxides and doped oxides have been evaluated as TCO materials with varying degrees of success.[7, 8] Among these alternatives to ITO, gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) [2, 9] and aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) [10, 11] have drawn particular attention. These materials have been demonstrated to have resistivities and transparencies approaching those of the best ITO, low toxicity, and much lower materials cost. Although AZO is attractive as a TCO electrode material, GZO features a greater resistance to oxidation as a result of gallium’s greater electronegativity compared to Submitted to 2 aluminum.[12, 13

Wang, Liang (Frank); Matson, Dean W.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Spinel LiMn(2)O(4)/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A well-crystallized and nano-sized spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide hybrid cathode material for high rate lithium-ion batteries has been successfully synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method at 200 C for 30 min without any post heat-treatment. The nano-sized LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles were evenly dispersed on the reduced graphene oxide template without agglomeration, which allows the inherent high active surface area of individual LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the hybrid. These unique structural and morphological properties of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} on the highly conductive reduced graphene oxide sheets in the hybrid enable achieving the high specific capacity, an excellent high rate capability and stable cycling performance. An analysis of the cyclic voltammogram data revealed that a large surface charge storage contribution of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide hybrid plays an important role in achieving faster charge/discharge.

Bak, S.M.; Nam, K.; Lee, C.-W.; Kim, K.-H.; Jung, H.-C.; Yang, X-Q.; Kim, K.-B.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Apparatus for coating powders  

SciTech Connect

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Carbonaceous film coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

Maya, L.

1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

SciTech Connect

Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Dielectric Coatings for IACT Mirrors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy need mirror with high reflectance roughly in the wavelength between 300 and 550 nm. The current standard reflective layer of such mirrors is aluminum. Being permanently exposed to the environment they show a constant degradation over the years. New and improved dielectric coatings have been developed to enhance their resistance to environmental impact and to extend their possible lifetime. In addition, these customized coatings have an increased reflectance of over 95% and are designed to significantly lower the night-sky background contribution. The development of such coatings for mirrors with areas up to 2 m2 and low application temperatures to suite the composite materials used for the new mirror susbtrates of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the results of extensive durability tests are presented.

Förster, A; Chadwick, P; Held, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

High Strain-Rate Mechanical Behaviour of a Copper Matrix Composite for Nuclear Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aim of this work is the investigation of mechanical behaviour of an alumina dispersion strengthened copper, known by the trade name GLIDCOP®, subjected to dynamic loads: it is a composite material with a copper matrix strengthened with aluminium oxide ceramic particles. Since the particle content is quite small the material keeps the OFE copper physical properties, such as thermal and electrical conductivity, but with a higher yield strength, like a mild-carbon steel. Besides, with the addition of aluminium oxide, the good mechanical properties are retained also at high temperatures and the resistance to thermal softening is increased: the second phase blocks the dislocation movement preventing the grain growth. Thanks to these properties GLIDCOP® finds several applications in particle accelerator technologies, where problems of thermal management, combined with structural requirements, play a key role. Currently, it is used for the construction of structural and functional parts of the particle beam collim...

Peroni, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and resistant to environmental damage from ingested sand particles ( categorized ... A Study on the Hot Corrosion Resistance of Metal-cemet-glass Coating on ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Use of a high repetition rate neutron generator for in vivo body composition measurements via neutron inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small D-T neutron generator with a high pulse rate is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. The core of the neutron generator is a 13 cm-long Zetatron tube pulsed at a rate of 10 kHz delivering 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ neutrons per pulse. A target-current feedback system regulates the source of the accelerator to assure constant neutron output. Carbon is measured by detecting the 4.44 MeV ..gamma..-rays from inelastic scattering. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the ..gamma..-rays during the 10 ..mu..s neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurements because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during the pulse). In vivo measurements were performed with normal volunteers using a scanning bed facility for a dose less than 25 mrem. This technique offers medical as well as general bulk analysis applications. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Weinlein, J.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

UT-B ID 201002370 06.2012 Technology Summary Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and ...

265

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

267

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

268

Coating Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Powder  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a method of modifying existing coating techniques to include a bonded superhydrophobic outer coating layer. ...

269

New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

'In vivo' Dose Measurements in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatments for Cervical Cancer: A Project Proposal  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this thesis project is to compare doses calculated from the treatment planning system using computed tomography images, with those measured 'in vivo' by using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at different regions of the rectum and bladder of a patient during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma. The experimental dosimeters characterisation and calibration have concluded and the protocol to carry out the 'in vivo' measurements has been established. In this work, the calibration curves of two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters (rods and chips) are presented, and the proposed protocol to measure the 'in vivo' dose is fully described.

Reynoso Mejia, C. A.; Buenfil Burgos, A. E.; Ruiz Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mota Garcia, A.; Trejo Duran, E.; Rodriguez Ponce, M. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando 22, Tlalpan, 4080, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pressure oscillations caused by momentum on shut in of a high rate well in a fractured formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure transient testing techniques are an important part of reservoir and production testing procedures. These techniques are frequently used to determine practical information about underground reservoirs such as the permeability, porosity, liquid content, reservoir and liquid discontinuities and other related data. This information is valuable in helping to analyze, improve and forecast reservoir performance. This report is concerned with developing models for pressure transient well testing in high permeability, high flow rate, naturally fractured reservoirs. In the present work, a study was made of the effects of liquid inertia in the fractures and the wellbore on the pressure response obtained during a well test. The effects of turbulent flow and multi-phase flow effects such as gravitational segregation or anisotropic porous media effects were not considered. The scope of the study was limited to studying inertial effects on the pressure response of a fractured reservoir.

Bhatnagar, S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

High-nitrogen-metal complexes as burning-rate modifiers for the aluminum-water propellant system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactions of electropositive metals, such as aluminum, with water have long been utilized in explosive and propellant formulations, but until recently this has mostly been limited to the water formed as a product gas from the decomposition of another energetic system . Recently, however, with the increased availability of nano-particulate materials, the direct reaction of nano-aluminum (nAl) with water as an oxidizer has been investigated as a propellant system due to high reaction temperatures and the production of hydrogen as the primary gaseous species. This system could be useful for intra-planetary travel where non-terrestrial water is harvested for the oxidizer. Here we present the study of nAl, mixed at a stoichiometric ratio with water ({Phi} = 1) with the highly water soluble metal complexes of bis(tetrazolato)amine (BTA) added at 5, 15,30 and 50 wt% in the case of FeBTA and 5 and 15 wt% in the case of NiBTA and CoBTA. The basic structure of the BTA complexes is shown below where M = Fe, Ni or Co, and x = 3 for Fe and Co and x = 2 for Ni. The particle size of nAl studied was primarily 38 nm with various studies with the particle size of 80 nm. The FeBT A at a loading of 15 wt% gave the highest burning rate enhancement (4.6x at {approx}6.8 MPa), while retaining a low pressure exponent (0.21 compared to 0.24 for nA/H{sub 2}O). At 15 wt% the Ni and Co increased the burning rate, but also increased the pressure exponents. The burning rate of the FeBTA modified material with 80 nm Al decreased as the weight percent of FeBTA was increased, which also tracked decrease in the calculated specific impulse of the mixtures.

