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Sample records for high plains ii

  1. Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

  2. Cotton and Manpower - Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducoff, Louis J.; Metzler, William H.; Motheral, Joe R.

    1953-01-01

    . DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 49103 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Figure 1. DIGEST This report presents the results of a study of farm labor employed in the cotton crop of the Texas High Plains. Made in Lubbock and Crosby counties by the Texas... Agricultural Experiment Station and the Bureau of Agricultural Econom- ics of the United States Department of Agriculture, the study covered the experience of 324 farm operators in the 1951 crop. It was focused on the types, sources and utilization of labor...

  3. Economic Implications of Applying Effluent for Irrigation in the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    and groundwater irrigated farms, the respective increases in returns are 170% and 65%. Keywords: Wastewater/rural communities/sewage treatment/waste disposal ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF APPLYING EFFLUENT FOR IRRIGATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS Raymond F... .......... . . . .................... . .................. 14 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ....................................... 17 ii ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF APPLYING EFFLUENT FOR IRRIGATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS INTRODUCTION Wastewater treatment through land application has been practiced for decades...

  4. Economically Optimum Irrigation Patternsfor Grain Sorghum Production: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, L. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Taylor, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Agricultural production and associated economic effects of irrigation on the Texas High Plains are seriously threatened by a rapidly declining groundwater supply and a swift upward trend in energy costs. To optimize the ...

  5. Biological studies and characterization of the High Plains Disease pathogen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirabile, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    High Plains Disease (HPD), which is a recently recognized affliction causing up to 80% yield losses in corn and wheat, has been suspected to be of viral origin, however no clear evidence existed to validate this claim. ...

  6. Larger Black Flour Beetle in Southern High Plains Homes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; McIntyre, Nancy E.

    2007-04-09

    Larger black flour beetles have invaded homes and other buildings in some Southern High Plains counties in Texas. This publication explains how to identify the beetles, find and eliminate the source, and exclude the insects from the house....

  7. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  8. High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho John W. Shervais a, , Scott K. Vetter b Snake River Plain SRP Yellowstone plume hotspots Basaltic volcanism in the western Snake River Plain

  9. An Economic Analysis of Cotton Gin Plants -- High Plains, Rolling Plains and Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Russell G.; Ward, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    volumes of cotton had much lower costs than those ginning relatively small volumes. For com- parable volumes, single-battery gins on the High Plains had lower costs per bale than multiple- battery gins. Costs per bale were considerably greater... in the Lower Rio Grande Valley than at comparable gin plants on the Plains. Costs per bale ranged from $8.41 to $16.49 at single-battery gin plants and from $9.72 to $16.66 at multiple- battery gin plants on the High Plains. Total costs ranged from $13...

  10. High Plains Tech Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea, CaliforniaHess Retail NaturalAreasHighMesaTech

  11. Sheepdogs and Barbed Wire: An Environmental History of Grazing on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Daniel Stewart

    2010-05-31

    An environmental history of High Plains grazing that focused on transhumant sheepherding of New Mexico, watershed cattle ranching of the open range, and barbed-wire stock-farming of the privatized plains--all systems of agroecology practiced...

  12. Tenure and Mechanization of the Cotton Harvest, Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzler, William H.; Adkins, William G.

    1955-01-01

    below those of 1951. The heavy frost of October 7 permitted ma- chine-harvesting to begin by the middle of Oc- tober. A frost that early in the season meant that High Plains farmers would be able to harvest their entire crop by hand or by machine... depends on the timely appearance of an adequate supply of migratory workers who will stay through the season. Machine-stripping depends on a frost early enough to per- mit harvesting over a period of 4 or 5 weeks. The advantage of one method over...

  13. Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Brownie

    2013-11-20

    Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer Brownie Wilson Geohydrology Section Kansas Geological Survey University of Kansas 12th Annual GIS Day @ KU November 20, 2013 The High Plains Aquifer Kansas Geological... Survey The High Plains Aquifer in Kansas Great Bend Prairie Equus Beds Ogallala Kansas Geological Survey Accumulated Water Level Change, 1996 to 2012 Kansas Geological Survey Water Management Activities, circa 2000 Kansas Geological Survey • Active...

  14. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  15. Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley impact crop produc- tion in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for 50

  16. Protecting Elm Trees from Elm Bark Beetle on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; Baugh, Brant A.; Siders, Kerry; Riley, Cherinell; Young, Stanley

    2001-06-27

    This publication can help you recognize and understand the development of the lesser European elm bark beetle, which threatens elm trees on the Texas High Plains. Management and prevention measures are discussed. Deciduous shade and flowering trees...

  17. The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

    2004-09-30

    based emission reducing practices. The practices investigated in the Texas High Plains involve reduced tillage use, reduced fallow use, reduced crop fertilization, cropland conversion to grassland, feedlot enteric fermentation management and digester...

  18. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  19. An economic analysis of alternative sprinkler irrigation distribution systems on the Southern High Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, John Christopher

    1973-01-01

    Situation; Texas High Plains. . . 146 Pumping Cost Per Acre Foot of Irri- gation Water~ Texas High Plains. . . . . . . 107 xiii LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Delineation of Study Area. ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ . ~ . ~ , 8 Hypothetical Iso-Product and Iso-Cost...-product curve is shown in Figure 2, with variable inputs capital and labor, used to produce Z units of' output. As capital is 20 Labor Iso-Product Curve I I I Capital Z3 Iso-Cost Curve Zl FIGURE 2. Hypothetical Iso-Product and Iso-Cost Curves...

  20. Modeling Cotton and Winter Wheat Growth and Yield Responses to Irrigation Management in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attia Mohamed, Ahmed

    2014-12-17

    were negatively correlated. A modeling study was performed using the cotton growth simulation model, Cotton2K, to investigate the lint yield, WUE, and economic return responses using 31 years weather records (1980 – 2010) from the Texas Rolling Plains...

  1. The Effects of Energy Prices on Agricultural Groundwater Extraction from the High Plains Aquifer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 The Effects of Energy Prices on Agricultural Groundwater Extraction from the High Plains-752-0824 Abstract In this article we examine the effects of energy prices on groundwater extraction using and extensive margins. Our results show that energy prices have an effect on both the intensive and extensive

  2. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  3. Irrigated Sugarbeets: Yield Response and Profit Implications, Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansford, Vernon D.; Winter S.R.; Harman, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    ; Haddock, 1959; Erie and French, 1968; Parashar and Dastane, 1973; Carter, 1980b; Barbieri, 1982; Winter, 1989). Research indicates that excessively high levels of nitrogen lowers sugar content. Nicholson et al. (1974), in Colorado, developed a mul..., using experimental data from Arizona, Colorado, and Texas, developed production functions reflecting the yield-water-nitrogen relationships for sugar beets. The ability to explain these relationships varied from site to site and year to year. A range...

  4. Water and Associated Costs in the Production of Cotton and Grain Sorghum, Texas High Plains, 1955. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, A. C.; Hughes, William F.

    1957-01-01

    vary widely; consequently, there is a wide range in the cost of machinery on High Plains farms. Most wholly irrigated farms are equipped with the amount and kinds of machinery required be- fore acreage-control programs reduced the cotton acreage.... Before acreage control, some 70 to 80 j~ercent of the irrigated lands in the area covered by this study commonly were planted to cotton. Irrigated farms with 100 percent of the cropland in cotton were' not unusual. Present machinery inventories...

  5. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  6. The Impact of Energy Shortage and Cost on Irrigation for the High Plains and Trans Pecos Regions of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Zavaleta, L.; Petty, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    ). The Ogalalla aquifer underlying the High Plains and many of the alluvium aquifers underlying the Trans Pecos are exhaustible; i.e., there is a negligible recharge from percolation and other sources. Therefore, even with unchanged natural gas prices...

  7. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  8. On the fast track: Collaboration expedites adoption of efficient irrigation technologies in the High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    the most of their available resources, Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service professionals are ge?ing new irrigation technologies into growers? hands in record time. Irrigation is incredibly valuable in the High... said. ?Part of that is due to the fact that we?ve got very harsh environmental ON THE FAST TRACK Collaboration expedites adoption of e?cient irrigation technologies in the High Plains 1 Texas Water Resources Institute EM-115, 2012. Summer 2013 tx...

  9. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http...://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/05/16/us/an-underground-pool-drying-up.html?ref=us Aquifer Decline When amount of water diverted in the zone of influence is greater than recharge, this will result decline in the water level in the Aquifer. Most concentrated irrigated...

  10. sessions II and High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    /high school certification. 20 Upper Division Biology Credits 06/12 MATH 95 Introductory Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT 20 SAT 500 MPT 12 UNLV; MATH 127 Precalculus I Math Placement Testing ACT 25 SAT 560 MPT 26 MATH 181 Calculus I Math Placement

  11. Ground-water solutes and eolian processes: An example from the High Plains of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Eolian dunes associated with saline-lake basins are important geologic features in arid and semiarid areas. The authors propose that eolian processes may also be important in controlling solute concentration and composition of ground water in these environments. A study of Double Lakes on the Southern High Plains of Texas suggests that approximately 200 megagrams of chloride enters this topographically closed basin from the surrounding water table aquifer, direct precipitation and surface runoff. Solute-transport simulation suggest that approximately 70 of the 200 megagrams of the chloride annually leaves the basin by diffusion and ground-water advection through a 30 meter-thick shale underlying the lake. The remaining 130 megagrams is hypothesized to be removed by eolian processes. Closed water-table contours around the lake and a hydrologic analysis suggest that it is improbable that solutes will reach the surrounding water-table aquifer by ground-water transport from this lake system. The conceptual eolian-transport model is further supported by observed chloride profiles in the unsaturated zone. When analyzed with estimates of recharge fluxes, these profiles suggest that approximately 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride are removed from the basin annually by eolian process and redeposited downwind of the lake. Eolian input to the ground water is consistent with the observed plume shape as well as with the solute and isotopic composition of ground water in the water-table aquifer downwind of the lake basin.

  12. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION METHODS BASED ON WELL LOGS FOR GROUNDWATER MODELING OF THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitzer, Sarah R.

    2011-04-27

    The Ogallala portion of the High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water for irrigation and municipal purposes in southwestern Kansas. The spatial variability and connectivity of permeable and non-permeable deposits influence local ground...

  13. Late Quaternary sedimentology and geochronology of small playas on the Southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    Late Quaternary sedimentology and geochronology of small playas on the Southern High Plains, Texas-three discussed by Holliday et al. (1996), were sampled for additional stratigraphic and sedimentological

  14. An economic evaluation of experimental response of irrigated grain sorghum to nitrogen on pullman soils in the high plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Alfred D. L

    1960-01-01

    Agricultural Experiment Station, March, 1960, p. 6. ~7 L. F. Miller, "Situation and Outlook for Grain Sorghum in the Plains, " Sante Fe, New Mexico: Great Plains Council Meeting, 1959, p. 2, '+S W. O. Trogdon, ~. ~ci . , pp. 7-8, ~9 L. F. Miller, ~o. cit...? the com- petitive position of sorghum grains as a feed should continue to improve The outlook for an expansion of livestock feeding in the High Plains also appears favorable. The grain sorghum-hog ratio in Texas was more favorable than the corn...

  15. Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Texas Southern High Plains Wheat Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Smith, Edward G.

    1985-01-01

    the relative magnitude of real financial growth. ? Acres owned, leased, and controlled at the end of the planning horizon for each iteration indicate the impacts of alternative scenarios on the rate of growth for representative farms. These three statistics...~ :) ,'---( _..----' I ... - Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Southern High Plains Wheat Farms tiD'" A".,V SEP 04 1985 8-1506 August 1985 THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION/Neville P. Clarke, DirectorlThe Texas A...

  16. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

  17. A Soil-Based Methodology for Locating Buried Early Prehistoric Cultural Deposits in Draws on the High Plains of Eastern Colorado and Western Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Kristopher R.

    2013-05-31

    5 and Core 5 PDI calculations and values...................108 19. (Appendix III) Core 6-1 PDI calculations and values........................................109 x 20. (Appendix III) Cutbank 6-2 PDI calculations and values... PAGE 1. Map of the United States showing the High Plains Physiographic Subprovince ..................8 2. Overview of the Middle Beaver Creek drainage basin ........................................................10 3. Excerpt of USGS 7.5...

  18. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  19. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Kevin Comer, Associate Principal, Antares Group Inc.

  20. SMALL MAMMALS ASSOCIATED WITH COLONIES OF BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS) IN THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    common species among the types of sites. Prairie dogs are touted as a keystone species) often are touted as a keystone species within the Great Plains ecosys- tem. If adhering to the definition of a keystone species as one whose impact on its c

  1. An economic evaluation of selected tenure arrangements for a representative farm in the northern high plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwell, R. Lynn

    1970-01-01

    'frixfxttee) ~ ~~yg/J Jeff:axxy 1970 ABSTRACT An Economic Evaluation of Selected Tenure Arrangements For A Representative Farm in the Northern Sigh Plains of Texas. (January 1970) Richard Lynn Sarwell; B. B. S. , The University of Texas Directed by: Dr. J. S... thar three-fourths of the annual noisture falls during the growing season [27]. LLANO M E'yg ~VI P@ I CO HARFvvv EHERSAV tiooRF HolCHINsoN Study Area vs% Figure 1. Distribution of Hardlands Soils, Texas bligh Pla111S Souro: [57 J !!ind !mi...

  2. Mineral resources of Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas, La Paz County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosdal, R.M.; Eppinger, R.G.; Erdman, J.A.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; O'Leary, R.M.; Watterson, J.R. (US Geological Survey (US)); Kreidler, T.J. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies in the Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas outlined in areas with moderate to high potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barite, fluorite, manganese, and sand suitable for foundry, fracturing, and abrasive uses and low resource potential for beryllium, uranium and bentonitic clays.

  3. Large-scale stabilized dunes on the High Plains of Colorado: Understanding the landscape response to Holocene climates with the aid of images from space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, S.L. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Goetz, A.F.H.; Yuhas, R.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Principal-component analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images from eastern Colorado reveals stabilized dune fields that are composed of single and compound parabolic dunes, some longer than 10 km. These dunes have been reactivated at least four times in the past 10,000 yr, at ca. 9500 to 5500 yr B.P., 5500 to {gt}4800 yr B.P., 4800 to {gt}1000 yr B.P., and {lt}1000 yr B.P., during droughts that probably exceeded the dry conditions during the 1930s. Dune orientations indicate that these landforms were molded by winds from the northwest, which now dominate during the winter and spring with the passage of Pacific air masses. This study underscores the sensitivity of the landscape of the High Plains to drought conditions, which may become more prevalent because of the anticipated effects of greenhouse warming.

  4. Plain Language Training Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link: Click Here to RegisterThe link will bring you to the Plain Writing Powerpedia page, where you can register for the class that works for you. Alternatively, please contact Michael...

  5. Plain Language Training Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link: Click Here to RegisterThe link will bring you to the Plain Writing Powerpedia page, where you can register for the class that works for you. Alternatively, please contact Michael...

  6. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  7. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  8. Civil Defence Manual of Basic Training volume II: Basic methods of protection against high explosive missiles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1949-01-01

    H0ME OFFICE CIVIL DEFENCE Manual of Basic Training VOLUME II BASIC METHODS OF PROTECTION AGAINST HIGH EXPLOSIVE MISSILES PAMPHLET No 5

  9. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation is the Introduction to the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, held on August 13, 2014.

  10. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, D. A., [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Adelaide (Australia); Younker, L.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Flood Plain Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1976-01-01

    are the soils that lie within th~ 500-year flood plain. Technical descriptions, general ae. ricultural uses, and locations of these soils are displa!ed in narrative and map form. These data are presented much like a standard county soil survey but in les... that will minimize flood damage. 3) adeauate ", 1 drainage for new subdivisions, and 4) new or replace- ment utility systems located and designed to preclude flood loss (24). The Texas Water Development Board listed 438 cities and 40 counties in Texas...

  12. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  13. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  14. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments.

  15. Geothermal features of Snake River plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1987-08-01

    The Snake River plain is the track of a hot spot beneath the continental lithosphere. The track has passed through southern Idaho as the continental plate has moved over the hot spot at a rate of about 3.5 cm/yr. The present site of the hot spot is Yellowstone Park. As a consequence of the passage, a systematic sequence of geologic and tectonic events illustrates the response of the continental lithosphere to this hotspot event. The three areas that represent various time slices in the evolution are the Yellowstone Plateau, the Eastern Snake River plain downwarp, and the Western Snake River plain basin/Owhyee Plateau. In addition to the age of silicic volcanic activity, the topographic profile of the Snake River plain shows a systematic variation from the high elevations in the east to lowest elevations on the west. The change in elevation follows the form of an oceanic lithosphere cooling curve, suggesting that temperature change is the dominant effect on the elevation.

  16. High-frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    High-frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear of pulses in noncentrosymmetric crystals. The method is based upon high-frequency expansions techniques pulses by using a technique based on high-frequency expansions of the fields.7 The derived equations find

  17. II*

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2 II Now

  18. FIRST HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGES OF THE SUN IN THE 2796 Å Mg II k LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J.; Danilovic, S.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knölker, M.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2013-10-10

    We present the first high-resolution solar images in the Mg II k 2796 Å line. The images, taken through a 4.8 Å broad interference filter, were obtained during the second science flight of Sunrise in 2013 June by the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) instrument. The Mg II k images display structures that look qualitatively very similar to images taken in the core of Ca II H. The Mg II images exhibit reversed granulation (or shock waves) in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun, at intensity contrasts that are similar to those found in Ca II H. Very prominent in Mg II are bright points, both in the quiet Sun and in plage regions, particularly near the disk center. These are much brighter than at other wavelengths sampled at similar resolution. Furthermore, Mg II k images also show fibril structures associated with plage regions. Again, the fibrils are similar to those seen in Ca II H images, but tend to be more pronounced, particularly in weak plage.

  19. Chemical Reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) at the Solid-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    ) oxides and highly Fe(III) oxide-enriched (18-35 wt % Fe) Atlantic coastal plain sediments. In contrast with relatively low Fe(III) oxide content (1-5 wt % Fe). Fe(II) sorption site density was severalfold lower Uranium(VI) is stable in oxic environments and typically exists as soluble carbonate complexes in aerobic

  20. Nearby-fluids equilibria. II. Zonal flows in a high-, self-organized plasma experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Nearby-fluids equilibria. II. Zonal flows in a high- , self-organized plasma experiment L. C. Steinhauera and H. Y. Guo University of Washington, Redmond Plasma physics Laboratory, Redmond, Washington structure observed in a high- field reversed configuration FRC produced in the translation, confinement

  1. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  2. Plain Language Training Class 01

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link:  CHRIS https://mis.doe.gov/ess/index.cfm   002357/0017 and https://powerpedia.energy.gov/wiki/Plain_Writing_Training_Class_October_...Course Type: Classroom   Course Location:...

