Sample records for high precision products

  1. Ultrafast, high precision gated integrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast, high precision gated integrator has been developed by introducing new design approaches that overcome the problems associated with earlier gated integrator circuits. The very high speed is evidenced by the output settling time of less than 50 ns and 20 MHz input pulse rate. The very high precision is demonstrated by the total output offset error of less than 0.2mV and the output droop rate of less than 10{mu}V/{mu}s. This paper describes the theory of this new gated integrator circuit operation. The completed circuit test results are presented.

  2. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: high-precision absolute yaw encoder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-precision absolute yaw encoder Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events,...

  4. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, K.K.D.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space is disclosed. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degrees of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns. 3 figs.

  5. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Kar-Keung David (Mountain View, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degreed of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns.

  6. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  7. High Precision Radiometric Dating of Sedimentary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, G. N.

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop field, petrographic and geochemical criteria to allow high precision U-Pb dating of sedimentary minerals within rapidly deposited sequences of carbonate and clastic rocks.

  8. High precision triangular waveform generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Theodore R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and descending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  9. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  10. High-Precision Computation and Mathematical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. This paper presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides some analysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, scattering amplitudes of quarks, gluons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, Ising theory, quantum field theory and experimental mathematics. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable component of a modern large-scale scientific computing environment.

  11. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  12. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  13. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  14. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  15. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, Thomas C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Marchant, Norman J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bolton, Steven M. (Pocatello, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  16. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  17. Faculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    , manipulation and metrology systems targeting additive manufacturing; · New kinematics, quasi-perfect guidings, actuators, transmission systems, sensors and methods targeting ultra-high precision additive manufacturingFaculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing at the Ecole Polytechnique

  18. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Steven A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  19. Optimization Online - Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Gunnels

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 10, 2008 ... Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra on parallel architectures for nonlinear discrete optimization. John Gunnels(gunnels ***at*** ...

  20. High-precision triangular-waveform generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, T.R.

    1981-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and decending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  1. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, 6009, WA (Australia)

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  2. Manufacturing Ultra-Precision Meso-scale Products by Coining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Davis, P J; Rickens, K; Osmer, J; Brinksmeier, E

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for replicating ultra-precision, meso-scale features onto a near-net-shape metallic blank has been demonstrated. The 'coining' technology can be used to imprint a wide range of features and/or profiles into two opposing surfaces. The instrumented system provides the ability to measure and control the product thickness and total thickness variation (TTV). The coining mechanism relies on kinematic principles to accurately and efficiently produce ultra-precision work pieces without the production of by products such as machining chips, or grinding swarf while preserving surface finish, material structure and overall form. Coining has been developed as a niche process for manufacturing difficult to machine, millimeter size components made from materials that may present hazardous conditions. In the case described in this paper a refractory metal part, tantalum (Ta) was produced with 4 {micro}m peak to valley 50 {micro}m special wavelength sine wave coined into the surface of 50 {micro}m blank. This technique shows promise for use on ductile materials that cannot be precision machined with conventional single crystal diamond tooling and/or has strict requirements on subsurface damage, surface impurities and grain structure. As a production process, it can be used to reduce manufacturing costs where large numbers of ultra-precision, repetitive designs are required and produce parts out of hazardous materials without generating added waste.

  3. SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision Instrument for In-Situ Characterization of the Size and SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High...

  4. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  5. High-precision thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolodner, Paul [Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an apparatus for performing high-precision electrical and thermal characterization of thermoelectric modules (TEMs). The apparatus is calibrated for operation between 20?°C and 80?°C and is normally used for measurements of heat currents in the range 0–10 W. Precision thermometry based on miniature thermistor probes enables an absolute temperature accuracy of better than 0.010?°C. The use of vacuum isolation, thermal guarding, and radiation shielding, augmented by a careful accounting of stray heat leaks and uncertainties, allows the heat current through the TEM under test to be determined with a precision of a few mW. The fractional precision of all measured parameters is approximately 0.1%.

  6. Fiber optic synchronisation architecture for high precision GPS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santerre, Rock

    Fiber optic synchronisation architecture for high precision GPS applications Daniel Macias and the receiver is monitored at the millimetre level [2]. These issues can be solved using optical fiber links), Université Laval, Québec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada sophie.larochelle@gel.ulaval.ca Abstract: We propose a GPS-over-fiber

  7. Zliding: Fluid Zooming and Sliding for High Precision Parameter Manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Ravin

    propose and study a mechanism for use with pressure sensitive input devices, called Zoom SlidingZliding: Fluid Zooming and Sliding for High Precision Parameter Manipulation Gonzalo Ramos, Ravin to the parameter itself. This paper introduces the notion of Zoom Sliding, or Zliding, for fluid integrated

  8. High precision measurements of Na-26 beta(-) decay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinyer, GF; Svensson, CE; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, AN; Austin, RAE; Ball, GC; Chakrawarthy, RS; Finlay, P.; Garrett, PE; Hackman, G.; Hardy, John C.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, VE; Koopmans, KA; Kulp, WD; Leslie, JR; Macdonald, JA; Morton, AC; Ormand, WE; Osborne, CJ; Pearson, CJ; Phillips, AA; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, MA; Scraggs, HC; Schwarzenberg, J.; Smith, MB; Valiente-Dobon, JJ; Waddington, JC; Wood, JL; Zganjar, EF.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision measurements of the half-life and beta-branching ratios for the beta(-) decay of Na-26 to Mg-26 have been measured in beta-counting and gamma-decay experiments, respectively. A 4 pi proportional counter and fast tape transport system...

  9. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenky, S M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of $n$-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  10. Installation of a high-precision Kirsten Hacker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Installation of a high-precision BPM in BC3 Kirsten Hacker 20-03-07 #12;BPM installed in BC2=T3*c dE/E=D/R16 EBPM T1 T2 T3 ~300mm 3um position resolution -> 1e-5 Energy resoution!!! BPM BPM #12;BPM for the Bunch Compressors beam stripline vacuumstripline vacuumStripline Vacuum Beam beam tapering

  11. High-precision calculations of vortex sheet motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, J.S. (Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR (United States)); Baker, G.R. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a vortex sheet undergoing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is known to be ill-posed, causing deterioration in numerical calculations from the rapid growth of round-off errors. In particular, it is the smallest scales (introduced by round-off) that grow the fastest. Krasny introduced a spectral filter to suppress the growth of round-off errors of the smallest scales. He was then able to detect evidence supporting asymptotic studies that indicate the formation of a curvature singularity in finite time. We use high precision interval arithmetic, coded in C + +, to re-examine the evolution of a vortex sheet from initial conditions used previously by several researchers. Most importantly, our results are free from the influence of round-off errors. We show excellent agreement between results obtained through high precision interval arithmetic and through the use of Krasny's spectral filter. In particular, our results support the formation of a curvature singularity in finite time. After the time of singularity formation, the markers move in peculiar patterns. We rule out any possibility of this motion resulting from round-off errors, but it does depend on the level of resolution. We find no consistent behavior in the motion of the markers as we improve the resolution of the vortex sheet. Also, we find some disagreement between the results obtained through high precision interval arithmetic and through the use of the spectral filter. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  12. High-Precision Computation: Mathematical Physics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barrio, R.; Borwein, J. M.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit oating-point arithmetic is suficiently accurate for most scientic applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientic computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion e ort. This pa- per presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides someanalysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, studies of the one structure constant, scattering amplitudes of quarks, glu- ons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, experimental mathematics, evaluation of orthogonal polynomials, numerical integration of ODEs, computation of periodic orbits, studies of the splitting of separatrices, detection of strange nonchaotic at- tractors, Ising theory, quantum held theory, and discrete dynamical systems. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable compo- nent of a modern large-scale scientic computing environment.

  13. High-precision micro/nano-scale machining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kapoor, Shiv G.; Bourne, Keith Allen; DeVor, Richard E.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision micro/nanoscale machining system. A multi-axis movement machine provides relative movement along multiple axes between a workpiece and a tool holder. A cutting tool is disposed on a flexible cantilever held by the tool holder, the tool holder being movable to provide at least two of the axes to set the angle and distance of the cutting tool relative to the workpiece. A feedback control system uses measurement of deflection of the cantilever during cutting to maintain a desired cantilever deflection and hence a desired load on the cutting tool.

  14. High Precision Astrometry in Asteroid Mitigation - the NEOShield Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Perna, Davide; Bancelin, David; Thuillot, William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the currently known Near Earth Objects (NEOs), roughly 1400 are classified as being potentially hazardous asteroids. The recent Chelyabinsk event has shown that these objects can pose a real threat to mankind. We illustrate that high precision asteroid astrometry plays a vital role in determining potential impact risks, selecting targets for deflection demonstration missions and evaluating mitigation mission success. After a brief introduction to the NEOShield project, an international effort initiated by the European Commission to investigate aspects of NEO mitigation in a comprehensive fashion, we discuss current astrometric performances, requirements and possible issues with NEO risk assessment and deflection demonstration missions.

  15. Bootstrap tomography of high-precision pulses for quantum control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Dobrovitski; G. de Lange; D. Ristè; R. Hanson

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-time dynamical decoupling and quantum control of qubits require high-precision control pulses. Full characterization (quantum tomography) of imperfect pulses presents a bootstrap problem: tomography requires initial states of a qubit which can not be prepared without imperfect pulses. We present a protocol for pulse error analysis, specifically tailored for a wide range of the single solid-state electron spins. Using a single electron spin of a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, we experimentally verify the correctness of the protocol, and demonstrate its usefulness for quantum control tasks.

  16. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  17. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  18. Precision optical slit for high heat load or ultra high vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Nord C. (Hayward, CA); DiGennaro, Richard S. (Albany, CA); Swain, Thomas L. (Richmond, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to slits used in optics that must be precisely aligned and adjusted. The optical slits of the present invention are useful in x-ray optics, x-ray beam lines, optical systems in which the entrance slit is critical for high wavelength resolution. The invention is particularly useful in ultra high vacuum systems where lubricants are difficult to use and designs which avoid the movement of metal parts against one another are important, such as monochrometers for high wavelength resolution with ultra high vacuum systems. The invention further relates to optical systems in which temperature characteristics of the slit materials is important. The present invention yet additionally relates to precision slits wherein the opposing edges of the slit must be precisely moved relative to a center line between the edges with each edge retaining its parallel orientation with respect to the other edge and/or the center line.

  19. Precision optical slit for high heat load or ultra high vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, N.C.; DiGennaro, R.S.; Swain, T.L.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to slits used in optics that must be precisely aligned and adjusted. The optical slits of the present invention are useful in x-ray optics, x-ray beam lines, optical systems in which the entrance slit is critical for high wavelength resolution. The invention is particularly useful in ultra high vacuum systems where lubricants are difficult to use and designs which avoid the movement of metal parts against one another are important, such as monochromators for high wavelength resolution with ultra high vacuum systems. The invention further relates to optical systems in which temperature characteristics of the slit materials is important. The present invention yet additionally relates to precision slits wherein the opposing edges of the slit must be precisely moved relative to a center line between the edges with each edge retaining its parallel orientation with respect to the other edge and/or the center line. 21 figures.

  20. ANTIHYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND PRECISION SPECTROSCOPY WITH ATHENA/AD-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER; C. AMSLER; ET AL

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CPT invariance is a fundamental property of quantum field theories in flat space-time. Principal consequences include the predictions that particles and their antiparticles have equal masses and lifetimes, and equal and opposite electric charges and magnetic moments. It also follows that the fine structure, hyperfine structure, and Lamb shifts of matter and antimatter bound systems should be identical. It is proposed to generate new stringent tests of CPT using precision spectroscopy on antihydrogen atoms. An experiment to produce antihydrogen at rest has been approved for running at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We describe the fundamental features of this experiment and the experimental approach to the first phase of the program, the formation and identification of low energy antihydrogen.

  1. HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mark Ammons, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division L-210, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Pitman, Joe [Exploration Sciences, P.O. Box 24, Pine, CO 80470 (United States); Woodruff, Robert A. [2081 Evergreen Avenue, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); Belikov, Ruslan, E-mail: guyon@naoj.org [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets require sub-{mu}as accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must, however, overcome astrometric distortions, which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surroundings. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the background stars and are therefore calibrated. We describe the technique, detail how the data collected by the wide-field camera are used to derive astrometric motion, and identify the main sources of astrometric error using numerical simulations and analytical derivations. We find that the 1.4 m diameter telescope, 0.3 deg{sup 2} field we adopt as a baseline design achieves 0.2 {mu}as single measurement astrometric accuracy. The diffractive pupil concept thus enables sub-{mu}as astrometry without relying on the accurate pointing, external metrology, or high-stability hardware required with previously proposed high-precision astrometry concepts.

  2. High-precision timeline for Earth's most severe extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Seth D.

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe loss of marine and terrestrial biota in the last 542 My. Understanding its cause and the controls on extinction/recovery dynamics depends on an accurate and precise age ...

  3. Experimental Study of Hypernuclei Electroproduction by High Precision Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomislav Seva

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jlab experiment E01-011, carried out in 2005 in JLab Hall C, is the second generation of the hypernuclear spectroscopy experiments by the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction. The (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is complimentary to the associated production reactions (K{sup -},{pi}{sup -}), ({pi}{sup +},K{sup +}) since, due to a larger momentum transfer to a hyperon, excitations of both spin-non-flip and spin-flip states are possible. The experiment uses high quality and continuous primary electron beam to produce neutron rich hypernuclei on various targets by the electroproduction. The experimental setup consists of splitter magnet, high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) and electron spectrometer (Enge) implemented in new configuration, the so called 'Tilt Method'. Production data was taken on multiple targets: CH{sub 2}, {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 10}B, {sup 12}C and {sup 28}Si. In present study the analysis of CH{sub 2}, {sup 12}C and {sup 28}Si is presented. The elementary processes of p(e,e{prime}K{sup +}){Lambda}/{Sigma} from CH{sup 2} data were used for calibration of the spectrometer optics and kinematics. The hypernuclear spectra of {sup 12}{sub {Lambda}}B was obtained with ground state resolution of 0.47 {+-} 0.07 MeV (FWHM), the best ever achieved. Feasibility of the electroproduction reaction to study medium to heavy targets has been proven with the first high resolution beyond p-shell hypernuclear spectra from {sup 28}{sub {Lambda}}Al hypernuclei. The obtained results of the E01-011 experiment confirmed that hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is a very useful technique.

  4. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

    2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  6. A high precision, compact electromechanical ground rotation sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dergachev, V., E-mail: volodya@caltech.edu [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); DeSalvo, R. [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States) [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); University of Sannio, C.so Garibaldi 107, Benevento 82100 (Italy); Asadoor, M. [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street, Pasadena, California 91105 (United States) [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street, Pasadena, California 91105 (United States); Oklahoma State University, 219 Student Union, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 (United States); Bhawal, A. [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States) [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States); Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Gong, P. [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Industrial and System Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0205 (United States); Kim, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Lottarini, A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Computer Science, Columbia University, 1214 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Minenkov, Y. [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica  1, 00133 Roma (Italy)] [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica  1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Murphy, C. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia) [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); University of Melbourne Grattan Street, Parkville VIC 3010 (Australia); O'Toole, A. [University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Peña Arellano, F. E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mechanical rotation sensor consisting of a balance pivoting on a tungsten carbide knife edge. These sensors are important for precision seismic isolation systems, as employed in land-based gravitational wave interferometers and for the new field of rotational seismology. The position sensor used is an air-core linear variable differential transformer with a demonstrated noise floor of 1 × 10{sup ?11}m/?( Hz ). We describe the instrument construction and demonstrate low noise operation with a noise floor upper bound of 5.7 × 10{sup ?9} rad /?( Hz ) at 10 mHz and 6.4 × 10{sup ?10} rad /?( Hz ) at 0.1 Hz. The performance of the knife edge hinge is compatible with a behaviorur free of noise from dislocation self-organized criticality.

  7. High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source A precision laser spectrometer for the detection of CO2 isotopes is reported. The spectrometer measures the fundamental absorption signatures of 13 C and 12 C isotopes in CO2 at 4.32 m using a tunable mid-IR laser

  8. High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical line trap Vassili://chaos.utexas.edu/ Abstract: We introduce the Standing Wave Optical Line Trap (SWOLT) as a novel tool for precise optical nanoparticles. © 2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (000.2170) Equipment and techniques; (120

  9. IBM Research Report Efficient High-precision Dense Matrix Algebra ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 29, 2008 ... staple of high performance computing to efficiently solve discrete optimization problems on modern computational platforms. Matrix-based ...

  10. Creating high-stability high-precision bipolar trim power supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhe [JLAB; Merz, William A. [JLAB

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is founded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) office of science for the technology advancement and physics research in electron beam accelerator. This facility has the state of the art technology to carry out world-class cutting-edge experiments for the nucleus composition and atomic characteristics identification and exploration for the nature of the matter in the universe. A continuous wave electron beam is featured for such experiments, thus precise and stable trim power supply is required to meet such purpose. This paper demonstrates the challenges and solutions to design, assemble, fabrication and test such high-precision high-stability power supplies. This paper presents the novel design and first article test of the ±20A ±75V bipolar, 100ppm stability level current-regulated high-power trim power supplies for the beam manipulation. This special design can provide valuable documentation and reference values for future designs and special applications in particle accelerator power supply creation.

  11. High-precision position control of a heavy-lift manipulator in a dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garretson, Justin R. (Justin Richard)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers the control of a heavy-lift serial manipulator operating on the deck of a large ocean vessel. This application presents a unique challenge for high- precision control because the system must contend ...

  12. High precision magnetic susceptibility of novel magnets and superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke ne rgy data

  13. High-Precision Thermodynamics and Hagedorn Density of States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the entropy density of the confined phase of QCD without quarks on the lattice to very high accuracy. The results are compared to the entropy density of free glueballs, where we include all the known glueball states below the two-particle threshold. We find that an excellent, parameter-free description of the entropy density between 0.7Tc and Tc is obtained by extending the spectrum with the exponential spectrum of the closed bosonic string.

  14. High Precision Measurement of the 19Ne Lifetime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovationHigh FluxPerformancng

  15. Controller design and implementation for a 6-degree-of-freedom magnetically levitated positioner with high precision 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ho

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the controller design and implementation of a high-precision 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) magnetically levitated (maglev) positioner. This high-precision positioning system consists of a novel ...

  16. Precision high energy liner implosion experiments PHELIX [1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the hardware design of a small megajoule sized transformer coupled pulse power system utilized to drive hydrodynamic liner experiments with a nominal current capability of 10 megAmperes. The resulting liner velocities and characteristics provide properties of physics interest. The capacitor banks utilize the ''Atlas'' plastic cased 60 kV, 60 kJ capacitors [2] and railgaps [3]. The air insulated marx'S are configured to dive a multi-filar toroidal transformer. The 4:1 multi-filar toroidal transformer is mechanically part of a circular disc line and this feature results in an attractive inductance budget. Because of the compact size, re-usable transformer, and resulting low maintenance cost, shot rates can be high compared to other ''large'' machines or explosively driven hydrodynamic methods. The PHELIX modeling, construction status, and test results will also be provided.

  17. Precise QCD predictions for the production of Higgs+jet final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Chen; T. Gehrmann; E. W. N. Glover; M. Jaquier

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the cross section and differential distributions for the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a hadronic jet to next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In Higgs boson studies at the LHC, final states containing one jet are a dominant contribution to the total event rate, and their understanding is crucial for improved determinations of the Higgs boson properties. We observe substantial higher order corrections to transverse momentum spectra and rapidity distributions in Higgs-plus-one-jet final states. Their inclusion stabilises the residual theoretical uncertainty of the predictions around 9\\%, thereby providing important input to precision studies of the Higgs boson.

  18. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meziane, Mehdi [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7? smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup ?4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  19. High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate modeling and experimental mathematics, a few of which are described in this article. Such developments suggest that in the future, the numeric precision used for a scientific computation may be as important to the program design as are the algorithms and data structures.

  20. Acoustic grating fringe projector for high-speed and high-precision three-dimensional shape measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Xuebing; Zhao Huijie; Zeng Junyu; Qu Yufu

    2007-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new acoustic grating fringe projector (AGFP) was developed for high-speed and high-precision 3D measurement. A new acoustic grating fringe projection theory is also proposed to describe the optical system. The AGFP instrument can adjust the spatial phase and period of fringes with unprecedented speed and accuracy. Using rf power proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and CCD synchronous control, we obtain fringes with fine sinusoidal characteristics and realize high-speed acquisition of image data. Using the device, we obtained a precise phase map for a 3D profile. In addition, the AGFP can work in running fringe mode, which could be applied in other measurement fields.

  1. High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl K I R * *Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot. The results were consistent with those of nononline gas chromatography­mass spectrometry for COS and IR gas

  2. PoS(HTRS2011)024 Implications of high-precision spectra of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Cole

    PoS(HTRS2011)024 Implications of high-precision spectra of thermonuclear X-ray bursts A few years after the discovery of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars, Jan van Paradijs proposed a method for using observations of thermonuclear X-ray bursts to constrain both

  3. ccsd-00003072,version3-22Oct2004 Toward high-precision values of the self

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions is described. Graphs of the self energy in hydrogen-like ions with nuclear in hydrogen-like ions, and describes work in progress on high-precision self energy values in hydrogen included in the figure can also be used for including QED effects in the energy levels of atoms and ions

  4. that precise estimation of production can be done within 30 d by sampling for eggs; this goal seems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motivating factors for conducting this research. Production and transport of crude oil appeared to havethat precise estimation of production can be done within 30 d by sampling for eggs; this goal seems- Alaskan oil pipeline and planned outer conti- nental shelf oil and gas lease sales were the principal

  5. High throughput protein production screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beernink, Peter T. (Walnut Creek, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  6. Using long-baseline interferometric gravitational waves detectors for high precision measures of the gravitational acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Corda

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A derivation of the optical axis lenght fluctations due by tilts of the mirrors of the Fabry-Perot cavity of long-baseline interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves in presence of the gravitational field of the earth is discussed. By comparing with the typical tilt-induced noises it is shown that this potential signal, which is considered a weak source of noise, is negligible for the first generation of gravitational waves interferometers, but, in principle, this effect could be used for high precision measures of the gravitational acceleration if advanced projects will achieve an high sensitivity. In that case the precision of the misure could be higher than the gravimeter realized by the Istituto di Metrologia ``Gustavo Colonnetti''.

  7. Detuned Twin-Signal-Recycling for ultra-high precision interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Thuering; Roman Schnabel; Harald Lueck; Karsten Danzmann

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new interferometer technique for high precision phase measurements such as those in gravitational wave detection. The technique utilizes a pair of optically coupled resonators that provides identical resonance conditions for the upper as well the lower phase modulation signal sidebands. This symmetry significantly reduces the noise spectral density in a wide frequency band compared with single sideband recycling topologies of current and planned gravitational wave detectors. Furthermore the application of squeezed states of light becomes less demanding.

  8. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  9. Thermo-optic noise in coated mirrors for high-precision optical measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Evans; S. Ballmer; M. Fejer; P. Fritschel; G. Harry; G. Ogin

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fluctuations in the coatings used to make high-reflectors are becoming significant noise sources in precision optical measurements and are particularly relevant to advanced gravitational wave detectors. There are two recognized sources of coating thermal noise, mechanical loss and thermal dissipation. Thermal dissipation causes thermal fluctuations in the coating which produce noise via the thermo-elastic and thermo-refractive mechanisms. We treat these mechanisms coherently, give a correction for finite coating thickness, and evaluate the implications for Advanced LIGO.

  10. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William S. McPhee

    2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) needs improved technologies to decontaminate large areas of both concrete and steel surfaces. The technology should have high operational efficiency, minimize exposures to workers, and produce low levels of secondary waste. In order to meet the DOE's needs, an applied research and development project for the improvement of a current decontamination technology, Vacuum Blasting, is proposed. The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of the existing vacuum blasting technology which has been widely used in DOE sites for removing radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint. The proposed work would increase the productivity rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites.

  11. Communication: High precision sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of the HeH{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; Markus, Charles R.; Kocheril, G. Stephen [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); McCall, Benjamin J., E-mail: bjmccall@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrohelium cation, HeH{sup +}, serves as an important benchmark for ab initio calculations that take into account non-adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamic effects. Such calculations are capable of predicting molecular transitions to an accuracy of ?300 MHz or less. However, in order to continue to push the boundaries on these calculations, new measurements of these transitions are required. Here we measure seven rovibrational transitions in the fundamental vibrational band to a precision of ?1 MHz using the technique of Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy. These newly measured transitions are included in a fit to the rotation-vibration term values to derive refined spectroscopic constants in the v = 0 and v = 1 vibrational states, as well as to calculate rotation-vibration energy levels with high precision.

  12. High-precision Distribution of Highly-stable Optical Pulse Trains with Sub-10-fs Timing Jitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning, B; Hou, D; Wu, J T; Li, Z B; Zhao, J Y

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision optical pulse trains distribution via fibre links has made huge impacts in many fields. In most published works, the accuracies are still fundamentally limited by some unavoidable noises, such as thermal and shot noise from conventional photodiodes, thermal noise from mixers. Here, we demonstrate a new high-precision timing distribution system by using highly-precision phase detector to overcome the limitations. Instead of using photodiodes and microwave mixers, we use several fibre Sagnac-loop-based optical-microwave phase detectors to realize optical-electrical conversion and phase measurements, for suppressing the noises and achieving ultra-high accuracy. A 10-km fibre link distribution experiment shows our system provides a residual instability at the level of 4.6*10-15@1-s and 6.1*10-18@10000-s, with an integrated timing jitter as low as 3.8 fs in a bandwidth of 1 Hz to 100 KHz. This low instability and timing jitter makes it possible that our system can be used in the optical clock distri...