Tappan, Bryce C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium containing ceramic breeder material is described which is coated with a neutron multiplier such as Beryllium (Be), Beryllium Oxide (BeO), or other material having a higher thermal conductivity than the lithium ceramic material itself. In addition to exhibiting certain thermal conductivity properties, the neutron multiplier must be capable of withstanding the high temperatures (700/sup 0/ to 1300/sup 0/K) experienced in a breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. State of the art considerations have indicated several possible configurations for the lithium containing ceramic breeders, including a sphere-pac arrangement or sintered pellets or blocks. When one adds a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO into a sphere-pac bed of lithium containing ceramic breeders, current concepts include mixing the neutron multiplier randomly into the sphere-pac bed in the form of small spheres of a size comparable to that of the lithium ceramic particles. The present invention shows that a sphere-pac bed of breeder particles coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be and BeO has an improved thermal conductivity when compared with that of a bed of uncoated breeder particles randomly mixed with Be or BeO spheres having the same breeder/multiplier composition ratio.

Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

1986-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

279

High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H{sub 2}, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are reduced; (3) surface hydrogen removal--heavier and more energetic helium ions break the Si-H much easier than hydrogen ions. The preferential attachment of Si-H to Ge-H is reduced. They also found that with the small amount of hydrogen put into the plasma, the superior properties of a-(Si,Ge):H made from pure hydrogen dilution plasma were still maintained. These hydrogen ions help to remove the subsurface weakly bonded hydrogen and buried hydrogen. They also help to passivate the Ge-dangling bond.

Yong Liu

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

High rate mesophilic, thermophilic, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge: A pilot scale study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperatures were tested in single and two-stage anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increased temperature demonstrated the possibility of improving typical yields of the conventional mesophilic process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature phased anaerobic digestion process (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) showed the best performances with yields of 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia and phosphate released from solids destruction determined the precipitation of struvite in the reactor. - Abstract: The paper reports the findings of a two-year pilot scale experimental trial for the mesophilic (35 Degree-Sign C), thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) and temperature phased (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. During the mesophilic and thermophilic runs, the reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In the temperature phased run, the first reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 15 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 2 days while the second reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 18 days (20 days for the whole temperature phased system). The performance of the reactor improved with increases in temperature. The COD removal increased from 35% in mesophilic conditions, to 45% in thermophilic conditions, and 55% in the two stage temperature phased system. As a consequence, the specific biogas production increased from 0.33 to 0.45 and to 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed} at 35, 55, and 65 + 55 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The extreme thermophilic reactor working at 65 Degree-Sign C showed a high hydrolytic capability and a specific yield of 0.33 gCOD (soluble) per gVS{sub fed}. The effluent of the extreme thermophilic reactor showed an average concentration of soluble COD and volatile fatty acids of 20 and 9 g/l, respectively. Acetic and propionic acids were the main compounds found in the acids mixture. Because of the improved digestion efficiency, organic nitrogen and phosphorus were solubilised in the bulk. Their concentration, however, did not increase as expected because of the formation of salts of hydroxyapatite and struvite inside the reactor.

Bolzonella, David, E-mail: david.bolzonella@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Cavinato, Cristina, E-mail: cavinato@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Fatone, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.fatone@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Pavan, Paolo, E-mail: pavan@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Cecchi, Franco, E-mail: franco.cecchi@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

REPORT: Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2007 ... EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the ...

284

Recent Approaches and Challenges in Smart Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-healing coatings -Self-cleaning and superhydrophobic coatings - Chemical Conversion Coatings - Nano- and Micro-capsules Based Polymer Coatings

285

Composition profiling of solar coating materials. Final report, April 16, 1976-April 15, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Auger electron composition vs. depth and optical analysis revealed that a very inexpensive-to-produce (15 min. 900/sup 0/C heat treatment in air) Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer on stainless steels provides an excellent diffusion barrier for preventing stainless steel constituents from entering into an IR reflective Mo coating. It was shown that with sputter deposition of Mo at high rate in a clean noble gas plasma, one can obtain Mo coatings of excellent IR reflectance (> 96% between 2.5 and 25 ..mu..m wavelength). The optical properties (..cap alpha.. and epsilon) of various other absorber surfaces such as stacked razor blades, cone or whisker-covered metal surfaces, plasma-sprayed chromic oxide coatings etc. were measured and explored. (MOW)

Wehner, G.K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Tag: coat drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 287

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    288

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    289

    Field Guide: Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has numerous products to help plant personnel meet the challenges of working with aging systems, structures, and components, but none that comprehensively address protective coatings and linings. This field guide provides a compilation of protective coating and lining information in a form that allows the user to have a ready reference available during condition assessment of the various protective coatings and linings used in the plant.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    290

    Polymeric and Conversion Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Ongoing research reveals that the search for appropriate conversion ... of the coated alloy was ~ 250 mV more noble compared to bare alloy.

    291

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    292

    Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

    293

    COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    294

    Alternate Coating Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The cold spray process can prepare thick coatings (> 1 cm) with many ... protection, thermal insulation, thermal dissipation, wear resistance, ...

    295

    Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to study the use of ceramic coatings on components in the hot-gas path of advanced low-emission gas-fired turbines. The types of ceramic coatings include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades, and combustor liners to allow hotter gas-path temperatures, and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high-temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites. The NDE methods will be used to (a) provide data to assess the reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages, (c) track growth rates of defects during component use in engines, and (d) allow rational judgment for replace/repair/re-use decisions regarding components. Advances in TBC application, both electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS), are allowing higher temperatures in the hot-gas path. However, as TBCs become ''prime reliant,'' their condition at scheduled or unscheduled outages must be known. NDE methods are under development to assess the condition of the TBC for pre-spall conditions. EB-PVD test samples with up to 70 thermal cycles have been studied by a newly developed method involving polarized laser back-scatter NDE. Results suggest a correlation between the NDE laser data and the TBC/bond-coat topography. This finding is important because several theories directed toward understanding the pre-spall condition suggest that the topography in the thermally grown oxide layer changes significantly as a function of the number of thermal cycles. Tests have also been conducted with this NDE method on APS TBCs. Results suggest that the pre-spall condition is detected for these coatings. One-sided, high-speed thermal imaging also has shown promise for NDE of APS coatings. Testing of SiC/SiC composites for combustor liners has demonstrated that environmental EBCs are required to reduce oxidation-induced recession rates. NDE technologies, primarily one-sided and through-thickness thermal imaging, are under development to detect delaminations and degradation of EBCs. Recent results have demonstrated that NDE thermal image data correctly detected pre-spall regions of a barium-strontium-alumino-silicate coating on melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC. The NDE data were verified with field test data from a combustor liner in a 4.5 MW(e) natural-gas-fired turbine. The shape of the spalled EBC region and the growth of the spalled EBC region after various engine run times were correlated with boroscope image data from field tests. An effort has recently been started to address NDE development for oxide/oxide ceramic composites with an EBC. We will discuss the NDE methods under development for TBCs, recent NDE test results from thermally cycled TBCs, NDE results from EBCs on SiC/SiC, and the new effort directed toward oxide/oxide materials.