  3. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  5. Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing, Part II: Conceptual Design of a High Speed Civil Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Gecheng

    ° so that the side of the airplane during supersonic flight becomes the front of the airplane airplanes and is not a serious problem for transonic flight due to the low supersonic Mach numberSupersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing, Part II: Conceptual Design of a High Speed Civil Transport

  6. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  7. The Feasibility of Outsourced Database Search in the Plain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Feasibility of Outsourced Database Search in the Plain Model Carmit Hazay Hila Zarosim Abstract. In this paper, we focus on the outsourced database search problem which is highly motivated in the context of delegatable computing since it offers storage alternatives for massive databases, that may contain

  8. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  9. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated that two of the key components of SLED-II; the Magic Tee and the 'Flower Petal' mode converter (converts between TE{sub 10} rectangular and TE{sub 01} circular modes), were not robust enough at higher power levels. Because of this, a major effort is underway to upgrade the existing devices to operate stably at the higher power levels, and also to investigate new components, which have inherently low field enhancement in their design and therefore more robust.

  10. DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 1 DOT WWW Pages --Plain Text Copy June 17, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 1 DOT WWW Pages -- Plain Text Copy ­ June 17, 2015 http . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 8 pdf copies of these pages 29 Welcome to the DOT web pages! The Dutch Open Telescope on La Palma observing: wiki external usage webcam #12;DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 2 1 DOT news · January 2012: Utrecht

  11. Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upadhyay, Jeetendra; Auvermann, Brent W.; Bush, K. Jack; Mukhtar, Saqib

    2008-02-11

    convert nitrogen into other chemical forms. Legume roots sustain rhizobia, the organisms capable of nitrogen fixation, a microbial process for con- verting nitrogen into ammonium (NH 4 ). Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are nitrogen- bearing compounds... acid gas can dissolve as the ammonium ion (NH 4 +), where it may react with Sources Transport / Transformation Removal Effects Photochemistry Chemical Transformations Cloud Processes Vertical Mixing Prevailing Winds Dry DepositionWet Deposition...

  12. Cotton Production on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, H. C.; Owen, W. L. Jr.; Walker, H. J.; Thaxton, E. L. Jr.; Ray, L. L.; Hudspeth, E. B. Jr.; Jones, D. L.

    1956-01-01

    , 1 , luly [ April. 11 August August 1 ,,A, ,, npr11 LL I line 25 Iuly 15 I August I 13.2 165 12.5 nly 8.2 21.4 420 19.6 une 12.2 25.4 451 17.8 uly 12.0 25.2 470 18.7 Lug. 12.5 25.7 517 20.1 une 12.9 26.1 468 17.9 une, 16.2 29.4 588...

  13. High Plains Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River PowerHeckertHidrotermica Jump

  14. High Plains Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River PowerHeckertHidrotermica JumpPower Inc Jump to:

  15. High Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea, CaliforniaHess Retail

  16. Cultural Control of the Boll Weevil: A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slosser, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    weevil control program of the Texas High Plains. Tex. Agric. Exp. Sta. Prog. Rep. 2766. Bottrell, D. G., J. R. White, D. S. Moody, and D. D. Hardee. 1972. Overwintering habitats of the boll weevil in the Rolling Plains of Texas. Environ. Entomol. 1... of the Boll Weevil A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains J. E. Slosser1 1Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station LIBRARY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY JUN 21 1995 TEXAS STATE DOCUMENTS Key Words: boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman...

  17. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on...

  18. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

  19. Searches for New Physics Using High Mass Dimuons at the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karagoz Unel, Muge

    2004-12-01

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the D0 experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb{sup -1}. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics. This work points out the aspects of the detector which need better understanding to reach Run I precision and to constrain the PDFs.

  20. INTRODUCTION Mesopotamia is the broad, flat alluvial plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    in upper right with the Mesopotamian flood- plain (star), Zagros Moun- tain (circle) and Indus River

  1. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

  2. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

  3. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript for the Nov. 16 webinar, High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications.

  4. Relation Between Type-II ELMs, Edge Localized Turbulence, Washboard Modes and Energy Losses Between ELMs in High Density ELMy H-modes on JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relation Between Type-II ELMs, Edge Localized Turbulence, Washboard Modes and Energy Losses Between ELMs in High Density ELMy H-modes on JET

  5. SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2012-09-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times as short as 85 days. In all cases, the cracking appeared to be associated with pitting or localized general corrosion. Crack initiation at other sites, such as surface imperfections or inclusions, cannot be excluded. Cracks appear in most cases to initiate through an intergranular mode and transition to a transgranular mode.

  6. Environmental perceptions in Great Plains novels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardee, Celeste Frances

    1976-01-01

    to environmental influ- ences on the overall settlement process. Finally, con- clusions are drawn on the contribution of novels to the study of environmental perception during the settlement period and to an understanding of Great Plains culture history...ENVIRONMENTAL PERCEPT10NS IN GREAT PLAINS NOVELS A Thesis CELESTE FRANCES PARDEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major...

  7. What Working on this Project Meant to Me from the Karns High School English II Honors Class 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    this project including that Oak Ridge started as a key site of the Manhattan Project.It was great#12;What Working on this Project Meant to Me from the Karns High School English II Honors Class. Thishasbeenagreat experienceforme. ­BrookeMercer This was a rewarding and informative project. I had no idea how

  8. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  9. Doppler tomography of the Little Homunculus: High resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-12-21

    High-resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around eta Carinae provide powerful diagnostics of the geometry and kinematics of the ``Little Homunculus'' (LH) growing inside the larger Homunculus nebula. The LH expansion is not perfectly homologous: while low-latitudes are consistent with linear expansion since 1910, the polar caps imply ejection dates around 1920--1930. However, the expansion speed of the LH is slower than the post-eruption wind, so the star's powerful wind may accelerate it. With an initial ejection speed of 200 km/s in 1890, the LH would have been accelerated to its present speed if the mass is roughly 0.1 Msun. This agrees with an independent estimate of the LH mass based on its density and volume. In any case, an ejection after 1930 is ruled out. Using the LH as a probe of the 1890 event, then, it is evident that its most basic physical parameters (total mass and kinetic energy; 0.1 Msun and 10^46.9 ergs, respectively) are orders of magnitude less than during the giant eruption in the 1840s. Thus, the ultimate energy sources were different for these two events -- yet their ejecta have the same bipolar geometry. This clue may point toward a collimation mechanism separate from the underlying causes of the outbursts.

  10. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada)] [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)] [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)] [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  11. Watermelon marketing in Texas with emphasis on the Rio Grande Plain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Charles William

    1958-01-01

    ?outs cf Water?alone by Truch and. Rail Frc? BobbrcnvQIop Texaco' 1957 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 33 7. Carlct Receipts cf Texas Waters?lens at, Major Barhots, 1953 561 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ * ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ II ~ ~ 38 8, Prices of Water... xxaternelon producing areas in the h. ie Grande PlaiR4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ 3, Distribution sf xxaterxalene free the Bio Grande Plain by w e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6. Distribution ef xxatermlone by rail...

  12. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  13. The case for the plain packaging of tobacco products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becky Freeman, BSc, MSc; Simon Chapman, BA, PhD; Matthew Rimmer, BA, LLB, PhD

    2007-01-01

    65-7. The case for the plain packaging of tobacco productsH. The effect of plain packaging on response to healthAnon. Opportunities in packaging innovation. March http://

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION A rare fight in female plains zebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION A rare fight in female plains zebra Ilya R. Fischhoff · Siva R. Sundaresan and Springer 2009 Abstract We describe a fight between two female plains zebra (Equus burchelli). Plains zebra observed. The fight immediately followed the birth of a foal to one of the females. The initiating female

  15. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

  16. Groundwater in the Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.

    2003-01-01

    - cide study. Results suggest that roughly 33% of the counties in the United States have both high pesticide use and high groundwater vulnerabil- ity, including a large section of Texas, Ne- braska, Kansas and Oklahoma that potentially could be especially... laboratories, local health depart- ments, and state and county agencies. Check with your local officials to determine who can test water in your area. Tests for pesticides and organic chemicals are usually more expensive than those for minerals and bacteria...

  17. The solar chromosphere at high resolution with IBIS: III. Comparison of Ca II K and Ca II 854.2 nm imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reardon, K P; Cauzzi, G

    2008-01-01

    Filtergrams obtained in Ca II H, Ca II K and H-alpha are often employed as diagnostics of the solar chromosphere. However, the vastly disparate appearance between the typical filtergrams in these different lines calls into question the nature of what is actually being observed. We investigate the lack of obvious structures of magnetic origin such as fibrils and mottles in on-disk Ca II H and K images by directly comparing a temporal sequence of classical Ca II K filtergrams with a co-spatial and co-temporal sequence of spectrally resolved Ca II 854.2 images obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS), considering the effect of both the spectral and spatial smearing. We find that the lack of fine magnetic structuring in Ca II K filtergrams, even with the narrowest available filters, is due to observational effects. Signatures of fibrils remain however in the temporal evolution of the filtergrams, in particular with the evidence of magnetic shadows around the network elements. The Ca II ...

  18. RuralNet (Digital Gangetic Plains): WiFi-Based Low-Cost Rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Bhaskaran

    RuralNet (Digital Gangetic Plains): WiFi-Based Low-Cost Rural Networking Bhaskaran Raman Department in the west This business model can thrive when average per capita income is high ($20K) Wireless systems being deployed in India are successful in Metro pockets, but providing cost effective voice and data

  19. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective strategies to address moisture and thermal needs.

  20. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Date/Time:  August 13, 2014; 3:00-4:30 PM EDTDescription: The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective...

  1. High-reliability gas-turbine combined-cycle development program: Phase II, Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, K.G.; Sanderson, R.A.; Smith, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This three-volume report presents the results of Phase II of the multiphase EPRI-sponsored High-Reliability Gas Turbine Combined-Cycle Development Program whose goal is to achieve a highly reliable gas turbine combined-cycle power plant, available by the mid-1980s, which would be an economically attractive baseload generation alternative for the electric utility industry. The Phase II program objective was to prepare the preliminary design of this power plant. The power plant was addressed in three areas: (1) the gas turbine, (2) the gas turbine ancillaries, and (3) the balance of plant including the steam turbine generator. To achieve the program goals, a gas turbine was incorporated which combined proven reliability characteristics with improved performance features. This gas turbine, designated the V84.3, is the result of a cooperative effort between Kraftwerk Union AG and United Technologies Corporation. Gas turbines of similar design operating in Europe under baseload conditions have demonstrated mean time between failures in excess of 40,000. The reliability characteristics of the gas turbine ancillaries and balance-of-plant equipment were improved through system simplification and component redundancy and by selection of component with inherent high reliability. A digital control system was included with logic, communications, sensor redundancy, and manual backup. An independent condition monitoring and diagnostic system was also included. Program results provide the preliminary design of a gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. This power plant has a predicted mean time between failure of nearly twice the 3000-h EPRI goal. The cost of added reliability features is offset by improved performance, which results in a comparable specific cost and an 8% lower cost of electricty compared to present market offerings.

  2. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos García-Argos

    2015-01-13

    This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker after 2023, to be installed for operations in the HL-LHC period. The high luminosity and number of interactions per crossing that will happen after the HL-LHC starts require a complete replacement of the ATLAS tracker. The systems that have been defined for the Phase-II Upgrade will be designed to cope with that increased radiation and have the right granularity to maintain the performance with higher pile-up. In this thesis I present results on single modules and larger structures comprising multiple modules. In the context of the current ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker studies, I present an analysis of the data taken by the detector from the beginning of operation in 2010 until the first Long Shut-down in 2013. The analysis consists of an energy loss study in the Semiconductor Tracker, a task the detector was not designed to perform. However, the availability of the Time-over-Threshold of the signals generated by particles traversing the detector elements allows an estimation of the charge deposited by the particles. This calculation of the energy loss is typically used to perform particle identification, a feature that is usually not required from the tracker. In addition, I present a study that proposes the use of this energy loss calculation as a means of tracking radiation damage in the silicon.

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  6. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation Transmission Planning Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line ...

  7. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility8PlainsInstrumentsSources of

  8. Western Plains Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginiaElectric Assn IncWesternPlains

  9. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3performedValleySouthern Great Plains Ice Nuclei

  10. Plain Language Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) Plain

  11. Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) PlainWriting

  12. Hunting the parent of the Orphan stream. II. The first high-resolution spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Andrew R.; Keller, Stefan C.; Da Costa, Gary; Maunder, Elizabeth [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frebel, Anna, E-mail: andrew.casey@anu.edu.au [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present the first high-resolution spectroscopic study on the Orphan stream for five stream candidates, observed with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Clay telescope. The targets were selected from the low-resolution catalog of Casey et al.: three high-probability members, one medium, and one low-probability stream candidate were observed. Our analysis indicates that the low- and medium-probability targets are metal-rich field stars. The remaining three high-probability targets range over ?1 dex in metallicity, and are chemically distinct compared to the other two targets and all standard stars: low [?/Fe] abundance ratios are observed, and lower limits are ascertained for [Ba/Y], which sit well above the Milky Way trend. These chemical signatures demonstrate that the undiscovered parent system is unequivocally a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, consistent with dynamical constraints inferred from the stream width and arc. As such, we firmly exclude the proposed association between NGC 2419 and the Orphan stream. A wide range in metallicities adds to the similarities between the Orphan stream and Segue 1, although the low [?/Fe] abundance ratios in the Orphan stream are in tension with the high [?/Fe] values observed in Segue 1. Open questions remain before Segue 1 could possibly be claimed as the 'parent' of the Orphan stream. The parent system could well remain undiscovered in the southern sky.

  13. The High-Energy Polarization-Limiting Radius of Neutron Star Magnetospheres II -- Magnetized Hydrogen Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy S. Heyl; Don Lloyd; Nir J. Shaviv

    2005-02-17

    In the presence of strong magnetic fields, the vacuum becomes a birefringent medium. We show that this QED effect couples the direction of the polarization of photons leaving the NS surface, to the direction of the magnetic field along the ray's path. We analyze the consequences that this effect has on aligning the polarization vectors to generate large net polarizations, while considering thermal radiation originating from a thermal hydrogen atmosphere. Counter to previous predictions, we show that the thermal radiation should be highly polarized even in the optical. When detected, this polarization will be the first demonstration of vacuum birefringence. It could be used as a tool to prove the high magnetic field nature of AXPs and it could also be used to constrain physical NS parameters, such as $R/M$, to which the net polarization is sensitive.

  14. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  15. Production of Virginia Peanuts in the Rolling Plains and Southern High Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemon, Robert G.; Lee, Thomas A.

    1995-08-01

    Cultural practices such as crop rotation, maintaining plant nutrition, irrigation management and disease management are crucial for the successful production of Virginia peanuts. This publications describes these and other ...

  16. Managing Cotton Insects in the High Plains, Rolling Plains and Trans Pecos Areas of Texas--2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siders, Kerry; Baugh, Brant A.; Sansone, Chris; Kerns, David L.

    2008-04-29

    Cotton insect management practices, including cultural control techniques that reduce the risk of crop damage, are discussed. The emphasis is on monitoring and identifying insect populations in cotton. A supplement (E-6A) lists insecticides...

  17. Groundwater Nitrogen Source Identification and Remediation in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaune, P.; Scanlon, B.; Reedy, R.; Schwartz, R.; Baumhardt, L.; Gregory, L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen in groundwater, more specifically nitrate, is common in certain areas and is often associated with agricultural production or urban areas underlain by coarse soils. While the presence of nitrates in groundwater is not debated, the specific...

  18. Paleomagnetic results from the Snake River Plain: Contribution to the time-averaged field global database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauxe, Lisa; Luskin, C; Selkin, P; Gans, P; Calvert, A

    2004-01-01

    of the eastern Snake River plain, Idaho, Memoir- Geol. Soc.et al. : Paleomagnetism of Snake River Plain Tauxe, L. , C.geology of the eastern Snake river plain Idaho, Guidebook to

  19. Factors influencing the road mortality of snakes on the Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochimsen, Denim M.

    2005-01-01

    loop on the upper Snake River Plain in southeastern Idahoof snakes on the upper Snake River Plain; (2) measure anyedge of the upper Snake River Plain located in southeastern

  20. Implications of Nutritional Potential of Anadromous Fish Resources of the Western Snake River Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plew, Mark G.

    1983-01-01

    Fishing on the Western Snake River Plain. Paper presented atResources of the Western Snake River Plain^ MARK G. PLEW HEon the western Snake River Plain, are energy expenditures of

  1. Henrikson: Prehistoric Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeological Investigations at Bobcat Cave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1997-01-01

    Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeologicaland Owl Cave on the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Reported toresponses to it in the Snake River Plain re- gion. This

  2. FLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    methodology is introduced for incorporating the risk of icejams into flood-plain delineations in northern in the computation of annual maximum flood elevation distributions and flood risk in icejam prone regionsFLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS By Richard M. Vogel,1 S. M. ASCE and Jery R

  3. Quantum Entanglement at High Temperatures? II. Bosonic Systems in Nonequilibrium Steady State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen-Tsung Hsiang; B. L. Hu

    2015-03-12

    This is the second of a series of three papers examining how viable it is for entanglement to be sustained at high temperatures for quantum systems in thermal equilibrium (Case A), in nonequilibrium (Case B) and in nonequilibrium steady state conditions (Case C). The system we analyze here consists of two coupled quantum harmonic oscillators each interacting with its own bath described by a scalar field, set at temperatures $T_1 > T_2$. For \\textit{constant bilinear inter-oscillator coupling} studied here (Case C1) owing to the Gaussian nature, the problem can be solved exactly at arbitrary temperatures even for strong coupling. We find that the valid entanglement criterion in general is not a function of the bath temperature difference, in contrast to thermal transport in the same NESS setting [1]. Thus lowering the temperature of one of the thermal baths does not necessarily help to safeguard the entanglement between the oscillators. Indeed, quantum entanglement will disappear if any one of the thermal baths has a temperature higher than the critical temperature $T_c$. With the Langevin equations derived we give a full display of how entanglement dynamics in this system depends on $T_{1}$, $T_{2}$ , the inter-oscillator coupling and the system-bath coupling strengths. For weak oscillator-bath coupling the critical temperature $T_c$ is about the order of the inverse oscillator frequency, but for strong oscillator-bath coupling it will depend on the bath cutoff frequency. We conclude that in most realistic circumstances, for bosonic systems in NESS with constant bilinear coupling, `hot entanglement' is largely a fiction. In Paper III we will examine the case (C2) of \\textit{time-dependent driven coupling } which contains the parametric pumping type described in [2] wherein entanglement was first shown to sustain at high temperatures.