  13. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  14. High-precision astrometry with VVV. I. An independent reduction pipeline for VIRCAM@VISTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libralato, M; Bedin, L R; Anderson, J; Piotto, G; Nascimbeni, V; Platais, I; Minniti, D; Zoccali, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new reduction pipeline for the VIRCAM@VISTA detector and describe the method developed to obtain high-precision astrometry with the VISTA Variables in the V\\'ia L\\'actea (VVV) data set. We derive an accurate geometric-distortion correction using as calibration field the globular cluster NGC 5139, and showed that we are able to reach a relative astrometric precision of about 8 mas per coordinate per exposure for well-measured stars over a field of view of more than 1 square degree. This geometric-distortion correction is made available to the community. As a test bed, we chose a field centered around the globular cluster NGC 6656 from the VVV archive and computed proper motions for the stars within. With 45 epochs spread over four years, we show that we are able to achieve a precision of 1.4 mas/yr and to isolate each population observed in the field (cluster, Bulge and Disk) using proper motions. We used proper-motion-selected field stars to measure the motion difference between Galactic disk and...

  15. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William S. McPhee

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and construct a pre-prototype of the nozzle, blast head with wind curtain, sensors, and dust separator and test this system to assess the performance of the new design under controlled conditions at the contractor's facility. In phase III, the Contractor shall design and construct a prototype of the High Productivity Vacuum Blasting System, based on the results of the pre-prototype design and testing performed. This unit will be a full-scale prototype and will be tested at a designated Department of Energy (DOE) facility. Based on the results, the system performance, the productivity, and the economy of the improved vacuum blasting system will be evaluated.

  16. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  17. Precision isotope shift measurements in Ca$^+$ using highly sensitive detection schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Gebert; Yong Wan; Fabian Wolf; Christopher N. Angstmann; Julian C. Berengut; Piet O. Schmidt

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an efficient high-precision optical spectroscopy technique for single trapped ions with non-closed transitions. In a double-shelving technique, the absorption of a single photon is first amplified to several phonons of a normal motional mode shared with a co-trapped cooling ion of a different species, before being further amplified to thousands of fluorescence photons emitted by the cooling ion using the standard electron shelving technique. We employ this extension of the photon recoil spectroscopy technique to perform the first high precision absolute frequency measurement of the $^{2}$D$_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition in $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$, resulting in a transition frequency of $f=346\\, 000\\, 234\\, 867(96)$ kHz. Furthermore, we determine the isotope shift of this transition and the $^{2}$S$_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition for $^{42}$Ca$^{+}$, $^{44}$Ca$^{+}$ and $^{48}$Ca$^{+}$ ions relative to $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$ with an accuracy below 100 kHz. Improved field and mass shift constants of these transitions as well as changes in mean square nuclear charge radii are extracted from this high resolution data.

  18. 234 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--II: EXPRESS BRIEFS, VOL. 59, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 A Low-Power and High-Precision Programmable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    -Power and High-Precision Programmable Analog Filter Bank Brandon Rumberg, Student Member, IEEE, and David W. Graham, Member, IEEE Abstract--Analog filter banks befit remote audio- and vibration-sensing applications-high precision. The precision of a filter bank depends on both the signal-path precision (i.e., dynamic range

  19. Precision isotope shift measurements in Ca$^+$ using highly sensitive detection schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gebert, Florian; Wolf, Fabian; Angstmann, Christopher N; Berengut, Julian C; Schmidt, Piet O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an efficient high-precision optical spectroscopy technique for single trapped ions with non-closed transitions. In a double-shelving technique, the absorption of a single photon is first amplified to several phonons of a normal motional mode shared with a co-trapped cooling ion of a different species, before being further amplified to thousands of fluorescence photons emitted by the cooling ion using the standard electron shelving technique. We employ this extension of the photon recoil spectroscopy technique to perform the first high precision absolute frequency measurement of the $^{2}$D$_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition in $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$, resulting in a transition frequency of $f=346\\, 000\\, 234\\, 867(96)$ kHz. Furthermore, we determine the isotope shift of this transition and the $^{2}$S$_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{2}$P$_{1/2}$ transition for $^{42}$Ca$^{+}$, $^{44}$Ca$^{+}$ and $^{48}$Ca$^{+}$ ions relative to $^{40}$Ca$^{+}$ with an accuracy below 100 kHz. Improved field and ...

  20. Development of a high-precision ADS-B based conflict alerting system for operations in the airport environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunzi, Fabrice

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) as the future source of aircraft surveillance worldwide provides an opportunity to introduce high-precision airborne conflict alerting systems for ...

  1. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Batra, P.; /Columbia U.; Bugel, Leonard G.; /Columbia U.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; /Columbia U.; Conrad, Janet Marie; /MIT; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Fisher, Peter H.; /MIT; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; /MIT; Jenkins, J.; /Northwestern U.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  2. THE APPLICATION OF MULTIVIEW METHODS FOR HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRIC SPACE VLBI AT LOW FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodson, R.; Rioja, M.; Imai, H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Asaki, Y. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hong, X.-Y.; Shen, Z., E-mail: richard.dodson@icrar.org [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, CAS, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision astrometric space very long baseline interferometry (S-VLBI) at the low end of the conventional frequency range, i.e., 20 cm, is a requirement for a number of high-priority science goals. These are headlined by obtaining trigonometric parallax distances to pulsars in pulsar-black hole pairs and OH masers anywhere in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. We propose a solution for the most difficult technical problems in S-VLBI by the MultiView approach where multiple sources, separated by several degrees on the sky, are observed simultaneously. We simulated a number of challenging S-VLBI configurations, with orbit errors up to 8 m in size and with ionospheric atmospheres consistent with poor conditions. In these simulations we performed MultiView analysis to achieve the required science goals. This approach removes the need for beam switching requiring a Control Moment Gyro, and the space and ground infrastructure required for high-quality orbit reconstruction of a space-based radio telescope. This will dramatically reduce the complexity of S-VLBI missions which implement the phase-referencing technique.

  3. HIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    HIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS. These supplies are intended to power magnetic systems of accelerators, requiring high stability and low ripples current at non-inductive load % 0,02 Rate of current raise without disturbing operation of the system

  4. TAUOLA for simulation of tau decay and production: perspectives for precision low energy and LHC applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbigniew Was

    2011-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of Monte Carlo system for the simulation of tau-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. Since previous tau-lepton conference in 2008 some practical modifications have been introduced: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of tau-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form-factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was developped and checked to work in Belle and BaBar software environment. Work on alternative paramterizations of hadronic decays is advanced. (ii) the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) is now public. A similar interface for PHOTOS is now also public. (iii) Extension of PHOTOS Monte Carlo for QED bremsstrahlung in decays featuring kernels based on complete first order matrix element are gradually becoming widely available thanks to properites of the new, HepMC based interface. (iv) Tests of the programs systematized with the help of MC-TESTER are now available for FORTRAN and C++ users. Presented here results illustrate the status of the projects performed in collaboration with Nadia Davidson, Piotr Golonka, Gizo Nanava, Tomasz Przedzinski, Olga Shekhovtsova, El zbieta Richter-Was, Pablo Roig, Qingjun Xu and others.

  5. NLO electroweak automation and precise predictions for W+multijet production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Kallweit; Jonas M. Lindert; Philipp Maierhöfer; Stefano Pozzorini; Marek Schönherr

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated implementation of next-to-leading order electroweak (NLO EW) corrections in the OpenLoops matrix-element generator combined with the Sherpa and Munich Monte Carlo frameworks. The process-independent character of the implemented algorithms opens the door to NLO QCD+EW simulations for a vast range of Standard Model processes, up to high particle multiplicity, at current and future colliders. As a first application, we present NLO QCD+EW predictions for on-shell W-boson production in association with up to three jets at the Large Hadron Collider. At the TeV energy scale, due to the presence of large Sudakov logarithms, EW corrections reach the 20-40% level and play an important role for searches of physics beyond the Standard Model. The dependence of NLO EW effects on the jet multiplicity is investigated in detail, and we find that W+multijet final states feature genuinely different EW effects as compared to the case of W+1jet.

  6. NLO electroweak automation and precise predictions for W+multijet production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Kallweit; Jonas M. Lindert; Philipp Maierhöfer; Stefano Pozzorini; Marek Schönherr

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated implementation of next-to-leading order electroweak (NLO EW) corrections in the OpenLoops matrix-element generator combined with the Sherpa and Munich Monte Carlo frameworks. The process-independent character of the implemented algorithms opens the door to NLO QCD+EW simulations for a vast range of Standard Model processes, up to high particle multiplicity, at current and future colliders. As a first application, we present NLO QCD+EW predictions for the production of positively charged on-shell W bosons in association with up to three jets at the Large Hadron Collider. At the TeV energy scale, due to the presence of large Sudakov logarithms, EW corrections reach the 20-40% level and play an important role for searches of physics beyond the Standard Model. The dependence of NLO EW effects on the jet multiplicity is investigated in detail, and we find that W+multijet final states feature genuinely different EW effects as compared to the case of W+1jet.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometric determination of UF/sub 6/ assay with 1 percent precision for international safeguards. Part 1: product and feed in 1S and 2S sample cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, E.

    1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The method is based on counting the 186-keV gamma rays emitted by /sup 235/U using a Pb-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Measurements of fifty UF/sub 6/ product and feed cylinders reveal the following precisions and counting times: Product - 2S, 0.98% (600 s); Feed - 2S, 0.48% (2500 s); Product - 1S, 0.62% (1000 s); Feed - 1S, 0.73% (3000 s). A 1% precision is desired for variables - attributes verification measurements of /sup 235/U assay in UF/sub 6/ sample cylinders for safeguards inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Statistically, these measurements stand between fine, high-precision (or variables) measurements and gross, low-precision (or attributes) ones. Because of their intermediate precisions, the variables-attributes measurements may not require analysis of all samples, and this could result in significant savings of IAEA inspector time. Although the precision of the above results is satisfactory, the average relative differences between gamma-ray and mass-spectrometric determinations for the last two sets of measurements (1S cylinders) have positive biases.

  8. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive ?0 production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kimy, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D.; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Micherdzinska, A.M.; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Sabatio, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watts, D; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin ?h amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle ?h of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  9. PRECISE HIGH-CADENCE TIME SERIES OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE VARIABLE YOUNG STARS IN AURIGA WITH MOST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Tayar, Jamie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matthews, Jaymie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kallinger, Thomas, E-mail: amc@ipac.caltech.edu [Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore young star variability on a large range of timescales, we have used the MOST satellite to obtain 24 days of continuous, sub-minute cadence, high-precision optical photometry on a field of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars (TTSs) in the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. Observations of AB Aurigae, SU Aurigae, V396 Aurigae, V397 Aurigae, and HD 31305 reveal brightness fluctuations at the 1%-10% level on timescales of hours to weeks. We have further assessed the variability properties with Fourier, wavelet, and autocorrelation techniques, identifying one significant period per star. We present spot models in an attempt to fit the periodicities, but find that we cannot fully account for the observed variability. Rather, all stars exhibit a mixture of periodic and aperiodic behavior, with the latter dominating stochastically on timescales less than several days. After removal of the main periodicity, periodograms for each light curve display power-law trends consistent with those seen for other young accreting stars. Several of our targets exhibited unusual variability patterns not anticipated by prior studies, and we propose that this behavior originates with the circumstellar disks. The MOST observations underscore the need for investigation of TTS light variations on a wide range of timescales in order to elucidate the physical processes responsible; we provide guidelines for future time series observations.

  10. A high precision TDC based on a multi-phase clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong Qi; Xiangting Meng; Deyuan Li; Lei Yang; Zeen Yao; Dongcang Li

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a high-precision time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a multiphase clock implemented using a single field-programmable gate array is discussed in this paper. The TDC can increase the resolution of the measurement by using time interpolation. A phase-locked loop is used to generate four multiphase clocks whose frequencies are the same and whose phases are 0{\\deg}, 45{\\deg}, 90{\\deg}, and 135{\\deg}. In addition, the duty ratios of the four clocks are 50%. By utilizing four multiphase clocks to make up the interpolation clock, one clock period can be divided into eight uniform parts. The resolution of the TDC can be improved to 1/8 of a clock period. Furthermore, we have also designed a discriminator circuit for identifying the start and stop signals. On the basis of this circuit, the TDC can still measure the time interval of two signals when the start and stop signals are uncertain. The experimental results indicate that the time resolution of the TDC can achieve the theoretical value, and the linearity is very good. The architecture consumes fewer logic cells and is more stable.

  11. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, George G. (San Ramon, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

  12. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  13. Making real-time precision adjustments to world-wide chip production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pai, Neelesh G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intel has recently embarked on a mission to improve its supply chain responsiveness. Currently production lead times are around 4 months requiring a forecast a quarter out. Most customer demand changes happen within lead ...

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 559 (2006) 207210 High precision numerical accuracy in physics research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villard, Gilles

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 559 (2006) 207­210 High precision numerical by physicists. However, current com- puters are able to perform billions of FP operations each second, and some in the near future. They are reviewed in Section 3, with an evaluation of their performance overhead

  15. Adaptive Robust Precision Motion Control of High-Speed Linear Motors with On-line Cogging Force Compensations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Adaptive Robust Precision Motion Control of High-Speed Linear Motors with On-line Cogging Force of the approach in practical applications. Index Terms-- Motion Control, Linear Motor, Adaptive Ro- bust Control I. INTRODUCTION Significant efforts have been devoted to solving the diffi- culties in controlling linear motors

  16. Precise Predictions for W+4-Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Carola

    We present the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD results for W+4-jet production at hadron colliders. This is the first hadron-collider process with five final-state objects to be computed at NLO. It represents an important ...

  17. High-precision measurements of atomic parity nonconservation in lead and thallium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumder, P.K. [Physics Dept. FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic parity nonconservative experiments in a number of elements have now achieved the level of precision necessary for significant tests of the physics of and beyond the standard model of electroweak interactions. In our laboratory, parity, nonconserving (PNC) optical rotation has recently been measured in both atomic lead and thallium at the 1% level of precision. The prospect of equally precise calculations of thallium atomic structure make this element an excellent candidate for a new low-energy test of electroweak physics. By studying hyperfine differences in thallium PNC, this experiment is also sensitive to nuclear spin dependent (anapole moment) effects at the level predicted by several models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  19. Precise Predictions for W 4 Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, Lance J.; /CERN /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first next-to-leading order QCD results for W + 4-jet production at hadron colliders. Total cross sections, as well as distributions in the jet transverse momenta and in the total transverse energy HT, are provided for the initial LHC energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV. We use a leading-color approximation, known to be accurate to 3% for W production with fewer jets. The virtual matrix elements and the most complicated real-emission matrix elements are handled by the BlackHat library, based on on-shell methods. The remaining parts of the calculation, including the integration over phase space, are performed by the SHERPA package.

  20. High precision measurement of undulator polarization in the regime of hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marx, B., E-mail: berit.marx@uni-jena.de [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Kämpfer, T.; Wehrhan, O.; Förster, E.; Paulus, G. G. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Wille, H. C.; Schlage, K.; Röhlsberger, R.; Weckert, E. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stöhlker, T. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the polarization purity of undulator radiation at 12.9?keV, with hitherto unachievable precision. We could measure a polarization purity of 1.8?×?10{sup ?4} by using a silicon channel-cut crystal with six Bragg reflections at 45° as analyzer.

  1. High-precision optical measurements of 13 isotope ratios in organic compounds at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    range with an average precision of 0.95 and 0.67 for ethane and propane, respec- tively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3 of the values determined using isotope ratio mass place in chemistry, especially in geochemistry, for determining reaction mechanisms and pro- viding

  2. Investigation of high-precision {Lambda} hypernuclear spectroscopy via the (e,e'K{sup +}) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawama, Daisuke

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of {Lambda} hypernuclear structure is very interesting in point of the understanding of the interaction between {Lambda} and nucleon ({Lambda}-N interaction) and its ?strange? structure itself due to the containment of a {Lambda} hyperon which has a strangeness as a new degree of freedom. In the several way to study the Lamda hypernuclei, the (e,e'K{sup +}) reaction spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the precise investigation of {Lamda} hypernuclear structure. The purpose of the preset thesis is the establishment of the experimental design with the efficient data analysis method for the (e,e'K{sup +}) hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment in the wide mass region (from A=7 to A=52). It is very challenging to perform the (e,e'K{sup +}) spectroscopic experiment with such a heavy target, because of the huge electron background due to the bremsstrahlung process. In the experiment, it is required to obtain the necessary hypernuclear yield, suppressing the background event ratio. We achieved these requirements by newly constructing the high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) and splitter magnet (SPL) dedicated to the (e,e'K{sup +}) spectroscopic experiment. The HES consists of two quadrupole magnets and a dipole magnets (Q-Q-D) with a momentum resolution of dp/p = 3x10^-4 at p = 0.84 GeV/c. It was used being vertically tilted by 6.5 degree so as to optimize signal to noise ratio and hypernuclear yield. The SPL is a dipole magnet. The experimental target was placed at the entrance of this magnet. The role of the SPL is to separate four kind of particles; scattered kaons, photons created by the bremsstrahlung, the post beam and scattered electrons. In addition, since the SPL is a part of the kaon and electron spectrometers. We designed the magnet shape carefully considering these points. The experiment was performed with 2.344 GeV/c electron beam from CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The experimental setup consists of the HES, SPL and HKS (high momentum resolution kaon spectrometer). The HKS is also a Q-Q-D type spectrometer with the momentum resolution of dp/p = 2x10^-4 at p = 1.2 GeV/c. In the data analysis, the particle momentum calibration was the most important procedure. At the initial point, the particle momentum was obtained from the calculated magnetic field map of the spectrometer whose accuracy is an order of 10^-2. The initial momentum was calibrated by two step, the the magnetic field map improvement and the calibration with known masses of {Lambda}/{Sigma}{sup 0} which were observed by the CH{sub 2} target data. As a result of the calibration, the momentum resolutions of HKS and HES were estimated as 4x10^-4 and 6x10^-4, respectively. Though these values are the double of the designed value, it was achieved to obtain the {Lambda}/{Sigma}{sup 0} peaks with the same order of the designed energy from the original calculated magnetic field. The cross section was calculated with the several estimated factors. The averaged p({gamma}*, K{sup +}){Lamda} cross section in the HKS acceptance, (0.90 < cos({theta}^CM_K{sup +}) < 1.0) was calculated as 227 ± 12 ±26 [nb/sr], which is consistent within the error bar with the other experiment results of p({gamma}, K{sup +}){Lamda}. The obtained yield of the peak was almost same as the designed value with the considered detector efficiencies. The observed hypernuclear spectrum of ^12_{Lambda} B was also consistent with the other experimental results. These analysis result represents that the experimental setup including the newly constructed HES and SPL worked and the calibration procedure of this unique experimental setup is basically established.

  3. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  4. High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Seven-Membered Diphosphine Ligands Containing High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using...

  5. In mold laser welding for high precision polymer based optical components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, N., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt; Pontes, A. J., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt [IPC - Institute for Polymers and Composites, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To assemble a complete subsystem as a rear lamp, is necessary to have different machines and to perform several tasks. This necessity obliges the companies to have large structures to support all the assembling process. These huge structures are very costly and have as a consequence the reduction of the competitiveness of the companies. The process presented in this document has the intention of reducing the number of tasks needed to produce the final subsystem/product. To achieve this goal were combined several technologies, as in-mould assembling, laser welding and LEDs (light-emitting diode). One of the advantages of this process was the utilization of only one injection molding machine with three injection units to do all the assembling process. To achieve the main objective, firstly, the rear lamp was designed according to with the legislation of UNECE Vehicle Regulations - 1958 Agreements; Regulation No. 50 -Rev.2 - Position lamps, stop lamps, direction indicators for motorcycles. Posterior several polymeric materials were studied at different levels. Initial were studied several concentrations of carbon nanotubes mixed with PC (polycarbonate). This had the objective of determine, if these materials are suitable to conduct the necessary electric current to turn on the different LEDs. One of the main advantages of this process is the use of the laser transmission welded process. Since, with this welding technology is possible reduce the complexity of the final part. To understand the potentialities of this technology a combination of two materials was studied. The studied showed that all materials presented a high transparency to the laser beam. In terms of weld process, the study showed that the best welding conditions are the lowest velocity, diameter and power. With these studies was possible conclude that this new process is suitable to be implemented at the industrial level.

  6. Calibrating High-Precision Faraday Rotation Measurements for LOFAR and the Next Generation of Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C; Hessels, J W T; de Bruyn, G; Noutsos, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Birzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Brueggen, M; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; Duscha, S; Eisloeffel, J; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Grit, T; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kohler, J; Kramer, M; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pilia, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Roettgering, H; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Stappers, B W; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnholds, S J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220728

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation contribution. We present ionFR, a code that calculates the amount of ionospheric Faraday rotation for a specific epoch, geographic location, and line-of-sight. ionFR uses a number of publicly available, GPS-derived total electron content maps and the most recent release of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field. We describe applications of this code for the calibration of radio polarimetric observations, and demonstrate the high accuracy of its modeled ionospheric Faraday rotations using LOFAR pulsar observations. These show that we can accurately determine some of the highest-precision pulsar rotation measures ever achieved. Precision rotation measures can be used to monitor rotation measure variations - e...

  7. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  8. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  9. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  10. \\Precision Mining" of High-Dimensional Patterns with Self-Organizing Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merényi, Erzsébet

    , provide the detailed spectral signatures that areknown to uniquely characterize and identify minerals assessment of natural hazards, water resources, environmental contamination, biomass and productivity, unique, discriminating spec- tral features of minerals, soils, rocks, and vegetation. While a multi

  11. Design and manufacturing of high precision roll-to-roll multilayer printing machine -- machine upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yufei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, a group of MIT Master of Engineering students built a roll to roll machine for printing thiol onto a flexible gold substrate by self-assembly. The machine demonstrated good performance in high speed printing (400 ...

  12. Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Holly E. (Tracy, CA); Goward, William D. (Antioch, CA); Dijaili, Sol P. (Moraga, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

  13. Production of high purity titanium by electrorefining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanda, Minoru; Sato, Kazusuke; Kimura, Etsuji [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Omiya, Saitama (Japan). Central Research Inst.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of impurities in electrorefining of Ti by NaCl-KCl-TiClx molten salts and the production process of its molten salts have been studied. As a result, purification of salts, materials for the apparatus and the quality of anode Ti were important for the production of high purity Ti. By using purified molten salts and the apparatus constructed of Ni, impurities of the Ti deposit, such as Fe, Ni, could be lowered to about 0.01 ppm. The contents of Al and Cr of this Ti were about 0.1 ppm. Volatile impurities were removed from the Ti obtained in this process by electron beam melting and Ti ingots with grades in excess of 6N (except for gas elements) were obtained.

  14. On the road to precision cosmology with high redshift HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Chávez, Ricardo; Plionis, Manolis; Bresolin, Fabio; Basilakos, Spyros

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of a programme aimed at studying the properties of high redshift galaxies with on-going massive and dominant episodes of star formation (HII galaxies). We use the $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ distance estimator based on the correlation between the ionized gas velocity dispersions and Balmer emission line luminosities of HII galaxies and Giant HII regions to trace the expansion of the Universe up to $z \\sim 2.33$. This approach provides an independent constraint on the equation of state of dark energy and its possible evolution with look-back time. Here we present high-dispersion (8,000 to 10,000 resolution) spectroscopy of HII galaxies at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.33, obtained at the VLT using XShooter. Using six of these HII galaxies we obtain broad constraints on the plane $\\Omega_m - w_0$. The addition of 19 high-z HII galaxies from the literature improves the constraints and highlights the need for high quality emission line profiles, fluxes and reddening corrections. The 25...

  15. Storage-discharge relationships at different catchment scales based on local high-precision gravimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Storage-discharge relationships at different catchment scales based on local high, Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Potsdam, Germany Abstract: In hydrology, the storage of catchment science. To date, there are no direct methods to measure water storage at catchment scales (101

  16. Development of High Precision Timing Counter Based on Plastic Scintillator with SiPM Readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo W. Cattaneo; Matteo De Gerone; Flavio Gatti; Miki Nishimura; Wataru Ootani; Massimo Rossella; Yusuke Uchiyama

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High-time-resolution counters based on plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout have been developed for applications to high energy physics experiments for which relatively large-sized counters are required. We have studied counter sizes up to $120\\times40\\times5$ mm^3 with series connection of multiple SiPMs to increase the sensitive area and thus achieve better time resolution. A readout scheme with analog shaping and digital waveform analysis is optimized to achieve the highest time resolution. The timing performance is measured using electrons from a Sr-90 radioactive source, comparing different scintillators, counter dimensions, and types of near-ultraviolet sensitive SiPMs. As a result, a resolution of $\\sigma =42 \\pm 2$ ps at 1 MeV energy deposition is obtained for counter size $60\\times 30 \\times 5$ mm^3 with three SiPMs ($3\\times3$ mm^2 each) at each end of the scintillator. The time resolution improves with the number of photons detected by the SiPMs. The SiPMs from Hamamatsu Photonics give the best time resolution because of their high photon detection efficiency in the near-ultraviolet region. Further improvement is possible by increasing the number of SiPMs attached to the scintillator.

  17. Precision Unification and Proton Decay in F-Theory GUTs with High Scale Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Hebecker; James Unwin

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    F-theory GUTs provide a promising UV completion for models with approximate gauge coupling unification, such as the (non-supersymmetric) Standard Model. More specifically, if the superparters have masses well above the TeV scale, the resulting imperfection in unification can be accounted for by the, in principle calculable, classical F-theory correction at the high scale. In this paper we argue for the correct form of the F-theory corrections to unification, including KK mode loop effects. However, the price of compensating the imprecise unification in such High Scale SUSY models with F-theory corrections is that the GUT scale is lowered, potentially leading to a dangerously high proton decay rate from dimension-6 operators. We analyse the possibility of suppressing the decay rate by the localization of $X,Y$ gauge bosons in higher dimensions. While this effect can be very strong for the zero modes, we find that in the simplest models of this type it is difficult to realize a significant suppression for higher modes (Landau levels). Notably, in the absence of substantial suppressions to the proton decay rate, the superpartners must be lighter than 100 TeV to satisfy proton decay constraints. We highlight that multiple correlated signals of proton decay could verify this scenario.