    Ellingson, W. A.; Deemer, C.; Sun, J. G.; Erdman, S.; Muliere, D.; Wheeler, B.

    2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable-risk prostate cancer, administered using a single implant over 2 days, is feasible and has acceptable acute and late toxicities. Further follow-up is still required to better evaluate the efficacy of such treatment.

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    297

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

    Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant. 4 figs.

    Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    299

    Thermal barrier coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    300

    Chemical Conversion Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 16   Applications of aluminum using chemical conversion coatings...doors 6063 Acrylic paint (b) Cans 3004 Sanitary lacquer Fencing 6061 None applied Chromate conversion coatings Aircraft fuselage skins 7075 clad with 7072 Zinc chromate primer Electronic chassis 6061-T4 None applied Cast missile bulkhead 356-T6 None applied Screen 5056 clad with 6253 Clear varnish...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

    Wei-Kao Lu

    2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    302

    Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. In previous tests, we had frequently encountered problems with our steam generator that were exacerbated by the very low flow rates that we needed. During this period we installed a new computer-controlled system for injecting water into the steam generator that eliminated this problem. We also tested alloy coupons coated by using the improved procedures described in our last quarterly report. Most of these coatings were nitrided Ti and Ta coatings, either by themselves, or sometimes with barrier layers of Al and Si nitrides. The samples were tested for 300 h at 900 C in a gas stream designed to mimic the environment in the high temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). Three samples that showed least corrosion were exposed for an additional 100 h.

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    304

    LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    305

    Laser Processing and Hard Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013 ... Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II: Laser Processing and Hard Coatings Sponsored by: TMS Materials ...

    306

    Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    307

    Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    308

    Comparison of HVOF Sprayed MCrAlY Coating and Nickel ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... coatings based on the application requirements and not on substrate physical properties such as thermal expansion rate Esp. within the same class of alloys.

    309

    Clock division as a power saving strategy in a system constrained by high transmission frequency and low data rate  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Systems are often restricted to have higher transmission frequency than required by their data rates. Possible constraints include channel attenuation, power requirements, and backward compatibility. As a result these ...

    Selbst, Andrew D. (Andrew David)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    310

    Superhydrophic Coatings - ORNL  

    The result is a coating which causes liquids to “bead up” on the surface of a ... Brian R. D’Urson and John T. Simpson, ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC

    311

    Coating Manufacturing Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 30, 2013 ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low emissivity ... Finally, specific functional applications such as electrical contact and coatings on ... The study is supported by RFBR, research project No.

    312

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    313

    Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

    SciTech Connect

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    314

    Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    315

    METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES  

    SciTech Connect

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    316

    Protective coatings for front surface reflectors. Phase I, final report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicone resins were evaluated as protective coatings for front surface aluminum and silver reflectors. The solar weighted hemispherical reflectances and specular reflectances of float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum and protected with silicone coatings were measured. The float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum were highly reflective. The total reflectances of the silver samples were 5 to 7% higher than the aluminized samples. The resin coated aluminum samples were much more specular than the silver samples. Coupling agents used to improve the adhesion of the protective silicone resin coating to the silver surface adversely affected the specularities.

    Dennis, W.E.

    1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    317

    Coating crystalline nuclear waste forms to improve inertness  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Crystalline waste forms of high simulated waste loading were successfully coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Sol-gel technology was used to produce microspheres that contained simulated waste. A separate process for cesium immobilization was developed, which loads 5 wt % Cs onto zeolite particles for subsequent coating. The chemical vapor deposition process was developed for depositing thin layers of carbon and silicon carbide onto particles in a fluidized-bed coater. Pyrolytic carbon-coated particles were extremely inert in numerous leach tests. Aqueous leach test results of coated waste forms were below detection limits of such sensitive analytical techniques as atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission.

    Stinton, D.P.; Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    319

    Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    320

    Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

    Riley, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    Characterization of High Strain Rate Mechanical behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy using 3D Digital Image Correlation  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Characterization of the material mechanical behavior at sub-Hopkinson regime (0.1 to 1000 s{sup -1}) is very challenging due to instrumentation limitations and the complexity of data analysis involved in dynamic loading. In this study, AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet specimens are tested using a custom designed servo-hydraulic machine in tension at nominal strain rates up to 1000 s{sup -1}. In order to resolve strain measurement artifacts, the specimen displacement is measured using 3D Digital Image correlation instead from actuator motion. The total strain is measured up to {approx} 30%, which is far beyond the measurable range of electric resistance strain gages. Stresses are calculated based on the elastic strains in the tab of a standard dog-bone shaped specimen. Using this technique, the stresses measured for strain rates of 100 s{sup -1} and lower show little or no noise comparing to load cell signals. When the strain rates are higher than 250 s{sup -1}, the noises and oscillations in the stress measurements are significantly decreased from {approx} 250 to 50 MPa. Overall, it is found that there are no significant differences in the elongation, although the material exhibits slight work hardening when the strain rate is increased from 1 to 100 s{sup -1}.

    Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Starbuck, J Michael [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    High Average Power, 100 Hz Repetition Rate, Table-top EUV/Soft X-ray Lasers  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Compact =13.9 nm and =18.9 nm lasers with >0.1 mW average power at 100 Hz repetition rate driven by a diode-pumped, 1 J, CPA laser were demonstrated. Wavelength scaling to =10.9 nm will be discussed.

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Durivage, Leon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Furch, Federico [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Curtis, Alden [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Salsbury, Chase [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Patel, Dinesh [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Menoni, Carmen [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    324

    High-energy threshold reaction rates on 0.8 GeV proton-irradiated thick Pb-target  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This works presents results of activation-aided determination of threshold reaction rates in 92 209Bi, natPb, 197Au, 181Ta, 169Tm, natIn, 93Nb, 64Zn, 65Cu, 63Cu, 59Co, 19F, and 12C samples and in 121 27Al samples. All the samples were aligned with the proton beam axis inside and outside the demountable 92-cm thick Pb target of 15-cm diameter assembled of 23 4-cm thick discs. The samples were placed on 12 target disks to reproduce the long axis distribution of protons and neutrons. In June 2006, the target was exposed for 18 hours to a 800-MeV proton beam extracted from the ITEP U-10 accelerator. The proton fluence and the proton beam shape were determined using the 27Al(p,x)7Be monitor reaction. The reaction rates were determined by the direct gamma-spectrometry techniques. In total, 1196 gamma-spectra have been measured, and about 1500 reaction rates determined. The measured reaction rates were simulated by the MCNPX code using the following databases: ENDF/B6 for neutrons below 20 MeV, MENDL2 for 20-100 MeV neutrons, and MENDL2P for proton cross sections up to 200 MeV. An acceptable agreement of simulations with experimental data has been found.