  4. Quantum Entanglement at High Temperatures? II. Bosonic Systems in Nonequilibrium Steady State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of a series of three papers examining how viable it is for entanglement to be sustained at high temperatures for quantum systems in thermal equilibrium (Case A), in nonequilibrium (Case B) and in nonequilibrium steady state conditions (Case C). The system we analyze here consists of two coupled quantum harmonic oscillators each interacting with its own bath described by a scalar field, set at temperatures $T_1 > T_2$. For \\textit{constant bilinear inter-oscillator coupling} studied here (Case C1) owing to the Gaussian nature, the problem can be solved exactly at arbitrary temperatures even for strong coupling. We find that the valid entanglement criterion in general is not a function of the bath temperature difference, in contrast to thermal transport in the same NESS setting [1]. Thus lowering the temperature of one of the thermal baths does not necessarily help to safeguard the entanglement between the oscillators. Indeed, quantum entanglement will disappear if any one of the thermal bath...

  5. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

  6. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silas R. Beane; William Detmold; Thomas C Luu; Kostas Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin J. Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-05-04

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the $\\Xi^0\\Xi^0 n$ system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}= 3877.9\\pm 6.9\\pm 9.2\\pm3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of \\delta E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}=E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}-2M_{\\Xi^0} -M_n=4.6\\pm 5.0\\pm 7.9\\pm 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  7. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  8. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  9. Phosphorus fertilization of alfalfa on Coastal Plain soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beedy, Tracy Lyn

    2000-01-01

    Grazing tolerant varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) are being introduced to improve the quality of pastures in the southern Coastal Plain. 'Alfagraze' alfalfa was planted on eight soils near Overton, Texas to determine the P requirement...

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of the geology of the Coastal Plain is based on outcrops and geophysical data from seismic surveys of the area. The extrapolation of known geology and information from wells...

  11. Useful General Links for Information on Web 2.0 Common Craft's "Social Media in Plain English" Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .html?scp=8&sq=facebook&st=nyt Useful General Links for Technology in the Classroom The ProfHacker Blog (one://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/ Liberal Education Tomorrow blog (useful for trends in technology) http://blogs.nitle.org/ Classroom://www.intodit.com Web 2.0 Technologies: Blogs in the Classroom Common Craft "Blogs in Plain English" video (highly

  12. Plain, Asiago, Chocolate Chip, Blueberry, Cin Sugar, Cin Raisin, Sesame, Everything, Sourdough, Honey Wheat, Plain Thin, Wheat Thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Applewood Bacon and Cheddar Egg Sandwich: Plain Bagel, Egg, Bacon and Cheddar Cheese, Bacon, Ancho-Mayo, Lettuce, Tomato, Red Onion, Spinach. $6.99 Turkey BAT: Honey Wheat Bagel, Turkey, Bacon, Avocado, Roasted Tomato Sauce, Lettuce, Tomato. $6

  13. Cost of Water for Irrigation on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.; Magee, A. C.; McArthur, W. C.; Hughes, W. F.

    1952-01-01

    ......................................................................... 8.46 Using gasoline ......................................................................... 9.85 Using natural gas ...................................................................... 5.94 Industrial engines: Using butane... Engines Using Gasoline .................................................................. 21 Engines Using Natural Gas ................. .... ............................. 21 Industrial Engines...

  14. Larger Black Flour Beetle in Southern High Plains Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Nancy E.

    1 to 3 years after the piles are built. When summer heat causes the piles to heat up and dry down, mostly as cattle feed or as a composting agent, it is usually thought of as a waste product of cotton

  15. Planting Equipment and Practices for Cotton on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holckamp, E. R.; Hudspeth, E. B.; Colwick, R. F.; Ray, L. L.

    1962-01-01

    The genetic algorithm paradigm is a well-known heuristic for solving many problems in science and engineering in which candidate solutions, or “individuals”, are manipulated in ways analogous to biological evolution, to ...

  16. Percolation of Water Through Pullman Soils: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronovici, V. S.

    1971-01-01

    . S., Arland D. Schneider, and Jones. Basin recharging the Ogallala aquifer Pleistocene sediments. Proceedings, Ogallala Symposium, Texas Tech University, Lubhocl pp. 182-192. May 1970. 2. Cronin, J. G., and Myers, B. N. A summ occurrence...

  17. Production Practices for Irrigated Crops on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.; McArthur, W. C.; Magee, A. C.; Hughes, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    per acre of cotton for one irrigation on sandy soils but only .85 hour per acre on heavy soils. This saving was possible because the runs were longer and it was not necessary to re-set siphon tubes so often on heavy soils. Also, farmers on sandy... soils had more trouble from washing and from ditches breaking than was experienced on, heavy soils. Sondy Soils Two-.or l*artor Faur-rnr 1.oslsr equlpmsnt *qulpmenl TO?OI how. pel acre YO- Tm~tor Yon TVO~O. 398 48 383 33 Hand "orb Machine work...

  18. GROWING TOMATOES SUCCESSFULLY ON THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    ............................................................................................................................. 6 Plastic mulches ................................................................................................................ 12 Maintain a deep layer of organic mulch

  19. High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:Hidden Hills,Implications

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  1. Impact of High-Order Multipole Errors in the NSLS-II Quadrupoles and Sectupoles on Dynamic and Momentum Aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash,B.; Guo, W.

    2009-05-04

    Successful operation of NSLS-II requires sufficient dynamic aperture for injection, as well as momentum aperture for Touschek lifetime. We explore the dependence of momentum and dynamic aperture on higher-order multipole field errors in the quadrupoles and sextupoles. We add random and systematic multipole errors to the quadrupoles and sextupoles and compute the effect on dynamic aperture. We find that the strongest effect is at negative momentum, due to larger closed orbit excursions. Adding all the errors based on the NSLS-II specifications, we find adequate dynamic and momentum aperture.

  2. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 (Lithuania); Kulkarni, Varsha P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  3. Mixed-mode, high-cycle fatigue-crack growth thresholds in II. Quantication of crack-tip shielding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    -tip shielding J.P. Campbell, R.O. Ritchie * Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University 2000; accepted 11 May 2000 Abstract The role of crack-tip shielding in in¯uencing mixed-mode (mode I crack-tip shielding with respect to both the mode I and mode II applied loading, enabling an estimation

  4. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  5. Application of PILATUS II Detector Modules for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Bitter, Ch. Borennimann, E.F. Eikenberry, K.W. Hill, A. Ince-Chushman, S.G. Lee, J.E. Rice, and S. Scott.

    2007-07-23

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for Doppler measurements of the radial profiles of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity in tokamak plasmas is presently being developed in a collaboration between various laboratories. The spectrometer will consist of a spherically bent crystal and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector; and it will record temporally and spatially resolved X-ray line spectra from highly-charged ions. The detector must satisfy challenging requirements with respect to count rate and spatial resolution. The paper presents the results from a recent test of a PILATUS II detector module on Alcator C-Mod, which demonstrate that the PILATUS II detector modules will satisfy these requirements.

  6. Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement Organization of field the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation with regional, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  7. Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain Floodplains Gregory B. Noe for their cumulative retention of the annual river loads of nutrients or sediments. Here we report measurements of sediment accretion and associated carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus accu- mulation as sedimentation over

  8. Profitable Grain Sorghum Production in the Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, U.U.; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Boring, Emory P. III; McCoy, Norman; Weaver, Dave

    1987-01-01

    ? The Texa. A&M University System ? College Station, Texas PROFITABLE GRAIN SORGHUM PRODUCTION IN THE ROLLING PLAINS v.v. Alexander, Cloyce G. Coffman, Emory P. Boring III, Norman McCoy and Dave Weaver? Grain sorghum is grown on about 250,000 acres...

  9. Upscaling carbon fluxes over the Great Plains grasslands: Sinks and sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of net ecosystem production (NEP) to various climatic conditions across the U.S. Great Plains grasslands NEP at 250 m spatial resolution over the Great Plains from 2000 to 2008. The results showed that the Great Plains was a net sink with an averaged annual NEP of 24 ± 14 g C m-2 yr-1 , ranging from a low

  10. Flood Plain Management Services Program U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Plain Management Services Program U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG® ® People that live and work in the flood plain need to know about the flood hazard and the actions that they can take to reduce property damage and to prevent the loss of life caused by flooding. The Flood Plain Management

  11. Large-volume Rhyolite Genesis in Caldera Complexes of the Snake River Plain: Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Large-volume Rhyolite Genesis in Caldera Complexes of the Snake River Plain: Insights from-volume rhyolites in the shallow crust is an im- portant, yet enigmatic, process in the Snake River Plain and world; rhyolite; Snake River Plain, zircon *Corresponding author. E-mail: kwatts@uoregon.edu y E-mail: address

  12. Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy, Faulting.J. McGee, 2002, Origin and evolution of the western Snake River Plain: Implications from stratigraphy, and Michael McCurry, eds., Tectonic and Magmatic Evolution of the Snake River Plain Volcanic Province: Idaho

  13. Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain volcanic ridge that trends northeast across the middle of the eastern Snake River Plain, and acts Snake River Plain: the AVZ, the Big Lost Trough to the north, and the Arco-Big Southern Butte (ABSB

  14. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Electro-Optic and Infrared Signals for High Resolution Visible Images: Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of high resolution and low noise level, but they cannot reflect information about the temperature the properties of low resolution and high noise level, but IR images can reflect information about temperature variation of objects in the daytime via high-resolution EO images. The proposed novel framework

  15. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  16. SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision Instrument for In-Situ Characterization of the Size and Composition of Fine and Ultrafine Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Choi, Eric Y.; Imre, Dan G.

    2009-05-01

    The properties of aerosols depend on the size and internal compositions of the individual particles. The vast majority of atmospheric aerosols are smaller than 200 nm, yet the single particle mass spectrometers, the only instruments that can characterize the size and internal compositions of individual particles, typically detect these small particles with extremely low efficiencies. In this paper we describe a new instrument called SPLAT II that provides unparalleled sensitivity to small particles, detecting 100% of particles that are larger than 125 nm and 40% of 100 nm particles. This instrument also brings an increase by a factor of 10 in temporal resolution, sizing up to 500 particles per second and characterizing the composition of up to 100 of them. SPLAT II uses a two-laser, two-step process to evaporate the particles and generate ions, producing high quality, reproducible mass spectra of the refractive and non-refractive aerosol fractions to yield the complete compositions of individual particles. The instrument control board provides for size dependent delays for lasers’ triggers to eliminate a size dependent hit rate. The mass spectra are recorded with 14-bit vertical resolution and analyzed using custom software packages. The instrument’s high sizing resolution and sensitivity makes it possible to combine it with the differential mobility analyzer(s) and measure particle size, composition, density, dynamic shape factor, hygroscopicity, and fractal dimension.

  17. Regional Service Plan South Plains Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Plains Association of Governments

    2010-10-27

    as follows: Adult Day Activity and Health Center Lubbock Bethphage Mission South Lubbock Farwell Convalescent Center Farwell Goodwill Industries of Lubbock Lubbock Hockley County Senior Citizens? Center Levelland Special....3% +1,638,202 16.0% 15.4% 9.9% In FY2005, Citibus carried a total of 3,779,325 passengers; due in large part to high gasoline prices, FY2006 ridership increased in all services with the exception of the Texas Tech University system. The ridership...

  18. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  19. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  20. Pleasant Plains, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehemPlainsboroPlasticCalifornia:Plains, Illinois:

  1. Alluvial plains and earthquake recurrence at the Coalinga anticline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, A.B. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Payen, L.A. (Univ. of California, Riverside (USA)); Atwater, B.F.; Trumm, D.A.; Tinsley, J.C. III; Stein, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Having approached 0.5 m during the May 2 earthquake, the uplift of Quaternary deposits on the Coalinga anticline may provide evidence of the average repeat time of similar earthquakes during the recent geologic past. Stein and King (1984) estimated the average late Quaternary repeat time to be 500 to 1,500 yr from the degree of folding in the upper Pliocene and Pleistocene Tulare Formation; in addition, they estimated the average Holocene repeat time to be at least 200 to 600 yr on the basis of an alluvial-plain profile near Los Gatos Creek, whose arroyo extends across the Coalinga anticline from the synclinal Pleasant Valley into the synclinal San Joaquin Valley. In this chapter, the authors estimate an average repeat time from the stratigraphy of Holocene alluvium exposed in the walls of that arroyo. Largely deposited overbank, this alluvium reveals the approximate configuration of former alluvial plains whose present configuration over the anticline should reflect the rate of anticlinal growth. Resulting constraints on the Holocene uplift rate, though made uncertain by possible differences in the initial configuration of the alluvial plains, suggest an average repeat time of at least 200 to 1,000 yr for major (M = 6-7) Coalinga-area earthquakes during the late Holocene.

  2. Search for New Physics in High p [subscript T] Like-Sign Dilepton Events at CDF II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high p[subscript T] leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1??fb-[superscript 1]. The observed data are consistent with ...

  3. Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically Contact and Environmental Research 50 µm Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically degraded soils provides a means

  4. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-25

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb-1. The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly-charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, mH±± > 190 - 245 GeV/c2, depending on the decay mode and coupling.

  5. Supermassive black holes with high accretion rates in active galactic nuclei. II. The most luminous standard candles in the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai [Wise Observatory, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Fang [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011, Yunnan (China); Lu, Kai-Xing [Astronomy Department, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Collaboration: SEAMBH collaboration

    2014-10-01

    This is the second in a series of papers reporting on a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign to measure black hole (BH) mass in high accretion rate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The goal is to identify super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) and to use their unique properties to construct a new method for measuring cosmological distances. Based on theoretical models, the saturated bolometric luminosity of such sources is proportional to the BH mass, which can be used to obtain their distance. Here we report on five new RM measurements and show that in four of the cases, we can measure the BH mass and three of these sources are SEAMBHs. Together with the three sources from our earlier work, we now have six new sources of this type. We use a novel method based on a minimal radiation efficiency to identify nine additional SEAMBHs from earlier RM-based mass measurements. We use a Bayesian analysis to determine the parameters of the new distance expression and the method uncertainties from the observed properties of the objects in the sample. The ratio of the newly measured distances to the standard cosmological ones has a mean scatter of 0.14 dex, indicating that SEAMBHs can be use as cosmological distance probes. With their high luminosity, long period of activity, and large numbers at high redshifts, SEAMBHs have a potential to extend the cosmic distance ladder beyond the range now explored by Type Ia supernovae.

  6. Search for Extremely Metal-poor Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (II): high electron temperature objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Morales-Luis, A B; Munoz-Tunon, C; Garcia-Benito, R; Nuza, S E; Kitaura, F S

    2016-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor (XMP) galaxies are defined to have gas-phase metallicity smaller than a tenth of the solar value (12 + log[O/H] < 7.69). They are uncommon, chemically and possibly dynamically primitive, with physical conditions characteristic of earlier phases of the Universe. We search for new XMPs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in a work that complements Paper I. This time high electron temperature objects are selected; since metals are a main coolant of the gas, metal- poor objects contain high-temperature gas. Using the algorithm k-means, we classify 788677 spectra to select 1281 galaxies having particularly intense [OIII]4363 with respect to [OIII]5007, which is a proxy for high electron temperature. The metallicity of these candidates was computed using a hybrid technique consistent with the direct method, rendering 196 XMPs. A less restrictive noise constraint provides a larger set with 332 candidates. Both lists are provided in electronic format. The selected XMP sample have mean stell...

  7. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-25

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb-1. The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly-charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, mH±± > 190 - 245 GeV/c2, depending on the decay mode and coupling.

  8. Suggested Insecticides for Managing Cotton Insects in the High Plains, Rolling Plains and Trans Pecos Areas of Texas--2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siders, Kerry; Baugh, Brant A.; Sansone, Chris; Kerns, David L.

    2008-06-10

    Metaflumizone Metaflumizone 23 Inhibitors of lipid synthesis Tetronic acid derivatives Spirodiclofen, Spiromesifen 24 24A Mitochondrial complex IV electron transport inhibitors Aluminium phosphide Aluminium phosphide 24B Cyanide Cyanide 24C...

  9. Assessing the Impacts of Climate Change on Cotton Production in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modala, Naga Raghuveer

    2014-12-11

    number of droughts. Projected changes in climate are expected to further add to the uncertainty of cotton production in this region. The overall goal of this research was to study the effects of climate change on cotton yield using the CROPGRO...

  10. Oxygen pumping II: Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High Frequency CMB Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Zoltan Haiman; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2007-09-20

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift inter-galactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 micron fine structure line of OI is pumped by the ~ 1300 AA soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen, assuming metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion, and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and on the cosmic epoch when the OI pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak \\delta y_{rms} ~ 10^{-7} (roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of few nK), it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to useful constraints on the heavy element enrichment history of the IGM.

  11. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Salman; LeCompte, Tom; Marshall, Zach; Borgland, Anders; Viren, Brett; Nugent, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Bauerdick, Lothar; Finkel, Hal; Gottlieb, Steve; Hoeche, Stefan; Sheldon, Paul; Vay, Jean-Luc; Elmer, Peter; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Yanny, Brian; Calafiura, Paolo; Dart, Eli; Gutsche, Oliver; Izubuchi, Taku; Lyon, Adam; Petravick, Don

    2015-01-01

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  12. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman Habib; Robert Roser; Tom LeCompte; Zach Marshall; Anders Borgland; Brett Viren; Peter Nugent; Makoto Asai; Lothar Bauerdick; Hal Finkel; Steve Gottlieb; Stefan Hoeche; Paul Sheldon; Jean-Luc Vay; Peter Elmer; Michael Kirby; Simon Patton; Maxim Potekhin; Brian Yanny; Paolo Calafiura; Eli Dart; Oliver Gutsche; Taku Izubuchi; Adam Lyon; Don Petravick

    2015-10-29

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  13. Populations of high-luminosity density-bounded H II regions in spiral galaxies? Evidence and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Beckman; M. Rozas; A. Zurita; R. A. Watson; J. H. Knapen

    2000-03-23

    (Abridged) We present evidence that the HII regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the H\\alpha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of HII regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity (L_ Str), L_H\\alpha = L_Str = 10^38.6 (\\pm 10^0.1) erg/s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for L_H\\alpha> L_Str. This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at L_H\\alpha = L_Str marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is presented. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. We estimate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to ionize the diffuse medium, but to cause a typical spiral to emit significant ionizing flux into the intergalactic medium. The low scatter observed in L_Str, less than 0.1 mag rms in the still quite small sample measured to date, is an invitation to widen the data base, and to calibrate against primary standards, with the aim of obtaining a precise standard candle.