  18. Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) for high-efficiency, precision grinding of ceramic parts: An experiment study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) as applied to the efficient, high-precision grinding of structural ceramics, and describes work performed jointly by Dr. B.P. Bandyopadhyay, University of North Dakota, and Dr. R. Ohmori, of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RINEN), Tokyo, Japan, from June through August, 1994. Dr. Ohmori pioneered the novel ELID grinding technology which incorporates electrolytically enhanced, in-process dressing of metal bonded superabrasive wheels. The principle of ELID grinding technology is discussed in the report as will its application for rough grinding and precision grinding. Two types of silicon nitride based ceramics (Kyocerals Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eaton`s SRBSN) were ground under various conditions with ELID methods. Mirror surface finishes were obtained with {number_sign} 4000 mesh size wheel (average grain size = 4 {mu}m). Results of these investigations are presented in this report. These include the effects of wheel bond type, type of power supply, abrasive grit friability, and cooling fluid composition. The effects of various parameters are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of ELID grinding, and in particular, the manner of boundary layer formation on the wheels and abrasive grit protrusion.

  19. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  20. A High-Precision Instrument for Mapping of Rotational Errors in Rotary Stages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu W.; Lauer,K.; Chu,Y.; Nazaretski,E.

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotational stage is a key component of every X-ray instrument capable of providing tomographic or diffraction measurements. To perform accurate three-dimensional reconstructions, runout errors due to imperfect rotation (e.g. circle of confusion) must be quantified and corrected. A dedicated instrument capable of full characterization and circle of confusion mapping in rotary stages down to the sub-10 nm level has been developed. A high-stability design, with an array of five capacitive sensors, allows simultaneous measurements of wobble, radial and axial displacements. The developed instrument has been used for characterization of two mechanical stages which are part of an X-ray microscope.

  1. Absolute kinematics of radio source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. III. First wide-field high-precision astrometry at 15.4 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Marti-Vidal; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; M. A. Perez-Torres; E. Ros

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first wide-field, high-precision astrometric analysis of the 13 extragalactic radio sources of the complete S5 polar cap sample at 15.4 GHz. We describe new algorithms developed to enable the use of differenced phase delays in wide-field astrometric observations and discuss the impact of using differenced phase delays on the precision of the wide-field astrometric analysis. From this global fit, we obtained estimates of the relative source positions with precisions ranging from 14 to 200 $\\mu$as at 15.4 GHz, depending on the angular separation of the sources (from $\\sim$1.6 to $\\sim$20.8 degrees). These precisions are $\\sim$10 times higher than the achievable precisions using the phase-reference mapping technique.

  2. A New Gas Cell for High-Precision Doppler Measurements in the Near-Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdivielso, L; Martín, E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the near-infrared could become the leading method for discovering extra-solar planets around very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. To help to achieve an accuracy of ~m/s, we are developing a gas cell which consists of a mixture of gases whose absorption spectral lines span all over the near-infrared region. We present the most promising mixture, made of acetylene, nitrous oxide, ammonia, chloromethans and hydrocarbons. The mixture is contained in a small size 13 cm long gas cell and covers most of the H and K-bands. It also shows small absorptions in the J-band but they are few and not sharp enough for near infrared wavelength calibration. We describe the working method and experiments and compare our results with the state of the art for near infrared gas cells.

  3. High productivity injection practices at Rouge Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, D.H.; Hegler, G.L.; Falls, C.E. [Rouge Steel Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rouge Steel Company, located in Dearborn, Michigan, operates two blast furnaces. The smaller of the pair, ``B`` Furnace, has a hearth diameter of 20 feet and 12 tuyeres. It has averaged 2,290 NTHM (net ton of hot metal) per day of 8.2 NTHM per 100 cubic feet of working volume. ``C`` Furnace has a hearth diameter of 29 feet and 20 tuyeres. Both of these furnaces are single tap hole furnaces. Prior to its reline in 1991, ``C`` Furnace was producing at a rate of 3,300 NTHM/day or about 6.25 NTHM/100 cfwv. In November, 1994 it averaged 5,106 NTHM/day or 9.6 NTHM/100 cfwv. This paper discusses how the current production rates were achieved. Also, the areas that needed to be addressed as production increased will be described. These areas include casthouse arrangement and workload, hot metal ladle capacity, slag pot capacity and charging capability. Coupled with the high blast temperature capability, the furnace was provided with a new natural gas injection system that injected the gas through the blowpipes and a natural gas injection system to enrich the stove gas. Following the furnace reline, natural gas has been used in three ways: tuyere level control; combination injection; and stove gas enrichment. Coke consumption rate has also decreased per NTHM.

  4. High-productivity automatic GTAW process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imaizumi, H.; Kato, T.; Murakami, Y.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has, since developed by AIRCO, spread globally as a weld process which assures a quality weld. However, the only drawback with GTAW is low productivity and we have challenged the subject in how we could improve that. To that end, we set the target of 3 times deposition rate as compared to conventional TIG. With conventional TIG arc, arc spread angle ranges 130{degrees} to 140{degrees}; to improve energy density, we have employed double flux TIG of SAF, France to converge the arc down to 80{degrees}. Consequently, energy density was upped to 4 times of conventional TIG, thus penetration depth and filler wire feed rated increased up to 2 to 4 times. We have succeeded in controlling cool-down in the molten pool, enabling the utilization of highly-converged TIG arc and preventing deposited metals burn-through for cleaner weld process, high-productivity GTAW. We find that: (1) The TIG arc spread angle is convergeable from 140{degrees} down to 80{degrees}; heat energy to be 3.5 times of that obtainable conventionally. (2) 65{emdash}80 g/min attained with 500A and C.S. in flat position, and 35{emdash}40 g/min., with all-position pipe weld. (3) 2{emdash}3 times efficiency improvement, obtained with work in C.S., S.S., and Inconel. (4) Excellent impact value obtainable despite heat-input increase. (5) Fume-less, spatterless, gouging-less and grindingless weld is obtainable; we were successful in improving the operational environment.

  5. HIGH PRECISION ABUNDANCES OF THE OLD SOLAR TWIN HIP 102152: INSIGHTS ON Li DEPLETION FROM THE OLDEST SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Melendez, Jorge; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabricio C. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramirez, Ivan [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bergemann, Maria [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lind, Karin [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Castro, Matthieu; Do Nascimento, Jose-Dias [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Bazot, Michael, E-mail: tmonroe@usp.br [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the old 8.2 Gyr solar twin, HIP 102152. We derive differential abundances of 21 elements relative to the Sun with precisions as high as 0.004 dex ({approx}<1%), using ultra high-resolution (R = 110,000), high S/N UVES spectra obtained on the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope. Our determined metallicity of HIP 102152 is [Fe/H] = -0.013 {+-} 0.004. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined to be 54 K cooler than the Sun, 0.09 dex lower in surface gravity, and a microturbulence identical to our derived solar value. Elemental abundance ratios examined versus dust condensation temperature reveal a solar abundance pattern for this star, in contrast to most solar twins. The abundance pattern of HIP 102152 appears to be the most similar to solar of any known solar twin. Abundances of the younger, 2.9 Gyr solar twin, 18 Sco, were also determined from UVES spectra to serve as a comparison for HIP 102152. The solar chemical pattern of HIP 102152 makes it a potential candidate to host terrestrial planets, which is reinforced by the lack of giant planets in its terrestrial planet region. The following non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Li abundances were obtained for HIP 102152, 18 Sco, and the Sun: log {epsilon} (Li) = 0.48 {+-} 0.07, 1.62 {+-} 0.02, and 1.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively. The Li abundance of HIP 102152 is the lowest reported to date for a solar twin, and allows us to consider an emerging, tightly constrained Li-age trend for solar twin stars.

  6. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  7. Inexpensive Production of High Density Thin Ceramic Films on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inexpensive Production of High Density Thin Ceramic Films on Rigid or Porous Substrates Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing...

  8. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This abstract outlinse a project that is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process, and transport woody biomass from southern pine...

  9. Project Profile: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells Project Profile: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost...

  10. Precision translator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  11. High productivity in Australian blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nightingale, R.J.; Mellor, D.G. [BHP Slab and Plate Products Div., Port Kembla, New South Wales (Australia); Jelenich, L. [BHP Rod and Bar Products Div., Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Ward, R.F. [BHP Long Products Div., Whyalla, South Australia (Australia)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the emergence of the Australian domestic economy from recession in 1992, the productivity of BHP`s blast furnace has increased significantly to meet the demands of both domestic and export markets. BHP Steel operates six blast furnaces at its three Australian integrated plants. These furnaces vary widely in their size, feed, technology and current campaign status. This paper reviews the principal issues associated with productivity improvements over recent years. These gains have been achieved through activities associated with a wide range of process, equipment and human resource based issues.

  12. Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

  13. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  14. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  15. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bultmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderon de la Barca Sanchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; A. B. Cudd; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L. -X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a new high-precision measurement of the mid-rapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, $A_{LL}$, in polarized $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC $pp$ data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-$x$ region $x>0.05$.

  16. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudakov, Eugene A. [JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  17. Toward high-precision values of the self energy of non-S states in hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric-Olivier Le Bigot; Ulrich D. Jentschura; Paul Indelicato; Peter J. Mohr

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The method and status of a study to provide numerical, high-precision values of the self-energy level shift in hydrogen and hydrogen-like ions is described. Graphs of the self energy in hydrogen-like ions with nuclear charge number between 20 and 110 are given for a large number of states. The self-energy is the largest contribution of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) to the energy levels of these atomic systems. These results greatly expand the number of levels for which the self energy is known with a controlled and high precision. Applications include the adjustment of the Rydberg constant and atomic calculations that take into account QED effects.

  18. Multi Jet Production at High Q2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-inelastic $e^+p$ scattering data, taken with the H1 detector at HERA, are used to investigate jet production over a range of four-momentum transfers $150 < Q^2 < 15000 \\mathrm{GeV}^2$ and transverse jet energies $5 < E_T < 50 \\mathrm{GeV}$. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}_\\mathrm{int} = 65.4 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$ taken in the years 1999-2000 at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\approx 319 \\mathrm{GeV}$. Jets are defined by the inclusive $k_t$ algorithm in the Breit frame of reference. Dijet and trijet jet cross sections are measured with respect to the exchanged boson virtuality and in addition the ratio of the trijet to the dijet cross section $R_{3/2}$ is investigated. The results are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$. The value of $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ determined from the study of $R_{3/2}$ is $\\alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.1175 \\pm 0.0017 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.0050 (\\mathrm{syst.}) ^{+0.0054}_{-0.0068} (\\mathrm{theo.})$.

  19. Method for high-precision multi-layered thin film deposition for deep and extreme ultraviolet mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruffner, J.A.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for coating (flat or non-flat) optical substrates with high-reflectivity multi-layer coatings for use at Deep Ultra-Violet (DUV) and Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) wavelengths. The method results in a product with minimum feature sizes of less than 0.10 [micro]m for the shortest wavelength (13.4 nm). The present invention employs a computer-based modeling and deposition method to enable lateral and vertical thickness control by scanning the position of the substrate with respect to the sputter target during deposition. The thickness profile of the sputter targets is modeled before deposition and then an appropriate scanning algorithm is implemented to produce any desired, radially-symmetric thickness profile. The present invention offers the ability to predict and achieve a wide range of thickness profiles on flat or figured substrates, i.e., account for 1/R[sup 2] factor in a model, and the ability to predict and accommodate changes in deposition rate as a result of plasma geometry, i.e., over figured substrates. 15 figs.

  20. Method for high-precision multi-layered thin film deposition for deep and extreme ultraviolet mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruffner, Judith Alison (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for coating (flat or non-flat) optical substrates with high-reflectivity multi-layer coatings for use at Deep Ultra-Violet ("DUV") and Extreme Ultra-Violet ("EUV") wavelengths. The method results in a product with minimum feature sizes of less than 0.10-.mu.m for the shortest wavelength (13.4-nm). The present invention employs a computer-based modeling and deposition method to enable lateral and vertical thickness control by scanning the position of the substrate with respect to the sputter target during deposition. The thickness profile of the sputter targets is modeled before deposition and then an appropriate scanning algorithm is implemented to produce any desired, radially-symmetric thickness profile. The present invention offers the ability to predict and achieve a wide range of thickness profiles on flat or figured substrates, i.e., account for 1/R.sup.2 factor in a model, and the ability to predict and accommodate changes in deposition rate as a result of plasma geometry, i.e., over figured substrates.

  1. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  2. Production of high voltage by ion bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phinney, Lucas Carter

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . 35 FIGIJRE Page 19 I-V curve for the ammeter setup . . 35 20 Diagram of the leakage current test setup . . . . . . 37 21 Voltmeter readings at each high voltage interval . . . . . , 38 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Direct energy conversion... streaming into the source There is also a moveable shutter that can stop the beam &om entering the beam line. A Varian VHS-6 diffusion pump is connected at the bottom of the glass cross. Its function is to maintain a vacuum in this part of the accelerator...

  3. Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

  4. Texas High Plains Supplement to Texas Alfalfa Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    "Spring Fever Alfalfa­The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas," by Calvin Trostle (MarchTexas High Plains Supplement to Texas Alfalfa Production Texas Cooperative Extension Bulletin B through puts them near 8 gpm/A. Notes about `Texas Alfalfa Production' B-5017 from Texas Cooperative

  5. Alfalfa Production Texas High Plains/Far West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Alfalfa Production Texas High Plains/Far West Texas Calvin Trostle Extension Agronomy, Lubbock 806.746.6101 ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu #12;Observations in West Texas · Our best alfalfa producers don't have a massive farm for sound, timely production practices · Lots of water! #12;Current West Texas Problems · Misunderstanding

  6. High-biomass sorghums for biomass biofuel production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packer, Daniel

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    photoperiod-sensitive (PS) hybrids within the Ma1/Ma5/Ma6 hybrid production system. High-biomass sorghums are PS and the Ma1/Ma5/Ma6 hybrid production system produces PS hybrids with PI parents by manipulating alleles at the Ma1, Ma5 and Ma6 sorghum maturity...

  7. Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production Peer M. Schenk fuels make up a much larger share of the global energy demand (66%). Biofuels are therefore rapidly for transport fuels. Increasing biofuel production on arable land could have severe consequences for global food

  8. A HIGHLY PARALLEL TURBO PRODUCT CODE DECODER WITHOUT INTERLEAVING RESOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A HIGHLY PARALLEL TURBO PRODUCT CODE DECODER WITHOUT INTERLEAVING RESOURCE Camille Leroux-STICC firstname.lastname@telecom-bretagne.eu ABSTRACT This article presents an innovative Turbo Product Code (TPC of such an architecture compared with exist- ing previous solutions. Considering a 6-iteration turbo de- coder of a (32

  9. Methods for high volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  10. High-precision abundances of elements in solar twin stars: Trends with stellar age and elemental condensation temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen, Poul E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HARPS spectra with S/N > 600 for 21 solar twin stars are used to determine very precise (sigma ~ 0.01 dex) differential abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Y in order to see how well [X/Fe] is correlated with elemental condensation temperature, Tc. In addition, precise (sigma < 0.8 Gyr) stellar ages are obtained by interpolating between Yonsei-Yale isochrones in the logg - Teff diagram. It is confirmed that the ratio between refractory and volatile elements is lower in the Sun than in most of the solar twins, but for many stars, the relation between [X/Fe] and Tc is not well defined. For several elements there is, instead, an astonishingly tight correlation between [X/Fe] and stellar age with amplitudes up to 0.2 dex over an age interval of 8 Gyr in contrast to the lack of correlation between [Fe/H] and age. While [Mg/Fe] increases with age, the s-process element yttrium shows the opposite behavior so that [Y/Mg] can be used as a sensitive chronometer for Galactic evolution. ...

  11. Precision and manufacturing at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, T.T.; Wasley, R.J.; Stowers, I.F.; Donaldson, R.R.; Thompson, D.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision Engineering is one of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s core strengths. This paper discusses the past and present current technology transfer efforts of LLNL`s Precision Engineering program and the Livermore Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Productivity (LCAMP). More than a year ago the Precision Machining Commercialization project embodied several successful methods of transferring high technology from the National Laboratories to industry. Currently LCAMP has already demonstrated successful technology transfer and is involved in a broad spectrum of current programs. In addition this paper discusses other technologies ripe for future transition including the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine.

  12. Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  13. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Lourenco de; Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio de; Burgos Cruz, Edmundo [CBMM-Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineracao, Fazenda Corrego da Mata, P.O. Box 838.183.903, Araxa, MG (Brazil)

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  14. Optimizing the coffee experience by developing a user-centered, internet connected, high precision coffee machine and integrated system experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuempel, Jeremy (Jeremy J.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current state of coffee production is reviewed; from the origins of the plant grown to modem coffee brew techniques. Initial experiments are reported in which coffee was brewed at different temperatures for different ...

  15. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  16. Practicing Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piccinni, PIN project leader and assistant professor of crop physiology with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Uvalde. ?While some growers are doing a very good job using limited irrigation strategies, others are overwatering their crops...tx H 2 O | pg. 24 W intergarden and High Plains researchers and county agents worked with 30 growers from various counties to conduct on-farm research demonstrations evaluating the extent to which limited irrigation practices may provide water...

  17. Meson production in high-energy electron-nucleus scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Fäldt

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of meson production through two-photon fusion in inelastic electron-nucleus scattering is now under way. A high-energy photon radiated by the incident electron is fused with a soft photon radiated by the nucleus. The process takes place in the small-angle-Coulomb region of nuclear scattering. We expound the theory for this production process as well as its interference with coherent-radiative-meson production. In particular, we investigate the distortion of the electron wave function due to multiple-Coulomb scattering.

  18. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorringe, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiment...

  19. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  20. High-precision acoustic helium signatures in 18 low-mass low-luminosity red giants. Analysis from more than four years of Kepler observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsaro, E; García, R A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision frequencies of acoustic modes in red giant stars are now available thanks to the long observing length and high-quality of the light curves provided by the NASA Kepler mission, thus allowing to probe the interior of evolved cool low-mass stars with unprecedented level of detail. We characterize the acoustic signature of the helium second ionization zone in a sample of 18 low-mass low-luminosity red giants by exploiting new mode frequency measurements derived from more than four years of Kepler observations. We analyze the second frequency differences of radial acoustic modes in all the stars of the sample by using the Bayesian code Diamonds. We find clear acoustic glitches due to the signature of helium second ionization in all the stars of the sample. We measure the acoustic depth and the characteristic width of the acoustic glitches with a precision level on average around $\\sim$2% and $\\sim$8%, respectively. We find good agreement with theoretical predictions and existing measurements from t...

  1. Original article Biomass and nutrient cycling of a highly productive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Biomass and nutrient cycling of a highly productive Corsican pine stand on former 14 April; accepted 22 September 1997) Abstract - Biomass and nutrient cycling were examined in a 62 on a coarse and dry sandy soil with low exchangeable nutrient pools. Total aboveground biomass was estimated

  2. Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David A.

    Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity Problem Presenter Ram Ramanan Bloom Energy: Introduction Bloom Energy manufactures power modules based on fuel cell technology. These are built up their possible placement within a cell assembly. Currently, these rules for assembling the basic components

  3. High-Level waste process and product data annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, G.E.

    1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to provide information on available issued documents that will assist interested parties in finding available data on high-level waste and transuranic waste feed compositions, properties, behavior in candidate processing operations, and behavior on candidate product glasses made from those wastes. This initial compilation is only a partial list of available references.

  4. Construction and test of high precision drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Nowak; Oliver Korner; Hubert Kroha; Philipp Schwegler; Federico Sforza

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in March 2014 new muon tracking chambers (sMDT) with drift-tubes of 15 mm diameter, half of the value of the standard ATLAS Monitored Drift-Tubes (MDT) chambers, and 10~$\\mu$m positioning accuracy of the sense wires have been constructed. The new chambers are designed to be fully compatible with the present ATLAS services but, with respect to the previously installed ATLAS MDT chambers, they are assembled in a more compact geometry and they deploy two additional tube layers that provide redundant rack information. The chambers are composed of 8 layers of in total 624 aluminium drift-tubes. The assembly of a chamber is completed within a week. A semi-automatized production line is used for the assembly of the drift-tubes prior to the chamber assembly. The production procedures and the quality control tests of the single components and of the complete chambers will be discussed. The wire position in the completed chambers have been measured by using a coordinate measuring machine.

  5. High-Precision Measurements of [superscript 33]S and [superscript 34]S Fractionation during SO[subscript 2] Oxidation Reveal Causes of Seasonality in SO[subscript 2] and Sulfate Isotopic Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Eliza

    This study presents high-precision isotope ratio-mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic fractionation during oxidation of SO[subscript 2] by OH radicals in the gas phase and H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] and transition ...

  6. Precision powder feeder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Michael S. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  7. VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them into 'digital organizations.' IT is the catalyst,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VII Pillars Of Productivity Seven practices characterize highly productive companies turning them's productivity growth, more than any other economic statistic, that determines our living standards. If productivity grows at 1% per year, living standards will double every 70 years. If productivity grows at 3% per

  8. Statistical considerations in high precision U-Pb geochronology, with an application to the tectonic evolution of the North Cascades, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Noah Morgan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The range of geologic problems that may be addressed by U-Pb geochronology is governed by the precision to which U-Pb dates can be measured, expressed as their estimated uncertainties. Accurate and precise knowledge of ...

  9. High-precision elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries from combined interferometry and spectroscopy. Application to the beta Cephei star beta Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ausseloos; C. Aerts; K. Lefever; J. Davis; P. Harmanec

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present methodology to derive high-precision estimates of the fundamental parameters of double-lined spectroscopic binaries. We apply the methods to the case study of the double-lined beta Cephei star beta Centauri. We also present a detailed analysis of beta Centauri's line-profile variations caused by its oscillations. We point out that a systematic error in the orbital amplitudes, and any quantities derived from them, occurs if the radial velocities of blended component lines are computed without spectral disentangling. This technique is an essential ingredient in the derivation of the physical parameters if the goal is to obtain a precision of only a few percent. We have devised iteration schemes to obtain the orbital elements for systems whose lines are blended throughout the orbital cycle. We find the following parameters for beta Cen: $M_1=10.7\\pm 0.1 M_\\odot$ and $M_2=10.3\\pm 0.1 M_\\odot$, an age of $(14.1\\pm 0.6)\\times 10^6$ years. We deduce two oscillation frequencies for the broad-lined primary of beta Centauri with degrees higher than 2. We propose that our iteration schemes be used in any future derivations of the spectroscopic orbital parameters of double-lined binaries with blended component lines to which disentangling can be successfully applied.

  10. A High Precision Aeromagnetic Survey Near the Glen Hummel Field in Texas; Identification of Cultural and Sedimentary Anomaly Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Clark R.; Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Bartelmann, Monika

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Austin, Te x a s JOE PHILLIPS, World Geoscience, Houston, Texas We present a case study of a high resolution aeromagnetic survey near the Glen Hummel oil field (Figure 1). The survey was original- ly flown to support a study of aero- magnetic methods... topography, most samples were gathered using a shovel to dig a hole near the fence line to a depth of 15-40 cm. With a plastic spoon, we scraped o ff material near the hole bottom, then gathered a sample, and sealed it in a plastic bag. Susceptibility values...

  11. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of ultra-precise optical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yudin; A. V. Taichenachev; A. Derevianko

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the $10^{-20}-10^{-21}$ level for all common systematic effects, such as black-body radiation, Zeeman, AC-Stark and quadrupolar shifts. Notice that usually-employed hyperfine clock transitions lie in the microwave spectral region. Our proposal moves such transitions to the optical domain. As the hyperfine transition frequencies depend on the fine-structure constant, electron-to-proton mass ratio, and nuclear magnetic moment, our proposal expands the range of experimental schemes for probing space and time variations of fundamental constants.

  12. Running Coupling Corrections to High Energy Inclusive Gluon Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Horowitz; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate running coupling corrections for the lowest-order gluon production cross section in high energy hadronic and nuclear scattering using the BLM scale-setting prescription. In the final answer for the cross section the three powers of fixed coupling are replaced by seven factors of running coupling, five in the numerator and two in the denominator, forming a 'septumvirate' of running couplings, analogous to the 'triumvirate' of running couplings found earlier for the small-x BFKL/BK/JIMWLK evolution equations. It is interesting to note that the two running couplings in the denominator of the 'septumvirate' run with complex-valued momentum scales, which are complex conjugates of each other, such that the production cross section is indeed real. We use our lowest-order result to conjecture how running coupling corrections may enter the full fixed-coupling kT-factorization formula for gluon production which includes non-linear small-x evolution.

  13. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  14. A high-precision variational approach to three- and four-nucleon bound and zero-energy scattering states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kievsky; S. Rosati; M. Viviani; L. E. Marcucci; L. Girlanda

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The hyperspherical harmonic (HH) method has been widely applied in recent times to the study of the bound states, using the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, and of low-energy scattering processes, using the Kohn variational principle, of A=3 and 4 nuclear systems. When the wave function of the system is expanded over a sufficiently large set of HH basis functions, containing or not correlation factors, quite accurate results can be obtained for the observables of interest. In this paper, the main aspects of the method are discussed together with its application to the A=3 and 4 nuclear bound and zero-energy scattering states. Results for a variety of nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) local or non-local interactions are reported. In particular, NN and 3N interactions derived in the framework of the chiral effective field theory and NN potentials from which the high momentum components have been removed, as recently presented in the literature, are considered for the first time within the context of the HH method. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, to present a complete description of the HH method for bound and scattering states, including also detailed formulas for the computation of the matrix elements of the NN and 3N interactions. Second, to report accurate results for bound and zero-energy scattering states obtained with the most commonly used interaction models. These results can be useful for comparison with those obtained by other techniques and are a significant test for different future approaches to such problems.

  15. Precision Robotic Assembly Machine

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world's largest laser system is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF's 192 laser beams are amplified to extremely high energy, and then focused onto a tiny target about the size of a BB, containing frozen hydrogen gas. The target must be perfectly machined to incredibly demanding specifications. The Laboratory's scientists and engineers have developed a device called the "Precision Robotic Assembly Machine" for this purpose. Its unique design won a prestigious R&D-100 award from R&D Magazine.