    Yu. E. Titarenko; V. F. Batyaev; A. Yu. Titarenko; M. A. Butko; K. V. Pavlov; R. S. Tikhonov; S. N. Florya; S. G. Mashnik; W. Gudowski

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling of 10 degrees Celsius and 20 degrees Celsius using PF-5060 as the test fluid and at atmospheric pressure. High-speed digital image acquisition techniques were used to perform hydrodynamic measurements. Boiling curves obtained from the experiments showed that the CNT coating enhanced critical heat flux (CHF) by 63% at 10 degrees Celsius subcooling. The CHF condition was not measured for the CNT sample at 20 degrees Celsius subcooling. Boiling incipience superheat for the CNT-coated surface is shown to be much lower than predicted by Hsu's hypothesis. It is proposed that bubble nucleation occurs within irregularities at the surface of the CNT coating. The irregularities could provide larger cavities than are available between individual nanotubes of the CNT coating. Measurements from high-speed imaging showed that the average bubble departing from the CNT coating in the nucleate boiling regime (excluding the much larger bubbles observed near CHF) was about 75% smaller (0.26 mm versus 1.01 mm)and had a departure frequency that was about 70% higher (50.46 Hz versus 30.10 Hz). The reduction in departure diameter is explained as a change in the configuration of the contact line, although further study is required. The increase in frequency is a consequence of the smaller bubbles, which require less time to grow. It is suggested that nucleation site density for the CNT coating must drastically increase to compensate for the smaller departure diameters if the rate of vapor creation is similar to or greater than that of a bare silicon surface.

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    Advances in Coatings Technologies for Corrosion and Wear ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    N.R. Sorensen and F.M. Hosking. Pulsed Ion Beam ... Chromate-Free Corrosion Resistant Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys R.G. Buchhiet ... Corrosion Inhibition Mechanisms in Polymer Systems for Compliant Coatings Technologies ... C.R. Aita. High Energy Ion Processing of Materials for Improved Hardcoatings

    327

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. [Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

    SciTech Connect

    In the previous period of work, twelve overlay hardfacing alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All twelve coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. The coating deposition and sample preparation procedures were described in the previous quarterly report. During the past quarter, all the coatings were erosion tested at 400 C. The erosion resistance of each coating was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. This progress report describes the erosion test results and coating microstructures. Also, a preliminary analysis on the relationships, between weld overlay coating hardness, microstructure, and erosion resistance will be discussed.

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    328

    METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    330

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    331

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    332

    Infinite cloud model of electrification by the precipitation mechanism in the presence of high rates of ion generation  

    SciTech Connect

    We have extended a simple, infinite cloud, precipitation mechanism model of thundercloud electrification to include effects due to the presence of radioactive aerosol particles resulting from fresh debris from a nuclear explosion. These effects involve ion generation, currents due to motions of ions and charged aerosol particles, and collection of ions and aerosol particles by hydrometeors and cloud droplets. Our conclusion is that an ion pair generation rate G> or approx. =10/sup 12/m/sup -3/ s/sup -1/ will prevent significant electric field growth.

    Spangler, J.D.; Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1979-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    Infinite cloud model of electrification by the precipitation mechanism in the pressence of high rates of ion generation  

    SciTech Connect

    We have extended a simple, infinite-cloud, precipitation-mechanism model of thundercloud electrification to include effects due to the presence of radioactive aerosol particles. These effects involve ion generation, currents due to motions of ions and charged aerosol particles, and collection of ions and aerosol particles by hydrometeors and cloud droplets. Our conclusion is that an ion-pair generation rate G equal to or greater than 10/sup 12/m/sup -3/s/sup -1/ will prevent significant electric-field growth.

    Spangler, J.D.; Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1978-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    334

    Use of very-high-frequency plasmas to prepare a-Si:H-based triple-junction solar cells at high deposition rates: Annual technical status report, 11 March 1998--11 March 1999  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during this phase of this subcontract. ECD researchers have made significant progress in advancing the very high frequency (VHF), high-rate technology. They demonstrated that 8.0% stable efficiencies can be achieved for a-Si:H cells whose i-layers are prepared at rates near 10 {angstrom}/s using the VHF technique. Presently, there is not a great difference in the performance of a-Si:H cells made using the VHF technique and i-layer deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s and that for cells made using the standard 13.56 MHz technique and rates near 1 {angstrom}/s in the same deposition system. In terms of the a-SiGe:H cells, researchers have completed a number of studies of devices with properties appropriate for middle-junction cells-that is, cells without Ag/ZnO back-reflectors having Voc values near 0.75V and Jsc values near 8.0 mA/cm{sup 2} when measured using AM1.5 light filtered using a 530-nm, low-band-pass filter. The stabilized proper ties for these cells prepared at i-layer rates near 10 {angstrom}/s are again similar to a-SiGe:H cells made using the same deposition hardware and the low-rate 13.56 MHz method. Establishing an initial 10.5% for a triple-junction cell whose i-layers are prepared at the high rates sets the baseline for ECD's future studies. The triple-junction cell degradation (10%--13%) with prolonged light soaking is similar to that regularly obtained for cells prepared at low i-layer deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s). This is important because the use of high-rate methods to prepare i-layers typically leads to less-stable materials and cells. Increasing the buffer-layer deposition rate to 6 {angstrom}/s leads to nearly a 15-min decrease in the total deposition time, whereas the increase in the n-layer and p-layer deposition rates both decrease the total time by 5 and 5.8 min, respectively. Thus, besides the i-layer growth rates, increasing the buffer layer growth rate has the strongest effect on the deposition time of the triple-junction semiconductor structures.

    Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Tsu, D.; Izu, M.

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    335

    Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization  

    SciTech Connect

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'Â?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    336

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    337

    Long-Term Testing of Protective Coatings and Claddings at Allegheny Energy Supply Hatfield's Ferry #2 Boiler  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Excessive waterwall corrosion due to the presence of iron sulfide (FeS) deposits was discovered in an Allegheny Energy Supply boiler firing eastern bituminous coal and retrofitted with a low-nitrogen oxide (NOx) cell burner (LNCB) system. Weld overlays with a high chromium (Cr) content reduced corrosion rates to tolerable levels. This report summarizes EPRI's long-term service tests of various coatings and weld overlays in the company's Hatfield's Ferry #2 boiler.