  14. Garden Plain, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy Resources Jump to:Garden Acres,Grove,Plain, Kansas:

  15. Plain City, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem BiomassMassachusetts:Piute County,PlacerPlain

  16. North Plains, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source History ViewLittlePerry, Ohio:North Plains,

  17. City of West Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation,Vineland, NewCity of Weimar, TexasPlains,

  18. West Plains Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)VosslohWest Plains Electric Coop Inc Place: North

  19. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of EnergyPlain

  20. Plain Language Compliance Report (2015) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) Plain Language

  1. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard) solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report also discusses plant performance, operations and maintenance, development, and facility cost estimate and economic analysis.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  4. Great Plains ASPEN model development: Phosam section. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, S.S.; Kirman, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    An ASPEN model has been developed of the PHOSAM Section, Section 4600, of the Great Plains Gasification Plant. The bases for this model are the process description given in Section 6.18 of the Great Plains Project Management Plan and the Lummus Phosam Schematic Process Flow Diagram, Dwg. No. SKD-7102-IM-O. The ASPEN model that has been developed contains the complete set of components that are assumed to be in the gasifier effluent. The model is primarily a flowsheet simulation that will give the material and energy balance and equipment duties for a given set of process conditions. The model is unable to predict fully changes in process conditions that would result from load changes on equipment of fixed sizes, such as a rating model would predict. The model can be used to simulate the steady-state operation of the plant at or near design conditions or to design other PHOSAM units. Because of the limited amount of process information that was available, several major process assumptions had to be made in the development of the flowsheet model. Patent literature was consulted to establish the ammonia concentration in the circulating fluid. Case studies were made with the ammonia content of the feed 25% higher and 25% lower than the base feed. Results of these runs show slightly lower recoveries of ammonia with less ammonia in the feed. As expected, the duties of the Stripper and Fractionator reboilers were higher with more ammonia in the feed. 63 references.

  5. sessions II and High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    certification. 20 Upper Division Biology Credits 07/11 MATH 95 Introductory Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT 20 SAT 500 MPT 12 UNLV Chemistry; MATH 127 Precalculus I Math Placement Testing ACT 25 SAT 560 MPT 26 MATH 181 Calculus I Math Placement

  6. Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains Jennifer M and discharge relationship for turbulent flows over vegetated flood plains. The model is based on the turbulent sites. The model estimates of the flood flow discharges from a natural site are compared to observed

  7. Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi- nated, the North Caro- lina State University Herbarium. 1 Department of Botany, North Carolina State University.S.A. WINTER KEYS TO COMMON, WETLAND TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL PLAIN JON M

  8. Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes of enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes online xxxx Keywords: Iodine Groundwater Spatial patterns Hydrogeochemistry North China Plain The North/L) and low-iodine (b10 g/L) groundwater regions that frequently result in iodine excess or deficien- cy

  9. Population Dynamics of Plain Chachalacas in the Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandaria, Adan G.

    2011-02-22

    National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, Texas, 2004?????????????.. 4 2 Seasonal survival for radio-tagged plain chachalacas by sex and season (breeding, December?March; nesting, April?July), Santa Ana... National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, Texas, 2004....................................... 8 3 Seasonal ranges (95% probability area) and core areas (50% probability area) for radio-tagged plain chachalacas by sex...

  10. A REANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STRONG WESTERLIES AND PRECIPITATION IN THE GREAT PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    precipitation patterns has been used to explain past drought events in the Great Plains and Midwest of North widespread drought in the Great Plains and Midwest, consistent with the hypothesis of stronger westerlies droughts of the Colorado front range (Muhs, 1985), and early to mid-Holocene aridity of the Upper Midwest

  11. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  12. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  13. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  14. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

  15. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore »(prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  16. Exotic physics: search for new physics leading to high mass tau pairs with ppbar collisions at 1.96 tev using cdf ii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-14

    We present the results of a search for anomalous resonant production of tau lepton pairs with large invariant mass, the first such search using the CDF II Detector in Run II of the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Such anomalous production could arise from various new physics processes. In a data sample corresponding to 195 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity we predict 2.8 {+-} 0.5 events from Standard Model background processes and observe 4. We use this result to set limits on the production of heavy scalar and vector particles decaying to tau lepton pairs.

  17. Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in NDCX-II experiments and high-gain heavy ion direct drive target designs using proven hydro codes like HYDRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J. J.; Hay, M. J.; Logan, B. G.; Ng, S. F.; Perkins, L. J.; Veitzer, S.; Yu, S. S.

    2010-07-01

    The simulations provided in this milestone have solidified the theoretical underpinning of direct drive targets and also the ability to design experiments on NDCX II that will enhance our understanding of ion-beam hydrodynamic coupling, and thus be relevant to IFE. For the case of the IFE targets, we have studied hydro and implosion efficiency using HYDRA in ID, a starting point towards the goal of polar direct drive in geometry compatible with liquid wall chambers. Recent analysis of direct drive fusion energy targets using heavy ion beams has found high coupling efficiency of ion beam energy into implosion energy. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the ion energy must increase during the pulse in order to penetrate the outflowing ablated material, and deposit the energy close enough to the fuel so that the fuel achieves sufficient implosion velocity. We have computationally explored ID (radial) time dependent models of ion driven direct drive capsule implosions using the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) code HYDRA, to help validate the theoretical analysis done so far, particularly exploring the effects of varying the ion energy and ion current over the course of the pulse. On NDCX II, experiments have been proposed to explore issues of ion penetration of the outflowing plasma over the course of the ion pulse. One possibility is to create a first pulse of ions that heats a planar target, and produces an outflow of material. A second pulse, {approx}10 ns after the first, of higher ion energy (and hence larger projected range) will interact with this outflow before reaching and further heating the target. We have investigated whether the change in range can be tailored to match the evolution of the ablation front. We have carried out simulations using the one-dimensional hydrodynamic code DISH and HYDRA to set parameters for this class of experiments. DISH was upgraded with an ion deposition algorithm, and we have carried out ID (planar) simulations. HYDRA was also used for ID (planar) and 2D (r,z) simulations of potential experiments. We have also explored whether similar physics could be studied using an energy ramp (i.e., a velocity tilt) rather than two separate pulses. We have shown that an optimum occurs in the macropulse duration (with fixed velocity tilt) that maximizes the shock strength. In the area of IFE target design we have continued to explore direct drive targets composed of deuterium-tritium fuel and ablator layers. We have extended our previous target designs at 0.44 MJ drive energy, gain 50, (50 MeV foot, 500 MeV main pulse, Rb ion, which requires a large number of beams due to a high beam space charge constraint) to a power plant scale 3.7 MJ drive energy, gain {approx}150 (220 MeV foot, 2.2 GeV main pulse, Hg ion) that eases requirements on the accelerator. We have studied the effects of two important design choices on ICF target performance. We have shown that increasing the number of foot pulses may reduce the target's in-flight adiabat and consequently improve its compressibility and fusion yield. As in the case of laser drive, the first three shocks are the most important to the target's performance, with additional shocks contributing only marginally to compression and burn. We have also demonstrated that ion range lengthening during the main pulse can further reduce the target adiabat and improve the efficiency with which beam energy is coupled into the target. (Ion range lengthening using two different kinetic energies for the foot and main pulse has previously proven effective in the design of high gain targets).

  18. Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Andrea Lee

    2000-01-01

    Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

  19. ESMN Solar Magnetism ESMN Pages --Plain Text Copy August 13, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    1 European Network ESMN Solar Magnetism ESMN Pages -- Plain Text Copy ­ August 13, 2011 http . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Structure and dynamics of solar surface fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.3 Topology and evolution of solar active regions

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709® Fabrics: A Parametric Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, Sireesha

    2011-10-21

    The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709® plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

  1. Environmental and Pedogenic Change in the Central Great Plains from the Middle Wisconsinan to the Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willey, Karen Lynn

    2009-07-30

    During the middle Wisconsinan, the Gilman Canyon Formation (GCF), consisting of three loess units and three soils, formed on the loess plateaus of the central Great Plains about 40-25 ka. Stable carbon isotope analysis of ...

  2. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  3. An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Marshall Conrad

    1977-01-01

    of daily mean precipitation amounts and Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) profiles with number of stations reporting dust for February- May 1974 in four regions of the Southern Great Plains 43 Contoured frequency graph depicting the comparison... of monthly dust observations with time of day of occurrence, Contours are labeled in number of. observations and the data base includes 5056 dust reports from 34 Southern Great Plains stations during February-May 1966-1975 . . . . . . . . . . . 46 20...

  4. A new look at geothermal energy potential of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.P.; Faulder, D.D.; Jackson, S.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (USA)); Hackett, W.R. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Passage of the Yellowstone plume beneath the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) left a wake of silicic batholiths and associated 4 to 6 Ma rhyolitic tuffs, a 1 km thick sequence of post 4 Ma basalt lava flows, and high heat flow comparable to that of the Basin-and-Range province. U.S.G.S. (United States Geological Survey) Circular 790 estimates that accessible resources are one-third larger than those of the Cascades, but geothermal exploration and research activities on the ESRP have quietly perished. The authors believe that the ESRP merits further attention as a geothermal exploration target. In this article, the first of several by their group, they identify relevant geological and geophysical features of the ESRP, the first step toward a meaningful exploration strategy. Although exploration is hindered by the heat-sapping effects of the overlying SRP aquifer, several geological features of the ESRP suggest that viable exploration targets exist beneath the aquifer: (1) the fracture zones of buried, Neogene silicic calderas; (2) Quaternary basaltic rift zones (several NW-trending ones and an axial one), which have been persistent zones of fissuring, minor faulting, and magma transport; (3) high-angle faults and fractures around the margin of the downwarped ESRP, including NW-trending basin-and-range faults and NE-trending marginal faults; and (4) fractured or brecciated zones near Pleistocene rhyolite domes and silicic intrusions. Existing geophysical data also constrain exploration targets. Aeromagnetic surveys show NW-trending highs that intersect a NE-trending axial high; rhyolite domes and youthful basaltic volcanism are localized along the highs and at intersections. Although the ESRP is remarkably aseismic, recently installed local seismic networks have identified contemporary microearthquakes that could preserve fracture permeability to depths of several kilometers.

  5. Copper(II) imidazolate frameworks as highly efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingtian; Luo, Deliang; Yang, Chengju; He, Shiman; Chen, Shangchao; Lin, Jiawei; Zhu, Li; Li, Xin, E-mail: xinliscau@yahoo.com

    2013-07-15

    Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were synthesized by a hydrothermal (or precipitation) reaction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG). Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activities of the samples for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol and degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation were also investigated. The results show that the as-prepared samples exhibit better photocatalytic activities for the reduction of carbon dioxide into methanol with water and degradation of MB under visible light irradiation. The orthorhombic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap of 2.49 eV and green (G) color has the best photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol, 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h, which is about three times as large as that of monoclinic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap 2.70 eV and blue (J) color. The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts fitted well to the apparent first-order rate equation and the apparent rate constants for the degradation of MB over G, J and P (with pink color) are 0.0038, 0.0013 and 0.0016 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The synergistic effects of smallest band gap and orthorhombic crystal phase structure are the critical factors for the better photocatalytic activities of G. Moreover, three frameworks can also be stable up to 250 °C. The investigation of Cu-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks maybe provide a design strategy for a new class of photocatalysts applied in degradation of contaminations, reduction of CO{sub 2}, and even water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light. - Graphical abstract: Carbon dioxide was reduced into methanol with water over copper(II) imidazolate frameworks under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were first applied in the photo-reduction of CO{sub 2}. • The photocatalytic activities of the frameworks depend on their band gap and phase structures. • The photocatalytic activity of orthorhombic frameworks is 3 times that of monoclinic frameworks. • The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts followed the first-order rate equation. • The largest yield for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol on green framworks was 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h.

  6. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  7. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  8. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries ServiceFuel EnergyCouncil

  9. Cyclogenesis and the low-level jet over the southern Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladwig, David Scott

    1980-01-01

    cyclone mov. 'ng through the The citations on the following pages follow +he style of the Journal cif ~A o'. i ed Meteorology . Great Plains. This model included a moist tongue coincident with a LLJ. A number of authors have discussed the advection... is that of the fully developed cyclone moving through the Great Plains and described in Newton's (1967) model. This model in- corporates those characteristics found in nearly every case of cyclo- genesis during the per', od of this study. Initially, a pola, air...

  10. Onset of deep drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    plains (Argentina) M. L. Amdan,1 R. Aragon,2,3 E. G. Jobbagy,3 J. N. Volante,4 and J. M. Paruelo1-fed agriculture and pasture, with different age of clearance (>30 years, 20 and 3 years) in Salta, Argentina, we drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina

  11. Failure Criterion for Two-Ply Plain-Weave CFRP Laminates H.M.Y.C. Mallikarachchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    -ply plain-weave lami- nates of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The criterion is formulated in terms of six-strain-energy composite deployable booms with tape-spring hinges made from a two-ply laminate of plain weave carbon fiber in the distribution and arrangement of the fibers that are responsible for stress concen- trations. These effects

  12. Plain Language Disclosure for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Plain Language Disclosure for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans William D. Ford Subsidized Loan and/or Direct Unsubsidized Loan to help cover the costs of your education. This Plain to separate loans made under the MPN depending on whether the loan is subsidized or unsubsidized, when

  13. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

  14. Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New Mexico, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New stratigraphy; Coal; Maceral analysis; Microlithotype Abstract The Campanian rocks of the Mesa Verde Group units, i.e. intermediate term cycles. The continental facies consist of coastal-plain deposits (coals

  15. Evaluation of ECMWF cloud type simulations at the ARM Southern Great Plains site using a new cloud type climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of ECMWF cloud type simulations at the ARM Southern Great Plains site using a new cloud; accepted 13 December 2006; published 3 February 2007. [1] A new method to derive a cloud type climatology is applied to cloud observations over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM

  16. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research facility in Oklahoma are used to develop detailed cloud climatology. Clouds

  17. Section II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistanceand Governmentm D m r ecmsw ' bNucleon Exchange

  18. II6^

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch8 IEEE TRANSACTIONS

  19. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Line project. The project would include an overhead 600-kilovolt (kv) high voltage, direct current electric transmission system and associated facilities with the capacity to...

  20. EIS-0486: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project. The proposed project would include an overhead 600 kilovolt (kV) high voltage direct current (HVDC) electric transmission system and associated facilities with the...

  1. Notice of Availability of Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    converter stations in Oklahoma and Tennessee; an approximately 720-mile high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line; an alternating current (AC) collection system;...

  2. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  3. Social relationships and reproductive state influence leadership roles in movements of plains zebra, Equus burchellii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    Social relationships and reproductive state influence leadership roles in movements of plains zebra 2007; MS. number: A10511) In animal groups, collective movements emerge from individual interactions that movement initiation in unstable groups depends on individual state at the time of the decision. We

  4. North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the world floristic inventory of a North Carolina savanna: Big Savannah (Pender Co.) (Shelingoski et al. 2005 & Shunk (1928), AK thanks: Donna Wright (North Carolina State University) for thoughtful discussions

  5. Referenceable Numbering for Plain TEX A Macro Package by Russell Lyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Russell

    Referenceable Numbering for Plain TEX A Macro Package with contributions from Oded Schramm Referencing Objects This package is called Ref.macros. Everything you number can be given a lab* *el, which can consist of numbers, letters, and symbols. The label must

  6. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  7. A shallow seismic reflection survey in basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1990-06-01

    recorded along a 500 m long line over a basalt, rhyolite, and sedimentary sequence in the Snake River Plain. Some shallow reflections at 40 to 50 ms on the field files are of exceptional quality with frequency exceeding 150 Hz. Reflections and refractions...

  8. The role of herbivores in Great Plains conservation: comparative ecology of bison and cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    The role of herbivores in Great Plains conservation: comparative ecology of bison and cattle BRADY with significant influence from bison (Bison bison), but is presently dominated by cattle (Bos taurus). While to study and compare the grazing behavior and effects of bison and cattle within grassland ecosystems

  9. NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN SOILS UNDER CONSERVATION-TILLED VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN SOILS UNDER CONSERVATION-TILLED VEGETABLE PRODUCTION G.D. Hoyt1 , D.C. Sanders2 , J.T. D.R. Decoteau3 , ABSTRACT Movement of soil nitrates by leaching. This study measured soil nitrate-N with depth at planting and after cucumber harvest at Clinton, NC, Florence

  10. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  11. College of Human Sciences FY2014 Research Abstracts Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alliance Oklahoma State University is a member institution in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance, a partnership of 20 public university members providing access to educational and maintenance of the alliance. Alliance membership is a selective process that engages institutional leadership

  12. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  13. Great Plains ASPEN model development: executive summary. Final topical report for Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinard, I.H.; Stern, S.S.; Millman, M.C.; Schwint, K.J.; Benjamin, B.W.; Kirman, J.J.; Dweck, J.S.; Mendelson, M.A.

    1986-07-25

    The Scientific Design Company contracted with the United States Department of Energy through its Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a steady-state simulation model of the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant. This plant produces substitute natural gas from North Dakota lignite. The model was to be developed using the ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) simulation program. The project was divided into the following tasks: (1) Development of a simplified overall model of the process to be used for a sensitivity analysis to guide the development of more rigorous section models. (2) Review and evaluation of existing rigorous moving-bed gasifier models leading to a recommendation of one to be used to model the Great Plains gasifiers. Adaption and incorporation of this model into ASPEN. (3) Review of the accuracy and completeness of the physical properties data and models provided by ASPEN that are required to characterize the Great Plains plant. Rectification of inaccurate or incomplete data. (4) Development of rigorous ASPEN models for critical unit operations and sections of the plant. (5) Evaluation of the accuracy of the ASPEN Cost Estimation and Evaluation System and upgrading where feasible. Development of a preliminary cost estimate for the Great Plains plant. (6) Validation of the simulation models developed in the course of this project. Determination of model sensitivity to variations of technical and economic parameters. (7) Documentation of all work performed in the course of this project. Essentially all of these tasks were completed successfully. 34 figs.

  14. SINGLE-PHASE LIQUID HEAT TRANSFER IN PLAIN AND ENHANCED MICROCHANNELS Mark E. Steinke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    SINGLE-PHASE LIQUID HEAT TRANSFER IN PLAIN AND ENHANCED MICROCHANNELS Mark E. Steinke Systems upon the understanding of the fundamental heat transfer processes that occur in these systems. There have been great advancements in our understanding of the heat transfer and fluid flow mechanisms

  15. Evidence of enhanced precipitation due to irrigation over the Great Plains of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Evidence of enhanced precipitation due to irrigation over the Great Plains of the United States of the local hydrological cycle has enhanced the regional precipitation. We examined station and gridded precipitation observations for the warm season months over and downwind of the Ogallala over the 20th century

  16. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Design Options for Locating Ducts...