  16. Towards an Abstraction-Friendly Programming Model for High Productivity and High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D; Panas, T

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    General purpose languages, such as C++, permit the construction of various high level abstractions to hide redundant, low level details and accelerate programming productivity. Example abstractions include functions, data structures, classes, templates and so on. However, the use of abstractions significantly impedes static code analyses and optimizations, including parallelization, applied to the abstractions complex implementations. As a result, there is a common perception that performance is inversely proportional to the level of abstraction. On the other hand, programming large scale, possibly heterogeneous high-performance computing systems is notoriously difficult and programmers are less likely to abandon the help from high level abstractions when solving real-world, complex problems. Therefore, the need for programming models balancing both programming productivity and execution performance has reached a new level of criticality. We are exploring a novel abstraction-friendly programming model in order to support high productivity and high performance computing. We believe that standard or domain-specific semantics associated with high level abstractions can be exploited to aid compiler analyses and optimizations, thus helping achieving high performance without losing high productivity. We encode representative abstractions and their useful semantics into an abstraction specification file. In the meantime, an accessible, source-to-source compiler infrastructure (the ROSE compiler) is used to facilitate recognizing high level abstractions and utilizing their semantics for more optimization opportunities. Our initial work has shown that recognizing abstractions and knowing their semantics within a compiler can dramatically extend the applicability of existing optimizations, including automatic parallelization. Moreover, a new set of optimizations have become possible within an abstraction-friendly and semantics-aware programming model. In the future, we will apply our programming model to more large scale applications. In particular, we plan to classify and formalize more high level abstractions and semantics which are relevant to high performance computing. We will also investigate better ways to allow language designers, library developers and programmers to communicate abstraction and semantics information with each other.

  17. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  18. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Gorringe; D. W. Hertzog

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiments. Another focus is the uncommonly broad and topical range of questions in atomic, nuclear and particle physics that such experiments explore.

  19. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  20. Optimal Capacity Conversion for Product Transitions Under High Service Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hongmin

    We consider the capacity planning problem during a product transition in which demand for a new-generation product gradually replaces that for the old product. Capacity for the new product can be acquired both by purchasing ...

  1. Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the 'Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products' project is to demonstrate thin film packaging solutions based on SiC hermetic coatings that, when applied to glass and plastic substrates, support OLED lighting devices by providing longer life with greater efficiency at lower cost than is currently available. Phase I Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on optical glass with lifetime of 1,000 hour life, CRI greater than 75, and 15 lm/W. Phase II Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on plastic or glass composite with 25 lm/W, 5,000 hours life, and CRI greater than 80. Phase III Objective: Demonstrate 2 x 2 ft{sup 2} thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED with 40 lm/W, 10,000 hour life, and CRI greater than 85. This report details the efforts of Phase III (Budget Period Three), a fourteen month collaborative effort that focused on optimization of high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED devices and thin-film encapsulation of said devices. The report further details the conclusions and recommendations of the project team that have foundation in all three budget periods for the program. During the conduct of the Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products program, including budget period three, the project team completed and delivered the following achievements: (1) a three-year marketing effort that characterized the near-term and longer-term OLED market, identified customer and consumer lighting needs, and suggested prototype product concepts and niche OLED applications lighting that will give rise to broader market acceptance as a source for wide area illumination and energy conservation; (2) a thin film encapsulation technology with a lifetime of nearly 15,000 hours, tested by calcium coupons, while stored at 16 C and 40% relative humidity ('RH'). This encapsulation technology was characterized as having less than 10% change in transmission during the 15,000 hour test period; (3) demonstrated thin film encapsulation of a phosphorescent OLED device with 1,500 hours of lifetime at 60 C and 80% RH; (4) demonstrated that a thin film laminate encapsulation, in addition to the direct thin film deposition process, of a polymer OLED device was another feasible packaging strategy for OLED lighting. The thin film laminate strategy was developed to mitigate defects, demonstrate roll-to-roll process capability for high volume throughput (reduce costs) and to support a potential commercial pathway that is less dependent upon integrated manufacturing since the laminate could be sold as a rolled good; (5) demonstrated that low cost 'blue' glass substrates could be coated with a siloxane barrier layer for planarization and ion-protection and used in the fabrication of a polymer OLED lighting device. This study further demonstrated that the substrate cost has potential for huge cost reductions from the white borosilicate glass substrate currently used by the OLED lighting industry; (6) delivered four-square feet of white phosphorescent OLED technology, including novel high efficiency devices with 82 CRI, greater than 50 lm/W efficiency, and more than 1,000 hours lifetime in a product concept model shelf; (7) presented and or published more than twenty internal studies (for private use), three external presentations (OLED workshop-for public use), and five technology-related external presentations (industry conferences-for public use); and (8) issued five patent applications, which are in various maturity stages at time of publication. Delivery of thin film encapsulated white phosphorescent OLED lighting technology remains a challenging technical achievement, and it seems that commercial availability of thin, bright, white OLED light that meets market requirements will continue to require research and development effort. However, there will be glass encapsulated white OLED lighting products commercialized in niche markets during the 2008 calendar year. This commercializ

  2. Precision flyer initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.M.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or ``flyer`` is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices. 10 figs.

  3. Precision flyer initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Alan M. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or "flyer" is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices.

  4. High biofuel production of Botryococcus braunii using optimized cultivation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. N2O release from agro-biofuel production negates globalcultivation and biofuel production (www.lyxia.com).183 (2001) Amin S. Review on biofuel oil and gas production

  5. Approaches To Crisis Prevention In Lean Product Development By High Performance Teams And Through Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    This thesis investigates crisis prevention in lean product development, focusing on high performance teams and risk management methods.

  6. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to these same feature surfaces to withstand the pulsating UHIP diesel injection without fatigue failure, through the expected life of the fuel system's components (10,000 hours for the pump and common rail, 5000 hours for the injector). The potential to Caterpillar of this fueling approach and the overall emissions reduction system is the cost savings of the fuel, the cost savings of not requiring a full emissions module and other emissions hardware, and the enabling of the use of biodiesel fuel due to the reduced dependency on after-treatment. A proprietary production CRS generating process was developed to treat the interior of the sac-type injector nozzle tip region (particularly for the sac region). Ninety-five tips passed ultra high pulsed pressure fatigue testing with no failures assignable to treated surfaces or materials. It was determined that the CRS impartation method does not weaken the tip internal seat area. Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development accepts that the CRS method initial production technical readiness level has been established. A method to gage CRS levels in production was not yet accomplished, but it is believed that monitoring process parameters call be used to guarantee quality. A precision profiling process for injector seat and sac regions has been shown to be promising but not yet fully confirmed. It was demonstrated that this precision profiling process can achieve form and geometry to well under an aggressively small micron peak-to-valley and that there are no surface flaws that approach an even tighter micron peak-to-valley tolerance. It is planned to purchase machines to further develop and move the process towards production. The system is targeted towards the high-power diesel electric power generators and high-power diesel marine power generators, with displacement from 20 liters to 80 liters and with power from 800 brake horsepower (BHP) to 3200BHP (0.6 megawatts to 2.4 megawatts). However, with market adoption, this system has the potential to meet EPA exhaust standards for all diesel engines nine liters and up, or 300B

  7. Cosmic Ray production of Beryllium and Boron at high redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Rollinde; David Maurin; Elisabeth Vangioni; Keith A. Olive; Susumu Inoue

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, new observations of Li6 in Pop II stars of the galactic halo have shown a surprisingly high abundance of this isotope, about a thousand times higher than its predicted primordial value. In previous papers, a cosmological model for the cosmic ray-induced production of this isotope in the IGM has been developed to explain the observed abundance at low metallicity. In this paper, given this constraint on the Li6, we calculate the non-thermal evolution with redshift of D, Be, and B in the IGM. In addition to cosmological cosmic ray interactions in the IGM, we include additional processes driven by SN explosions: neutrino spallation and a low energy component in the structures ejected by outflows to the IGM. We take into account CNO CRs impinging on the intergalactic gas. Although subdominant in the galactic disk, this process is shown to produce the bulk of Be and B in the IGM, due to the differential metal enrichment between structures (where CRs originate) and the IGM. We also consider the resulting extragalactic gamma-ray background which we find to be well below existing data. The computation is performed in the framework of hierarchical structure formation considering several star formation histories including Pop III stars. We find that D production is negligible and that a potentially detectable Be and B plateau is produced by these processes at the time of the formation of the Galaxy (z ~ 3).

  8. The magic road to precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Safronova; Z. Zuhrianda; U. I. Safronova; Charles W. Clark

    2015-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict a sequence of magic-zero wavelengths for the Sr excited $5s5p~ ^3P_0$ state, and provide a general roadmap for extracting transition matrix elements using precise frequency measurements. We demonstrate that such measurements can serve as a best global benchmark of the spectroscopic accuracy that is required for the development of high-precision predictive methods. These magic-zero wavelengths are also needed for state-selective atom manipulation for implementation of quantum logic operations. We also identify five magic wavelengths of the $5s^2\\ ^1S_0 - 5s5p\\ ^3P_0$ Sr clock transition between 350 nm and 500 nm which can also serve as precision benchmarks.

  9. Well Productivity Enhancement of High Temperature Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanqun

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidizing is one of the most popular techniques for well productivity enhancement during oil and gas production. However, the treatment method is not very effective when the wellbore penetrates through multiple layers of heterogeneous reservoirs...

  10. Overview of High-Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J. S.; O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Hartvigsen, J. J.; Petri, M. C.; Carter, J. D.; Bischoff, B. L.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last five years there has been a growing interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, particularly to augment transportation fuels and thus reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, in the long term, methane reforming is not a viable process for the large-scale hydrogen production since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen without consuming fossil fuels and without emitting greenhouse gases through the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is developing three general categories of high temperature processes for hydrogen production: thermochemical, electrolytic and hybrid thermo-electrolytic. This paper introduces the work being done in the development of high temperature electrolysis of steam. High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) is built on the technology of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which were invented over a century ago, but which have been most vigorously developed during the last twenty years. SOFCs consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce steam and electricity. Solid Oxide Electrolytic Cells (SOECs) consume electricity and steam and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the HTE research is to solve those problems unique to the electrolytic mode of operation, while building further on continuing fuel cell development. ORGANIZATION Experiments have been conducted for the last three years at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. on the operation of button cells and of progressively larger stacks of planar cells. In addition, the INL has been performing analyses of the cell-scale fluid dynamics and plant-scale flowsheets in order to determine optimum operating conditions and plant configurations. Argonne National Laboratory has been performing experiments for the development of new electrode materials, as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics and flowsheets for comparison with the work being done at the INL. ANL has also been performing diagnostic measures on components form long-duration tests at the INL and Ceramatec to determine the causes for the slow degradation in cell performance. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing high temperature porous membranes for the separation of hydrogen from the residual steam, thus avoiding the need to condense and reheat the steam. The University of Nevada at Las Vegas has been collaborating with ANL on the development of electrode and electrolyte materials and will soon begin to investigate the causes of cell degradation. HTE research also includes NERI projects at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute on the development of toughened SOEC composite seals and at the Georgia Institute of Technology on the microstructural design of SOEC materials. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS The most recent large-scale test of HTE was performed from June 28 through Sept 22, 2006 at the Ceramatec plant in Salt Lake City. The test apparatus consists of two stacks of 60 cells each in a configuration that will be used in the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) experiment during FY-07. The ILS will contain three modules of four stacks each. The “Half-Module” initially produced 1.2 normal m3of H2/hour and 0.65 Nm3/hr at the end of the 2040-hour continuous test.

  11. Production trap improvements using high-efficiency internals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delavan, D.P.; Wilson, T.T.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the Gas-Oil Separation Plants (GOSP) in Southern Area Producing of Saudi Aramco will be producing between 40% and 75% water cuts by the turn of the century. Many GOSPs will be producing more than twice the amount of water they were originally designed for. Consequently, modifications must be made to the GOSPs so that they will have the capacity to separate and clean up these large volumes of produced water. The most attractive option is to improve the separation efficiency of the High Pressure Production Traps (HPPT) where formation water is first removed from the wellhead fluid. These traps have historically removed very little water from the wellhead fluid. However, the following modifications have proven to significantly improve the separation efficiency of the traps: double the height of the weir, and raise the oil level from 40% to 65% full; install a new inlet device to minimize the formation of foam; install coalescing and foam-breaking internals to enhance oil/water coalescing and separation and to break the foam on top of the oil layer.

  12. Soviet precision timekeeping research and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vessot, R.F.C.; Allan, D.W.; Crampton, S.J.B.; Cutler, L.S.; Kern, R.H.; McCoubrey, A.O.; White, J.D.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the result of a study of Soviet progress in precision timekeeping research and timekeeping capability during the last two decades. The study was conducted by a panel of seven US scientists who have expertise in timekeeping, frequency control, time dissemination, and the direct applications of these disciplines to scientific investigation. The following topics are addressed in this report: generation of time by atomic clocks at the present level of their technology, new and emerging technologies related to atomic clocks, time and frequency transfer technology, statistical processes involving metrological applications of time and frequency, applications of precise time and frequency to scientific investigations, supporting timekeeping technology, and a comparison of Soviet research efforts with those of the United States and the West. The number of Soviet professionals working in this field is roughly 10 times that in the United States. The Soviet Union has facilities for large-scale production of frequency standards and has concentrated its efforts on developing and producing rubidium gas cell devices (relatively compact, low-cost frequency standards of modest accuracy and stability) and atomic hydrogen masers (relatively large, high-cost standards of modest accuracy and high stability). 203 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. High precision high flow range control valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid control valve is described having a valve housing having first and second valve housing openings for the ingress and egress of fluid through the control valve. Disposed within a void formed by the control valve is a sleeve having at least one sleeve opening to permit the flow of fluid therethrough. A flow restricter travels within the sleeve to progressively block off the sleeve opening and thereby control flow. A fluid passageway is formed between the first valve housing opening and the outer surface of the sleeve. A second fluid passageway is formed between the inside of the sleeve and the second valve housing opening. Neither fluid passageway contains more than one 90.degree. turn. In the preferred embodiment only one of the two fluid passageways contains a 90.degree. turn. In another embodiment, the control valve housing is bifurcated by a control surface having control surface opening disposed therethrough. A flow restricter is in slidable contact with the control surface to restrict flow of fluid through the control surface openings.

  14. High precision high flow range control valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, J.A.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid control valve is described having a valve housing having first and second valve housing openings for the ingress and egress of fluid through the control valve. Disposed within a void formed by the control valve is a sleeve having at least one sleeve opening to permit the flow of fluid therethrough. A flow restricter travels within the sleeve to progressively block off the sleeve opening and thereby control flow. A fluid passageway is formed between the first valve housing opening and the outer surface of the sleeve. A second fluid passageway is formed between the inside of the sleeve and the second valve housing opening. Neither fluid passageway contains more than one 90 [degree] turn. In the preferred embodiment only one of the two fluid passageways contains a 90[degree] turn. In another embodiment, the control valve housing is bifurcated by a control surface having control surface opening disposed therethrough. A flow restricter is in slidable contact with the control surface to restrict flow of fluid through the control surface openings. 12 figs.

  15. Amorphous Si Thin Film Based Photocathodes with High Photovoltage for Efficient Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    thin film with TiO2 encapsulation layer is demonstrated as a highly promising and stable photo- cathode for solar hydrogen production. With platinum as prototypical cocatalyst, a photocurrent onset potential of 0 for solar hydrogen production. KEYWORDS: Water splitting, hydrogen production, photochemistry, high

  16. High Activity catalysts for Polyols Production From C-6 Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Werpy; Alan Zacher; John Frye; Keith Peterson; Gary Neuenschwander; Eric Alderson; Daniel Muzatko; Jim White

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project, many significant discoveries have been made in the process for the conversion of sorbitol to value added products. The object was developing a process for the production of propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and glycerol from sorbitol.

  17. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  18. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W. Bruce (Knoxville, TN); McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  19. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  20. Method for grinding precision components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramanath, Srinivasan (Holden, MA); Kuo, Shih Yee (Westboro, MA); Williston, William H. (Holden, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for precision cylindrical grinding of hard brittle materials, such as ceramics or glass and composites comprising ceramics or glass, provides material removal rates as high as 19-380 cm.sup.3 /min/cm. The abrasive tools used in the method comprise a strong, light weight wheel core bonded to a continuous rim of abrasive segments containing superabrasive grain in a dense metal bond matrix.

  1. Precision displacement reference system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Dubois, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Strother, Jerry D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  2. Economically Optimum Irrigation Patternsfor Grain Sorghum Production: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, L. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Taylor, C. R.

    generated at every starting point for each of the production periods. If discrepancies between the expected and the realized values existed, then, based on current conditions a reevaluation of the control variable, irrigation water, was made and the decision...

  3. High-biomass sorghums for biomass biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packer, Daniel

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    for breeding evaluations. Seventeen hundred ninety two exotic sorghum accessions from 7 different geographic origins were evaluated for high-biomass desirability in 3 environments. Significant relationships between passport data and high-biomass desirability...

  4. Paleo-highs may be key to deeper oil production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.G.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois basin is primarily a Paleozoic epeirogenic and epicratonic basin located in the east-central United States. Hydrocarbons have been commercially produced from this basin for more than a century, having reached cumulative production of more than 3.2 billion bbl of oil, with relatively little gas. Pursuing this production, more than 72 million feet of exploratory footage, a considerable sum, have been drilled. Taken at face value, these facts have created a commonly held impression throughout the oil and gas industry that the Illinois basin is in a very mature stage of exploration, In other words, the prejudice is that not many reserves remain to be found.

  5. Phosphate bonded structural products from high volume wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to produce structural products from benign waste is provided comprising mixing pretreated oxide with phosphoric acid to produce an acid solution, mixing the acid solution with waste particles to produce a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a structural material comprising waste particles enveloped by an inorganic binder. 1 fig.

  6. Reduced Call-Backs with High Performance Production Builders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    work high and catching problems before move-in. Read about this Top Innovation. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate reduced...

  7. Affordable High Performance in Production Homes: Artistic Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and technical assistance to Artistic Homes.Read about this Top Innovation. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate how high...

  8. Production of highly unidirectional lower-hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, R.; Okubo, M.; Platt, R.C.; Sheehan, D.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a highly unidirectional lower-hybrid wave source would improve the electron current drive efficiency in tokamaks. Lower-hybrid waves launched from a phased wave array are shown to be reflected from a grid placed in a cold, low-density plasma. The antenna--grid combination results in highly unidirectional lower-hybrid waves.

  9. High Tunnel Crop Production Tips Lewis W. Jett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    . Specifically, high tunnels are passively vented, solar greenhouses covered with 1-2 layers of greenhouse perpendicular (at right angles) to the prevailing winds on your farm. Generally, this is a north-south direction supplemental heating systems? High tunnels should be designed and managed as passively vented and solar heated

  10. High-precision gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of aqueous salt solutions as a probe of the femtosecond-to-picosecond dynamics of liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinh, N Q; Allen, S James; George, D K; Rahmani, A J; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because it is sensitive to fluctuations occurring over femtoseconds to picoseconds, gigahertz-to-terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy can provide a valuable window into water's most rapid intermolecular motions. In response, we have built a vector network analyzer dielectric spectrometer capable of measuring absorbance and index of refraction in this frequency regime with unprecedented precision. Using this to determine the complex dielectric response of water and aqueous salt solutions from 5.9 GHz to 1.12 THz (which we provide in the SI), we have obtained strong new constraints on theories of water's collective dynamics. For example, while the salt-dependencies we observe for water's two slower relaxations (8 and 1 ps) are easily reconciled with suggestions that they arise due to rotations of fully and partially hydrogen bonded molecules, respectively, the salt-dependence of the fastest relaxation (180 fs) appears difficult to reconcile with its prior assignment to liberations of single hydrogen bon...

  11. Evaluation of photoneutron production at high energy LINACS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Z.W.

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an estimate of neutron production at a 9 MeV LINAC, and the potential for photoactivation of materials present at the LINAC facility. It was found that only isotopes of U, W, Ta, and Pb had daughters whose activities might be measurable. The LINAC was found to be capable of producing in the neighborhood of 10{sup 10} neutrons/second from these heavy metals, and that subsequent neutron activation might be more of a concern. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transport and capture in the concrete and steel found in the LINAC vault indicates that {sup 55}Fe may be produced in measurable quantities.

  12. Production Practices for Irrigated Crops on the High Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.; McArthur, W. C.; Magee, A. C.; Hughes, W.F.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was snapped and the re- mainder was machine-stripped. th lint yields averaging nearly a bale per acre (Table and 24.0 hours, respectively, of off-farm labor were cotton snapping on sandy and on heavy soils. From hour of labor was used to cover... approximately half rl acreage with a stripper. hough machine operations on dry-land and on irrigated CULLIJI~ are similar for seedbed preparation, planting and culti- vating, nearly twice as much labor was needed for production of the irrigated crop...

  13. THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

  14. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar Power ProjectHawai'iPresentedHighHighBOP andPlantations |

  15. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  16. Production and Properties of Solidified High-Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;- 5 - 1. INTRODUCTION For more than 30 years, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has taken assistance from Risø to ELSAM/ELKRAFT's waste management project. Abstract. Available information form. Liquid high-level waste will also be produced by future reprocessing of power reactor fuel

  17. European High-End Products in International Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - formance. Using an econometric shift-share methodology, Cheptea et al. (2014) shows buoy- ancy of EU market, and market power. On the demand side, a large share of high-priced goods in EU consumption and exports to large differences within the Single European Market in labor costs, skills, and ultimately, com

  18. Towards the Light Front Variables for High Energy Production Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. S. Amaglobeli; S. M. Esakia; V. R. Garsevanishvili; G. O. Kuratashvili; N. K. Kutsidi; R. A. Kvatadze; Yu V. Tevzadze; T. P. Topuria

    1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale invariant presentation of inclusive spectra in terms of light front variables is proposed. The variables introduced go over to the well-known scaling variables x_F = 2p_z/sqrt(s) and x_T=2p_T/sqrt{s} in the high p_z and high p_T limits respectively. So Some surface is found in the phase space of produced pi-mesons in the inclusive reaction anti p p -> pi+- X at 22.4 GeV/c, which separates two groups of particles with significantly different characteristics. In one of these regions a naive statistical model seems to be in a good agreement with data, whereas it fails in the second region. Key words: Light front, inclusive, hadron-hadron, electron-positron, relativistic heavy ions, deep inelastic.

  19. Raw material preparation for ultra high production rate sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany); Cappel, F.; Weisel, H.; Richter, G. [LURGI AG, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An R and D program in pot grate sintering showed, that an intensive preparation of ores, additives and coke breeze improves the sintering capacity. The tests were conducted using an ore mixture composed of typical ores imported to Europe. The highest capacities were attained up to 63.8 t/m{sup 2} {times} 24 h maximum for a sinter which well fulfills the high requirements on chemical, physical and metallurgical properties.

  20. Measuring Productivity on High Performance Computers Marvin Zelkowitz1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    Measuring Productivity on High Performance Computers Marvin Zelkowitz1,2 Victor Basili1,2 Sima, lorin, hollings, nakamura}@cs.umd.edu Abstract In the high performance computing domain, the speed of concern to high performance computing developers. In this paper we will discuss the problems of defining

  1. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  2. High Precision Astrometry with VLBI: from the Triangle 1803+784/1928+738/2007+777 to the Complete S5 Polar Cap Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ros; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; M. A. Perez-Torres

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The VLBI technique can image compact radio sources with resolutions of the order of the milliarcsecond and can determine astrometrically relative positions with submilliarcsecond precisions. We determined the angular separations among the radio sources in the triangle 1803+784/1928+738/2007+777 with submilliarcsecond accuracy from a weighted least squares analysis of the differential phases. The comparison of the estimated separation of the pair 1928+738/2007+777 with previous such estimates obtained from data at different epochs allowed us to align the maps of 1928+738 at diferent epochs relative to those of 2007+777, showing that the jet components of 1928+738 display proper motions, and suggesting an identification for the position of the core of this radio source. We have also observed astrometrically the complete S5 polar cap sample, that among the 13 sources within 20 degrees to the celestial North Pole includes the above 3. These observations are carried out in the framework of a long-term astrometric program to determine the absolute kinematics of radio sources in the S5 complete sample.

  3. High-precision multi-band time-series photometry of exoplanets Qatar-1b and TrES-5b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mislis, D; Tregloan-Reed, J; Ciceri, S; Southworth, J; D'Ago, G; Bruni, I; Ba?türk, Ö; Alsubai, K A; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D M; Henning, Th; Hinse, T C; Iannella, A L; Parley, N; Schroeder, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the Qatar-1 and TrES-5 transiting exoplanetary systems, which contain Jupiter-like planets on short-period orbits around K-dwarf stars. Our data comprise a total of 20 transit light curves obtained using five medium-class telescopes, operated using the defocussing technique. The average precision we reach in all our data is $RMS_{Q} = 1.1$ mmag for Qatar-1 ($V = 12.8$) and $RMS_{T} = 1.0$ mmag for TrES-5 ($V = 13.7$). We use these data to refine the orbital ephemeris, photometric parameters, and measured physical properties of the two systems. One transit event for each object was observed simultaneously in three passbands ($gri$) using the BUSCA imager. The QES survey light curve of Qatar-1 has a clear sinusoidal variation on a period of $P_{\\star} = 23.697 \\pm 0.123$\\,d, implying significant starspot activity. We searched for starspot crossing events in our light curves, but did not find clear evidence in any of the new datasets. The planet in the Qatar-1 system did not transit the...

  4. Precision laser aiming system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  5. Gluon polarisation from high transverse momentum hadron pairs production (COMPASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Silva; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new preliminary result of a gluon polarisation \\Delta G/G obtained selecting high transverse momentum hadron pairs in DIS events with Q^2>1 (GeV/c)^2 is presented. Data has been collected by COMPASS at CERN during the 2002-2004 years. In the extraction of $\\Delta G/G$ contributions coming from the leading order $\\gamma q$ and QCD processes are taken into account. A new weighting method based on a neural network approach is used. Also a preliminary result of \\Delta G/G for events with Q^2<1 (GeV/c)^2 is presented.

  6. High Temperature Electrolysis for Efficient Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a r r t t m m e e n n t t o oHigh

  7. Production of high-Q ions by laser bombardment method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phaneuf, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expanding plasma produced when an intense pulse of laser radiation is focused in vacuum onto a solid target has been used as a source of highly stripped ions for collision cross-section measurements. Usable fluxes of carbon nuclei at energies of a few hundred eV/charge have been obtained by irradiation of graphite with pulses of CO/sub 2/ laser radiation at a focused power density of 3 x 10/sup 10/ W/cm/sup 2/. Bombardment of aluminum and iron targets at comparable power levels have yielded ions of maximum charges of 9 and 16, respectively. A time-of-flight apparatus has been constructed to utilize the laser source for measurement of electron capture cross sections for highly stripped ions in gases at energies in the few hundred eV/charge range. Apertures collimate an ion beam from the plasma blowoff, and an electrostatic analyzer selects ions from the expanding plasma which have the same energy per charge. The beam is directed through a gas target cell, charge analyzed once more by deceleration, and detected by a channel plate electron multiplier used in a current amplification mode. Electron capture cross sections have been measured for C/sup +q/ ions, q = 3, 4, 5 in H/sub 2/ at energies ranging from 150 to 1160 eV/charge.