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    338

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    339

    Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    340

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    silicon carbide (SiC) substrate coated with tungsten. Although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is being method for coating preparation. Another example application is the tungsten-plasma spray- ing coated SiC-fiber (foam) for high heat-resistance. It is helpful to enhance the SiC-fiber heat-resistance that tungsten

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    342

    Superhydrophobic Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Technology Marketing Summary ORNL researchers have developed a variety of materials and processes to produce coatings with superhydrophobic properties ...

    343

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    344

    Understanding Compatibilities between Advanced Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    345

    Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry  

    SciTech Connect

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    346

    Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    347

    Coating method for graphite  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    348

    Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

    SciTech Connect

    Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications  

    SciTech Connect

    An ultrasupercritical (USC) boiler with higher steam temperature and pressure is expected to increase the efficiency of the coal-fired power plant and also decrease emissions of air pollutants. Ferritic/martensitic alloys have been developed with good creep strength for the key components in coal-fired USC plants. However, they typically suffer excessive steam-side oxidation, which contributes to one of main degradation mechanisms along with the fire-side corrosion in coal-fired boilers. As the steam temperature further increases in USC boilers, oxidation of the tube internals becomes an increasing concern, and protective coatings such as aluminide-based diffusion coatings need to be considered. However, conventional aluminizing processes via pack cementation or chemical vapor deposition are typically carried out at elevated temperatures (1000-1150 C). Thermochemical treatment of ferritic/martensitic alloys at such high temperatures could severely degrade their mechanical properties, particularly the alloy's creep resistance. The research focus of this project was to develop an aluminide coating with good oxidation resistance at temperatures {le} 700 C so that the coating processing would not detrimentally alter the creep performance of the ferritic/martensitic alloys. Nevertheless, when the aluminizing temperature is lowered, brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases, such as Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}, tend to form in the coating, which may reduce the resistance to fatigue cracking. Al-containing binary masteralloys were selected based on thermodynamic calculations to reduce the Al activity in the pack cementation process and thus to prevent the formation of brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases. Thermodynamic computations were carried out using commercial software HSC 5.0 for a series of packs containing various Cr-Al binary masteralloys. The calculation results indicate that the equilibrium partial pressures of Al halides at 700 C were a function of Al content in the Cr-Al alloys. Cr-25Al and Cr-15Al were chosen as the masteralloys in the pack cementation process. In contrast to pure Al masteralloy which led to the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings at 650 C, a coating consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an FeAl inner layer was formed at 700 C with the Cr-25Al masteralloy. By switching to the Cr-15Al masteralloy, thin FeAl coatings ({approx}12 {micro}m) containing < 50 at.% Al were achieved at 700 C. The effect of the amount of masteralloys on coating growth was also studied by employing packs containing 2NH{sub 4}Cl-x(Cr-15Al)-(98-x)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where x = 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 wt.%. It was noticed that when the Cr-15Al masteralloy was increased from 10 to 40 wt.% in the pack, both coating thickness and surface Al content increased, suggesting that gas phase kinetics played an important role in Al deposition. However, with further increase of the masteralloy, solid state diffusion became the rate-limiting factor. The long-term oxidation performance of the aluminide coatings synthesized at 700 C with Cr-25Al and Cr-15Al masteralloys was evaluated in the water vapor environment at 650-700 C. The low-temperature pack coatings demonstrated excellent oxidation resistance at 650 C in humid air after {approx}1.2 yr testing. Longer lifetimes can be expected for these thin coatings due to minimal interdiffusion at this testing temperature. Exposure at 700 C was conducted to accelerate coating failure via increased interdiffusion of Al with the substrate alloy. The coatings also exhibited good oxidation protection up to 6,000-8,000 h at 700 C, with longer testing needed for coating failure to occur. Furthermore, the oxidation results indicate that in addition to the Al reservoir (as determined by the Al content and coating thickness), the initial coating surface quality had a significant impact on the oxidation behavior. In addition, the effect of various pack aluminide coatings on the creep resistance of coated T91 was investigated. Three representative types of coatings with

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    350

    A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution  

    SciTech Connect

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

    Lima, Frederico A.; Milne, Christopher J.; Amarasinghe, Dimali C. V.; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; Veen, Renske M. van der; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Mourik, Frank van; Chergui, Majed [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, ISIC, FSB, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Johnson, Steven L.; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abela, Rafael [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Design and demonstration of heat pipe cooling for NASP and evaluation of heating methods at high heating rates  

    SciTech Connect

    An evaluation of two heating methods for demonstration of NASP leading edge heat pipe technology was conducted. The heating methods were and rf induction heated plasma jet and direct rf induction. Tests were conducted to determine coupling from the argon plasma jet on a surface physically similar to a heat pipe. A molybdenum tipped calorimeter was fabricated and installed in an rf induction heated plasma jet for the test. The calorimetric measurements indicated a maximum power coupling of approximately 500 W/cm{sup 2} with the rf plasma jet. The effect of change in gas composition on the heating rate was investigated using helium. An alternative to the plasma heating of a heat pipe tip, an rf concentrator was evaluated for coupling to the hemispherical tip of a heat pipe. A refractory metal heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested for the evaluation. The heat pipe was designed for operation at 1400 to 1900 K with power input to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a hemispherical nose tip. Power input of 800 W/cm{sup 2} was demonstrated using the rf concentrator. 2 refs., 13 figs.

    Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    352

    Rate Schedules  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

    353

    Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08  

    SciTech Connect

    The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter, conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    354

    Tribological Study of Plasma Sprayed Wear Resistant Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Higher quality coatings are by and large achieved using high energy air plasma spraying system. Cr2O3.2TiO2 is ideal for hard chrome replacement.As sprayed  ...

    355

    Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    356

    Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    358

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is well known that fireside corrosion of waterwall panels in coal-fired boilers increased with the introduction of low NOx combustion systems since the early 1980s. This report describes ongoing work to evaluate protective coating solutions used to mitigate the wastage due to corrosion, and to determine which provide the greatest resistance to the circumferential cracking phenomena. It includes recent laboratory corrosion assisted thermal fatigue tests and analyses of field-exposed samples of ...

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    359

    Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells at high rates by glow discharge of disilane. Final subcontract report, January 1985-July 1986  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report summarizes the results of recent a-Si:H thin-film photovoltaic (PV) materials research. The work reported here concerned the fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells at high deposition rates using disilane. This task required the construction of a new, dual-chamber deposition system to control the dopant profile between the heavily doped p-type layer and the undoped (intrinsic) layer in the solar cell structure. Conditions were sought that would produce high-quality films at a high deposition rate. Complete photovoltaic devices were fabricated. In disilane-deposited material, the optimum substrate temperature is much higher than in silane material, presumably because it is harder to eliminate the excess hydrogen in the former. The efficiency of the best disilane cell was about 7%, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.80 V, a short-circuit current density of 14.7 mA cm/sup -2/ and a fill factor of 0.59. The most likely area for improvement is in the voltage, where values as high as 0.9 V should be possible with careful adjustment of the cell structure.