  17. Potassium in Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils: II. Crop Responses and Changes in Soil Potassium Under Intensive Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    on the two sandier soils. In the zero K plots, dilute double acid-extractable K concentrations ranged from 56 soil texture and the quantity of water that percolates through the soil profile (Bertsch and Thomas the land in the grain when modern picker-shellers are used for harvest (Welch and Flannery, 1985

  18. American Indian Women of the Plains and Northern Woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlmann, Annette

    1992-04-01

    by a short paragraph of quantitative data documenting American Indian poverty, health problems, high rates of alcoholism, and high birth rates. Only two, Kammeyer et, ale (1990) and Vander Zanden (1990) explore the continued exploitation of natural... and harvesting, dominated by women, as on hunting and warfare. They lived in 3 Mid-American Review ofSociology predominantly sedentary, economically autonomous, villages where women producedample food surplus. They not only owned the products of their labor...

  19. Dryland Winter Wheat and Grain Sorghum Cropping Systems: Northern High Plains of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Paul W.

    1972-01-01

    -RF and T47F systems, respectively. hfult.iple linear regression analvsis (Ezekiel and Fox, 1959)-was used to establish relationships between available soil water at seeding, growing seayon precipi- tation and wheat grain yields. For this analysis... at seedins for the CS and TVSF-RF systems were sim- ilar during the 1967-70 period, and yields also were similar for the two systems. The yield increases due to additional stored water at seeding were in the range reported by Bond, Army and Lehman (1964...

  20. Movement Restriction Implications on Potential Welfare Slaughter for Texas High Plains Feedlots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galli, Monica

    2012-02-14

    the total cost of each strategy. This study examined direct disease management costs (indemnity payments, feed costs, marketing costs, surveillance costs, cleaning and disinfecting costs, appraisal cost, euthanasia costs, and disposal costs). Overall...

  1. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  2. Information Basic to Farm Adjustments in the High Plains Cotton Area of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibodeaux, B. H. (Ben Hur); Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs)

    1944-01-01

    of which are dependent upon many of the same practices. The close relationship between soil and moisture conserva- tion is indicated by the fact that wind erosion control is more difficult when soils are dry than when soil moisture is plentiful.... This is particu- larly true when the ground has little or no vegetative cover. Since wind erosion causes the loss of fertile top soil and also loss of stand of young crops, its control is important both from the long-time standpoint of fertility maintenance...

  3. Response surfaces of vulnerability to climate change: the Colorado River Basin, the High Plains, and California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    more likely to experience water shortages (Barnett et al. 2004; Barnett and Pierce 2008, 2009; Cayan et has not fully provided water security across the Southwest (Barnett and Pierce 2008), as the annual

  4. Some Economic Effects of Adjusting to a Changing Water Supply, Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, William F.; Magee, A. C.

    1960-01-01

    Approximately 136,000 refuse trucks were in operation in the United States in 2007. These trucks burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of greenhouse gases. In ...

  5. Property Rights and Groundwater Management in the High Plains Aquifer1 Lisa Pfeiffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    Professor Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics University of California at Davis One Shields Avenue Davis, California 95616 Email: cclin@primal.ucdavis.edu Phone: 530-752-0824 Abstract In western 1 We thank Jeffrey Peterson, Bill Golden and Nathan Hendricks for their assistance in obtaining

  6. Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    , with very little recharge; i.e., less than 1/2 inch per acre of surface area per year (Hughes and Harman). This means continued pumping will result in declining water levels and eventually economic exhaustion of the aquifer. As the water level decreases...

  7. Farmers' Attitudes Toward All-Risk Crop Insurance High Plains of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, John; Wehrly, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    - , Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant All Average age 53.9 41.7 45.4 46.1 56.3 38.0 44.3 43.6 54.4 40.6 45.2 45.6 54.7: 40.2 44.8 Average size family3.1 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.0 4.0 3.7 3 3.1 4.0 3... Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant Total Owner Tenant tenant All fanners Yes 80 88 60 80 67 78 77 76 79 79 66 76 76: 82 70 76 No 13 8 20 12 22 13 17 16 14 17 17 16 161 12 17 15 Not wheat 7 10 4 11 9 6 7 17 6 838 6...

  8. Depositonal and Paleoclimatic Evolution of the Cenozoic High Plains Succession from Core: Haskell Co., Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harlow, R. Hunter

    2013-12-31

    model for the HPS. From vertical sequence stratigraphic analysis, 99 individual fluvial aggradational cycles (FACs), 10 FAC-sets, and three fluvial sequences (FS) are identified. The considerable distance from the Cenozoic paleoshoreline (well over 900...

  9. Economics of Mechanical Cotton Harvesting in the High Plains Cotton Area of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Ralph H.; Morgan, Quevedo Martin; Williamson, M. N. (Marion Newton)

    1951-01-01

    339 125 1949 Yield Lbs. 224 58 480 121 - Loss ------ Pct. 9 10 6 8 - Yield Lbs. 309 8 7 502 157 - Loss Pct. 4 6 4 7 14 BULLETIN 735. TEXAS AGKICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION In addition to the setting of the machine... workday was 1 hour longer'than in 1947. Average Costs for Machine Harvesting Average costs for mechanical cotton strippers, compiled from information supplied by stripper owners, are presented in Table 7. These costs consist of operating and overhead...

  10. An Economic Study of Farm Organization and Operation in the High Plains Cotton Area of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C.A.; Thibodeaux, B. H.; Magee, A.C.

    1939-01-01

    , the first of a series, contains a description of the agriculture and agricultural resources of the area and an analysis of variations in farm earnings during the period of the study. Later pl~blications will pertain to farm credit and to agricultural... adjustments in the area. The number of farms studied each year ranged from 127 to 141, or an average of 137. The average operator's earnings per farm amounted to $223 in 1931, $124 in 1932, $1,808 in 1933, $254 in 1934, and $980 in 1935. These year...

  11. COMPARISON OF PICKER AND STRIPPER HARVESTERS ON IRRIGATED COTTON ON THE HIGH PLAINS OF TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, William B.

    2010-01-16

    Selected paired-sample t-test results of 2007 carded-and-combed yarn analysis ......................................................................................... 78 Table 29 Regression analysis for CSP from fiber properties...

  12. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14

    -Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. Cn – Constant in the Penman-Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. ea – Actual vapor pressure. Units: kPa es – Saturation vapor... automated weather stations. The Saturation vapor pressure, es, was calculated based on daily minimum and maximum 26 temperatures. Actual vapor pressure, ea, for the Penman-Monteith method was calculated using the daily minimum and maximum relative...

  13. Economies of Size on Irrigated Cotton Farms of the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, J. Patrick; Davis, Bob

    1965-01-01

    produce almost $60,000 gross income on a 440-acre farm. Net profit, or return to the operator's management, would be $17,400. This profit is over and above a return to the operator's labor ($2,569) and interest on his equity in the investment...,000 acres. These sizes are attainable within the family type of business, where the management and most of the labor is supplied by the family rather than hired workers. The average sized farm family can supply most of the labor for an irrigated cotton...

  14. Cotton hedging strategies using prices for Texas High Plains and Rio Grande Valley areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John V

    1979-01-01

    as futures prices fall). The technical strategies were designed to be dynamic in nature i. e. , entering and leaving the futures market as conditions dictated. These strategies consisted of different combinations of short and lory moving averages of daily... prices. A four day weighted average in . " 'or was used in conjunction with selected average systems. The results of each hedging strategy were compared with the re- sults of the cash-market-only strategies. The cash strategies were (a) to sell...

  15. Modeling Economic Resilience and Animal Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hen-I

    2012-02-14

    to utilize a combined epidemic and economic modeling framework to evaluate animal disease management strategies which can be used to reduce the potential losses in an unusual event such as FMD outbreaks. In this study, we compare the welfare changes among...

  16. Changes in Investment and Irrigation Water Costs, Texas High Plains, 1950-54. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, A. C.; Hughes, William F.

    1956-01-01

    1949-7.4 13.1 Farms ma!ring capital improvements. 1950-54 82.6 86.9 Additional wells only 19.9 11.9 Distribution systems onlyi 8.1 2.2 Wells and distribution systems' 23.3 7.6 Lowering pumps only 8.1 21.7 Lowering pumps + additional wells 8.1 19....5 Lowering pumps + distribution systems4 4.6 14.2 Lowering pumps + additional wells and distribution systemst 10.5 9.8 10.2 - - 'Number of irrigated farms in sample. 177 (sandy-land area, 86: heavv land area. 91). 'Exclusive of Lynn and Terry counties...

  17. Stochastic analysis of selected hedging strategies for cotton in the Texas Southern High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Willis A.

    2013-02-22

    market they should hedge their commodity. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze alternative marketing strategies in both the futures and options markets. A simulation model was developed to simulate weekly cash and future prices and option premiums...

  18. Impact of New Irrigation Technology on the Texas High Plains: 1980-2020 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    based upon representative counties showed the similarities and differences of response given particular resource endowments, technological options and price situations. Part of the analysis considers the impact of annual qroundwater withdrawal...

  19. Fiber Characteristics and Spinning Performance of Mechanically-Stripped Cotton on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulson, W. E.; Hessler, L. E.; Ward, J. M.

    1953-01-01

    of the 1949 and 1951 crops were on -3 cotton machine-stripped after frost. The samples of the 1 crop also included cotton hand-pulled before frost. All samples of the 1949 crop and 60 percent of those of the crop were from field-stored machine...-stripped seed cotton. samples were obtained at or near the time of ginning n storage stocks. Hand pulling of cotton before frost is more selective and ~nc~udes only the more mature bolls. Stripping after frost is the kind of mechanical harvesting done...

  20. A Model for Estimating Demand for Irrigation Water on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.; Sprott, J. M.; Adams, B. M.

    1975-01-01

    and soybeans. Inputs that can be evaluated include irrigation water, natural gas, diesel, nitrogen fertilizer and herbicides. The primary focus of this work was to estimate the demand for irrigation water in the study area. The model was applied using...

  1. Development of wheat marketing strategies for the Texas Northern High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Karl E

    1982-01-01

    Marketing Strategy Results Marketing Strategy Comparison 42 55 55 71 72 77 78 SUEY. REFERENCES 83 86 APPENDIX A: Selected Moving Average Combination Results 88 APPENDIX B: February and August Wheat Outlook and Situa- tion Accuracy Plots 90..., 1974-1980. Examples of Buy and Sell Signals Generated by Moving Averages. 14 May Wheat Outlook and Situation Hard Winter Wheat Forecast Beginning Stock and Actual Beginning Stock Values for Crop Years 1975-1979. 44 November Wheat Outlook...

  2. Irrigation Water Management for the Texas High Plains: A Research Summary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Jordan, Wayne R.

    1987-01-01

    and irrigation to achieve 3,000 to 6,700 pounds per acre (3,400-7,500 kg/ha) of grain sorghum yield. Dryland sorghum yields average about 1,600 pounds per acre (1,800 kg/ha), and yields up to 3,000 pounds per acre (3,400 kg/ha) are not uncommon. Peak water use...

  3. ODONATA OF PLAYAS IN THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS, TEXAS BRYAN A. REECE* AND NANCY E. MCINTYRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Nancy E.

    ~as charcas efi´meras durante algu´n estado de sus historias de vida; por ejemplo, las libe´lulas (Insecta

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ?} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ?}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  5. Chap. II : Les structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot 12 f´evrier 2009 #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es Pour de types "structur´es". #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es

  6. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sbir. The Phase II awards related to SSL are listed below: Recipient: Physical Optics Corporation (POC) Title: Highly Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Devices for General...

  7. Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in NDCX-II experiments and high-gain heavy ion direct drive target designs using proven hydro codes like HYDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    and J. Meyer-Ter- Vehn, The Physics of Inertial Fusion: BeamREPORT Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydroand J. Meyer-Ter-Vehn, The Physics o f Inertial Fusion: Beam

  8. Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in NDCX-II experiments and high-gain heavy ion direct drive target designs using proven hydro codes like HYDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in N Dtarget designs using proven hydro codes like H Y D R A . byF E targets, we have studied hydro and implosion efficiency

  9. Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

    2013-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

  10. 3D Lya radiation transfer. II. Fitting the Lyman break galaxy MS 1512-cB58 and implications for Lya emission in high-z starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaerer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Using our 3D Lya radiation transfer code, we compute the radiation transfer of Lya and UV continuum photons including dust. Observational constraints on the neutral gas (column density, kinematics, etc.) are taken from other analysis of this object. RESULTS: The observed Lya profile of MS 1512--cB58 is reproduced for the first time taking radiation transfer and all observational constraints into account. The observed absorption profile is found to result naturally from the observed amount of dust and the relatively high HI column density. Radiation transfer effects and suppresion by dust transform a strong intrinsic Lya emission with EW(Lya)>~ 60 Ang into the observed faint superposed Lya emission peak. We propose that the vast majority of LBGs have intrinsically EW(Lya)~60-80 Ang or larger, and that the main physical parameter responsible for the observed variety of Lya strengths and profiles in LBGs is N_H and the accompanying variation of the dust content. Observed EW(Lya) distributions, Lya luminosity fun...

  11. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14

    This dissertation focuses on examining the relationship between antecedent soil moisture and summer precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains (GP). The influence of Nino sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on summer precipitation ...

  12. The Shelterbelt Project: a study of tree planting on the Great Plains, 1934-1942 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilkemann, Virginia Violet

    1978-01-01

    for the Shelterbelt Project. From the beginning it was apparent that the Shelter- belt Project rested on "shaky" ground. During its lifetime the Project suffered from financial difficulties and public misunderstanding of its aims and purpose. Although it never...-108 A PRESS RELEASE 100 B A TEN-ROW SHELTERBELT DESIGN 103 D THE LENRD DISTRICT THE GREAT PLAINS REGION NEBRASKA 104 105 106 EFFECTS OF SHELTER BELTS ON WIND VELOCITY 107 LOCATION OF THE ORIGINAL SHELTERBELT ZONE 108 VITA 109 CHAPTER I...

  13. Hiding in Plain Sight: Exploiting Broadcast for Practical Host Anonymity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shue, Craig A; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2010-01-01

    Users are being tracked on the Internet more than ever before as Web sites and search engines gather pieces of information sufficient to identify and study their behavior. While many existing schemes provide strong anonymity, they are inappropriate when high bandwidth and low latency are required. In this work, we explore an anonymity scheme for end hosts whose performance makes it possible to have it always on. The scheme leverages the natural grouping of hosts in the same subnet and the universally available broadcast primitive to provide anonymity at line speeds. Our scheme is strongly resistant against all active or passive adversaries as long as they are outside the subnet. Even within the subnet, our scheme provides reasonable resistance against adversaries, providing anonymity that is suitable for common Internet applications.

  14. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538/Cancer and Leukemia Group B 30610).

  15. Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis – Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John W.; Glen, Jonathan M.; Liberty, Lee M.; Dobson, Patrick; Gasperikova, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province (SRP) overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle; it represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America. Our goals for this Phase 1 study are to: (1) adapt the methodology of Play Fairway Analysis for geothermal exploration to create a formal basis for its application to geothermal systems, (2) assemble relevant data for the SRP from publicly available and private sources, and (3) build a geothermal play fairway model for the SRP and identify the most promising plays, using software tools that are standard in the petroleum industry. The success of play fairway analysis in geothermal exploration depends critically on defining a systematic methodology that is grounded in theory (as developed within the petroleum industry over the last two decades) and within the geologic and hydrologic framework of real geothermal systems. Our preliminary assessment of the data suggests that important undiscovered geothermal resources may be located in several areas of the SRP, including the western SRP (associated with buried lineaments defined by gravity or magnetic anomalies, and capped by extensive deposits of lacustrine sediment), at lineament intersections in the central SRP (along the Banbury-Hagerman trend NW of Twin Falls, and along the northern margin of the Mt Bennett Hills-Camas Prairie area), and along the margins of the eastern SRP. Additional high temperature resources are likely associated with rhyolite domes and crypto-domes in the eastern SRP, but are masked by shallow groundwater flow leading to low upper crustal heat flow values. These blind resources may be exploitable with existing deep drilling technology. Groundwater modeling planned for later phases of the PFA project will address whether temperatures at viable producing depths are sufficient to support electricity production.

  16. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  17. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 1. Design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report discusses in detail the design of the collector system, heat transport system, thermal storage subsystem, heat transport loop, steam generation subsystem, electrical, instrumentation, and control systems, power conversion system, master control system, and balance of plant. The performance, facility cost estimate and economic analysis, and development plan are also discussed.

  18. LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS Most of the laboratory problems so far have was constant. In this set of laboratory problems, the total force acting on an object, and thus its's oscillation frequency. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  19. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations K. W. OLESON AND G. B. BONAN Climate and Global Dynamics... Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity studies and the model’s ability to simulate urban heat islands in different environments is evaluated. Findings show that heat storage and sensible heat flux are most sensitive...

  20. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  1. Don Quijote on the Plains: Harnessing Enthusiasm for the "Quijote" at the Undergraduate Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Patricia W.

    2005-03-01

    , when the light bounces off the wind turbines near Montezuma, Kansas at just the right angle, they almost resemble the traditional windmills one sees in Spain. But apart from this climatological predisposition toward wind-power, other parallels between... the plains of twenty-first-century Kansas and the seventeenth-century Spain of the Quijote are few and far between. Despite the large temporal and spatial gap between these two worlds, I am pleased to note the number of students in the upper...

  2. Two dimensional finite element analysis of homogenization and failure in plain weave textile composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondagunta, Veeraraghava Gopal

    1993-01-01

    and continuity[7]. The model is still two-dimensional and the actual three-dimension- al cross-sectional shape of the fiber bundles was not considered. The fiber undulation model could analyze the knee behavior in plain-weave composites. Ishikawa and Chou [7... is discussed. 23 III. 2 Micromechanics model for calculating fiber tow properties One of the most basic problems in the analysis of the behavior of composite materials is the prediction of effective or average macroscopic properties in terms...