  8. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Dry-grind Highly Digestible Grain Sorghum Lines for Ethanol Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Joan R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of high digestible grain sorghum (HDGS) with a modified starch protein endosperm matrix to replace corn in ethanol production was investigated using dry grind simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Preliminary...

  9. Feedback Controlled High Frequency Electrochemical Micromachining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozkeskin, Fatih Mert

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are different from those for silicon. A promising mass production method for micro/meso scale components is electrochemical micromachining. The complex system, however, requires high precision mechanical fixtures and sophisticated instrumentation for proper...

  10. High-precision determination of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in natural waters and carbonates by ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketterer, M.E. [John Carroll Univ., University Heights, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Khourey, C.J. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed for precise measurement of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in natural waters and carbonates using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of 80--85% of seawater U is achieved by Fe(III) coprecipitation followed by extraction chromatography with a supported dipentyl pentane phosphonate material; 90--95% of U is recovered from carbonates, which are dissolved in HNO{sub 3} and subjected to the same extraction chromatographic preparation. Isotopic measurements are made via recirculating pneumatic nebulization of small volumes of solutions containing 0.5--5 mg/L U. {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U is measured as a proxy for determination of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U; iridium is added to sample solutions and the ion ratio {sup 191}Ir{sup 40}Ar{sup +}/{sup 193}Ir{sup 40}Ar{sup +} is measured for internal mass discrimination correction {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in the range 1.143--1.154 are observed for 13 seawater and contemporary corals, in agreement with the established marine {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio. For samples sizes of 5--25 {micro}g U, ICPMS uncertainties of {+-} 0.2--0.5% relative, 2{theta} standard error, approach those obtained for < 0.1 {micro}g U by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in bottled waters, Lake Erie surface waters, mollusk fossils, and fertilizers are also demonstrated.

  11. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  12. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  13. Precision cosmology and the landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing the cosmological constant problem -- why is Lambda not huge? -- I outline the two basic approaches that had emerged by the late 1980s, and note that each made a clear prediction. Precision cosmological experiments now indicate that the cosmological constant is nonzero. This result strongly favors the environmental approach, in which vacuum energy can vary discretely among widely separated regions in the universe. The need to explain this variation from first principles constitutes an observational constraint on fundamental theory. I review arguments that string theory satisfies this constraint, as it contains a dense discretuum of metastable vacua. The enormous landscape of vacua calls for novel, statistical methods of deriving predictions, and it prompts us to reexamine our description of spacetime on the largest scales. I discuss the effects of cosmological dynamics, and I speculate that weighting vacua by their entropy production may allow for prior-free predictions that do not resort to explicitly anthropic arguments.

  14. Design and development of high precision elastomeric-stamp wrapping system for roll-to-roll multi-layer microcontact printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datar, Charudatta Achyut

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcontact printing is an emerging printing technique that could potentially find application in the electronics industry. High-speed roll-to-roll equipment was built at Nano Terra, Inc in 2008, for microcontact printing. ...

  15. Verification of the MCU precision code and ROSFOND neutron data in application to the calculations of criticality of fast reactors with highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, N. I.; Kalugin, M. A.; Kulakov, A. S.; Novosel’tsev, A. P.; Sergeev, G. S.; Shkarovskiy, D. A.; Yudkevich, M. S., E-mail: umark@adis.vver.kiae.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of 335 critical assemblies (benchmark experiments) with the core of highly enriched uranium and reflectors of various materials is performed. The statistical analysis of the results shows that, for all 16 materials studied, the absolute value of the most probable deviation of the calculated value of K{sub eff} from the experimental one does not exceed 0.005.

  16. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  17. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  18. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  19. A New Method For Robust High-Precision Time-Series Photometry From Well-Sampled Images: Application to Archival MMT/Megacam Observations of the Open Cluster M37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new methods for robust high-precision photometry from well-sampled images of a non-crowded field with a strongly varying point-spread function. For this work, we used archival imaging data of the open cluster M37 taken by MMT 6.5m telescope. We find that the archival light curves from the original image subtraction procedure exhibit many unusual outliers, and more than 20% of data get rejected by the simple filtering algorithm adopted by early analysis. In order to achieve better photometric precisions and also to utilize all available data, the entire imaging database was re-analyzed with our time-series photometry technique (Multi-aperture Indexing Photometry) and a set of sophisticated calibration procedures. The merit of this approach is as follows: we find an optimal aperture for each star with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and also treat peculiar situations where photometry returns misleading information with more optimal photometric index. We also adopt photometric de-trending based on ...

  20. A Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Top Quark Production at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouëné, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with two aspects of the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is a project of a linear electron-positron collider of up to at least 500 GeV center of mass energy. The first aspect is the development of a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for one of the detectors of the ILC. The concept of this detector is driven by the ILC beam specifications and by the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). This requires highly granular calorimeter and very compact one with integrated electronics. To prove the capability of the SiW- ECAL a technological prototype has been built and tested in test beam at DESY. The results are presented here, and show, after the calibration procedure a signal over noise ratio of 10, even in the power pulsing mode. The second aspect is the study of one of the important physics channels of the ILC, the top anti-top quark pairs production. The main goal of this study is to determine the precision that we can expect at the ILC on the top coupling with the W bos...

  1. Sub-threshold $\\phi$ and $\\Xi^-$ production by high mass resonances with UrQMD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinheimer, Jan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a possible explanation for the deep sub-threshold, $\\phi$ and $\\Xi^-$ production yields measured with the HADES experiment in Ar+KCl reactions at $E_{\\mathrm{lab}}=1.76$ A GeV and present predictions for Au+Au reactions at $E_{\\mathrm{lab}}=1.23$ A GeV. To explain the surprisingly high yields of $\\phi$ and $\\Xi^-$ hadrons we propose new decay channels for high mass baryon resonances. These new decay channels are constrained by elementary $\\mathrm{p+p}\\rightarrow \\mathrm{p+p+}\\phi$ cross sections, and $\\Xi^-$ production in p+Nb. Based on the fits to the elementary reactions one obtains a satisfactorily description of $\\phi$ and $\\Xi^-$ production in deep sub-threshold Ar+KCl reactions. The results implicate that no new medium effects are required to describe the rare strange particle production data in low energy nuclear collisions.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE TARGETS AND ION SOURCES FOR ONLINE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    PRODUCTION V.N.Panteleev, A.E.Barzakh, D.V.Fedorov, V.S.Ivanov, F.V.Moroz, S.Yu.Orlov, A.G.Polyakov, M.D.Seliverstov, Yu.M.Volkov 1. Introduction At the IRIS facility a high temperature target for effective production of a tungsten foil as a target container material allows to maintain the working temperature for refractory foil

  3. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  4. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialographic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone. 1 fig.

  5. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Dragon, Ernest P. (Danville, CA); Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialogroaphic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone.

  6. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  7. Forward production of high-energy electrons from megavoltage photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The forward production of high-energy electrons from materials with various atomic numbers from carbon to lead has been measured for megavoltage photon beams from 4- to 25-MV peak bremsstrahlung energy by placing a thin-window parallel-plate ionization chamber directly behind foils of the various materials. The relative forward production of electrons decreases with atomic number for energies less than or equal to10 MV until about Z = 50, after which it rises. For photon energies greater than or equal to15 MV, forward production increases with atomic number with a break point at Z--50, beyond which the curve becomes steeper.

  8. Archiving Data from New Survey Technologies: Lessons Learned on Enabling Research with High-Precision Data While Preserving Participant Privacy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Burton, E.; Murakami, E.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 15 years, increasing numbers of organizations and planning agencies have begun collecting high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) travel data. Despite the significant effort and expense to collect it, privacy concerns often lead to underutilization of the data. To address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with support from the U.S. Department of Transportation and U.S. Department of Energy, established the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). Lessons drawn from best-practice examples from other data centers have helped shape the structure and operating procedures for the TSDC, which functions under the philosophy of first and foremost preserving privacy, but doing so in a way that balances security with accessibility and usability of the data for legitimate research. This paper provides details about the TSDC approach toward achieving these goals, which has included creating a secure enclave with no external access for backing up and processing raw data, a publicly accessible website for downloading cleansed data, and a secure portal environment through which approved users can work with detailed spatial data using a variety of tools and reference information. This paper also describes lessons learned from operating the TSDC with respect to improvements in GPS data handling, processing, and user support, along with plans for continual enhancements to better support the needs of both data providers and users and to thus advance the research value derived from such valuable data.

  9. Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons (FCNC) decay ¯B0 ¯K0 e+ e- K- + e+ e-. Prompt photon production in pp (p¯p) collisions. Production measurement of photon polarization is difficult, therefore one can instead use virtual-photon production b

  10. Attaining the Photometric Precision Required by Future Dark Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbs, Christopher

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines our progress towards achieving the high-precision astronomical measurements needed to derive improved constraints on the nature of the Dark Energy. Our approach to obtaining higher precision flux measurements has two basic components: 1) determination of the optical transmission of the atmosphere, and 2) mapping out the instrumental photon sensitivity function vs. wavelength, calibrated by referencing the measurements to the known sensitivity curve of a high precision silicon photodiode, and 3) using the self-consistency of the spectrum of stars to achieve precise color calibrations.

  11. Production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) by Ralstonia eutropha in high cell density palm oil fermentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusof, Zainal Abidin Mohd

    Improved production costs will accelerate commercialization of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymer and PHA-based products. Plant oils are considered favorable feedstocks, due to their high carbon content and relatively low ...

  12. Soft vs Hard: Particle Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Pareek, Pooja; Behera, Nirbhay K; Sahoo, Raghunath; Nandi, Basanta K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of pseudorapidity density of charged particles and transverse energy is studied for a wide range of collision energies for heavy-ion collisions at midrapidity. A two-component model approach has been adopted to quantify the soft and hard components of particle production, coming from nucleon participants and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, respectively. Within experimental uncertainties, the hard component contributing to the particle production has been found to be nearly independent of collisions energy from RHIC to LHC. The suppression of high-$p_{\\rm T}$ hadrons and jets in the medium created in heavy-ion collisions seem to play a role in the nearly independent collision energy behavior of hard components in particle production. We also use MC event generators, like HIJING and AMPT to study the possible effects of the suppression of high $p_{T}$ partons inside the medium and the effect of the threshold momentum for minijets, contributing to hard scattering processes.

  13. Factorized power expansion for high-pT heavy quarkonium production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Sterman, George; Zhang, Hong

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that when the factorized cross section for heavy quarkonium production includes next-to-leading power contributions associated with the production of the heavy quark pair at short distances, it naturally reproduces all high pT results calculated in nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization. This extended formalism requires fragmentation functions for heavy quark pairs, as well as for light partons. When these fragmentation functions are themselves calculated using NRQCD, we find that two of the four leading NRQCD production channels, ³S[1]1 and ¹S[8]0, are dominated by the next-to-leading power contributions for a very wide pT range. The large next-to-leading order corrections of NRQCDmore »are absorbed into the leading order of the first power correction. The impact of this finding on heavy quarkonium production and its polarization is discussed.« less

  14. Factorized power expansion for high-pT heavy quarkonium production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Qiu, Jian-Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sterman, George [Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Zhang, Hong [Stony Brook University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that when the factorized cross section for heavy quarkonium production includes next-to-leading power contributions associated with the production of the heavy quark pair at short distances, it naturally reproduces all high pT results calculated in nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization. This extended formalism requires fragmentation functions for heavy quark pairs, as well as for light partons. When these fragmentation functions are themselves calculated using NRQCD, we find that two of the four leading NRQCD production channels, ³S[1]1 and ¹S[8]0, are dominated by the next-to-leading power contributions for a very wide pT range. The large next-to-leading order corrections of NRQCD are absorbed into the leading order of the first power correction. The impact of this finding on heavy quarkonium production and its polarization is discussed.

  15. Factorized power expansion for high-pT heavy quarkonium production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Qiu, Jian-Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sterman, George [Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Zhang, Hong [Stony Brook University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that when the factorized cross section for heavy quarkonium production includes next-to-leading power contributions associated with the production of the heavy quark pair at short distances, it naturally reproduces all high pT results calculated in nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization. This extended formalism requires fragmentation functions for heavy quark pairs, as well as for light partons. When these fragmentation functions are themselves calculated using NRQCD, we find that two of the four leading NRQCD production channels, ³S[1]1 and ¹S[8]0, are dominated by the next-to-leading power contributions for a very wide pT range. The large next-to-leading order corrections of NRQCD are absorbed into the leading order of the first power correction. The impact of this finding on heavy quarkonium production and its polarization is discussed.

  16. Making a high-mix make-to-order production system lean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-mix, make-to-order production system can become inefficient when non-value added operations consume too much time, space or labour. To address these issues, cell re-layout is conducted and a CONWIP system is proposed. ...

  17. Precision hybrid pipelined ADC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markova, Mariana (Mariana T.)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology scaling poses challenges in designing analog circuits because of the decrease in intrinsic gain and reduced swing. An alternative to using high-gain amplifiers in the implementation of switched-capacitor circuits ...

  18. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to avoid conflicts with wildlife migration. The drilling will apply closed-circuit, low footprint sump-less drilling techniques for the first time in geothermal exploration...

  19. Ultra High Precision Muon Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, B. Lee

    .06 UF5 White 348 Disp. 6.45 UF6 Colorless 64.05 56.54 5.06 UCl3 Olive green 837 1657 5.51 UCl4 Dark

  20. Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

  1. Tar-free fuel gas production from high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Leguan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Shiming, E-mail: Zhangping101@yeah.net; Cheng, Gong; He, Piwen; Sun, Lei

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • High temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge was efficient for producing tar-free fuel gas. • Complete tar removal and volatile matter release were at elevated temperature of 1300 °C. • Sewage sludge was converted to residual solid with high ash content. • 72.60% of energy conversion efficiency for gas production in high temperature pyrolysis. • Investment and costing for tar cleaning were reduced. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was studied in a free-fall reactor at 1000–1400 °C. The results showed that the volatile matter in the sludge could be completely released to gaseous product at 1300 °C. The high temperature was in favor of H{sub 2} and CO in the produced gas. However, the low heating value (LHV) of the gas decreased from 15.68 MJ/N m{sup 3} to 9.10 MJ/N m{sup 3} with temperature increasing from 1000 °C to 1400 °C. The obtained residual solid was characterized by high ash content. The energy balance indicated that the most heating value in the sludge was in the gaseous product.

  2. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  3. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  4. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

  5. Generalized Lyapunov exponents in high-dimensional chaotic dynamics and products of large random matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisanti, A.; Paladin, G.; Vulpiani, A.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behavior of the generalized Lyapunov exponents for chaotic symplectic dynamical systems and products of random matrices in the limit of large dimensions D. For products of random matrices without any particular structure the generalized Lyapunov exponents become equal in this limit and the value of one of the generalized Lyapunov exponents is obtained by simple arguments. On the contrary, for random symplectic matrices with peculiar structures and for chaotic symplectic maps the generalized Lyapunov exponents remains different for D ..-->.. infinity, indicating that high dimensionality cannot always destroy intermittency.

  6. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I. [Department of Physics, Danish National Research Foundation's Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF), Technical University of Denmark, Building 312, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O. [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

  7. Saturation Physics in Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Heavy Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Goncalves; M. V. T. Machado

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the heavy quark production in the interaction of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere, considering that the primary cosmic ray is a proton or a photon. At these energies the saturation momentum Q_{sat}^2 stays above the hard scale \\mu_c^2=4m_c^2, implying charm production probing the saturation regime. In particular, we show that the ep HERA data presents a scaling on \\tau_c = (Q^2+\\mu_c^2)/Q_{sat}^2. We derive our results considering the dipole picture and the Color Glass Condensate formalism, which one shows to be able to describe the heavy quark production in photon-proton and proton-proton collisions. Nuclear effects are considered in computation of cross sections for scattering on air nuclei. Implications on the flux of prompt leptons at the earth are analyzed and a large suppression is predicted.

  8. Implementing the Data Center Energy Productivity Metric in a High Performance Computing Data Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Marquez, Andres; Rawson, Andrew; Cader, Tahir; Fox, Kevin M.; Gustafson, William I.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As data centers proliferate in size and number, the improvement of their energy efficiency and productivity has become an economic and environmental imperative. Making these improvements requires metrics that are robust, interpretable, and practical. We discuss the properties of a number of the proposed metrics of energy efficiency and productivity. In particular, we focus on the Data Center Energy Productivity (DCeP) metric, which is the ratio of useful work produced by the data center to the energy consumed performing that work. We describe our approach for using DCeP as the principal outcome of a designed experiment using a highly instrumented, high-performance computing data center. We found that DCeP was successful in clearly distinguishing different operational states in the data center, thereby validating its utility as a metric for identifying configurations of hardware and software that would improve energy productivity. We also discuss some of the challenges and benefits associated with implementing the DCeP metric, and we examine the efficacy of the metric in making comparisons within a data center and between data centers.

  9. Method for producing through extrusion an anisotropic magnet with high energy product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandhok, Vijay K.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing an anisotropic magnet with high energy product through extrusion and, more specifically, by placing a particle charge of a composition from the which magnet is to be produced in a noncircular container, heating the container and particle charge and extruding the container and particle charge through a noncircular extrusion die in such a manner that one of the cross-sectional axes or dimension of the container and particle charge is held substantially constant during the extrusion to compact the particle charge to substantially full density by mechanical deformation produced during the extrusion to achieve a magnet with anisotropic magnetic properties along the axes or dimension thereof and, more specifically, a high energy product along the transverse of the smallest cross-sectional dimension of the extruded magnet.

  10. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  11. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Tuchin

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  12. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; Gaston Gutierrez; Michael H. L. S. Wang; Zhenyu Ye

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  13. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Oleg; Wang, Michael H L S; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by two orders of magnitude. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing e...

  14. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Z.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of themore »matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  15. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O. [Physikalisches Inst, Gottingen (Germany); Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Gutierrez, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Wang, M. H.L.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Ye, Z. [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  16. Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

    PRODUCTION OF HIGH QUALITY DUST CONTROL FOAM TO MINIMIZE MOISTURE ADDITION TO COAL Frank Tenni ne Steve T. Jordan BETZ Laboratories, Trevose, PA Inc. ABSTRACT Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling... fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet...

  17. Studies of heavy flavour production and the hadronic final state in high energy ep collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An extract of recent results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations is shown. Various properties of quantum chromo dynamics are investigated by studying the details of the hadronic final state of high energy electron proton collisions at HERA. The presented results include analyses of jet cross sections and single particle production such as $\\gamma$ and $D$. Part of the measurements deal with final states involving identified heavy quarks (charm and beauty).

  18. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  19. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Langford

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  20. Precision mechatronics lab robot development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Adam Gregory

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    based mobile robot. The principal goal of this work was the demonstration of the Precision Mechatronics Lab (PML) robot. This robot should be capable of traversing any known distance while maintaining a minimal position error. An optical correction...

  1. Precision mechatronics lab robot development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Adam Gregory

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    based mobile robot. The principal goal of this work was the demonstration of the Precision Mechatronics Lab (PML) robot. This robot should be capable of traversing any known distance while maintaining a minimal position error. An optical correction...

  2. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  3. Dell Precision Workstations Precision is the key element that separates greatness from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    Pro and NVIDIA Quadro graphics options enable you to run high-end graphics for all of your professional needs for the utmost in color precision ·100% BFR/PVC free10 , ENERGY STAR 5.2 qualified and EPEAT registered11 and optional NVIDIA® OptimusTM technology which intelligently provides graphics performance when you need

  4. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  5. Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800º-900ºC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

  6. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300?C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  7. Non-relativistic high-energy physics: top production and dark matter annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneke, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic physics is often associated with atomic physics and low-energy phenomena of the strong interactions between nuclei and quarks. In this review we cover three topics in contemporary high-energy physics at or close to the TeV scale, where non-relativistic dynamics plays an important if not defining role. We first discuss in detail the third-order corrections to top-quark pair production in electron-positron collisions in the threshold region, which plays a major role at a future high-energy e+ e- collider. Threshold effects are also relevant in the production of heavy particles in hadronic collisions, where in addition to the Coulomb force soft gluon radiation contributes to enhanced quantum corrections. We review the joint resummation of non-relativistic and soft gluon effects for pair production of top quarks and supersymmetric particles to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The third topic deals with pair annihilation of dark matter particles within the framework of the Minimal Sup...

  8. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

  9. Long-range Cooper pair splitter with high entanglement production rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; D. N. Shi; D. Y. Xing

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooper pairs in the superconductor are a natural source of spin entanglement. The existing proposals of the Cooper pair splitter can only realize a low efficiency of entanglement production, and its size is constrained by the superconducting coherence length. Here we show that a long-range Cooper pair splitter can be implemented in a normal metal-superconductor-normal metal (NSN) junction by driving a supercurrent in the S. The supercurrent results in a band gap modification of the S, which significantly enhances the crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) of the NSN junction and simultaneously quenches its elastic cotunneling. Therefore, a high entanglement production rate close to its saturation value can be achieved by the inverse CAR. Interestingly, in addition to the conventional entangled electron states between opposite energy levels, novel entangled states with equal energy can also be induced in our proposal.

  10. ARPREC: An arbitrary precision computation package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H.; Yozo, Hida; Li, Xiaoye S.; Thompson, Brandon

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new software package for performing arithmetic with an arbitrarily high level of numeric precision. It is based on the earlier MPFUN package, enhanced with special IEEE floating-point numerical techniques and several new functions. This package is written in C++ code for high performance and broad portability and includes both C++ and Fortran-90 translation modules, so that conventional C++ and Fortran-90 programs can utilize the package with only very minor changes. This paper includes a survey of some of the interesting applications of this package and its predecessors.

  11. Estimation of charm production cross section in hadronic interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. Vereshkov; Yu. F. Novoseltsev

    2004-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of processing experimental data on charm production in hadron-hadron interactions are presented. The analysis is carried out within the frame of phenomenological model of diffraction production and quark statistics based on additive quark model (AQM). In low energy region sqrt s = 20 - 40GeV, the cross sections si_ {pN to c bar cX} (s), si_ {pi N to c bar cX} (s) are fitted by logarithmic function with the parameters connected by relationship of AQM. At collider energies 200, 540, 900, 1800 GeV, the values of si_{bar pp to c bar cX} (s) were obtained by a quark statistics method from the data on diffraction dissociation. It is established, that logarithmic function with universal numerical parameters describes the whole set of low-energy and high-energy data with high accuracy. The expected values of cross sections are si_{pp to c bar cX} = 250 pm 40 mu b and 355 pm 57 mu b at TEVATRON energy sqrt {s} = 1.96 TeV and LHC energy sqrt {s} = 14 TeV accordingly. Opportunities of use of the obtained results for calibration of a flux of "prompt" muons in high-energy component of cosmic rays are discussed.

  12. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  13. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  14. Between the Low Road and the High Road: Logics of Valorization and Regimes of Lean Production in US Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Matt

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean-as-toolbox Plastic containers No Consultativebranch plant 4. Plastic Containers 5. Precision Metalfab 6.Metalfab X X X Plus 17. Plastic X Containers 18. Precision X

  15. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

  16. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways 1) intravascularly, 2) extravascularly, 3) by vessel puncture, and 4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting.

  17. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ji, Qing (Albany, CA); Barletta, William A. (Oakland, CA); Jiang, Ximan (El Cerrito, CA); Ji, Lili (Albany, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  18. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  19. Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

  20. Research Article In Situ Biodiesel Production from Fast-Growing and High Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Content Chlorella; Rice Straw Hydrolysate; Penglin Li; Xiaoling Miao; Rongxiu Li; Jianjiang Zhong

    which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Rice straw hydrolysate was used as lignocellulose-based carbon source for Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation and the feasibility of in situ biodiesel production was investigated. 13.7 g/L sugar was obtained by enzymatic hydrolyzation of rice straw. Chlorella pyrenoidosa showed a rapid growth in the rice straw hydrolysate medium, the maximum biomass concentration of 2.83 g/L was obtained in only 48 hours. The lipid content of the cells reached as high as 56.3%. In situ transesterification was performed for biodiesel production. The optimized condition was 1 g algal powder, 6 mL n-hexane, and 4 mL methanol with 0.5 M sulfuric acid at the temperature of 90 ? C in 2-hour reaction time, under which over 99 % methyl ester content and about 95 % biodiesel yield were obtained. The results suggested that the method has great potential in the production of biofuels with lignocellulose as an alternative carbon source for microalgae cultivation. 1.

  1. Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorbani, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A.M., E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, M. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

  2. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

    1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  3. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

  4. Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; Bill Galyean

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the methods, models, and results of an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a nuclear power plant. In order to answer the risk-related questions for this combined nuclear and chemical facility, we utilized standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies to answer three questions: what can happen, how likely is it, and what are the consequences? As part of answering these questions, we developed a model suitable to determine separation distances for hydrogen process structures and the nuclear plant structures. Our objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions related to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic standpoint we would like the two facilities to be quite close. However, safety and regulatory implications force the separation distance to be increased, perhaps substantially. Without answering these safety questions, the likelihood for obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the U.S. would be questionable. The quantitative analysis performed for this report provides us with a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters related to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. From our calculations, we estimate that when the separation distance is less than 100m, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications, for example blast-deflection barriers, were explored to determine the impact of potential mitigating strategies. We found that these mitigating cases may significantly reduce risk and should be explored as the design for the hydrogen production facility evolves.