    Vanier, P.E.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

    362

    Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000şC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    363

    Effect of porosity on resistance of epoxy coatings to cold-wall blistering  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Electric utilities use polymer coatings for corrosion protection in a variety of locations, such as cooling towers, water boxes, and tubesheets. In some cases, these coatings are vulnerable to failure in areas where a temperature gradient exists between a cold substrate and relatively warm fluid (cold-wall blistering). Six epoxy-based coating systems were tested for their resistance to degradation in the form of cold wall blistering. The coatings were applied to type 1010 steel substrates and exposed to heated water for up to 10 months in Atlas test cells as a modified version of NACE Standard TM0174. The performance of the coatings was measured by the exposure time for the coatings to start blistering, the time for the corrosion potential of the coating substrates to shift toward active values, and the delamination rate of the coatings. Good cold-wall blistering resistance was observed for two polyamine-cured epoxy coating systems with porosity levels 1 vol%. Poor cold-wall blistering resistance was shown by a polyamide epoxy system, an amine adduct epoxy system, and an amido-amine epoxy system, all of which had porosity levels > 1 vol%. Most of the coating samples exhibited linear blistering rates, which indicated that the kinetics of cold-wall blistering were diffusion controlled. The two coating systems that showed the best resistance to cold-wall blistering also showed the lowest blistering rates, indicating that these coatings may have had lower permeabilities and/or better adherences than the poorer performing coatings, probably as a result of their lower porosity levels and similar compositions.

    Kosek, J.R.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    364

    Durability of Solar Reflective Materials with an Alumina Hard Coat Produced by Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    A promising low-cost reflector material for solar concentrating power (CSP) generation is a silvered substrate protected by an alumina coating several microns thick. The alumina hard coat is deposited under high vacuum by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD). Samples of this material have been produced both by batch and continuous roll-coating processes. The substrate materials investigated were polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET laminated to stainless-steel foil, and chrome-plated carbon steel strip. The advantage of steel strip compared to PET is that it withstands a higher process temperature and lowers the final product installation costs. In this paper, we compare the durability of batch and roll-coated reflective materials with an alumina deposition rate as high as 10 nm/s. In general, the durability of the samples is found to be excellent. Comparisons between accelerated and outdoor exposure testing results indicate that these front-surface mirrors are more susceptible to weather conditions not simulated by accelerated tests (i.e., rain, sleet, snow, etc.) than other types of solar reflectors. For long-term durability, edge protection will be necessary, and durability could be improved by the addition of an adhesion-promoting layer between the silver and alumina.

    Kennedy, C. E.; Smilgys, R. V.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    365

    Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    366

    Investigation on Oxidation Resistance of NiCoCrAlY Coating ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Investigation on Oxidation Resistance of NiCoCrAlY Coating Irradiated by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam. Author(s), Xianxiu Mei, Cunxia  ...

    367

    A Micro-Indentation Method for Assessment of TBC Bond Coat ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sep 16, 2007 ... NETL bond-coated coupons were subjected to cumulative rapid thermal cycling, and after every 100 high temperature thermal cycles, ...

    368

    The Effect of MnCoO-CeO Spinel Coating Thickness on Electrical ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A Novel Electrode Material for Symmetrical Solid Oxide Fuel Cells · Ceramic ... High Performance Oxide Protective Coatings for SOFC Components · Influence of ...

    369

    Energy Rating  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

    Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    Insertion Rates  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    HOME > Insertion Rates. TECH HEADLINES. Research Explores a New Layer in Additive Manufacturin... Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility.

    371

    Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    372

    UV Curable Coatings -- Marketing Kit  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Ultra violet (UV) curable coatings are being successfully applied to electric motors, metal shafts, cell phones, printing, plastic packaging, and wood laminates. Demand is expected to expand to an even greater number of end products as issues related to environmental well-being, finish quality, cost reductions, and manufacturing efficiencies drive this market. This UV Curable Coatings-Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel present UV curable coating opportunities to custo...

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    373

    Thermal and Cold Sprayed Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013... Coating Evaluated by Micro and Nano Indentation: Meysam Keshavarz1; Mohd Hasbullah bin Hj.Idris1; 1UTM,Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

    374

    Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods  

    SciTech Connect

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    High-Strain-Rate II  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A 40kJ instrumented pendulum machine has been used to perform DWTT test for an API X80 pipeline steel to acquire the force-displacement curve, which ...

    376

    Silicon nucleation and film evolution on silicon dioxide using disilane: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of very smooth silicon at high deposition rates  

    SciTech Connect

    An investigation of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon on SiO{sub 2} has been performed at temperatures ranging from 590 to 900 C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 Torr. Deposition at 590 C yields amorphous silicon films with the corresponding ultrasmooth surface with a deposition rate of 68 nm/min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of a sample deposited at 625 C and 1 Torr reveals a bilayer structure which is amorphous at the growth surface and crystallized at the oxide interface. Higher temperatures yield polycrystalline films where the surface roughness depends strongly on both deposition pressure and temperature. Silane-based amorphous silicon deposition in conventional systems yields the expected ultrasmooth surfaces, but at greatly reduced deposition rates unsuitable for single-wafer processing. However, disilane, over the process window considered here, yields growth rates high enough to be appropriate for single-wafer manufacturing, thus providing a viable means for deposition of very smooth silicon films on SiO{sub 2} in a single-wafer environment.

    Violette, K.E.; Oeztuerk, M.C.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    377

    Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    378

    Rate schedule  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

    379

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders  

    SciTech Connect

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    380

    CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling  

    SciTech Connect

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    382

    High Temperature Corrosion  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 18, 2010 ... Protective Coatings for Corrosion Resistance at High Temperatures: Vilupanur Ravi1; Thuan Nguyen1; Alexander Ly1; Kameron Harmon1; ...

    383

    Commercial oxide paints as coatings for SiGe thermoelectric materials  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicon-germanium alloys are used as thermoelectric materials for radioisotope thermoelectric generators. One problem is the loss of the alloy by sublimation. In the Unicouple, sublimation was minimized by a Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coating. In the Multicouple design the application of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coatings which is done at high temperature is not practical. Suppression of sublimation in the Multicouple design is presently accomplished by applying glass coatings. The difficulties encountered with the glass coatings are associated with the poor adherence of the coatings. In the present study, commercial oxide points (mainly ZrO/sub 2/) which have low thermal expansion coefficients are used as coating materials. No spalling from the surface of the coated sample occurred in 1506 hours at 1080/sup 0/C in vacuum, and sublimation was reduced significantly. Zirconium silicate was observed on the surface by x-ray diffraction.

    Amano, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1986-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    384

    Thin film ion conducting coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    385

    Sodium compatibility studies of low friction carbide coatings for reactor application  

    SciTech Connect

    Design requirements for low friction materials in FFTF have led to an experimental sodium compatibility program, the objective of which is to select and qualify a low friction coating for the fuel assembly duct load pad. Results are given for chromium carbide and titanium carbide-based coatings on stainless steel exposed to 1160 deg F sodium for several thousand hours. A chromium carbide coating (with a nichrome binder) having an average corrosion rate of approximately 0.25 mpy exhibits optimum sodium compatibility behavior of the materials examined. Both plasma-sprayed chromium carbide and titanium carbide based coatings were found to be unstable when exposed to sodium. (auth)

    Whitlow, G.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Wu, P.C.S.