  3. EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreaforInformation ECrNEPAStateEPANationalPlain English

  4. Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flexpad: Highly Flexible Bending Interactions for Projected Handheld Displays Jürgen Steimle MIT of plain paper or foam into flexible, highly deformable, and spatially aware handheld displays. We present application examples: curved cross-cuts in volumetric images, deforming virtual paper characters, and slicing

  5. PEP-II Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wienands, H.U.; Biagini, M.E.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.H.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.V.; Meyer, T.; Nelson, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Reichel, I.; Sullivan, M.; Seeman, J.T.; Turner, J.; /SLAC; Steier, C.; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-04-24

    PEP-II/BABAR are presently in their second physics run. With machine and detector performance and reliability at an all-time high, almost 51 fb{sup -1} have been integrated by BABAR up to mid-October 2001. PEP-II luminosity has reached 4.4 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and our highest monthly delivered luminosity has been above 6 pb{sup -1}, exceeding the performance parameters given in the PEP-II CDR by almost 50%. The increase compared to the first run in 2000 has been achieved by a combination of beam-current increase and beam-size decrease. In this paper we will summarize the PEP-II performance and the present limitations as well as our plans to further increase machine performance.

  6. Achieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    : rapid increase in the permeability occurred for plain concrete under stress; increasep y p ; remainedAchieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete ShihShih--Ho Chao,Ho Chao, Ph.DPh.D Assistant Professor, Department of Civil

  7. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  8. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  9. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845* Storage Systems INTERACTIONSTemperatureII:

  10. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M0572 dated 3215 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012)...

  11. In the Po Plain (Northern Italy), the natural compo-nent of subsidence can be split into: (1) a long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY In the Po Plain (Northern Italy), the natural compo- nent of subsidence can be split into subsidence rates of about 1.0 mm yr-1. Long term subsidence in the Venice area and in the Po Plain on total natu- ral subsidence rates in the area of Venice, with aver- age values of around 1.3 mm yr-1

  12. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing Building America Webinar: High Performance Space...

  13. HYDROGEN SULFIDE -HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE - HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A Foundation. ii #12;HYDROGEN SULFIDE-HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 139

  14. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694707 Plain strain soilstructure interaction model for a building supported by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    2006-01-01

    Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694­707 Plain strain soil­structure interaction, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract A simple theoretical model for soil­structure interaction in water saturated poroelastic soils is presented, developed to explore if the apparent building­foundation­soil

  15. OE Issues Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 21, 2012, DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) issued a Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project on behalf of the Department and Southwestern Power Administration

  16. Active deformation front delineated by drainage pattern analysis and vertical movement rates, southwestern Coastal Plain of Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Shan

    , southwestern Coastal Plain of Taiwan Chih-Cheng Barry Yang a,*, Wen-Shan Chen a , Leh-Chyun Wu b , Chii-Wen Lin c a Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan b Department of Geology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan c Central Geological Survey, MOEA, Taipei, Taiwan

  17. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  18. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  19. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  20. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  1. (MATH 1302) Calculus II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    (MATH 1302) MATH 1426 Calculus I MATH 2425 Calculus II MATH 2326 Calculus III IE 3312 PHYS 1443 PHYS 1444 IE 3301 EE 2440 Circuits MATH 3319 ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 (1310) (Intro) 1320 C/C++ 2312 Ass Sw Des Pat *4321 Testing *4322 Sw Mgmt (CHEM 1300) CHEM 1441 Math Placement Test / Advising (MATH

  2. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 ___________________________________ 12 7. Emissions of Individual Vehicles Vary from Test to Test ________ 15 8. Total Emissions

  3. Spontaneous CO Release from RuII(CO)2–Protein Complexes in Aqueous Solution, Cells, and Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaves-Ferreira, Miguel; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Coelho, Ana C.; Carvalho, Sandra M.; Saraiva, Lígia M.; Romão, Carlos C.; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2014-12-04

    stream_source_info Chaves_Ferreira_et_al-2015-Angewandte_Chemie_International_Edition.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 21359 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Chaves_Ferreira_et_al-2015-Angewandte_Chemie... denaturing conditions. c) ESI-MS analysis of CO release from HEWL–RuII(CO)2 at 0, 2, and 4 h in aqueous buffered solution (PBS pH 7.4). Angewandte Chemie 1173Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 1172 –1175 ? 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag Gmb...

  4. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  5. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

  6. Relativistic cyclotron resonance condition as applied to Type II interplanetary radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Relativistic cyclotron resonance condition as applied to Type II interplanetary radio emission W. M agreement in many areas including the prediction of ``Zeeman'' splitting of the Type II emission. Based on the character of the high-resolution emission spectrum, we can narrow the Type II source location to the IP

  7. 5) Management ii) Mechanical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods = manually or mechanically damaging plants #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition · Works well

  8. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  9. High Performance Computing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

  10. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  11. Seismic Behavior and Retrofit of Concrete Columns of Old R.C. Buildings Reinforced With Plain Bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marefat, M. S. [Professor, School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arani, K. Karbasi [Ph.D. Candidate, School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, S. M. Hassanzadeh; Amrollahi, A. [Graduate Student, School of Civil Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08

    Seismic rehabilitation of old buildings has been a major challenge in recent years. The first step in seismic rehabilitation is evaluation of the existing capacity and the seismic behaviour. For investigation of the seismic behaviour of RC members of a real old building in Iran which has been designed and constructed by European engineers in 1940, three half-scale column specimens reinforced with plain bars have been tested. The tests indicate significant differences between the responses of specimens reinforced by plain bars relative to those reinforced by deformed bars. A regular pattern of cracking and a relatively brittle behaviour was observed while a relatively large residual strength appeared after sudden drop of initial strength and stiffness due to slip of longitudinal bars.

  12. Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation Center by E. Kathleen Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for allowing me access to the wildlife admittance records and providing

  13. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, these cycles are strongly...

  14. Multiscalar Ecological Characterization of Say's and Eastern Phoebes and their Zone of Contact in the Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schukman, John M.; Lira-Noriega, André s; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2011-05-01

    . J. DRAPEK. 2001. Climate change effects on vegetation distribution and car- bon budget in the United States. Ecosystems 4:164–185. BRATTON, G. F., F. R. SCHAEFER, AND J. R. BRANDLE. 1995. Conser- vation forestry for sustainable Great Plains... of invasive woody plants (Coppedge et al. 2001), changes in agroforestry (Bratton et al. 1995), and anticipated shifts in response to climate change (Peterson 2003) raise the question of how the balance between the earlier-nesting East- ern Phoebe...

  15. Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Forward Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle Texas Rollin Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Martin, J. Rod

    1978-01-01

    STATION / Neville P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System 1 College Station, Texas Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Fomd Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle, B-1187 Texas Rolling Plains February 1978 Donald S. Moore... and J. Rod Martin* Agricultural producers are continually adjusting to changing marketing channels. Some farmers obviously seek these changes, while others are only later affected by the changing conditions. One example of changing marketing channels...

  16. Pleistocene and Recent environments of the Central Great Plains. Edited by Wakefield Dort, Jr., and J. Knox Jones, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1970-01-01

    , these grass­ lands occupy a region stretching from southern Canada to northern Mexico and from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the west to beyond the Mississippi River in the east. The natural setting of this vast area long has interested natural... is an unusual record preserved in a lava cave on the Snake River Plain of Idaho (Butler, 1968; Dort, 1968). Here, exca­ vations by archaeologists revealed a se­ quence of laminated silts that had been periodically augmented by windblown sediment...

  17. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  18. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  19. History of transcontinental railroads and coal mining on the Northern Plains to 1920

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryans, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    This history examines the symbiotic relationship between three transcontinental railroads-the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern-and coal mining in Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming through 1920. Throughout their dual existence, American railroads and the coal industry enjoyed a mutually beneficial association. On the Northern Plains, however, this partnership assumed new dimensions. There, the coal and rails exerted unique influences upon one another. The location of deposits determined many of the transcontinentals' early decisions, especially route selection. The native fuel also was used to promote settlement on railroad lands. Two of the roads, the Union Pacific and Northern Pacific, held land grants containing valuable deposits. The Great Northern, having no such subsidy, acquired coal lands in northern Montana. On these properties, the three railroads pioneered the region's commercial coal mining industry. Eventually, each formed subsidiaries to direct their coal operations. While much of their production supplied steam locomotives, some was sold to the public. Furthermore, the policies of the Northern Pacific and Great Northern especially enabled their coal to stimulate non-railroad enterprises. In addition, all three provided the transportation which made exploitation by others economically feasible.

  20. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  1. Recent summer droughts in Texas have made dust control in feedyards in the semi-arid High Plains far

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    the drying rate of manure on the corral surface. Then, light winds and temperature inversions in the late System. #12;example) and from truck traffic on unpaved roads, most of the dust generated in a feedyard

  2. Comparative Cost Analysis of Alternative Animal Tracing Strategies Directed Toward Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Looney, John C.

    2010-07-14

    back the subsequent infected and/or dangerous contacts with which the initial outbreak herd has been in contact. The study examines direct disease management costs (slaughter, euthanasia, disposal, surveillance, and cleaning disinfection), forgone...

  3. Seasonal Abundance of the Greenbug and its Natural Enemies in Grain Sorghum in the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teetes, George L.; Lopez, Ector G.; Schaefer, Curtis A.

    1975-01-01

    . Major predators recorded weekly were: Hippodanzia spp., Chn~sopa spp., Scyrnrzus spp., Syriphid spp. (larvae), spiders, and three hemipteran species, Orius spp., Nabis spp.. and Geocoris spp. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Greenbugs infested grain sorghum...

  4. Iron and zinc response and nutrient uptake of sorghums grown on two calcareous soils from the High Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, Hurm Dale

    1971-01-01

    . (11) suggest that Pe is absorbed at different rates by the different species from the Tulare clay which could account for the 19 differences in Fe chlorosis shown by different plant species. DeKock and. Hall (17) measured the P~Fe and Ca... and Portales soils. Sorghums grown on the Drake sandy loam soil are more chlorotic than those grown on the Portales loam soil. The Drake soil has more CaCO and. "availaole" P but 3 less total Fe and EDTA extractable Fe than the Portales soil, The Drake...

  5. Break-Even Investment in a Wind Energy Conversion System for an Irrigated Farm on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, D. C.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    costs were included. The basic LP model was applied to develop the benchmark case (i.e., without wind power). The farm operation with wind power was analyzed by applying the LP model with the monthly expectations of wind-generated electricity added...

  6. Soil-geomorphic relations of lamellae in eolian sand on the High Plains of Texas and New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    621 4734; fax: +1 520 621 2088. E-mail addresses: vthollid@email.arizona.edu (V.T. Holliday), rawlingj

  7. Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Texas Southern High Plains Cotton Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Smith, Edward G.

    1985-01-01

    owned, leased, and controlled at the end of the planning horizon for each iteration indicate the impacts 'of alternative scenarios on the rate of growth for representative farms. These three statistics provide an indication of how the farm grew either... number of acres they controlled. The 1,088-acre farm grew 470 acres (43%) over the 10 year planning horizon, while the 3,383- and 5,570-acre farms grew by 26.7% and 7.70/0, respectively. Acreage Reduction Program Imposing a 20% acreage reduction...

  8. Spatial application of a cotton growth model for analysis of site-specific irrigation in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clouse, Randy Wayne

    2007-09-17

    2k performed well compared to the other two models on tests of cumulative evapotranspiration and applied water yield relations and equal to the other models for tracking soil water profiles. A global optimization method, simulated annealing...

  9. Precision Irrigators Network: On-Farm Research Demonstration to Evaluate Irrigation Scheduling Tools in the Wintergarden and Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piccinni, Giovanni; Leskovar, Daniel; Harman, Wyatte; Marek, Thomas; Harris, B.L.

    2009-01-01

    between 0 and 50 represents wet soil and plentiful moisture conditions. Soil moisture values near 150 to 200 represents extremely dry soil moisture conditions. CroPMan Crop Evapotranspiration and Crop Simulation Models Located online at: http... involved in the Wintergarden. An additional 5 growers were involved in vegetable crop demonstrations for monitoring soil moisture, but these growers were not subject to modeling. - 11 - Data collected from on-farm research demonstrations for row...

  10. Peanut Profits and Irrigation Yield Response in the Northern Texas High Plains, A Non-Traditional Production Area. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Wyatte L.; Regier, C.; Petr, F.; Lansford, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    of irrigation. Knowledge of the most profitable timings of applica tions rela tive to physiologi cal development and yield response is important also for efficient use of water resources. Thus, the objectives of this research were to (1) assess peanut yield... development (Stansell and Pallas,. 1985; An, 1978; Reddi and Reddy, 1977). Furthermore, excessive late season irrigations or rain fall, especially on heavier soils, can decrease yields (Mantell and Goldin, 1964). Peg attachments may be weakened...

  11. Impact of Alternative Energy Prices, Tenure Arrangements and Irrigation Technologies on a Typical Texas High Plains Farm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petty, J. A.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Whitson, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    water situation, showed that a natural gas price increase from $1.50 to $2.20 per thousand cubic feet (mcf) would result in reductions in irrigation levels. Irrigation was terminated when the price of natural gas reached about $7.00 per mcf. In a shallow...

  12. Effects of the declining groundwater supply in the northern high plains of Oklahoma and Texas on community service expenditures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williford, George Herbert

    1976-01-01

    data to meet statistical criteria, all estimates of service expenditure functions are developed using a cross-sectional data sample. Linear and power model forms are applied to provide alternate estimates of community service expenditure functions... developed above using projected values of the demographic and economic variables to determine the long-term effects on expenditures levels for community public services. Study Area The study area is comprised of 25 counties of the Northern Texas...

  13. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  14. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1 ContractII

  15. PARS II TRAINING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more than 20-yearPAE EvaluationPARS II13,

  16. Questions about Cori II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and RemovalQuantumdefault Sign In About

  17. Heat flow and seismicity patterns in the vicinity of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D. Kelley, S.A.; Steele, J.L. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    New heat flow data and thermal modeling are used to calculate crustal temperatures in and adjacent to the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). The estimated crustal temperature are then used to investigate the relationship between crustal strength and the observed parabolic pattern of seismicity around the SRP. Heat flow below the SRP aquifer in deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site near the northern margin of the SRP is 107 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. Heat flow values from deep wells on both the northern and southern margins of the eastern SRP average 100 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. 2-D finite-difference thermal models were developed to fit seismic and heat flow data in the vicinity of the SRP. The models have a shallow silicic magma chamber that is as wide as the SRP. The silicic chamber is underlain by mafic heat sources in the middle to lower crust and in the upper mantle. The heat flow data are best fit by models with deep heat sources that are wider than the SRP. These results are consistent with the presence of young basaltic centers that have been observed outside the SRP. The temperature from the authors thermal models were used to calculate strength envelopes for the crust in the SRP/Basin and Range region. The weakest part of the crust is along the edge of the Basin and Range, where it is heated by the SRP; thus the boundary to the two provinces may be a zone of weak coupling. Their modeling indicates that it is difficult to explain the earthquake pattern in the vicinity of the SRP as a thermomechanical effect related to the passage of the Yellowstone hot spot.

  18. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  19. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1983-01-01

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  20. 8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brass, Stefan

    8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II References: · Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd Edition, 1999. Chap. 8, "SQL -- The Relational Database Standard" (Sect. 8.2, 8.3.3, part of 8.3.4.) · Silberschatz/Korth/Sudarshan: Database System Concepts, 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill, 1999: Chapter 4: "SQL

  1. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Buried Ducts Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried Ducts Dave Mallay, Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI),...

  2. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation Building America Webinar:...

  3. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Introduction This presentation is the Introduction to...

  4. Design Study of Belle II Interaction Region Shinya Sugihara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aihara, Hiroaki

    Design Study of Belle II Interaction Region Shinya Sugihara Department of Physics, University positron collider SuperKEKB which is designed to have a luminosity of 8 × 1035 cm-2 s-1 . To achieve this high luminosity, we have to design a new interaction region due to high background and reduced space

  5. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  6. QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342 KPTC 103 9:00 ­ 10:20 a.m. 1 Tues., Thurs. ­ Winter Quarter 2011 quantum mechanics at the graduate level. The text for Quantum Mechanics II will be J. J. Sakurai and Jim Napolitano, Modern Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, San Francisco, 2011). For supplemental

  7. II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de Septiembre 2011 Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud #12;Taller: "Elaboración de Manuscritos y Proceso Editorial en Revistas Indexadas: el Caso del: Secretaría. Departamento de Psicología de la Salud II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  9. Sist. Lin. II Aps Escalonamento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    Lineares ­ 2a Parte Paulo Goldfeld Marco Cabral Departamento de Matemática Aplicada Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 1 conjunto-solução = { } sistema inconsistente Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo

  10. Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Interpolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Unit II-5 Interpolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 2 Interpolation outside the range of values of xi use extrapolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 3 Basic ideas · given: n+1 in tabular format Unit II-5 Interpolation 4 Basis functions · n basis functions 1, 2, ... , n can be used

  11. Effectiveness of two spraying systems for bollworm suppression, canopy penetration, and drift reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John Robert Calvert

    1986-01-01

    for small droplets to drift (Wodageneh and Matthews 1981). ~AA' y. ' f CDA ~tt 1 . ft f' t CDA y y developed in Great Britain in the early 1950s by E. J. Bals (Freed 1982). Various hand held models have been successfully used in tropical countries... Effectiveness of Two Spraying Systems for Bollworm Suppression, Canopy Penetration, and Drift Reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas (May 1986) John Robert Calvert Robinson, B. S. , Texas ARM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: J. E. Slosser J. K...

  12. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  13. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern hemisphere, and elsewhere. Finally these data can be integrated into a history of climate change and predictive climate models. This is not a small undertaking. The goals of researchers and the methods used vary considerably. The primary task of this project was literature research to (1) evaluate existing methodologies used in geologic climate change studies and evidence for short-term cycles produced by these methodologies and (2) evaluate late Holocene climate patterns and their interpretations.

  14. Is Ursa Major II the Progenitor of the Orphan Stream?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellhauer, M.; Evans, N.W.; Belokurov, V.; Zucker, D.B.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.; Yanny, B.; /Fermilab; Wilkinson, M.I.; Gilmore, G.; Irwin, M.J.; Bramich, D.M.; Vidrih, S.; Hewett, Paul C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /Michigan State U.

    2006-11-01

    Prominent in the ''Field of Streams''--the Sloan Digital Sky Survey map of substructure in the Galactic halo--is an ''Orphan Stream'' without obvious progenitor. In this numerical study, we show a possible connection between the newly found dwarf satellite Ursa Major II (UMa II) and the Orphan Stream. We provide numerical simulations of the disruption of UMa II that match the observational data on the position, distance and morphology of the Orphan Stream. We predict the radial velocity of UMa II as -100kms{sup -1}, as well as the existence of strong velocity gradients along the Orphan Stream. The velocity dispersion of UMa II is expected to be high, though this can be caused both by a high dark matter content or by the presence of unbound stars in a disrupted remnant. However, the existence of a gradient in the mean radial velocity across UMa II provides a clear-cut distinction between these possibilities. The simulations support the idea that some of the anomalous, young halo globular clusters like Palomar 1 or Arp 2 or Ruprecht 106 may be physically associated with the Orphan Stream.