  5. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  6. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Harvey; Jerry Nolen, George Vandegrift, Itacil Gomes, Tom Kroc, Phil Horwitz, Dan McAlister, Del Bowers, Vivian Sullivan, John Greene

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 GeV protons available at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Targets will be processed at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and purify the actinium-225 that will subsequently be transferred to NorthStar laboratory facilities for product quality testing and comparison to the product quality of ORNL produced actinium-225, which is currently the industry standard. The test irradiations at FNAL will produce 1-20 mCi per day which is more than sufficient for quantitative evaluation of the proposed production process. The beneficial outcome of this effort will be a new production route for actinium-225 that does not use or require any uranium-233 materials owned by DOE or use any radium-226 as an irradiation target but can supply the medical community's needs for actinium-225 now and in the future.

  7. Precision control of multiple quantum cascade lasers for calibration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubman, Matthew S., E-mail: Matthew.Taubman@pnnl.gov; Myers, Tanya L.; Pratt, Richard M.; Stahl, Robert D.; Cannon, Bret D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a precision, 1-A, digitally interfaced current controller for quantum cascade lasers, with demonstrated temperature coefficients for continuous and 40-kHz full-depth square-wave modulated operation, of 1–2 ppm/?°C and 15 ppm/?°C, respectively. High precision digital to analog converters (DACs) together with an ultra-precision voltage reference produce highly stable, precision voltages, which are selected by a multiplexer (MUX) chip to set output currents via a linear current regulator. The controller is operated in conjunction with a power multiplexing unit, allowing one of three lasers to be driven by the controller, while ensuring protection of controller and all lasers during operation, standby, and switching. Simple ASCII commands sent over a USB connection to a microprocessor located in the current controller operate both the controller (via the DACs and MUX chip) and the power multiplexer.

  8. Environmental proteomics of microbial plankton in a highly productive coastal upwelling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowell, Sarah [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Smith, Daniel [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Barofsky, Douglas [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Giovannoni, Stephen [Oregon State University, Corvallis

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metaproteomics is one of a suite of new approaches providing insights into the activities of microorganisms in natural environments. Proteins, the final products of gene expression, indicate cellular priorities, taking into account both transcriptional and posttranscriptional control mechanisms that control adaptive responses. Here, we report the proteomic composition of the o 1.2 lm fraction of a microbial community from Oregon coast summer surface waters, detected with two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Spectra corresponding to proteins involved in protein folding and biosynthesis, transport, and viral capsid structure were the most frequently detected. A total of 36% of all the detected proteins were best matches to the SAR11 clade, and other abundant coastal microbial clades were also well represented, including the Roseobacter clade (17%), oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria group (6%), OM43 clade (1%). Viral origins were attributed to 2.5% of proteins. In contrast to oligotrophic waters, phosphate transporters were not highly detected in this nutrient-rich system. However, transporters for amino acids, taurine, polyamines and glutamine synthetase were among the most highly detected proteins, supporting predictions that carbon and nitrogen are more limiting than phosphate in this environment. Intriguingly, one of the highly detected proteins was methanol dehydrogenase originating from the OM43 clade, providing further support for recent reports that the metabolism of one-carbon compounds by these streamlined methylotrophs might be an important feature of coastal ocean biogeochemistry.

  9. Cryogenic Treatment of Production Components in High-Wear Rate Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.

    2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep Cryogenic Tempering (DCT) is a specialized process whereby the molecular structure of a material is ''re-trained'' through cooling to -300 F and then heating to +175-1100 F. Cryocon, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Cryocon) and RMOTC entered an agreement to test the process on oilfield production components, including rod pumps, rods, couplings, and tubing. Three Shannon Formation wells were selected (TD about 500 ft) based on their proclivity for high component wear rates. Phase 1 of the test involved operation for a nominal 120 calendar day period with standard, non-treated components. In Phase 2, treated components were installed and operated for another nominal 120 calendar day period. Different cryogenic treatment profiles were used for components in each well. Rod pumps (two treated and one untreated) were not changed between test phases. One well was operated in pumped-off condition, resulting in abnormal wear and disqualification from the test. Testing shows that cryogenic treatment reduced wear of rods, couplers, and pump barrels. Testing of production tubing produced mixed results.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  11. High Power Molten Targets for Radioactive Ion Beam Production: from Particle Physics to Medical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Melo Mendonca, T M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Megawatt-class molten targets, combining high material densities and good heat transfer properties are being considered for neutron spallation sources, neutrino physics facilities and radioactive ion beam production. For this last category of facilities, in order to cope with the limitation of long diffusion times affecting the extraction of short-lived isotopes, a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target loop equipped with a diffusion chamber has been proposed and tested offline during the EURISOL design study. To validate the concept, a molten LBE loop is now in the design phase and will be prototyped and tested on-line at CERN-ISOLDE. This concept was further extended to an alternative route to produce 1013 18Ne/s for the Beta Beams, where a molten salt loop would be irradiated with 7 mA, 160 MeV proton beam. Some elements of the concept have been tested by using a molten fluoride salt static unit at CERNISOLDE. The investigation of the release and production of neon isotopes allowed the measurement of the diffu...

  12. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  13. Observation and Measurement of Se-79 in SRS High-Level Tank Fission Product Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the first observation of confirmed Se-79 activity in Savannah River Site high level fission product waste. Se-79 was measured after a seven step chemical treatment to remove interfering activity from Cs-137, Sr-90, and plutonium at levels 105 times higher than the observed Se-79 content and to remove Tc-99 at levels 300 times higher than observed Se-79. Se-79 was measured by liquid scintillation beta-decay counting after specific tests to eliminate uncertainties from possible contributions from Tc-99, Pm-147, Sm-151, Zr-93, or Pu-241, whose beta-decay spectra could appear similar to that of Se-79, and whose content would be expected at levels near or greater than Se-79.

  14. $J/\\psi$ production and suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a Color Glass Condensate+Non-Relativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute $J/\\psi$ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high $p_\\perp$ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD + NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for $p_\\perp$ spectra at RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio $R_{pA}$ of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the $R_{pA}$ data is strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this result provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.

  15. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and {pi}{sup 0} mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and {pi}{sup -} beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  16. On the possibility of q-scaling in high energy production processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybczynski, Maciej; Wilk, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been noticed recently that transverse momenta (p_T) distributions observed in high energy production processes exhibit remarkably universal scaling behaviour. This is the case when a suitable variable replaces the usual p_T. On the other hand, it is also widely known that transverse momentum distributions in general follow a power-like Tsallis distribution, rather than an exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs, with a (generally energy dependent) nonextensivity parameter q. Here we show that it is possible to choose a suitable variable such that all the data can be fitted by the same Tsallis distribution (with the same, energy independent value of the q-parameter). Thus they exhibit q-scaling.

  17. On the possibility of q-scaling in high energy production processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Rybczynski; Zbigniew Wlodarczyk; Grzegorz Wilk

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been noticed recently that transverse momenta (p_T) distributions observed in high energy production processes exhibit remarkably universal scaling behaviour. This is the case when a suitable variable replaces the usual p_T. On the other hand, it is also widely known that transverse momentum distributions in general follow a power-like Tsallis distribution, rather than an exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs, with a (generally energy dependent) nonextensivity parameter q. Here we show that it is possible to choose a suitable variable such that all the data can be fitted by the same Tsallis distribution (with the same, energy independent value of the q-parameter). Thus they exhibit q-scaling.

  18. Anisotropic particle production and azimuthal correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize some recent ideas relating to anisotropic particle production in high-energy collisions. Anisotropic gluon distributions lead to anisotropies of the single-particle azimuthal distribution and hence to disconnected contributions to multi-particle cumulants. When these dominate, the four-particle elliptic anisotropy $c_2\\{4\\}$ changes sign. On the other hand, connected diagrams for $m$-particle cumulants are found to quickly saturate with increasing $m$, a ``coherence'' quite unlike conventional ``non-flow'' contributions such as decays. Finally, we perform a first exploratory phenomenological analysis in order to estimate the amplitude ${\\cal A}$ of the $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ anisotropy of the gluon distribution at small $x$, and we provide a qualitative prediction for the elliptic asymmetry from three-particle correlations, $c_2\\{3\\}$.

  19. Modeling of fission product release from HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel for risk analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolin, J.; Verfondern, K.; Dunn, T.; Kania, M.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US and FRG have developed methodologies to determine the performance of and fission product release from TRISO-coated fuel particles under postulated accident conditions. The paper presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison of US and FRG models. The models are those used by General Atomics (GA) and by the German Nuclear Research Center at Juelich (KFA/ISF). A benchmark calculation was performed for fuel temperatures predicted for the US Department of Energy sponsored Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). Good agreement in the benchmark calculations supports the on-going efforts to verify and validate the independently developed codes of GA and KFA/ISF. This work was performed under the US/FRG Umbrella Agreement for Cooperation on Gas Cooled Reactor Development. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Parametric Study Of Large-Scale Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Co-Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. L. Hawkes

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a largescale high-temperature co-electrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The co-electrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the Honeywell UniSim systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flow sheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard UniSim component, a custom one-dimensional co-electrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall UniSim process flow sheet. The one dimensional co-electrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the gas shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of co-electrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides); mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the UniSim flow sheet model for a 300 MW co-electrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the overall process, from production through utilization, would be climate neutral.

  1. High-Power Detectors Newport Corporation warrants this product to be free from defects In material and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    High-Power Detectors #12;Warranty Newport Corporation warrants this product to be free from defects.3 Unpacking and Inspection 2 Section 2 - Detector Operation 2.1 Introduction 3 2.2 Power Signal Behavior 3 2 Reflections 7 2.7 Spectral Response 8 2.8 Care for High-Power Detectors 9 2.9 Detector Recalibration 9 Section

  2. Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten spraying; Nickel; Tungsten carbide 1. Introduction 1.1. General Since the mid-1990s, the market share of cemented Z .carbides has surpassed that of high-speed steels HSS , Z .with tungsten carbide WC having 50

  3. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  4. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  5. Adaptive robust motion control of linear motors for precision manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    for widespread use in high-speed/high-accuracy positioning systems [1­3]. In general, the linear motor hasAdaptive robust motion control of linear motors for precision manufacturing Bin Yao *, Li Xu School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA Received 6 October 1999; accepted 11

  6. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P. Higginson,1,2 J. M. Mc of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons

  7. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  8. Axion Bounds from Precision Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffelt, G. G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Hamann, J.; Hannestad, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mirizzi, A. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Wong, Y. Y. Y. [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on their mass, axions produced in the early universe can leave different imprints in cosmic structures. If axions have masses in the eV-range, they contribute a hot dark matter fraction, allowing one to constrain m{sub a} in analogy to neutrinos. In the more favored scenario where axions play the role of cold dark matter and if reheating after inflation does not restore the Peccei-Quinn symmetry, the axion field provides isocurvature fluctuations that are severely constrained by precision cosmology. There remains a small sliver in parameter space where isocurvature fluctuations could still show up in future probes.

  9. Precision Silicon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation toPower andPoyry Group JumpPramacPrecision

  10. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  11. Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

  12. A lightweight method for improving coordination in distributed, high-variability product companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Brian S. (Brian Scott)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product companies face new challenges as they continue to expand their international footprints. Whereas globalization initially sought savings by outsourcing production to low-cost regions, emerging markets now present ...

  13. Production of Virginia Peanuts in the Rolling Plains and Southern High Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemon, Robert G.; Lee, Thomas A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultural practices such as crop rotation, maintaining plant nutrition, irrigation management and disease management are crucial for the successful production of Virginia peanuts. This publications describes these and other production considerations....

  14. Developing Biomimetic Design Principles for the Highly Optimized and Robust Design of Products and Their Components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadia, Anosh Porus

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering design methods focus on developing products that are innovative, robust, and multi-functional. In this context, the term robust refers to a product's ability to accomplish successfully its predetermined functions. ...

  15. Quantum Gravity and Precision Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. P. Burgess

    2006-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article provides a cartoon of the quantization of General Relativity using the ideas of effective field theory. These ideas underpin the use of General Relativity as a theory from which precise predictions are possible, since they show why quantum corrections to standard classical calculations are small. Quantum corrections can be computed controllably provided they are made for the weakly-curved geometries associated with precision tests of General Relativity, such as within the solar system or for binary pulsars. They also bring gravity back into the mainstream of physics, by showing that its quantization (at low energies) exactly parallels the quantization of other, better understood, non-renormalizable field theories which arise elsewhere in physics. Of course effective field theory techniques do not solve the fundamental problems of quantum gravity discussed elsewhere in these pages, but they do helpfully show that these problems are specific to applications on very small distance scales. They also show why we may safely reject any proposals to modify gravity at long distances if these involve low-energy problems (like ghosts or instabilities), since such problems are unlikely to be removed by the details of the ultimate understanding of gravity at microscopic scales.

  16. High Resolution Supply Chain Management Resolution of the polylemma of production by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    loops for Production Plan- ning and Control (PPC). By this HRSCM pursues the idea of enabling organiza enabled by today's planning approaches. These two chal- lenges constitute the polylemma of production and self-optimizing supply chains based on decentralized production control mechanisms must replace

  17. Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kinard, W.F. [Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

  18. Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Kinard, W.F. (Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

  19. Toward Precise Control of a Robotic Boat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedantam, Satish; Zhang, Wenyi; Mitra, Urbashi; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise Control of a Robotic Boat Arvind Menezes Pereira,David Caron & Gaurav Sukhatme Robotic Embedded Systems Lab,

  20. PROCESS MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a large-scale high-temperature coelectrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The coelectrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the HYSYS systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional coelectrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. The 1-D coelectrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the HYSYS flowsheet model for a 300 MW coelectrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the entire process would be climate neutral.

  1. Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

  2. Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01×106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  3. Precision Control of Multiple Quantum Cascade Lasers for Calibration Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Pratt, Richard M.; Stahl, Robert D.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a precision, digitally interfaced current controller for quantum cascade lasers, with demonstrated DC and modulated temperature coefficients of 1- 2 ppm/ºC and 15 ppm/ºC respectively. High linearity digital to analog converters (DACs) together with an ultra-precision voltage reference, produce highly stable, precision voltages. These are in turn selected by a low charge-injection multiplexer (MUX) chip, which are then used to set output currents via a linear current regulator. The controller is operated in conjunction with a power multiplexing unit, allowing one of three lasers to be driven by the controller while ensuring protection of controller and all lasers during operation, standby and switching. Simple ASCII commands sent over a USB connection to a microprocessor located in the current controller operate both the controller (via the DACs and MUX chip) and the power multiplexer.

  4. Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

  5. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ([alpha], n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of neutron production from ([alpha], n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ([alpha], n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ([alpha], n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ([alpha], n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  6. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ({alpha}, n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of neutron production from ({alpha}, n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ({alpha}, n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ({alpha}, n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ({alpha}, n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  7. Lead Section Grower Four Star Greenhouse has been producing high quality garden products since

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products since 1977 and is the largest partner/supplier of the nationally recognized Greenhouse's Mission Statement in all job related functions. Minimum Qualifications: 1

  8. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -344-3957, vmf5@columbia.edu 2 Center for Life Cycle Analysis, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA 3 SunLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

  9. Sustainability of Forage-based Livestock Production Systems in South Texas in an Era of High Synthetic Nitrogen Fertilizer Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability of Forage-based Livestock Production Systems in South Texas in an Era of High of soil tests and alternative application methods. The second alternative is to reintroduce into their management practices that were the norm until the advent of cheap synthetic fertilizers after 1945

  10. Vibration damping using low-wave-speed media with applications to precision machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Kripa K. (Kripa Kiran), 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration and noise are an ever-present problem in the majority of mechanical systems, from consumer products to precision manufacturing systems. But most approaches for vibration suppression are expensive and invasive, ...

  11. Results on charm production from E791, a high statistics charm hadroproduction experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, S.; Appel, J.A. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Aitala, E.M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Amato, S.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Aryal, M. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Ashery, D. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel); Blaylock, G. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bracker, S.B. [and others

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab experiment E791 collected a large sample of charm events to study several aspects of charm physics. Many topics on production and decay of charm particles can be covered with this data set. This talk will concentrate on the production asymmetry of charm mesons.

  12. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the use of High Performance Computing (HPC) and in factNERSC is the primary high-performance computing facility forthree major High Performance Computing Centers: NERSC and

  13. Ultra-precision positioning assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C. (San Francisco, CA); Locke, Stanley F. (Livermore, CA); Thompson, Samuel L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  14. Method and apparatus for precision laser micromachining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim (San Ramon, CA); Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA); Dragon, Ernest P. (Danville, CA)

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for micromachining and microdrilling which results in a machined part of superior surface quality is provided. The system uses a near diffraction limited, high repetition rate, short pulse length, visible wavelength laser. The laser is combined with a high speed precision tilting mirror and suitable beam shaping optics, thus allowing a large amount of energy to be accurately positioned and scanned on the workpiece. As a result of this system, complicated, high resolution machining patterns can be achieved. A cover plate may be temporarily attached to the workpiece. Then as the workpiece material is vaporized during the machining process, the vapors condense on the cover plate rather than the surface of the workpiece. In order to eliminate cutting rate variations as the cutting direction is varied, a randomly polarized laser beam is utilized. A rotating half-wave plate is used to achieve the random polarization. In order to correctly locate the focus at the desired location within the workpiece, the position of the focus is first determined by monitoring the speckle size while varying the distance between the workpiece and the focussing optics. When the speckle size reaches a maximum, the focus is located at the first surface of the workpiece. After the location of the focus has been determined, it is repositioned to the desired location within the workpiece, thus optimizing the quality of the machined area.

  15. Training manual for precision hand deburring, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 is presented of 4 parts of a training manual to be used by machinist trainees, production workers, and others removing burrs from precision miniature parts. The manuals are written to be self-teaching and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day along with another six hours of bench work in deburring.

  16. Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercialscale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540° C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 × 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  17. Managing configuration options for build-to-order highly customized products with application to specialty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amador Gallardo, Jorge Enrique

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decades there has been a shift in customer expectations that has had a significant effect in the business models of manufacturing companies. Customer requirements have shifted from accepting standardized products ...

  18. The Production of High Levels of Renewable Natural Gas from Biomass Using Steam Hydrogasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thanmongkhon, Yoothana

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012. 14. Pless, J. , Natural Gas Development and HydraulicProduction of Substituted Natural Gas from the Wet OrganicU.S.E.I.A), California Natural Gas Consumption. 2012. 116.

  19. Effects of the reflective scattering in hadron production at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Troshin; N. E. Tyurin

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A gradual transition to the reflecting scattering mode developing already at the LHC energies is affecting multiparticle production dynamics, in particular, relation of the centrality with the impact parameter values of $pp$--collisions. We discuss the issues in the framework of the geometrical picture for the multiparticle production processes proposed by Chou and Yang. We consider effects of reflective scattering mode presence for the inclusive cross-sections.

  20. Efficient design of precision medical robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanumara, Nevan Clancy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medical robotics is increasingly demonstrating the potential to improve patient care through more precise interventions. However, taking inspiration from industrial robotics has often resulted in large, sometimes cumbersome ...

  1. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  2. System Analyses of High and Low-Temperature Interface Designs for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; J. E. O'Brien

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, an evaluation of a low-temperature heat-pump interface design for a nuclear-driven high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production plant was performed using the UniSim process analysis software. The lowtemperature interface design is intended to reduce the interface temperature between the reactor power conversion system and the hydrogen production plant by extracting process heat from the low temperature portion of the power cycle rather than from the high-temperature portion of the cycle as is done with the current Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reference design. The intent of this design change is to mitigate the potential for tritium migration from the reactor core to the hydrogen plant, and reduce the potential for high temperature creep in the interface structures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) operating at a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa and a reactor outlet temperature of 900°C. The lowtemperature heat-pump loop is a water/steam loop that operates between 2.6 MPa and 5.0 MPa. The HTE hydrogen production loop operated at 5 MPa, with plant conditions optimized to maximize plant performance (i.e., 800°C electrolysis operating temperature, area specific resistance (ASR) = 0.4 ohm-cm2, and a current density of 0.25 amps/cm2). An air sweep gas system was used to remove oxygen from the anode side of the electrolyzer. Heat was also recovered from the hydrogen and oxygen product streams to maximize hydrogen production efficiencies. The results of the UniSim analysis showed that the low-temperature interface design was an effective heat-pump concept, transferring 31.5 MWt from the low-temperature leg of the gas turbine power cycle to the HTE process boiler, while consuming 16.0 MWe of compressor power. However, when this concept was compared with the current INL reference direct Brayton cycle design and with a modification of the reference design to simulate an indirect Brayton cycle (both with heat extracted from the high-temperature portion of the power cycle), the latter two concepts had higher overall hydrogen production rates and efficiencies compared to the low-temperature heatpump concept, but at the expense of higher interface temperatures. Therefore, the ultimate decision on the viability of the low-temperature heat-pump concept involves a tradeoff between the benefits of a lower-temperature interface between the power conversion system and the hydrogen production plant, and the reduced hydrogen production efficiency of the low-temperature heat-pump concept compared to concepts using high-temperature process heat.

  3. Training manual for precision hand deburring, Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is Part 3 of a 4 part training manual to be used by machinist trainees, production workers, and others removing burrs from precision miniature parts. The manuals are written to be self-teaching and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day along with six additional hours of bench work in deburring. This part describes mounted stones, scrapers, hand stones, abrasive filled rubber and cotton tools, abrasive paper products, felt bobs and lapping compounds, mandrels and arbors, miscellaneous tools, personal techniques for assuring quality, cleaning parts, and deburring gears and plastic parts.

  4. Production of a beam of highly vibrationally excited CO using perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Nils

    An intense molecular beam of CO (X[superscript 1]?[superscript +]) in high vibrational states (v = 17, 18) was produced by a new approach that we call PUMP – PUMP – PERTURB and DUMP. The basic idea is to access high ...

  5. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

  6. J.iV. CRONIN PRELIMINARY OBSERVATION OF HIGH TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT NAL (P. 455)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J.iV. CRONIN PRELIMINARY OBSERVATION OF HIGH TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT NAL (P. 455 report here preliminary r e s u l t s from a tungsten tar- get bombarded by 200 and 300 GeV protons t i o n f was computed t o be 0.4 f o r a 5 cm long tungsten t a r g e t . Vstlcdly quadrupoles , s n

  7. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  8. Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo integration cycle Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates The Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate DeviceV Thermo Scientific MAT 253 or the 3-kV DELTA V isotope ratio mass spectrometer meets the requirements

  9. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    if acetate is the main soluble fermentation end product. Further conver- sion to hydrogen without additional of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation by anaerobic fermentation [2­4]. However, only a maximum of 3 mol of H2 can be produced per mole of glycerol

  10. Process for the production of high purity zirconium tetrafluoride and other fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, H.P.; Woytek, A.J.; Lileck, J.T.

    1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for producing metal fluorides for low optical loss glass applications selected from the group. It comprises: aluminum trifluoride, hafnium tetrafluoride and zirconium tetrafluoride. The steps comprise: incompletely reacting reactants of a fluorinating agent selected from the group consisting of F{sub 2}, NF{sub 3}, N{sub 2}F{sub 2}, N{sub 2}F{sub 4}, ClF{sub 3}, BrF{sub 3}, IF{sub 5} and SF{sub 4} and a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, hafnium and zirconium, or the corresponding metal's compound to produce a reaction product comprising the metal fluoride and at least an amount of the residual metal or its compound effective to react with any metal fluoride impurities in the reactants, and separating the metal fluoride from the reaction product by heating the reaction product to selectively vaporize the metal fluoride for separate recovery from the reaction product and to react the residual metal or its compound with the metal fluoride impurities.

  11. Evaluation of catalysts and membranes for high yield biohydrogen production via electrohydrogenesis in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , electrolysis, hydrogen, membranes INTRODUCTION Conventional wastewater treatment is needed to avoid water processes being developed to accomplish wastewater treatment that produce a net amount of energy in a useful Park, PA 16802, USA E-mail: blogan@psu.edu Hydrogen gas can be produced from fermentation end products

  12. HIGH LEVEL PETRI NETS BASED APPROACH FOR ANALYSING CONCEPTUAL OBJECTS FOR PRODUCTION SYSTEMS SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system, formal methods of design are needed. In this work, the selected modelling and verification tool In the development life cycle of manufacturing systems, the verification of analytical models is often addressed via a powerful framework to model and analyse production systems. Indeed, their characteristics, graphical

  13. Ultrahigh precision cosmology from gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, Curt [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the Big Bang Observer (BBO), a proposed space-based gravitational-wave (GW) detector, would provide ultraprecise measurements of cosmological parameters. By detecting {approx}3x10{sup 5} compact-star binaries, and utilizing them as standard sirens, BBO would determine the Hubble constant to {approx}0.1%, and the dark-energy parameters w{sub 0} and w{sub a} to {approx}0.01 and {approx}0.1, respectively. BBO's dark-energy figure-of-merit would be approximately an order of magnitude better than all other proposed, dedicated dark-energy missions. To date, BBO has been designed with the primary goal of searching for gravitational waves from inflation, down to the level {omega}{sub GW}{approx}10{sup -17}; this requirement determines BBO's frequency band (deci-Hz) and its sensitivity requirement (strain measured to {approx}10{sup -24}). To observe an inflationary GW background, BBO would first have to detect and subtract out {approx}3x10{sup 5} merging compact-star binaries, out to a redshift z{approx}5. It is precisely this carefully measured foreground which would enable high-precision cosmology. BBO would determine the luminosity distance to each binary to {approx} percent accuracy. In addition, BBO's angular resolution would be sufficient to uniquely identify the host galaxy for the majority of binaries; a coordinated optical/infrared observing campaign could obtain the redshifts. Combining the GW-derived distances and the electromagnetically-derived redshifts for such a large sample of objects, out to such high redshift, naturally leads to extraordinarily tight constraints on cosmological parameters. We emphasize that such 'standard siren' measurements of cosmology avoid many of the systematic errors associated with other techniques: GWs offer a physics-based, absolute measurement of distance. In addition, we show that BBO would also serve as an exceptionally powerful gravitational-lensing mission, and we briefly discuss other astronomical uses of BBO, including providing an early warning system for all short/hard gamma-ray bursts.

  14. Perspective on plating for precision finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended as an overview on platings for precision finishing operations. After a brief review of the two processes (polishing and precision machining) by which a coating on a part can be converted to a precision surface, the coatings which work successfully in these applications will be discussed. Then adhesion and stress aspects of deposits will be covered. Electroless nickel, which is a particularly attractive coating for precision finishing applications, will be discussed in some detail, from its early years as the Kanigen'' process to the present. Since microstructural changes in deposits are important for precision parts, this aspect will be covered for electroless nickel, copper and silver deposits. Lastly, some words will be directed at potential future electrodeposited coatings including nickel-phosphorus alloys, and various silver alloys. 41 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  15. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop and demonstrate high-temperature ESP motor windings for use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems and operation at 300?C.