    1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    386

    Performance of carbon-based hot frit substrates. 2, Coating performance studies in hydrogen at atmospheric pressure  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Erosion tests were conducted on coated graphite and 2D, 3D carbon- carbons in 1 atm hydrogen at high temperatures. Refractory NbC, TaC coatings were used. It was found that the most effective combination of coating and substrate was TaC deposited by chemical vapor reaction method on AXF-5QI graphite.

    Barletta, R.; Vanier, P.; Adams, J.; Svandrlik, J.; Powell, J.R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    387

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings | Department...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV)...

    388

    Solar selective absorption coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron ...

    389

    Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers  

    SciTech Connect

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    390

    High-Density-Infrared Transient Liquid Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Infrared energy is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between 0.78 mm ..... that may bring to the market new materials that cannot be produced economically ... For more information, contact C.A. Blue, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ...

    391

    High-Performance Nanostructured Coating (Fact Sheet)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The University of California San Diego is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    392

    Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    393

    Impact of ALD Coating on Mn-rich Cathode Materials (Presentation)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    LG Chem Power Inc. (LGCPI) and NREL have collaborated to demonstrate the scalability of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating process over the last 6 months, and the benefits of ALD coatings for long-term cycling and calendar life are being quantified. The objectives of this work are two-fold: 1) to evaluate the scalability of the process to coat LGCPI cathodes with alumina using the ALD technique, and 2) to demonstrate improvements in rate capability and life of ALD-coated LGCPI electrodes. NREL received samples of baseline material to be coated from LGCPI. NREL carried out ALD coating of the samples with help from a subcontractor, ALD Nanosolutions. NREL fabricated cells from those samples for quick screening and feedback to ALD Nanosolutions. LGCPI is currently fabricating larger-format cells for further evaluation.

    Santhanagopalan, S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    394

    Ceramic composite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1989-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    396

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    397

    Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    398

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    399

    Mechanisms, Models, and Simulations of Metal-Coated Fiber Consolidation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of existing contacts as matrix plasticity and/or PLC. When the voids are small the coated fiber bundle shrinks-shaped voids with a shape factor similar to that observed in the experiments. Creep rates were microstructure fractions were introduced into the model using micromechanics-based creep constitutive relationships

    Wadley, Haydn

    400

    Environmental Effects/Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 18, 2011 ... Presence of steam accelerated creep rates and dramatically reduced ... turbine- based power generation and aerospace propulsion systems as ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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    401

    Optimization of solar-selective paint coatings. Final report, September 15, 1980-June 15, 1982  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objective of this program was the development of low-cost, high-performance, solar-selective paint coatings for solar flat-plate collector (FPC) use and passive thermal wall application. Thickness-sensitive selective paint (TSSP) coating development was intended to demonstrate large-scale producibility. Thickness-insensitive selective paint (TISP) coating development was intended to develop and optimize the coating for passive solar systems and FPC applications. Low-cost, high-performance TSSP coatings and processes were developed to demonstrate large-scale producibility and meet all program goals. Dip, spray, roll, laminating and gravure processes were investigated and used to produce final samples. High-speed gravure coating was selected as the most promising process for solar foil fabrication. Development and optimization of TISP coatings was not completely successful. A variation in reflective metal pigment was suspected of being the primary problem, although other variables may have contributed. Consistent repeating of optical properties of these coatings achieved on the previous program was not achieved. However, a new method of achieving better control of coating components was conceived and preliminary development initiated. The new concept was described as an engineered pigment approach. The engineered pigment approach uses TSSP-coated metal foil particles instead of uncoated aluminum flakes in a liquid TSSP coating. The approach offers many advantages over the use of uncoated aluminum flakes: control of particle flatness, size, and thickness; control of the optical selectivity of each particle; and control of the liquid TSSP coating surrounding the coated particles.

    McChesney, M.A.; Zimmer, P.B.; Lin, R.J.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

    2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    403

    A fiber damage model for early stage consolidation of metal-coated fibers  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) possess combinations of specific modulus, strength, and creep resistance that are well suited for a variety of aerospace applications. Recent studies of the high temperature consolidation of titanium alloy coated {alpha}-alumina fiber tows and SiC monofilaments have both revealed the widespread occurrence of fiber bending and fracture during early stage consolidation. This damage was shown to arise from the bending of unaligned fibers during consolidation and was found to be affected by the mechanical behavior of the metal-metal contacts at fiber crossovers. To predict the incidence of fiber fracture during early stage high temperature consolidation, a time-temperature dependent micromechanical model incorporating the evolving contact geometry and mechanical behavior of both the metal matrix and the ceramic fibers has been combined with a statistical representation of crossovers in the pre-consolidated layup. The damage predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental results. The model has subsequently been used to explore the effects of fiber strength, matrix constitutive properties and the processing conditions upon the incidence of fiber fracture. It reveals the existence of a temperature dependent pressurization rate below which fracture is relatively unlikely. This critical pressure rate can be significantly increased by the enhanced superplasticity of the initially nanocrystalline coating.

    Warren, J.; Elzey, D.M.; Wadley, H.N.G. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    404

    Novel Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Coatings for Metal Alloys in Coal-fired Environments  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Intermetallic coatings (iron aluminide and nickel aluminide) were prepared by a novel reaction process. In the process, the aluminide coating is formed by an in-situ reaction between the aluminum powder fed through a plasma transferred arc (PTA) torch and the metal substrate (steel or Ni-base alloy). Subjected to the high temperature within an argon plasma zone, aluminum powder and the surface of the substrate melt and react to form the aluminide coatings. The prepared coatings were found to be aluminide phases that are porosity-free and metallurgically bonded to the substrate. The coatings also exhibit excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance under the conditions which simulate the steam-side and fire-side environments in coal-fired boilers. It is expected that the principle demonstrated in this process can be applied to the preparation of other intermetallic and alloy coatings.

    Z. Zak Fang; H. Y. Sohn

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    405

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Tariff Rates FY 2014 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2013 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2012 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2011 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2010 Rates and Rate Schedules FY...

    406

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    407

    Low-Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coating for Gas Turbines: Material Testing Status  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Advanced gas turbines rely on air-cooled components protected by ceramic thermal barrier coatings to survive increasingly high operating temperatures. A new generation of coatings offers lower thermal conductivity, potentially further reducing component heat loading, which can improve durability, lower life cycle cost, and enable longer range efficiency gains. Testing improved coatings is a necessary step towards field demonstration.BackgroundAs gas turbine ...