  15. Library of high and mid-resolution spectra in the CaII H & K, H{alpha}, H{beta}, NaI D{1}, D{2}, and HeI D{3} line regions of F, G, K and M field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Montes; E. L. Martin; M. J. Fernandez-Figueroa; M. Cornide; E. De Castro

    1996-09-30

    In this work we present spectroscopic observations centered in the spectral lines most widely used as optical indicators of chromospheric activity (H{alpha}, H{beta}, Ca II H & K, and He I D{3}) in a sample of F, G, K and M chromospherically inactive stars. The spectra have been obtained with the aim of providing a library of high and mid-resolution spectra to be used in the application of the spectral subtraction technique to obtain the active-chromosphere contribution to these lines in chromospherically active single and binary stars. This library can also be used for spectral classification purposes. A digital version with all the spectra is available via ftp and the World Wide Web (WWW) in both ASCII and FITS formats

  16. Probing Galaxy Formation with He II Cooling Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujin Yang; Ann I. Zabludoff; Romeel Davé; Daniel J. Eisenstein; Philip A. Pinto; Neal Katz; David H. Weinberg; Elizabeth J. Barton

    2005-09-01

    Using high resolution cosmological simulations, we study hydrogen and helium gravitational cooling radiation. We focus on the HeII cooling lines, which arise from gas with a different temperature history (T_max ~ 10^5K) than HI line emitting gas. We examine whether three major atomic cooling lines, HI 1216A, HeII 1640A and HeII 304A are observable, finding that HI 1216A and HeII 1640A cooling emission at z=2-3 are potentially detectable with deep narrow band (R>100) imaging and/or spectroscopy from the ground. While the expected strength of HI 1216A cooling emission depends strongly on the treatment of the self-shielded phase of the IGM in the simulations, our predictions for the HeII 1640A line are more robust because the HeII 1640A emissivity is negligible below T~10^4.5 K and less sensitive to the UV background. Although HeII 1640A cooling emission is fainter than HI 1216A by at least a factor of 10 and, unlike HI 1216A, might not be resolved spatially with current observational facilities, it is more suitable to study gas accretion in the galaxy formation process because it is optically thin and less contaminated by the recombination lines from star-forming galaxies. The HeII 1640A line can be used to distinguish among mechanisms for powering the so-called "Lyman alpha blobs" -- including gravitational cooling radiation, photoionization by stellar populations, and starburst-driven superwinds -- because (1) HeII 1640A emission is limited to very low metallicity (log(Z/Z_sun) wind speeds.

  17. HighResolution Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Hot Plasma in the Stellar Wind of ee Canis Majoris (B2 II) David H. Cohen, Stanley P. Owocki, Joseph P. Cassinelli, & Joseph J. MacFarlane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    High­Resolution Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Hot Plasma in the Stellar Wind of ee Canis Majoris structure in the shocked winds of hot stars. OB stars are characterized by fast line­driven winds, and our­ray spectroscopy is vital for determining in what part of the wind the X­rays are produced, for quantifying

  18. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. II. MOLECULAR CLOUD ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xi; Gan Conggui; Shen Zhiqiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He Jinhua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-06-01

    We have undertaken a survey of molecular lines in the 3 mm band toward 57 young stellar objects using the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m radio telescope. The target sources were young stellar objects with active outflows (extended green objects (EGOs)) newly identified from the GLIMPSE II survey. We observe a high detection rate (50%) of broad line wing emission in the HNC and CS thermal lines, which combined with the high detection rate of class I methanol masers toward these sources (reported in Paper I) further demonstrates that the GLIMPSE II EGOs are associated with outflows. The physical and kinematic characteristics derived from the 3 mm molecular lines for these newly identified EGOs are consistent with these sources being massive young stellar objects with ongoing outflow activity and rapid accretion. These findings support our previous investigations of the mid-infrared properties of these sources and their association with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, methanol masers and millimeter dust sources) presented in Paper I. The high detection rate (64%) of the hot core tracer CH{sub 3}CN reveals that the majority of these new EGOs have evolved to the hot molecular core stage. Comparison of the observed molecular column densities with predictions from hot core chemistry models reveals that the newly identified EGOs from the GLIMPSE II survey are members of the youngest hot core population, with an evolutionary time scale of the order of 10{sup 3} yr.

  19. Metallic fuels: The EBR-II legacy and recent advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Porter; Steven L. Hayes; J. Rory Kennedy

    2012-09-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) metallic fuel was qualified for high burnup to approximately 10 atomic per cent. Subsequently, the electrometallurgical treatment of this fuel was demonstrated. Advanced metallic fuels are now investigated for increased performance, including ultra-high burnup and actinide burning. Advances include additives to mitigate the fuel/cladding chemical interaction and uranium alloys that combine Mo, Ti and Zr to improve alloy performance. The impacts of the advances—on fabrication, waste streams, electrorefining, etc.—are found to be minimal and beneficial. Owing to extensive research literature and computational methods, only a modest effort is required to complete their development.

  20. Status of the NSLS-II Injection System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaftan,T.

    2008-06-23

    The NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3rd generation 3 GeV light source that will be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Its design is well under way. The requirements for the compact injector complex, which will continuously provide 3 GeV electrons for top-off injection into the storage ring, are demanding: high reliability, relatively high charge and low losses. The injector consists of a linear accelerator, a full-energy booster, as well as transport lines, and an injection straight section. In this paper we give an overview of the NSLS-II injector, discuss its status, specifications, and the design challenges.

  1. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12;#12;Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  2. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12; #12; Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  3. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  4. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  5. by popular demand: Addiction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niv, Yael

    by popular demand: Addiction II PSY/NEU338:Animal learning and decision making: Psychological, size of other non-drug rewards, and cost (but ultimately the demand is inelastic, or at least

  6. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  7. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4?} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the Jahn–Teller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of Jahn–Teller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. • New layered phosphate structure. • Jahn–Teller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  8. [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the strontium filament of eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Bautista; H. Hartman; T. R. Gull; N. Smith; K. Lodders

    2006-06-12

    We study the nature of the [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the TiII and NiII systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the TiII ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with an electron density of the order of $10^7$ cm$^{-3}$ and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March~2000 and November~2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused by dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of \\etacar. We study the condensation chemistry of Ti, Ni and Fe within the filament and suggest that the observed gas phase overabundance of Ti

  9. Comparison of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties with ground-based measurements at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    Comparison of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties with ground- based measurements at the DOE ARM are compared with observations taken at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site from March 2000 through December 2004. Retrievals from ARM surface-based data

  10. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  11. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  12. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  13. Stubble Mulch Management for Water Conservation and Erosion Control on Hardlands of the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wendell C. (Wendell Clifford); Van Doren, C. E.; Whitfield, Charles J. (Charles James)

    1949-01-01

    % level. Iata highly significant at the la/o level. inalyses were made by K. B. Porter, Agronomist, Amarillo Experiment , ,,tion. Source variation Total. ........ Treatment.. ... Replication. ... Error. ........ Degrees freedom 15 3 3 9...

  14. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio;...

  15. ALT-II armor tile design for upgraded TEXTOR operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, B.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McGrath, R.T.; Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohlhaas, W.; Finken, K.H. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Noda, N. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    The upgrade of the TEXTOR tokamak at KFA Juelich was recently completed. This upgrade extended the TEXTOR pulse length from 5 seconds to 10 seconds. The auxiliary heating was increased to a total of 8.0 MW through a combination of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. Originally, the inertially cooled armor tiles of the full toroidal belt Advanced Limiter Test -- II (ALT-II) were designed for a 5-second operation with total heating of 6.0 MW. The upgrade of TEXTOR will increase the energy deposited per pulse onto the ALT-II by about 300%. Consequently, the graphite armor tiles for the ALT-II had to be redesigned to avoid excessively high graphite armor surface temperatures that would lead to unacceptable contamination of the plasma. This redesign took the form of two major changes in the ALT-II armor tile geometry. The first design change was an increase of the armor tile thermal mass, primarily by increasing the radial thickness of each tile from 17 mm to 20 mm. This increase in the radial tile dimension reduces the overall pumping efficiency of the ALT-II pump limiter by about 30%. The reduction in exhaust efficiency is unfortunate, but could be avoided only by active cooling of the ALT-II armor tiles. The active cooling option was too complicated and expensive to be considered at this time. The second design change involved redefining the plasma facing surface of each armor tile in order to fully utilize the entire surface area. The incident charged particle heat flux was distributed uniformly over the armor tile surfaces by carefully matching the radial, poloidal and toroidal curvature of each tile to the plasma flow in the TEXTOR boundary layer. This geometry redefinition complicates the manufacturing of the armor tiles, but results in significant thermal performance gains. In addition to these geometry upgrades, several material options were analyzed and evaluated.

  16. HELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    with the term "solar flare" dominate our thinking about energy conversion from magnetic storage to other formsHELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES edited by CAROLUS J. SCHRIJVER Lockheed Martin of a solar flare 11 2.3.1 Flare luminosity and mechanical energy 11 2.3.2 The impulsive phase (hard X

  17. Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations January 21, 2002 This assignment is meant to give you some practical experience in using the Saha and Boltzmann equations that govern the level populations in atoms;s =kT the partition function of ionization stage r. The Saha equation: N r+1 N r = 2U r+1 U r P e #18

  18. Observation of Coherence in the Photosystem II Reaction Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin D. Fuller; Jie Pan; S. Seckin Senlik; Daniel E. Wilcox; Jennifer P. Ogilvie

    2013-10-03

    Photosynthesis powers life on our planet. The basic photosynthetic architecture comprises antenna complexes to harvest solar energy and reaction centers to convert the energy into a stable charge separated state. In oxygenic photosynthesis, the initial charge separation event occurs in the photosystem II reaction center; the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosynthesis are rapid and have high quantum efficiencies. Recently, nonlinear spectroscopic experiments have suggested that electronic coherence may play a role in energy transfer efficiency in antenna complexes. Here we report the observation of coherence in the photosystem II reaction center by two dimensional electronic spectroscopy. The frequencies of the observed coherences match exciton difference frequencies and/or known vibrational modes of the photosystem II reaction center. These observations raise questions about the possible role of electronic and/or vibrational coherence in the fundamental charge separation process in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  19. SHEBA-II as a criticality safety benchmark experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBauve, R.J.; Sapir, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    SHEBA-II (Solution High Energy Burst Assembly-II) is a critical assembly experiment currently (1995) being operated at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. It is a bare assembly fueled with an aqueous solution of about 5% enriched uranyl fluoride that is stored in four critically safe steel tanks. The solution is transferred to the critical assembly vessel (CAV) by applying gas pressure to the storage tanks. Reactivity is controlled by varying the solution level, and a safety rod may be inserted in a thimble along the central axis of the CAV for fast shutdown. The simple geometry provided by this cylindrical system allows for easily applied calculational methods, and thus SHEBA-II is ideally suited for use as a criticality safety benchmark experiment.

  20. Well control simulation with the Macintosh II computer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, Gregory Tad

    1991-01-01

    B-1 Effect of Location on Geothermal Gradient C-1 Methane-Water Interfacial Tension as a Function of Pressure D-1 Bubble Migration Velocity in Plain Water D-2 Slug Migration Velocity in Plain Water D-3 Bubble Migration Velocity in XC Polymer... Work CONCLUSIONS NOMENCLATURE REFERENCES Page . 53 76 80 83 100 104 104 126 130 136 136 139 141 147 APPENDIX A: DRILLING AND CIRCULATION EQUATIONS . . . . I 4 9 APPENDIX B: KICK INFLUX APPENDIX C: GAS BUBBLE MIGRATION APPENDIX D...

  1. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  2. Mittwoch, 28.05.2014 Zeit H17, NW II H18, NW II H20, NW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    Beliefs and Fracking Gebäude Audimax 09:40 (Gebäudewechsel Audimax -> NW II) 10:00 "Hydrogeologie von

  3. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  4. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending...

  5. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  6. Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy Theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-12-14

    Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy. Theory II. Michael J. Hopkins. ?. Jeffrey H. Smith. †. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts.

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat:July 2013 BuildingUpdate:ToolNewNew

  8. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

  9. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

  10. ZERH WEBINAR: HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME SALES TRAINING PART II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  11. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department of Energy America: Research forDepartment ofNew

  12. THE SURVEY OF LINES IN M31 (SLIM): INVESTIGATING THE ORIGINS OF [C II] EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapala, M. J.; Sandstrom, K.; Groves, B.; Kreckel, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F.; Fouesneau, M. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Croxall, K. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dalcanton, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Leroy, A., E-mail: kapala@mpia.de [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The [C II] 158 ?m line is one of the strongest emission lines observed in star-forming galaxies and has been empirically measured to correlate with the star-formation rate (SFR) globally and on kiloparsec scales. However, because of the multiphase origins of [C II], one might expect this relation to break down at small scales. We investigate the origins of [C II] emission by examining high spatial resolution observations of [C II] in M31 with the Survey of Lines in M31. We present five ?700 × 700 pc (3' × 3') fields mapping the [C II] emission, H? emission, and the ancillary infrared (IR) data. We spatially separate star-forming regions from diffuse gas and dust emission on ?50 pc scales. We find that the [C II]-SFR correlation holds even at these scales, although the relation typically has a flatter slope than found at larger (kiloparsec) scales. While the H? emission in M31 is concentrated in the SFR regions, we find that a significant amount (?20%-90%) of the [C II] emission comes from outside star-forming regions and that the total IR emission (TIR) has the highest diffuse fraction of all SFR tracers. We find a weak correlation of the [C II]/TIR to dust color in each field and find a large-scale trend of increasing [C II]/TIR with galactocentric radius. The differences in the relative diffuse fractions of [C II], H?, and IR tracers are likely caused by a combination of energetic photon leakage from H II regions and heating by the diffuse radiation field arising from older (B-star) stellar populations. However, we find that by averaging our measurements over kiloparsec scales, these effects are minimized, and the relation between [C II] and SFR found in other nearby galaxy studies is retrieved.

  13. Highfrequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    High­frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear of pulses in noncentrosymmetric crystals. The method is based upon high­frequency expansions techniques pulses by using a technique based on high­frequency expansions of the fields. 7 The derived equations

  14. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

  15. Prison Food on the Plains: the Role of Food Production in the Rehabilitative Curriculum of the Kansas Industrial School for Girls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmel, Wesley James

    2010-06-11

    Prison Food on the Plains: the Role of Food Production in the Rehabilitative Curriculum of the Kansas Industrial School for Girls Wesley James Kimmel Prisons have been a common feature of the American landscape since the days of the American... of the State Board of Corrections For the Two Years Ending June 30, 1916 (Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1916), 648. 28 Wesley James Kimmel In early America, separate rehabilitative institutions such as the Kansas Girls’ Industrial School did...

  16. The effect of global warming scenarios on soybean and peanut yields in the Coastal Plain region of Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laitta, M.T.; Huebner, N.J. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This study is an evaluation of peanut and soybean yield in the Coastal Plain of Georgia as a function of seasonal water deficit scenarios. An analytical model of the Thornthwaite water balance model, based on historical temperature and precipitation data, is used to evaluate the probable response of crop productivity to climate changes in selected counties in South Georgia. The input of temperature and precipitation values for each site is based on the results of three general circulation models (GCM), which were regionally tailored to the Southeastern United States. A regression analysis was preformed to establish a numerical relationship between historical yield and moisture deficits. This model, in association with projected GCM model deficits, was used to predict future crop yields. Our results showed that given all GCM models evaluated, deficit periods for the selected sites will increase both the intensity and duration droughts in the southeastern U.S. Of the two crops analyzed, it was found that soybeans showed a higher sensitivity to moisture deficits than did peanuts.

  17. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa AMY

  18. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa AMY

  19. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa

  20. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa :

  1. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N SGwen} ;im1 * I

  2. II

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas LiquidsENERGYww0,

  3. Simulations of Blood Flow in Plain Cylindrical and Constricted Vessels with Single Cell Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Janoschek; Federico Toschi; Jens Harting

    2011-05-31

    Understanding the physics of blood is challenging due to its nature as a suspension of soft particles and the fact that typical problems involve different scales. This is valid also for numerical investigations. In fact, many computational studies either neglect the existence of discrete cells or resolve relatively few cells very accurately. The authors recently developed a simple and highly efficient yet still particulate model with the aim to bridge the gap between currently applied methods. The present work focuses on its applicability to confined flows in vessels of diameters up to 100 micrometres. For hematocrit values below 30 percent, a dependence of the apparent viscosity on the vessel diameter in agreement with experimental literature data is found.

  4. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Yong Zhang; Xiao Cai; Xiao-Hu Mo; Di-Zhou Guo; Jian-Li Wang; Bai-Qi Liu; M. N. Achasov; A. A. Krasnov; N. Yu. Muchnoi; E. E. Pyata; E. V. Mamoshkina; F. A. Harris

    2015-10-28

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  5. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M N; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Pyata, E E; Mamoshkina, E V; Harris, F A

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  6. Thermostable purified endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Thomas, Steven R. (Denver, CO); Nieves, Rafael A. (Lakewood, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A purified low molecular weight endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) is disclosed. The endoglucanase is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1, and C.sub.x types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 81.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and at a inactivation temperature of about 100.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9.

  7. Thermostable purified endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, W.S.; Thomas, S.R.; Nieves, R.A.; Himmel, M.E.

    1994-11-22

    A purified low molecular weight endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) is disclosed. The endoglucanase is water soluble, possesses both C[sub 1], and C[sub x] types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 81 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and at a inactivation temperature of about 100 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9. 9 figs.

  8. PEP-II: An asymmetric B factory. Conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the authors have described an updated conceptual design for the high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory (PEP-II) to be built in the PEP tunnel culmination of more than four years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sub +}e{sub {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. All aspects of the conceptual design were scrutinized in March 1991 by a DOE technical review committee chaired by Dr. L. Edward Temple. The design was deemed feasible and capable of achieving its physics goals. Furthermore, the cost estimate, schedule, and management plan for the project were fully endorsed by the committee. This updated conceptual design report captures the technical progress since the March 1991 review and reflects the lower cost estimate corresponding to the improved design. Although the PEP-II design has continued to evolve, no technical scope changes have been made that invalidate the conclusion of the DOE review. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, an electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of PEP-II. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two PEP-II storage rings.