  16. Structure and Fine Structure in Multiparticle Production Data at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wit Busza

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is given of data on the longitudinal rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions observed in $e^+e^-$, pp, pA and AA collisions at high energies. The remarkable simplicity and universality observed in the data and its relevance to the study of the high energy density system produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

  17. High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    as the lower-energy L-shell peaks, allowing more positive sample identification. This report shows how a paired-ray sources for use in imaging, materials analysis, and other applications. For many applications, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

  18. Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dow, T. [ed.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M. [and others

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

  19. Observation of high momentum eta(l) production in B decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of B --> eta'X transitions with high momentum eta' mesons. We observe 39.0 +/- 11.6 B decay events with 2.0 c processes is suppressed. We...

  20. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  1. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  2. Lean Implementation Considerations in Factory Operations of Low Volume/High Complexity Production Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Thomas J.

    The researchers of the Lean Aircraft Initiative developed a hypothesized lean implementation model seeking to provide its members guidance on implementing lean transitions in factory operations of low volume/high complexity ...

  3. Precision metering of germinated seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot, Gregory Lawrence

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actuated by an electrical solenoid was used to mechanically capture individual seeds. Air was used to eject the seeds from the system. A new single file device employing dilution flow was tested at rates as high as ten seeds per second. It produced... distribution was found to adequately represent the data. The metering system was tested at ejection rates ranging from 1. 3 to 4. 5 seeds per second, with most tests at rates between two and three seeds per second. The performance of the metering system...

  4. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  5. Development of a model system for testing the physiological effects of high fiber products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yung, Kit-Ying

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction (OBF 145. 6728. 61; OBO's 151. 1728. 47 vs. WB 230. 00+9, 89 mg/dl) and OBM produced the lowest (192. 17M. 17 vs. WB 230. 0(7L9. 89 mg/dl). In the colon, products which effectively lowered serum cholesterol increased cecal surface area, cecal.... Gtetchen Schoeffler for her help with animal care and surgeries. Xiao-Qing Sun for constant support and assistance with animal care and surgeries. Susan Sharp for her invaluable technical advice and assistance with surgeries. Ben Haley and Li-Wei Yu...

  6. Production of high Resoulution Irradiance Data for Central America and Cuba

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister|Production Wells

  7. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, Scott A [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)] [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  8. High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Seven-Membered Diphosphine Ligands Containing One Pendent Amine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Michael P.; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Wiese, Stefan; Lindstrom, Mary L.; Thogerson, Colleen E.; Raugei, Simone; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of Ni-based electrocatalysts, [Ni(7PPh2NC6H4X)2](BF4)2, featuring seven-membered cyclic diphosphine ligands incorporating a single amine base, 1-para-X-phenyl-3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane (7PPh2NC6H4X where X = OMe, Me, Br, Cl or CF3), have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction studies have established that the [Ni(7PPh2NC6H4X)2]2+ complexes have a square planar geometry, with bonds to four phosphorus atoms of the two bidentate diphosphine ligands. Coordination of the bidentate phosphine ligands to Ni result in one six-membered ring containing a pendent amine, and one five membered ring. Each of the complexes is an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen production at the potential of the Ni(II/I) couple, with turnover frequencies ranging from 2,400 to 27,000 s-1 with [(DMF)H]+ in acetonitrile. Addition of water (up to 1.0 M) accelerates the catalysis, giving turnover frequencies ranging from 4,100 - 96,000 s-1. Computational studies carried out on the [Ni(7PPh2NC6H4X)2]2+ family indicate the catalytic rates reach a maximum when the electron-donating character of X results in the pKa of the pendent amine matching that of the acid used for proton delivery. Additionally, the fast catalytic rates for hydrogen production by the [Ni(7PPh2NC6H4X)2]2+ family relative to the analogous [Ni(PPh2NC6H4X2)2]2+ family are attributed to preferred formation of endo protonated isomers with respect to the metal center in the former, which is essential for the protons to attain suitable proximity to the reduced metal center to generate H2. The results of this work highlight the importance of the necessity for precise pKa matching with the acid for proton delivery to the metal center, and the mechanistic details described herein will be used to guide future catalyst design. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. A portion of the computing resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  9. Transmutation of high-level radioactive waste and production of {sup 233}U using an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takashita, Hirofumi; Chen, Xinyi

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor safety, the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, and nonproliferation of nuclear material for military purposes are the problems of greatest concern for nuclear energy. Technologies for accelerators developed in the field of high-energy physics can contribute to solving these problems. For reactor safety, especially for that of a Na-cooled fast reactor, the use of an accelerator, even a small one, can enhance the safety using a slightly subcritical reactor. There is growing concern about how we can deal with weapons-grade Pu, and about the large amount of Pu accumulating from the operation of commercial reactors. It has been suggested that this Pu could be incinerated, using the reactor and a proton accelerator. However, because Pu is a very valuable material with future potential for generating nuclear energy, we should consider transforming it into a proliferation-resistant material that cannot be used for making bombs, rather than simply eliminating the Pu. An accelerator-driven fast reactor (700 MWt), run in a subcritical condition, and fueled with MOX can generate {sup 233}U more safely and efficiently than can a critical reactor. We evaluate the production of {sup 233}U, {sup 239}Pu, and the transmutation of the long-lived fission products of {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I, which are loaded with YH{sub 1.7} between the fast core and blanket, by reducing the conversion factor of Pu to {sup 233}U. And we assessed the rates of radiation damage, hydrogen production, and helium production in a target window and in the surrounding vessel.

  10. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  11. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, Ivar H. (Bangor, ME)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  12. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and the Production of Cosmogenic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated version of the {\\it SimProp} Monte Carlo code to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays in astrophysical backgrounds computing the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on earth. The study of secondary neutrinos provides a powerful tool to constrain the source models of these extremely energetic particles. We will show how the newly detected IceCube neutrino events at PeV energies together with the the latest experimental results of the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment are almost at the level of excluding several hypothesis on the astrophysical sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Results presented here can be also used to evaluate the discovery capabilities of future high energy cosmic rays and neutrino detectors.

  13. Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Larry D. (San Diego, CA); Johnson, Jr., William R. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

  14. High oil production continues to cut U.S. oil imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs BosonAccurate knowledgeHighHigh oil

  15. Precision Engineering within the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J S; Carlisle, K; Klingmann, J L; Geraghty, P; Saito, T T; Montesanti, R C

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this very brief talk, we'll discuss how precision engineering impacts 4 key areas of NIF: (1) Diamond turning of KDP crystals; (2) Mitigation of laser damage on optics; (3) Alignment of lasers, targets, diagnostics; (4) Target fabrication.

  16. Digital multimirror devices for precision laser micromachining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DMD LIFT results 24 PMMA donors New 3D printing technology! BiTe semiconductor film New laser 3D printing facility...An ORC breakthrough 75 µm #12;Summary · DMDs are very useful for precise ablation

  17. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelmann, A.

    As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section ...

  18. Laser frequency combs for precision astrophysical spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chih-Hao

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines resulting from the motion of the host star around the barycentre of an extrasolar system have recently achieved a precision of 60 ...

  19. Rubber bearings for precision positioning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton Martinelli, Augusto E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we investigate the use of thin rubber sheets or laminates of metal and rubber sheets as bearings in precision positioning systems. Such bearings have the potential to replace more conventional flexures ...

  20. Jet and Leading Hadron Production in High-energy Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Nian Wang

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet tomography has become a powerful tool for the study of properties of dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. I will discuss recent progresses in the phenomenological study of jet quenching, including momentum, colliding energy and nuclear size dependence of single hadron suppression, modification of dihadron correlations and the soft hadron distribution associated with a quenched jet.

  1. Fission Product Impact Reduction via Protracted In-core Retention in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Transmutation Scenarios 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of HTGR by improvements in thermal efficiency and deployment for high-temperature applications such as hydrogen production, sea-water desalination and industrial process heat supply [17]. The VHTR is a graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor...-based transmutation concept takes advantage of the higher number of steps it takes for a neutron to slow-down to thermal energies in graphite than the steps required in conventional LWR. The reduced slowing-down rate in graphite media favors the attainment...

  2. Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

  3. High Efficiency Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy: Laboratory Demonstration of S-I Water-Splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckingham, R.; Russ, B.; Brown, L.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Gelbard, F.; Pickard F.S.; Leybros, J.; Le Duigou, A.; Borgard, J.M.

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the French CEA, US-DOE INERI project is to perform a lab scale demonstration of the sulfur iodine (S-I) water splitting cycle, and assess the potential of this cycle for application to nuclear hydrogen production. The project will design, construct and test the three major component reaction sections that make up the S-I cycle. The CEA will design and test the prime (Bunsen) reaction section. General Atomics will develop and test the HI decomposition section, and SNL will develop and test the H2SO4 decomposition section. Activities for this period included initial program coordination and information exchange, the development of models and analyses that will support the design of the component sections, and preliminary designs for the component reaction sections. The sections are being designed to facilitate integration into a closed loop demonstration in a later stage of the program.

  4. Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  5. Accuracy assessment of the MODIS 16-day albedo product for snow: comparisons with Greenland in situ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    upon a surface. Snow and ice cover, with its high albedo, is a critical component of the global energy regions is available from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder (APP) data-by-site basis using precise optical black radiometer data. Results indicate that the MOD43 albedo product

  6. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs.

  7. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  8. PRECISIONTM The Dell PrecisionTM M4400 Mobile Workstation, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    THE DELL PRECISIONTM M4400 The Dell PrecisionTM M4400 Mobile Workstation, a powerhouse-Core Processors · Up to 8GB1 of high bandwidth dual-channel 800MHz memory · Data security options with Intel

  9. Precision cancer mouse models through genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Haiwei

    The cancer genome is highly complex, with hundreds of point mutations, translocations, and chromosome gains and losses per tumor. To understand the effects of these alterations, precise models are needed. Traditional ...

  10. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of 3C 273 jet knots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avara, Mark J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from precision X-ray spectroscopy using high-resolution ([delta lambda] = 0.01A) spectra of 3C 273 jet knots extracted from eight observations made using Chandra in conjunction with the HETGS. Using these ...

  11. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  12. Scrap recycling and production of high quality steel grades in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marique, C. [C.R.M., Liege (Belgium)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible deleterious effects of higher contents in tramp elements on steel properties must be well defined in order to keep them within acceptable limits. No industrial technique is presently available to remove tramp elements from steel melts. Only a strict control on the metallic input and on the scrap composition is feasible. In this matter, scrap preparation which aims at a better separation between iron and other nonferrous components, is getting more attention. A large multinational project has been initiated in Europe under the sponsorship of ECSC and of the Steel Industry to better identify the effects of residuals on steel properties and to examine potential techniques able to control tramp elements during steelmaking operations. The project has been supported and orientated by a preliminary study, reviewing the relevant published data on the tramp element influence for long and flat products. The present report is devoted to overview available information on the effects of tramp elements and to describe the targets and the content of the European megaproject on scrap recycling.

  13. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  14. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel) [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ?200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ?2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ?4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  15. Possible Implication of a Single Nonextensive p_T Distribution for Hadron Production in High-Energy pp Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL; Wilk, Grzegorz [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw, Poland; Cirto, Leonardo J. L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF), Brazil; Tsallis, Constantino [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Brazil

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiparticle production processes in $pp$ collisions at the central rapidity region are usually considered to be divided into independent "soft" and "hard" components. The first is described by exponential (thermal-like) transverse momentum spectra in the low-$p_T$ region with a scale parameter $T$ associated with the temperature of the hadronizing system. The second is governed by a power-like distributions of transverse momenta with power index $n$ at high-$p_T$ associated with the hard scattering between partons. We show that the hard-scattering integral can be approximated as a nonextensive distribution of a quasi-power-law containing a scale parameter $T$ and a power index $n=1/(q -1)$, where $q$ is the nonextensivity parameter. We demonstrate that the whole region of transverse momenta presently measurable at LHC experiments at central rapidity (in which the observed cross sections varies by $14$ orders of magnitude down to the low $p_T$ region) can be adequately described by a single nonextensive distribution. These results suggest the dominance of the hard-scattering hadron-production process and the approximate validity of a ``no-hair" statistical-mechanical description of the $p_T$ spectra for the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity for $pp$ collisions at high-energies.

  16. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  17. High energy product permanent magnet having improved intrinsic coercivity and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Berkeley, CA); Thomas, Gareth (Berkeley, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy rare earth-ferromagnetic metal permanent magnet is disclosed which is characterized by improved intrinsic coercivity and is made by forming a particulate mixture of a permanent magnet alloy comprising one or more rare earth elements and one or more ferromagnetic metals and forming a second particulate mixture of a sintering alloy consisting essentially of 92-98 wt. % of one or more rare earth elements selected from the class consisting of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and mixtures of two or more of such rare earth elements, and 2-8 wt. % of one or more alloying metals selected from the class consisting of Al, Nb, Zr, V, Ta, Mo, and mixtures of two or more of such metals. The permanent magnet alloy particles and sintering aid alloy are mixed together and magnetically oriented by immersing the mixture in an axially aligned magnetic field while cold pressing the mixture. The compressed mixture is then sintered at a temperature above the melting point of the sintering aid and below the melting point of the permanent magnet alloy to thereby coat the particle surfaces of the permanent magnetic alloy particles with the sintering aid while inhibiting migration of the rare earth element in the sintering aid into the permanent magnet alloy particles to thereby raise the intrinsic coercivity of the permanent magnet alloy without substantially lowering the high energy of the permanent magnet alloy.

  18. Singlet-Catalyzed Electroweak Phase Transitions and Precision Higgs Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Profumo; Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf; Carroll L. Wainwright; Peter Winslow

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We update the phenomenology of gauge singlet extensions of the Standard Model scalar sector and their implications for the electroweak phase transition. Considering the introduction of one real scalar singlet to the scalar potential, we analyze present constraints on the potential parameters from Higgs coupling measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and electroweak precision observables for the kinematic regime in which no new scalar decay modes arise. We then show how future precision measurements of Higgs boson signal strengths and Higgs self-coupling could probe the scalar potential parameter space associated with a strong first-order electroweak phase transition. We illustrate using benchmark precision for several future collider options, including the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the International Linear Collider (ILC), TLEP, China Electron Positron Collider (CEPC), and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider, such as the Very High Energy LHC (VHE-LHC) or the Super proton-proton Collider (SPPC). For the regions of parameter space leading to a strong first order electroweak phase transition, we find that there exists considerable potential for observable deviations from purely Standard Model Higgs properties at these prospective future colliders.

  19. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a relative uncertainty of about 50% and found to be less than 285 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  20. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  1. Direct visualization of atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Geng; Lu, Jianchen; Du, Shixuan, E-mail: sxdu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: feng@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Gao, Hong-Jun [Institute of Physics and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Xiao [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Berger, Reinhard; Feng, Xinliang, E-mail: sxdu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: feng@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Müllen, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated atomically precise nitrogen-doped chevron-type graphene nanoribbons by using the on-surface synthesis technique combined with the nitrogen substitution of the precursors. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that the well-defined nanoribbons tend to align with the neighbors side-by-side with a band gap of 1.02?eV, which is in good agreement with the density functional theory calculation result. The influence of the high precursor coverage on the quality of the nanoribbons is also studied. We find that graphene nanoribbons with sufficient aspect ratios can only be fabricated at sub-monolayer precursor coverage. This work provides a way to construct atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons.

  2. Precision measurements of Standard Model parameters with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Collaboration is engaged in precision measurement of fundamental Standard Model parameters, e.g. the weak-mixing angle and the complete set of coefficients that describe the angular distributions of Drell-Yan production. A measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process is presented and the results are then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. This measurement shows significant sensitivity to the uncertainties of the parton density functions of the proton. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic of the Z-boson production mechanisms. We present a measurement of the complete set of angular coefficients describing these distributions using 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The measurement is compared with the theoretical predictions and shows discrimination power between different approaches of the QCD modeling.

  3. Sum-of-Product Architectures Computing Just Right F. de Dinechin, Matei Istoan, Abdelbasset Massouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (SPC). This paper addresses the automatic construction of low-precision, but high accuracy SPC-processing transforms that can be expressed as a sum of products with constants (SPC). Specifically, a SPC is any Recherche (ANR) SPC architecture generator real coeff. (ai)0i

  4. Low Voltage High Precision Spatial Light ModulatorsFinal Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papavasiliou, A P

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to make LLNL a leader in Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) by developing the technology that will be needed by the next generation of SLMs. We would use new lower voltage actuators and bond those actuators directly to controlling circuitry to break the fundamental limitations that constrain current SLM technology. This three-year project was underfunded in the first year and not funded in the second year. With the funding that was available, we produced actuators and designs for the controlling circuitry that would have been integrated in the second year. Spatial light modulators (SLMs) are arrays of tiny movable mirrors that modulate the wave-fronts of light. SLMs can correct aberrations in incoming light for adaptive optics or modulate light for beam control, optical communication and particle manipulation. MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) is a technology that utilizes the microfabrication tools developed by the semiconductor industry to fabricate a wide variety of tiny machines. The first generation of MEMS SLMs have improved the functionality of SLMs while drastically reducing per pixel cost making arrays on the order of 1000 pixels readily available. These MEMS SLMs however are limited by the nature of their designs to be very difficult to scale above 1000 pixels and have very limited positioning accuracy. By co-locating the MEMS mirrors with CMOS electronics, we will increase the scalability and positioning accuracy. To do this we will have to make substantial advances in SLM actuator design, and fabrication.

  5. High precision measurements of Na-26 beta(-) decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinyer, GF; Svensson, CE; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, AN; Austin, RAE; Ball, GC; Chakrawarthy, RS; Finlay, P.; Garrett, PE; Hackman, G.; Hardy, John C.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, VE; Koopmans, KA; Kulp, WD; Leslie, JR; Macdonald, JA; Morton, AC; Ormand, WE; Osborne, CJ; Pearson, CJ; Phillips, AA; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, MA; Scraggs, HC; Schwarzenberg, J.; Smith, MB; Valiente-Dobon, JJ; Waddington, JC; Wood, JL; Zganjar, EF.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific, Singapore, 1999), Vol. 338. [11] A. P. Baerg, Metrologia 1, No. 3, 131 (1965). [12] W. H. Press et al., Numerical Recipes in C, 2nd ed. (Cambridge University Press, 1992). [13] S. Baker and R. D. Cousins, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res...

  6. High precision astrometry with a diffractive pupil telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyon, Olivier; Milster, Thomas D; Eisner, Josh A; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J; Ammons, Stephen M; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A; Belikov, Ruslan; 10.1088/0067-0049/200/2/11

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets requires sub-microarcsec accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must however overcome astrometric distortions which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surrounding. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the backg...

  7. Gravitational wave detection using high precision pulsar observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Hobbs

    2008-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsar timing experiments are reaching sufficient sensitivity to detect a postulated stochastic gravitational wave background generated by merging supermassive black hole systems in the cores of galaxies. We describe the techniques behind the pulsar timing detection method, provide current upper bounds on the amplitude of any gravitational wave background, describe theoretical models predicting the existence of such a background and highlight new techniques for providing a statistically rigorous detection of the background.

  8. Optical Deformations in Solar Glass Filters for High Precision Astrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Boscardin, Sérgio Calderari; Penna, Jucira Lousada; Reis-Neto, Eugênio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the solar diameter at all position angles gives the complete figure of the Sun. Their asphericities have implications in classical physics and general relativity, and the behavior of the optical systems used in the direct measurements is to be known accurately. A solar filter is a plane-parallel glass with given absorption, and here we study the departures from the parallelism of the faces of a crystal slab 5 mm thick, because of static deformations. These deformations are rescaled to the filter's dimensions. Related to the Solar Disk Sextant experiment and to the Reflecting Heliometer of Rio de Janeiro a simplified model of the influences of the inclination between the external and the internal surfaces of a glass solar filter, is discussed.

  9. Nuclear Structure Revealed by High-Precision Mass Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /76Safeguards andSciences

  10. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name:Hidralia EnergiaFalls,

  11. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgers, C.P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kirk, J.G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Duclous, R. [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Blackburn, T.G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bell, A.R. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup ?2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  12. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Kao Lu

    2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

  13. Medical Devices and Systems PRECISE Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    that are not likely to be met by research in your field alone? ­ Advances in medical devices domain requires12/16/2008 1 Medical Devices and Systems Insup Lee PRECISE Center Department Computer and Information Science University of Pennsylvania 12/15/08 CPS Information Day Medical Devices Containing

  14. Summary of the COSY-11 Measurements of Hyperon Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grzonka

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies of hyperon production performed at COSY-11 are summarized. The results of the experiments in the reaction channels pp-->pK+Lambda, pp-->pK+Sigma0, and pp-->nK+Sigma+ are shown. Excitation functions fromthreshold up to about 90MeV excess energies have been evaluated with high precision for the Lambda and Sigma0 production. The Lambdap and Sigma0p final state interactions were extracted. The Sigma+ production was measured at 13 and 60 MeV excess energies.

  15. Microwave-and Nitronium Ion-Enabled Rapid and Direct Production of Highly Conductive Low-Oxygen Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    -18 In brief, one must oxidize graphite powder, exfoliate the oxidized product to form nonconductive graphene

  16. High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing a crisis due to doubling of fertilizer, grain, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing for adaptation, water· use efficiency, pest resistance, and forage nutritive value. New, efficient beef) and high plant nutrient efficiency grasses. Develop improved management systems to incorporate the new

  17. PROSPECT - A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment at Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ashenfelter; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. Bass; N. S. Bowden; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Fan; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; L. Hu; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; Y. Kamyshkov; S. Kettell; C. Lane; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. Martinez; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; S. Morrell; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; J. S. Nico; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; P. T. Surukuchi; S. J. Thompson; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; R. E. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; N. Zaitseva; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.

  18. Precision linac and laser technologies for nuclear photonics gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, F.; Hartemann, F. V.; Anderson, S. G.; Cross, R. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Hall, J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF and Photon Science, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunable, high precision gamma-ray sources are under development to enable nuclear photonics, an emerging field of research. This paper focuses on the technological and theoretical challenges related to precision Compton scattering gamma-ray sources. In this scheme, incident laser photons are scattered and Doppler upshifted by a high brightness electron beam to generate tunable and highly collimated gamma-ray pulses. The electron and laser beam parameters can be optimized to achieve the spectral brightness and narrow bandwidth required by nuclear photonics applications. A description of the design of the next generation precision gamma-ray source currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented, along with the underlying motivations. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology, used in conjunction with fiber-based photocathode drive laser and diode pumped solid-state interaction laser technologies, will be shown to offer optimal performance for high gamma-ray spectral flux, narrow bandwidth applications.

  19. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  20. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  1. Mobile Robotic Teams Applied to Precision Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.D. McKay; M.O. Anderson; N.S. Flann (Utah State University); R.A. Kinoshita; R.W. Gunderson; W.D. Willis (INEEL)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Utah State University?s Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS) have developed a team of autonomous robotic vehicles applicable to precision agriculture. A unique technique has been developed to plan, coordinate, and optimize missions in large structured environments for these autonomous vehicles in real-time. Two generic tasks are supported: 1) Driving to a precise location, and 2) Sweeping an area while activating on-board equipment. Sensor data and task achievement data is shared among the vehicles enabling them to cooperatively adapt to changing environmental, vehicle, and task conditions. This paper discusses the development of the autonomous robotic team, details of the mission-planning algorithm, and successful field demonstrations at the INEEL.

  2. Mobile Robotic Teams Applied to Precision Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Matthew Oley; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Mckay, Mark D; Willis, Walter David; Gunderson, R.W.; Flann, N.S.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Utah State University’s Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS) have developed a team of autonomous robotic vehicles applicable to precision agriculture. A unique technique has been developed to plan, coordinate, and optimize missions in large structured environments for these autonomous vehicles in realtime. Two generic tasks are supported: 1) Driving to a precise location, and 2) Sweeping an area while activating on-board equipment. Sensor data and task achievement data is shared among the vehicles enabling them to cooperatively adapt to changing environmental, vehicle, and task conditions. This paper discusses the development of the autonomous robotic team, details of the mission-planning algorithm, and successful field demonstrations at the INEEL.

  3. Precise wavefunction engineering with magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Bennie; P. B. Wigley; S. S. Szigeti; M. Jasperse; J. J. Hope; L. D. Turner; R. P. Anderson

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling quantum fluids at their fundamental length scale will yield superlative quantum simulators, precision sensors, and spintronic devices. This scale is typically below the optical diffraction limit, precluding precise wavefunction engineering using optical potentials alone. We present a protocol to rapidly control the phase and density of a quantum fluid down to the healing length scale using strong time-dependent coupling between internal states of the fluid in a magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate this protocol by simulating the creation of a single stationary soliton and double soliton states in a Bose-Einstein condensate with control over the individual soliton positions and trajectories, using experimentally feasible parameters. Such states are yet to be realized experimentally, and are a path towards engineering soliton gases and exotic topological excitations.

  4. Precision micro drilling with copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.J.; Martinez, M.W.; Warner, B.E.; Dragon, E.P.; Huete, G.; Solarski, M.E.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed a copper vapor laser based micro machining system using advanced beam quality control and precision wavefront tilting technologies. Micro drilling has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratio up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled on a variety of metals with good quality. For precision trepanned holes, the hole-to-hole size variation is typically within 1% of its diameter. Hole entrance and exit are both well defined with dimension error less than a few microns. Materialography of sectioned holes shows little (sub-micron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone with surface roughness within 1--2 microns.