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    408

    The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagaraj, B.A. [General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Aircraft Engine Group

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    409

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    411

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    412

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    A Comprehensive Analysis of Cardiac Dose in Balloon-Based High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

    SciTech Connect

    Purpose: To investigate radiation dose to the heart in 60 patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using MammoSite or Contura applicators. Methods and Materials: We studied 60 consecutive women with breast cancer who were treated with 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions using MammoSite (n = 37) or Contura (n = 23) applicators. The whole heart and the left and right ventricles were retrospectively delineated, and dose-volume histograms were analyzed. Multiple dosimetrics were reported, such as mean dose (D{sub mean}); relative volume receiving 1.7, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (V1.7, V5, V10, and V20, respectively); dose to 1 cc (D{sub 1cc}); and maximum point dose (D{sub max}). Biologic metrics, biologically effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose were computed. The impact of lumpectomy cavity location on cardiac dose was investigated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation of D{sub mean} was 2.45 {+-} 0.94 Gy (range, 0.56-4.68) and 3.29 {+-} 1.28 Gy (range, 0.77-6.35) for the heart and the ventricles, respectively. The average whole heart V5 and V10 values were 10.2% and 1.3%, respectively, and the heart D{sub max} was >20 Gy in 7 of 60 (11.7%) patients and >25 Gy in 3 of 60 (5%) patients. No cardiac tissue received {>=}30 Gy. The V1.7, V5, V10, V20, and D{sub mean} values were all higher for the ventricles than for the whole heart. For balloons located in the upper inner quadrant of the breast, the average whole heart D{sub mean} was highest. The D{sub mean}, biologically effective dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose values for heart and ventricles decreased with increasing minimal distance from the surface of the balloon. Conclusions: On the basis of these comprehensive cardiac dosimetric data, we recommend that cardiac dose be routinely reported and kept as low as possible in balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning for patients with left-sided breast cancer so the correlation with future cardiac toxicity data can be investigated.

    Valakh, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir@valakh.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E. Day; Trombetta, Mark G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    414

    DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES  

    SciTech Connect

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying  

    SciTech Connect

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    416

    LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures  

    SciTech Connect

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Category Rating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... Gold category: highly proficient with an overall comprehensive level of knowledge; skills, and abilities of the job based on a complete review of ...

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    3: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw 3: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw September 9, 2011 - 10:47am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Reporter. A remote user can view files on the target system and gain full control of the target application. PLATFORM: All pre-9.3 versions of Reporter installed on a Windows server are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Full Control. reference LINKS: Blue Coat Security Advisory ID: SA60 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026023 About Path Traversal IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Reporter installed on a Windows server is vulnerable to an HTTP directory traversal attack. An unauthenticated user can browse the file system and read any file. Data from these files can be used by an attacker to gain

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high rate coating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Radiation Control Coatings Installed on Federal Buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The technical objectives of this CRADA comprise technology deployment and energy conservation efforts with the radiation control coatings industry and the utility sector. The results of this collaboration include a high-level data reporting, analysis and management system to support the deployment efforts. The technical objectives include successfully install, commission, operate, maintain and document the performance of radiation control coatings on roofs at Tyndall AFB and the Buildings Technology Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; determine the life cycle savings that can be achieved by using radiation control coatings on entire roofs at Tyndall AFB, based on documented installed cost and operating maintenance costs with and without the coatings; determine if any specific improvements are required in the coatings before they can be successfully deployed in the federal sector; determine the most effective way to facilitate the widespread and rapid deployment of radiation control coatings in the federal sector; and clearly define any barriers to deployment.

    Kaba, R.L.; Petrie, T.W.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with the short standoff distance and is not a reflection of the normal quality of plasma sprayed coatings. Even if coating porosity could be reduced, the coupling of an alloy coating to a polymer-based barrier coating in the same electrolyte is not recommended. Therefore, polymer coatings that can be field applied to the tube ends after roller expansion should be sought.

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    423

    Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

    Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    425

    Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders  

    SciTech Connect

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

    427

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet ...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet...

    428

    Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

    SciTech Connect

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

    SciTech Connect

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

    SciTech Connect

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

    Corman, G.S.; Luthra, K.L.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    BWR Vessel and Internals Project Evaluation of Zirconium Oxide Protective Coatings in BWR Environment (BWRVIP-81)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes development of a method to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of stainless steel in boiling water reactors (BWRs) by in-situ deposition of a highly resistive dielectric coating of zirconium oxide. The coating decreases the Electrochemical Corrosion Potential (ECP) of stainless steel in BWR water even in the absence of added hydrogen.

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steel. Part 2, Water flow rate effects in high sulfur plate steel  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high- sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O{sub 2} < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243{degrees}C, under loading conditions ({Delta}K, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/sec. or 4.7 m/sec. was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi- stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/sec. and 5.0 m/sec. parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity.

    James, L.A; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States); Cullen, W.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    433

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component for 2011 Firm Power Rates 2010 Rates and Rate Schedule - Current * 2009 Rates and Rate Schedule 2008 Rates and...

    434

    RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    435

    RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Preparation and properties of high-deposition-rate a-Si:H films and solar cells using disilane: Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1987--30 April 1988  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report contains results of the first year of research on producing p-i-n amorphous silicon solar cells with the intrinsic layer deposited from higher order silanes at deposition rates of 1 nm/s or more. The research was divided into three major areas: diagnostic studies of monosilane and disilane RF discharges using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to assist in optimizing discharge conditions and gas-phase processes; parametric studies of material properties of 1-layers prepared form disilane as a function of deposition rate and other process parameters; and parametric studies of p-i-n devices with the i-layer prepared from disilane at various deposition rates. The focus during the first year was to fabricate a p-i-n solar cell with 9/percent/ AM1.5 efficiency over an area greater than 0.08 cm/sup 2/ with the i-layer deposited at 1 nm/s or more. Material properties such as the dark and AM1.5 light conductivities, optical band gap, and conductivity activation energy showed a weak dependence on deposition rate. The performance characteristics of unoptimized p-i-n solar cells with i-layers prepared from disilane were independent of the deposition rate of the i-layer. A p-i-n device was prepared at a rate close to 1 nm/s with an AM1.5 efficiency of 9/percent/. 20 refs, 26 figs, 2 tabs.

    Bhat, P.K.; Chatham, H.; Madan, A.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    437

    Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M. [LERMPS-UTBM (Site de Sevenans), 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    Cathode Coating (IN-09-061)  

    A team of scientists at Argonne National Laboratory has developed a special coating for the cathodes used in lithium batteries. With the coating, batteries charge and discharge more quickly, without a loss in performance.

    439

    Superhydrophobic Metal-Oxide Thin Film Coatings  

    Because of their numerous advantages and applications, considerable efforts have been expended to develop superhydrophobic (water repellant) coatings. However, traditional superhydrophobic coatings are soft in nature, with a Teflon-like surface ...

    440

    Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the