  5. A precision pulser for main ring extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinkel, J.; Biggs, J.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulser has been designed to produce a 14 Hz sinusoid current pulse at a 2 s rate with peak amplitudes from 400 amps to 3750 amps, and a long term stability of + or -400 mA. Short term stability is achieved by the use of a precision voltage regulator for the capacitor bank. This voltage regulator uses gate turnoff thyristors to control the charging current to the 13 mF capacitor bank. Load current is monitored with a precision dc current transductor. The peak value is read into a single chip microcomputer programmed to act as a digital regulator. The microcomputer calculates reference values for the capacitor bank charging supply and the capacitor bank voltage regulator.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, S. V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photoanode applications in hydrogen production S. V.of sunlight into hydrogen by pho- toelectrochemical ͑PEC͒is crucial for efficient hydrogen production using the PEC

  7. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Blaedel, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Pete J. (Pleasanton, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools.

  8. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Blaedel, K.L.; Colella, N.J.; Davis, P.J.; Juntz, R.S.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool are disclosed. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools. 11 figs.

  9. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  10. Interplay of IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory and NLO Parton Shower MC Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, B F L; Yost, S A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the interplay between the new IR-improved DGLAP-CS theory and the precision of NLO parton shower/ME matched MC`s as it is realized by the new MC Herwiri1.031 in interface to MC@NLO. We discuss phenomenological implications using comparisons with recent LHC data on single heavy gauge boson production.

  11. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  12. Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

  13. Fission product release from highly irradiated LWR fuel heated to 1300 to 1600/sup 0/C in steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Malinauskas, A.P. Osborne, M.F.; Towns, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four tests were performed with high-burnup light water reactor (LWR) fuel to explore the amount and characteristics of fission product release at short heating times (0.4 to 10 min) in steam atmosphere in the temperature range 1300 to 1600/sup 0/C. The test fuel rod segments were cut from full-length fuel rods irradiated at low heat rating to 30,000 MWd/MT in the H.B. Robinson-2 reactor. The releases of cesium and iodine increased tenfold (approx.0.3 to >4%) with temperature from 1350 to 1400/sup 0/C from fuel with defects that simulate ruptured cladding. Krypton release rose from approx.2 to approx.11% of total inventory in this temperature range. This sudden increase in release of krypton, cesium, and iodine is believed to result from prior accumulations of these species at or very near the grain boundaries. At 1600/sup 0/C, the releases of krypton, cesium, and iodine were in the range 17 to 25% of total fuel inventory.

  14. Multi-agent cooperative systems applied to precision applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, M.D.; Anderson, M.O. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gunderson, R.W.; Flann, N.; Abbott, B. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory agencies are imposing limits and constraints to protect the operator and/or the environment. While generally necessary, these controls also tend to increase cost and decrease efficiency and productivity. Intelligent computer systems can be made to perform these hazardous tasks with greater efficiency and precision without danger to the operators. The Idaho national Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems at Utah State University have developed a series of autonomous all-terrain multi-agent systems capable of performing automated tasks within hazardous environments. This paper discusses the development and application of cooperative small-scale and large-scale robots for use in various activities associated with radiologically contaminated areas, prescription farming, and unexploded ordinances.

  15. High conversion of coal to transportation fuels for the future with low HC gas production. Progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An announced objective of the Department of Energy in funding this work, and other current research in coal liquefaction, is to produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel. A second objective, reflecting a recent change in direction in the synthetic fuels effort of DOE, is to produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline-burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number. Experimental coal liquefaction studies conducted in a batch microreactor in the authors laboratory have demonstrated potential for high conversions of coal to liquids with low yields of hydrocarbon (HC) gases, hence small consumption of hydrogen in the primary liquefaction step. Ratios of liquids/HC gases as high as 30/1, at liquid yields as high as 82% of the coal by weight, have been achieved. The principal objective of this work is to examine how nearly such results may be approached in a continuous-flow system, at a size sufficient to evaluate the process concept for production of transportation fuels from coal.

  16. Metal vapor target for precise studies of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W., E-mail: w.chen@gsi.de; Vorobyev, G.; Herfurth, F.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Spillmann, U. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Guo, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 Gansu (China); Trotsenko, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stöhlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although different ion-atom collisions have been studied in various contexts, precise values of cross-sections for many atomic processes were seldom obtained. One of the main uncertainties originates from the value of target densities. In this paper, we describe a unique method to measure a target density precisely with a combination of physical vapor deposition and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. This method is preliminarily applied to a charge transfer cross-section measurement in collisions between highly charged ions and magnesium vapor. The final relative uncertainty of the target density is less than 2.5%. This enables the precise studies of atomic processes in ion-atom collisions, even though in the trial test the deduction of precise capture cross-sections was limited by other systematic errors.

  17. irm-EAMS routine measurements: high precision; high accuracy; high throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eurovector EA allows to exchange the reactors separately (and fast). Exchange of the Mg(ClO4)2 water traps and selective CO2 trapping; Improved halide robustness of the combustion reactor using CeO2., Rapid Comm. Mass) inside the EA are exchanged regularly. On the CE-EA, combustion and reduction reactors are always

  18. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial Cold Climate HeatEnergy

  19. Higgs triplets and limits from precision measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; Krupovnickas, Tadas; /Brookhaven

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, they present the results on a global fit to precision electroweak data in a Higgs triplet model. In models with a triplet Higgs boson, a consistent renormalization scheme differs from that of the Standard Model and the global fit shows that a light Higgs boson with mass of 100-200 GeV is preferred. Triplet Higgs bosons arise in many extensions of the Standard Model, including the left-right model and the Little Higgs models. The result demonstrates the importance of the scalar loops when there is a large mass splitting between the heavy scalars. It also indicates the significance of the global fit.

  20. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  1. Gallant Precision Machining GPM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to:Gallant Precision

  2. Final Technical Report - High-Performance, Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Tubes for Production of Ethylene adn Other Industrial Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKimpson, Marvin G.

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken by Michigan Technological University and Special Metals Corporation to develop creep-resistant, coking-resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tubes for use in industrial-scale ethylene pyrolysis and steam methane reforming operations. Ethylene pyrolysis tubes are exposed to some of the most severe service conditions for metallic materials found anywhere in the chemical process industries, including elevated temperatures, oxidizing atmospheres and high carbon potentials. During service, hard deposits of carbon (coke) build up on the inner wall of the tube, reducing heat transfer and restricting the flow of the hydrocarbon feedstocks. About every 20 to 60 days, the reactor must be taken off-line and decoked by burning out the accumulated carbon. This decoking costs on the order of $9 million per year per ethylene plant, accelerates tube degradation, and requires that tubes be replaced about every 5 years. The technology developed under this program seeks to reduce the energy and economic cost of coking by creating novel bimetallic tubes offering a combination of improved coking resistance, creep resistance and fabricability not available in current single-alloy tubes. The inner core of this tube consists of Incoloy(R) MA956, a commercial ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloy offering a 50% reduction in coke buildup combined with improved carburization resistance. The outer sheath consists of a new material - oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Alloy 803(R) developed under the program. This new alloy retains the good fireside environmental resistance of Alloy 803, a commercial wrought alloy currently used for ethylene production, and provides an austenitic casing to alleviate the inherently-limited fabricability of the ferritic Incoloy(R) MA956 core. To provide mechanical compatibility between the two alloys and maximize creep resistance of the bimetallic tube, both the inner Incoloy(R) MA956 and the outer ODS Alloy 803 are oxide dispersion strengthened materials produced using mechanical alloying technology. To minimize cost, the bimetallic tube is produced by direct powder co-extrusion. This technology has potential for domestic energy savings of up to 4.1 trillion BTU/year (4.3 x 1015J/year) and a reduction of 370,000 tons (340,000 tonnes) of CO2 emissions in short-residence-time ethylene furnaces. This represents an energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction of about 3.3%. If the technology is also applied to other types of ethylene pyrolysis furnaces, total energy savings and CO2 emissions reductions could increase by up to five times. The work involved: Developing powder and consolidation processing protocols to produce an oxide-dispersion strengthened variant of Alloy 803 exhibiting creep strength comparable to Incoloy? Alloy MA956, Developing a direct powder co-extrusion protocol for fabricating co-extruded bimetallic Incoloy? Alloy MA956 / ODS Alloy 803 tubes, Characterizing the properties of the ODS Alloy 803 material, the welding characteristics of the bimetallic tubes, and the coking characteristics of the Incoloy? MA956 alloy, and Documenting the potential energy savings and user requirements for these bimetallic pyrolysis furnace tubes. The project demonstrated that oxide dispersion strengthened Alloy 803 can be produced successfully using conventional mechanical alloying technology. The oxide dispersion strengthened bimetallic radiant coil technology explored under this program has significant potential for energy savings and productivity improvements for domestic ethylene producers. In today's competitive market, however, domestic furnace manufacturers and ethylene producers appear reluctant to pay any cost premium for higher-performance coil materials offering either higher temperature capabilities or longer service life. Interest in oxide dispersion strengthened radiant coils is likely to increase if furnace and ethylene producers begin to focus more on increasing tube wall temperatures to improve productivity.

  3. J/psi production at high transverse momentum in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at \\sNN=200GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC presents measurements of \\Jpsi$\\to{e^+e^-}$ at mid-rapidity and high transverse momentum ($p_T>5$ GeV/$c$) in \\pp and central \\cucu collisions at \\sNN = 200 GeV. The inclusive \\Jpsi production cross section for \\cucu collisions is found to be consistent at high $p_T$ with the binary collision-scaled cross section for \\pp collisions, in contrast to previous measurements at lower $p_T$, where a suppression of \\Jpsi production is observed relative to the expectation from binary scaling. Azimuthal correlations of $J/\\psi$ with charged hadrons in \\pp collisions provide an estimate of the contribution of $B$-meson decays to \\Jpsi production of $13% \\pm 5%$.

  4. J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B. I.

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC presents measurements of J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} at mid-rapidity and high transverse momentum (p{sub T} > 5 GeV/c) in p+p and central Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}sNN = 200 GeV. The inclusive J/{psi} production cross section for Cu+Cu collisions is found to be consistent at high p{sub T} with the binary collision-scaled cross section for p+p collisions, in contrast to previous measurements at lower p{sub T}, where a suppression of J/{psi} production is observed relative to the expectation from binary scaling. Azimuthal correlations of J/{psi} with charged hadrons in p+p collisions provide an estimate of the contribution of B-meson decays to J/{psi} production of 13% {+-} 5%.

  5. Software for precise tracking of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurokawa, Hiroshi [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Noda, Hisayori [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sugiyama, Mayu [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukami, Kiyoko [School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)] [School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Miyawaki, Atsushi, E-mail: matsushi@brain.riken.jp [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed software for analyzing cultured cells that divide as well as migrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The active contour model (Snakes) was used as the core algorithm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time backward analysis was also used for efficient detection of cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With user-interactive correction functions, the software enables precise tracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The software was successfully applied to cells with fluorescently-labeled nuclei. -- Abstract: We have developed a multi-target cell tracking program TADOR, which we applied to a series of fluorescence images. TADOR is based on an active contour model that is modified in order to be free of the problem of locally optimal solutions, and thus is resistant to signal fluctuation and morphological changes. Due to adoption of backward tracing and addition of user-interactive correction functions, TADOR is used in an off-line and semi-automated mode, but enables precise tracking of cell division. By applying TADOR to the analysis of cultured cells whose nuclei had been fluorescently labeled, we tracked cell division and cell-cycle progression on coverslips over an extended period of time.

  6. Precision Studies of Light Mesons at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Ketzer; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN's SPS investigates the structure and excitations of strongly interacting systems. Using reactions of 190 GeV/c pions with protons and nuclear targets, mediated by the strong and electromagnetic interaction, an unprecedented statistical precision has been reached allowing new insight into the properties of light mesons. For the first time the diffractively produced 3pi final state has been analyzed simultaneously in bins of invariant mass and four-momentum transfer using a large set of 88 waves up to a total angular momentum of 6. In addition to a precise determination of the properties of known resonances and including a model-indepedent analysis of the pi pi S-wave isobar, a new narrow axial-vector state coupling strongly to f0(980)pi has been found in previously unchartered territory. By selecting reactions with very small four-momentum transfer COMPASS is able to study processes involving the exchange of quasi-real photons. These provide clean access to low-energy quantities such as radiative couplings and polarizabilities of mesons, and thus constitute a test of model predictions such as chiral perturbation theory.

  7. Resource Conservative Manufacturing Transforming Waste into High Value Resource through Closed-Loop Product Systems (ResCoM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    and the environment, the EU has no choice but to go for the transition to a resource-efficient and ultimately), supply chain management (integrated supply chains), business model development (closed-loop business of closed loop product design in terms of resource efficiency, CO2 production and energy use

  8. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  9. An Energy-efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Precision Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    An Energy-efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Precision Agriculture Herman Sahota Ratnesh Kumar and control technologies in application areas such as precision agriculture. We design MAC and Network layers for a wireless sensor network deployed for a precision agriculture application which requires periodic collection

  10. SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15 INSTRUCTION MANUAL Serial No._____________________ 8/94 World Precision Instruments, Inc. SP100i Syringe Pump Digital Infusion Syringe Pump #12;SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Contents GENERAL DESCRIPTION

  11. High conversion of coal to transportation fuels for the future with low HC gas production. Progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental coal liquefaction studies conducted in a batch microreactor in our laboratory have demonstrated potential for high conversions of coal to liquids with low yields of hydrocarbon (HC) gases, hence a small consumption of hydrogen in the primary liquefaction step. Ratios of liquids/HC gases as high as 30/1, at liquid yields as high as 82% of the coal by weight, have been achieved. The principal objective of this work is to examine how nearly we may approach these results in a continuous-flow system, at a size sufficient to evaluate the process concept for production of transportation fuels from coal.

  12. High conversion of coal to transportation fuels for the future with low HC gas production. Progress report No. 14, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel (Task A). A second objective, reflecting a recent change in direction in the synthetic fuels effort of DOE, is to produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline- burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number (Task B). Experimental coal liquefaction studies conducted in a batch microreactor in our laboratory have demonstrated potential for high conversions of coal to liquids with low yields of hydrocarbon (HC) gases, hence small consumption of hydrogen in the primary liquefaction step. Ratios of liquids/HC gases as high as 30/1, at liquid yields as high as 82% of the coal by weight, have been achieved. The principal objective of this work is to examine how nearly we may approach these results in a continuous- flow system, at a size sufficient to evaluate the process concept for production of transportation fuels from coal. A continuous system has been constructed and operated, with a one-half inch inside diameter (ID) tube as the reaction vessel. As the work in this project proceeded toward its conclusion, an unexpected benefit was discovered. As the residence times were decreased to values of 10 seconds or less, ratios of liquids/HC gases of 20/1 or higher were achieved. But very importantly, it was discovered that the chemical reactions which produce the primary liquids can be carried to high conversions at pressures much lower than reported, and indeed required, in the processes at longer times.

  13. ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cancer treatment with PET/CT: does it make a difference? Jfor decentralized production of PET tracers. In Positronprobes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET imaging agents for HSV1-

  14. Dynamic modelling of high biomass density cultivation and biohydrogen production in different scales of flat plate photobioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongda; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; del Rio-Chanona, Ehecatl Antonio; Maitland, Geoffrey C.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass and biogas through optimization of the reactor width. Specifically, the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is selected in this research, as this species is characterised by the highest hydrogen production rate of any other...

  15. Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

  16. Multiple-part-type systems in high volume manufacturing : long-term capacity planning & time-based production control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines a production station that faces fluctuating demand with seasonal pattern. The cumulative capacity exceeds the cumulative demand in a one year period; however, its weekly capacity is not able to meet ...

  17. PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD'S STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jieun; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McCarthy, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wright, Jason T., E-mail: jieun_eb@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 248 precise Doppler measurements of Barnard's Star (Gl 699), the second nearest star system to Earth, obtained from Lick and Keck Observatories during the 25 years between 1987 and 2012. The early precision was 20 m s{sup -1} but was 2 m s{sup -1} during the last 8 years, constituting the most extensive and sensitive search for Doppler signatures of planets around this stellar neighbor. We carefully analyze the 136 Keck radial velocities spanning 8 years by first applying a periodogram analysis to search for nearly circular orbits. We find no significant periodic Doppler signals with amplitudes above {approx}2 m s{sup -1}, setting firm upper limits on the minimum mass (Msin i) of any planets with orbital periods from 0.1 to 1000 days. Using a Monte Carlo analysis for circular orbits, we determine that planetary companions to Barnard's Star with masses above 2 M {sub Circled-Plus} and periods below 10 days would have been detected. Planets with periods up to 2 years and masses above 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} (0.03 M {sub Jup}) are also ruled out. A similar analysis allowing for eccentric orbits yields comparable mass limits. The habitable zone of Barnard's Star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger, save for face-on orbits. Previous claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted. The radial velocity of Barnard's Star increases with time at 4.515 {+-} 0.002 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, consistent with the predicted geometrical effect, secular acceleration, that exchanges transverse for radial components of velocity.

  18. PRECISION CLEANING OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES USING CARBON DIOXIDE-BASED FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. RUBIN; L. SIVILS; A. BUSNAINA

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory, on behalf of the Hewlett-Packard Company, is conducting tests of a closed-loop CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid process, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover (SCORR). We have shown that this treatment process is effective in removing hard-baked, ion-implanted photoresists, and appears to be fully compatible with metallization systems. We are now performing experiments on production wafers to assess not only photoresist removal, but also residual surface contamination due to particulate and trace metals. Dense-phase (liquid or supercritical) CO{sub 2}, since it is non-polar, acts like an organic solvent and therefore has an inherently high volubility for organic compounds such as oils and greases. Also, dense CO{sub 2} has a low-viscosity and a low dielectric constant. Finally, CO{sub 2} in the liquid and supercritical fluid states can solubilize metal completing agents and surfactants. This combination of properties has interesting implications for the removal not only of organic films, but also trace metals and inorganic particulate. In this paper we discuss the possibility of using CO{sub 2} as a precision-cleaning solvent, with particular emphasis on semiconductor surfaces.

  19. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschke, K. D. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable A{sub PV} - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  20. The critical role of manufacturing-process innovation on product development excellence in high-technology companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duarte, Carlos E. A., 1962-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few managers of high-technology companies view manufacturing-process development as primary source of competitive advantage. For the last two decades trends have shown an increasing number of high-tech industries outsourcing ...

  1. Radio Frequency Phototube, Optical Clock and Precise Measurements in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amur Margaryan

    2009-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new experimental program of novel systematic studies of light hypernuclei using pionic decay was established at JLab (Study of Light Hypernuclei by Pionic Decay at JLab, JLab Experiment PR-08-012). The highlights of the proposed program include high precision measurements of binding energies of hypernuclei by using a high resolution pion spectrometer, HpiS. The average values of binding energies will be determined within an accuracy of ~10 keV or better. Therefore, the crucial point of this program is an absolute calibration of the HpiS with accuracy 10E-4 or better. The merging of continuous wave laser-based precision optical-frequency metrology with mode-locked ultrafast lasers has led to precision control of the visible frequency spectrum produced by mode-locked lasers. Such a phase-controlled mode-locked laser forms the foundation of an optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb (OFC) generator, with a regular comb of sharp lines with well defined frequencies. Combination of this technique with a recently developed radio frequency (RF) phototube results in a new tool for precision time measurement. We are proposing a new time-of-flight (TOF) system based on an RF phototube and OFC technique. The proposed TOF system achieves 10 fs instability level and opens new possibilities for precise measurements in nuclear physics such as an absolute calibration of magnetic spectrometers within accuracy 10E-4 - 10E-5.

  2. Synthesis of oxygenate products for high volume fuels applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and setup of twin laboratory gas phase reactors with in-line Gas chromatographic analysers was completed. Calibration and C.G. analysis methods development were carried out, and spreadsheet programs were written for reduction of data to interpretable results. Initial tests were carried out with pentasil zeolite ASM-5 containing very low (0.1%) levels of mercury as potential catalysts for conversion of acetylene/methanol streams to 1,1-dimethoxyethane or to C{sub 2}{sup +} alcohols, both useful as high-oxygenate gasoline blending agents. Trace levels of both types of products were observed, although the predominant products were light olefins at lower reaction temperatures and aromatics at higher temperatures. It is anticipated that less acidic zeolites and/or Zn- containing catalysts will be more active for oxygenate production. Testing of these materials is underway.

  3. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slininger, Patricia J; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A; Thompson, Stephanie R; Dien, Bruce S; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Dale, Bruce E; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock useful for the production of fuel-grade ethanol via the processing steps of pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. Traditional industrial yeasts do not ferment xylose and are not able to grow, survive, or ferment in concentrated hydrolyzates that contain enough sugar to support economical ethanol recovery since they are laden with toxic byproducts generated during pretreatment.

  4. Fission Product Impact Reduction via Protracted In-core Retention in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Transmutation Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    is performed, the spent fuel can be partitioned and separated into 3 streams: depleted uranium (to be recycled with plutonium in reactors), TRU and FP. The TRU content of spent fuel is potentially a useable material. TRU can be recycled in advanced reactors... percent depleted uranium and 1.1 percent higher actinides [25]. Based on the 4.6w/o fission product content, it can be estimated that 10GWd/MTU burnup corresponds to about 1.0w/o of fission products in the spent fuel. Given the burnup of U.S. legacy...

  5. Design and construction of a precision tubular linear motor and controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Bryan Craig

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a novel tubular high-precision direct-drive brushless linear motor has been developed. The novelty of the design lies in the orientation of the magnets in the mover. In conventional linear motors the magnets of the armature...

  6. Farm-level simulation of alternative resource-conserving production systems for representative crop farms in the Northern Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Brey, Cristobal J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 1988). The relative share of dryland farming has increased in recent years leaving land more, susceptible to wind and water erosion. Erosion concerns have increased over the 1980's. Resource-conserving production systems have, gained interest... cotton farms were assessed (Richardson et al. 1989). Conservation compliance scenarios analyzed by Richardson and others included high residue crop rotations and annual wind strips. FLlPSIM has also been used in combination with EPIC (Erosion...

  7. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilkey, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Dept.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  8. A precise definition of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-Y. Pauchy Hwang

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To write the $SU_c(3) \\times SU_L(2) \\times U(1) \\times SU_f(3)$ Standard Model in Minkowski space-time in a precise way, we assume that a special space-time such as the $SU_c(3) \\times SU_L(2) \\times U(1) \\times SU_f(3)$ Minkowski space-time exists to begin with. Thus, the scalar fields $\\Phi(1,2)$ (the Standard-Model Higgs), $\\Phi(3,1)$ (the purely family Higgs), and $\\Phi(3,2)$ (the mixed family Higgs), with the first family label and the second $SU_L(2)$ label, all pre-exist with all gauge bosons, each with well-defined group assignment and the "purpose" (of making a certain gauge boson massive). Moreover, this space-time turns out to support the lepton world, and it also supports the quark world. In this language, all the various gauge bosons are born with the special gauge-group Minkowski space-time. (Or, the Minkowski space-time is further characterized by the force fields, or the gauge group.) This may be the most efficient and clearest way to spell out the Standard Model.

  9. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, Ivan; Lazeyras, Pierre; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; ten Have, I; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S R; Buchmüller, O L; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Bauerdick, L A T; Blumenschein, U; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. The data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarised beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarised asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, $MZ$ and $GZ$, and its couplings to fermions, for example the $ ho$ parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: egin{eqnarray*} MZ & = & 91.1875 pm 0.0021~GeV \\ GZ & = & 2.4952 pm 0.0023~GeV \\ ho_ell & = & 1.0050 pm 0.0010 \\ swsqeffl & =& 0.23153 pm 0.00016 ,. end{eqnarray*} The number of light neutrino species is determined to be $2.9840pm0.0082$, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the pr...

  10. TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05×10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

  11. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  12. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; /Hawaii U.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  13. Production of glycoprotein-deleted rabies viruses for monosynaptic tracing and high-level gene expression in neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickersham, Ian R.

    Recombinant rabies viruses rendered replication-deficient by the deletion of their envelope glycoprotein gene are useful tools for neuroscientists, permitting (1) extraordinarily high transgene expression levels within ...

  14. Open Charm Production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Dong

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental measurements on open charm production in proton-proton, proton (deuteron)-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC are reviewed. A comparison with theoretical predictions is made. Some unsettled issues in open charm production call for precise measurements on directly reconstructed open charm hadrons.

  15. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex (Kensington, CA); Yuzvinsky, Thomas David (Berkeley, CA); Fennimore, Adam (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  16. Precise attention filters for Weber contrast derived from centroid estimations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, George

    Precise attention filters for Weber contrast derived from centroid estimations Department attention filters for Weber contrast derived from centroid estimations. Journal of Vision, 10(10):20, 1

  17. applying precision feeding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in control of vertebrate pests might prove useful to workers in both Galef Jr., Bennett G. 2 Developing a supervised training algorithm for limited precision feed-forward...

  18. Cost and Pecuniary Economies in Cotton Production and Marketing: A Study of Texas Southern High Plains Cotton Producers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, E.G.; Richardson, J.W.; Knutson, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Objectives 1 Cost of Production or Economies of Size Studies 2 ECONOMIES OF SIZE 3 Methodology 4 Study Area 4 Procedure 5 INPUT ECONOMIES... of Marketing Economies for Farm Structure 17 TOTAL BENEFITS BY FARM SIZE 17 CONCLUSIONS 19 REFERENCES SUMMARY In recent years, the "family farm" and its chances for survival has emerged as one of the major agricultural policy issues. The decline in farm...

  19. System-size dependence of strangeness production in high-energy A+A collisions and percolation of strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hoehne; F. Puehlhofer; R. Stock

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the shape of the system-size dependence of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be understood in a picture that is based on the formation of clusters of overlapping strings. A string percolation model combined with a statistical description of the hadronization yields a quantitative agreement with the data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=17.3$ GeV. The model is also applied to RHIC energies.

  20. MIRRORCLE-CV The Portable Synchrotron For Precise Non-Destructive Testing And Medical Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasegawa, Daisuke [Photon Production Laboratory Ltd., 4-2-1 (808) Takagai-cho Minami, Ohmihachiman-city 523-0898, Shiga (Japan); Yamada, Hironari [Synchrotron Light Life Science Center, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu-city 525-8577, Shiga (Japan)

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing the portable synchrotron MIRRORCLE-CV series, which provides a high quality x-ray beam for high precision non-destructive testing (NDT). Computer simulations for the magnetic field design and electron dynamics reveal that the outer diameter of the synchrotron magnet can be as small as 30 cm. This synchrotron size approaches that of a conventional x-ray tube.