  9. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

    2012-04-01

    We evaluate horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities together with geologic, volcanic, and seismic data to interpret extension, shear, and contraction within the Snake River Plain and the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. We estimate horizontal surface velocities using GPS data collected at 385 sites from 1994 to 2009 and present an updated velocity field within the Stable North American Reference Frame (SNARF). Our results show an ENE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Centennial Tectonic belt and an E-oriented extensional strain rate of 6.2 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Intermountain Seismic belt combined with the northern Great Basin. These extensional strain rates contrast with the regional north-south contraction of -2.6 {+-} 1.1 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} calculated in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau over a 125 x 650 km region. Tests that include dike-opening reveal that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones does not occur in the Snake River Plain at present. This slow internal deformation in the Snake River Plain is in contrast to the rapidly-extending adjacent Basin and Range provinces and implies shear along boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of <0.5 to 1.7 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic belt. The fastest lateral shearing occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional GPS velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic belt, Idaho batholith, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and central Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is driven by extension to the south in the Great Basin and not localized extension in the Basin and Range or Yellowstone hotspot volcanism. We propose that the GPS velocity field reflects the regional deformation pattern since at least 15-12 Ma, with clockwise rotation over the Northern Basin and Range Province consistent with Basin and Range extension initiating 16 Ma. The region modified by hotspot volcanism has a low-strain rate. If we assume the low rate of deformation is reflected in the length of time between eruptions on the order of 10{sup 4} to >10{sup 6} yrs, the low-strain field in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau would extend through the Quaternary.

  10. Belle II Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abe; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; S. Ahn; H. Aihara; K. Akai; M. Aloi; L. Andricek; K. Aoki; Y. Arai; A. Arefiev; K. Arinstein; Y. Arita; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; T. Aziz; A. M. Bakich; V. Balagura; Y. Ban; E. Barberio; T. Barvich; K. Belous; T. Bergauer; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; O. Brovchenko; T. E. Browder; G. Cao; M. -C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; K. -F. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; C. -C. Chiang; R. Chistov; K. Cho; S. -K. Choi; K. Chung; A. Comerma; M. Cooney; D. E. Cowley; T. Critchlow; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; A. Dieguez; A. Dierlamm; M. Dillon; J. Dingfelder; R. Dolenec; Z. Dolezal; Z. Drasal; A. Drutskoy; W. Dungel; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; A. Enomoto; D. Epifanov; S. Esen; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; M. Fernandez Garcia; T. Fifield; P. Fischer; J. Flanagan; S. Fourletov; J. Fourletova; L. Freixas; A. Frey; M. Friedl; R. Fruehwirth; H. Fujii; M. Fujikawa; Y. Fukuma; Y. Funakoshi; K. Furukawa; J. Fuster; N. Gabyshev; A. Gaspar de Valenzuela Cueto; A. Garmash; L. Garrido; Ch. Geisler; I. Gfall; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; I. Gorton; R. Grzymkowski; H. Guo; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hara; T. Hara; T. Haruyama; K. Hayasaka; K. Hayashi; H. Hayashii; M. Heck; S. Heindl; C. Heller; T. Hemperek; T. Higuchi; Y. Horii; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; C. -H. Huang; S. Hwang; H. J. Hyun; Y. Igarashi; C. Iglesias; Y. Iida; T. Iijima; M. Imamura; K. Inami; C. Irmler; M. Ishizuka; K. Itagaki; R. Itoh; M. Iwabuchi; G. Iwai; M. Iwai; M. Iwasaki; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; S. Iwata; H. Jang; X. Ji; T. Jinno; M. Jones; T. Julius; T. Kageyama; D. H. Kah; H. Kakuno; T. Kamitani; K. Kanazawa; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; M. Kawai; Y. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; J. Kennedy; H. Kichimi; M. Kikuchi; C. Kiesling; B. K. Kim; G. N. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. -B. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. K. Kim; K. T. Kim; T. Y. Kim; K. Kinoshita; K. Kishi; B. Kisielewski; K. Kleese van Dam; J. Knopf; B. R. Ko; M. Koch; P. Kodys; C. Koffmane; Y. Koga; T. Kohriki; S. Koike; H. Koiso; Y. Kondo; S. Korpar; R. T. Kouzes; Ch. Kreidl; M. Kreps; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; H. Krueger; A. Kruth; W. Kuhn; T. Kuhr; R. Kumar; T. Kumita; S. Kupper; A. Kuzmin; P. Kvasnicka; Y. -J. Kwon; C. Lacasta; J. S. Lange; I. -S. Lee; M. J. Lee; M. W. Lee; S. -H. Lee; M. Lemarenko; J. Li; W. D. Li; Y. Li; J. Libby; A. Limosani; C. Liu; H. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; D. Liventsev; A. Lopez Virto; Y. Makida; Z. P. Mao; C. Marinas; M. Masuzawa; D. Matvienko; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; T. Miyoshi; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; D. Mohapatra; A. Moll; T. Mori; A. Morita; Y. Morita; H. -G. Moser; D. Moya Martin; T. Mueller; D. Muenchow; J. Murakami; S. S. Myung; T. Nagamine; I. Nakamura; T. T. Nakamura; E. Nakano; H. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakazawa; S. -H. Nam; Z. Natkaniec; E. Nedelkovska; K. Negishi; S. Neubauer; C. Ng; J. Ninkovic; S. Nishida; K. Nishimura; E. Novikov; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; K. Ohmi; Y. Ohnishi; T. Ohshima; N. Ohuchi; K. Oide; S. L. Olsen; M. Ono; Y. Ono; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; H. Palka; H. Park; H. K. Park; L. S. Peak; T. Peng; I. Peric; M. Pernicka; R. Pestotnik; M. Petric; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; M. Prim; K. Prothmann; K. Regimbal; B. Reisert; R. H. Richter; J. Riera-Babures; A. Ritter; A. Ritter; M. Ritter; M. Roehrken; J. Rorie; M. Rosen; M. Rozanska; L. Ruckman; S. Rummel; V. Rusinov; R. M. Russell; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; L. Santelj; T. Sasaki; N. Sato; Y. Sato; J. Scheirich; J. Schieck; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; B. Schwenker; A. Seljak; K. Senyo; O. -S. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; H. Shibuya; S. Shiizuka; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; H. J. Simonis; J. B. Singh; R. Sinha; M. Sitarz; P. Smerkol; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Staric; J. Stypula; Y. Suetsugu; S. Sugihara; T. Sugimura; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; H. Takagaki; F. Takasaki; H. Takeichi; Y. Takubo; M. Tanaka; S. Tanaka; N. Taniguchi; E. Tarkovsky; G. Tatishvili; M. Tawada; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; I. Tikhomirov; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; K. Tsunada; Y. -C. Tu; T. Uchida; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; S. Vahsen; M. Valentan; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; P. Vazquez; I. Vila; E. Vilella; A. Vinokurova; J. Visniakov; M. Vos; C. H. Wang; J. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; A. Wassatch; M. Watanabe; Y. Watase; T. Weiler; N. Wermes; R. E. Wescott; E. White; J. Wicht; L. Widhalm; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Xu; B. D. Yabsley; H. Yamamoto; H. Yamaoka; Y. Yamaoka; M. Yamauchi; Y. Yin; H. Yoon; J. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yusa; D. Zander; M. Zdybal; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; L. Zhao; Z. Zhao; V. Zhilich; P. Zhou; V. Zhulanov; T. Zivko; A. Zupanc; O. Zyukova

    2010-11-01

    The Belle detector at the KEKB electron-positron collider has collected almost 1 billion Y(4S) events in its decade of operation. Super-KEKB, an upgrade of KEKB is under construction, to increase the luminosity by two orders of magnitude during a three-year shutdown, with an ultimate goal of 8E35 /cm^2 /s luminosity. To exploit the increased luminosity, an upgrade of the Belle detector has been proposed. A new international collaboration Belle-II, is being formed. The Technical Design Report presents physics motivation, basic methods of the accelerator upgrade, as well as key improvements of the detector.

  11. Luz II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:Lowell Point, Alaska:Vermont:Lutz, Florida:II Jump to:

  12. Harvest II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energy Resources JumpConsultingHarfordHarvard,BioFuelsII

  13. Limon II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds JumpOxiranchem IncLighthouseLigninLimon I JumpII

  14. Majestic II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGenerationMainsa Instalaciones JumpMajestic II

  15. Musselshell II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas: Energy Resources JumpMuskegonIII

  16. Penascal II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergy GroupPeetz

  17. Peculiarities of Environment Pollution as a Special Type of Radioactive Waste: Field Means for Comprehensive Characterization of Soil and Bottom Sediments and their Application in the Survey at the Flood plain of Techa River - 13172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Danilovich, Alexey; Potapov, Victor; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Volkovich, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Contamination of natural objects - zone alarm fallout, zones and flood plains near production sites (the result of technological accidents and resource extraction) occupy large areas. Large area and volume of contaminated matter, moderate specific activity (as low - medium-level wastes) make such objects specific types of radioactive waste. These objects exist for a long time, now they are characterized by a bound state of nuclides with the matrix. There is no cost-effective ways to remove these waste, the only solution for the rehabilitation of such areas is their isolation and regular monitoring through direct and indirect measurements. The complex of instruments was developed to field mapping of contamination. It consists of a portable spectrometric collimated detector, collimated spectrometric borehole detector, underwater spectrometer detector, spectrometer for field measurements of the specific activity of Sr-90, connected to a portable MCA 'Colibry (Hummingbird)'. The complex was used in settlements of Bryansk region, rivers Techa and Yenisei. The effectiveness of the developed complex considered by the example of characterization of the reservoir 10 (artificial lake) in Techinsky cascade containing a huge amount of radioactive waste. The developed field means for comprehensive characterization of soil and bottom sediments contamination are very effective for mapping and monitoring of environment contamination after accidents. Especially in case of high non-uniformity of fallout and may be very actual in Fukushima area. (authors)

  18. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  19. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  20. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  1. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Low-Energy, High-Performance Lossless 8×8 SOA Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Q.; Wonfor, A.; Wei, J. L.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.

    2015-03-22

    /plain; charset=UTF-8 Low-Energy, High-Performance Lossless 8×8 SOA Switch Q. Cheng, A. Wonfor, J. L. Wei, R. V. Penty, I. H. White Centre for Photonic Systems, Electrical Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United... capacity and energy consumption, both in the internet core and also within datacenters. Optical switch fabrics, which have been the subject of much research in recent years, are regarded as potential key components for meeting future communications...

  3. 2,3-Migration in Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of -Trifluoroacetamido

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    2,3-Migration in Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of -Trifluoroacetamido r-Diazocarbonyl Compounds Feng(II)-catalyzed reactions of these diazo compounds gave 2,3-migration products in high yields. 1,2-Migration is one,2-migration reactions, the 1,2-hydride migration is generally predominant, but 1,2-alkyl, 1,2-aryl, 1,2-thio

  4. Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investigation Report (Phase II Report) More Documents & Publications Central Characterization Program (CCP) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Interface Document Oak Ridge...

  5. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  6. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    longer, and could lead to feeling satisfied after smaller portions, lowering overall food intake, which could help treat obesity. Knowing the mechanism of action for TPP II...

  7. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; ,

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  8. Insight into the Structure of Light Harvesting Complex II and its Stabilization in Detergent Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Mateus B [ORNL; Smolensky, Dmitriy [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The structure of spinach light-harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in a solution of the detergent n-octyl-{beta}-d-glucoside (BOG), was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Physicochemical characterization of the isolated complex indicated that it was pure (>95%) and also in its native trimeric state. SANS with contrast variation was used to investigate the properties of the protein-detergent complex at three different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast match points, enabling the scattering properties of the protein and detergent to be investigated independently. The topological shape of LHC II, determined using ab initio shape restoration methods from the SANS data at the contrast match point of BOG, was consistent with the X-ray crystallographic structure of LHC II (Liu et al. Nature 2004 428, 287-292). The interactions of the protein and detergent were investigated at the contrast match point for the protein and also in 100% D{sub 2}O. The data suggested that BOG micelle structure was altered by its interaction with LHC II, but large aggregate structures were not formed. Indirect Fourier transform analysis of the LHC II/BOG scattering curves showed that the increase in the maximum dimension of the protein-detergent complex was consistent with the presence of a monolayer of detergent surrounding the protein. A model of the LHC II/BOG complex was generated to interpret the measurements made in 100% D{sub 2}O. This model adequately reproduced the overall size of the LHC II/BOG complex, but demonstrated that the detergent does not have a highly regular shape that surrounds the hydrophobic periphery of LHC II. In addition to demonstrating that natively structured LHC II can be produced for functional characterization and for use in artificial solar energy applications, the analysis and modeling approaches described here can be used for characterizing detergent-associated {alpha}-helical transmembrane proteins.

  9. IDetachable, Human-Rated, Ablative Environmentally Compliant TPSLunar Surface Systems 2008 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems 2008 Phase II Proposal X8.01-8631 Lightweight Hybrid Ablator Incorporating Aerogel-Filled Open skeleton filled with a high temperature nanoscale aerogel insulator. Structural integrity and high insulation behavior have been demonstrated when used in combination with a non-ablating, coated carbon

  10. April 22, 2010 Coronal hole boundaries evolution at small scales: II. XRT view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 22, 2010 Coronal hole boundaries evolution at small scales: II. XRT view Can small-scale outflows at CHBs be a source of the slow solar wind? S. Subramanian, M. S. Madjarska and J. G. Doyle Armagh to further explore the small-scale evolution of coronal hole boundaries using X-ray high-resolution and high

  11. Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory Protein from Ralstonia Metallidurans: Development of a Fluorescent Lead(ii) Probe** Peng Chen, Bill Greenberg, Safiyh Taghavi, Christine Romano, Daniel van der Lelie, and Chuan He* Lead contamination is a serious threat to human health

  12. 9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST II OR ASSOCIATE IN RESEARCH APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu/). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  13. 12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST II OR ASSOCIATE IN RESEARCH APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  14. Climatology of summer midtropospheric perturbations in the U.S. northern plains. Part I: Influence on northwest flow severe weather outbreaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Tsing-Chang; Correia, James

    2011-02-13

    Northwest flow severe weather outbreaks (NWF outbreaks) describe a type of summer convective storm that occurs in areas of mid-level NWF in the central United States. Convective storms associated with NWF outbreaks are often progressive (i.e. traveling a long distance) along systematic, northwestsoutheast oriented tracks throughout the northern plains. Previous studies have observed that progressive convective storms under NWF are often coupled with subsynoptic-scale midtropospheric perturbations (MPs) coming from the Rocky Mountains. This study traces such MPs for the decade of 1997-2006 using the North American Regional Reanalysis to examine their climatology and possible influence on NWF outbreaks. MPs initiated over the Rocky Mountains have a maximum frequency in July when the North American anticyclone fully develops and forms prevailing NWF over the northern plains. MPs developed under this anticyclone appear restricted in their vertical extension. Nevertheless, persistent upward motion is apparent in the leading edge (east) of MPs soon after their genesis subsequently inducing or intensifying convective storms. MPs propagate along systematic tracks similar to those of NWF outbreaks. The propagation of MPs also synchronizes with the progressive behavior of the associated convective storms. When encountering strong low-level jets (LLJs), upward motion and convergence of water vapor flux associated with MPs intensify substantially, resulting in strongly enhanced convection and precipitation. Convective wind and hail frequencies associated with MPs in strong LLJs reveal a pattern and magnitude very similar to that of NWF outbreaks. While about 60% of summer rainfall in the northern plains is linked to MPs, 75% of these instances occur in strong LLJs.

  15. Stochastic force generation by small ensembles of myosin II motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Erdmann; Ulrich S. Schwarz

    2012-02-14

    Forces in the actin cytoskeleton are generated by small groups of non-processive myosin II motors for which stochastic effects are highly relevant. Using a crossbridge model with the assumptions of fast powerstroke kinetics and equal load sharing between equivalent states, we derive a one-step master equation for the activity of a finite-sized ensemble of mechanically coupled myosin II motors. For constant external load, this approach yields analytical results for duty ratio and force-velocity relation as a function of ensemble size. We find that stochastic effects cannot be neglected for ensemble sizes below 15. The one-step master equation can be used also for efficient computer simulations with linear elastic external load and reveals the sequence of build-up of force and ensemble rupture that is characteristic for reconstituted actomyosin contractility.

  16. LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue the concepts of field and potential are abstract and difficult to visualize, this laboratory uses a computer and electric potential at any point in space. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you

  17. Occupational and Environmental Clinical Medicine II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Years I-IV 2014-2015 Year II Clinical Medicine II · Toxicology- 4 lecture unit · Clinical Correlations: Poisoned Patient- 2 lecture unit Year I Clinical MedicineDetroit · Earthworks · Greening of Detroit Street Medicine · Detroit Clean Up Clinical Education Year III Family

  18. LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab II - 1 It is often useful to study physical. An electric circuit illustrates how energy can be transformed within a system, transferred to different parts it is the electric charge that transports the energy from one place in the system to another

  19. PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS MARK ELLERMANN II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    #12;PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS by MARK ELLERMANN II Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School OF SCIENCE December 2010 #12;PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS Approved: Adviser Dean of the College of Arts & Science Dean of Graduate Studies and Research ii #12;ABSTRACT PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS Mark Ellermann

  20. Esp. Vet. II (In)Dependncia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    ­ 2a Parte Paulo Goldfeld Marco Cabral Departamento de Matemática Aplicada Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 1 / 28-trivial destes vetores. Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 2 / 28

  1. LABORATORY II FORCE AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    on an object and its kinetic energy. · Define and use sine, cosine and tangent for a right triangleLABORATORY II FORCE AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY Lab II - 1 After studying forces and material bodies the relationship between forces and energy conservation. Energy and forces, together, support an extremely

  2. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

  3. Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Inner product and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Unit II-1 Inner product and orthogonality Unit II-1 Inner products 2 a (real) inner product space ­ sometimes a Euclidean space Unit II-1 Inner products 3 Examples: Real inner matrix is the sum of its diagonal entries Unit II-1 Inner products 4 Complex inner product · an inner

  4. Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices 1 Orthogonal matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices 1 Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices 2 `orthonormal matrix' is more accurate Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices 3 Example. Find an orthogonal matrix whose first row is a multiple of u1=(1,2,2). Unit II-3 Orthogonal matrices 4 Orthogonal matrices · a matrix P

  5. SUBJECT INDEX abyssal plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evolution, A:135 petrography, A:130­131 photograph, A:147, 188, 191 saturation remanence, B8:24 Unit 3, A

  6. Coal. [Great Plains Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The status of various research projects related to coal is considered: gasification (approximately 30 processes) and in-situ gasification. Methanol production, retrofitting internal combustion engines to stratified charge engines, methanation (Conoco), direct reduction of iron ores, water resources, etc. Approximately 200 specific projects related to coal are considered with respect to present status. (LTN)

  7. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility009 ARM Orientation 1Southern Great

  8. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, AlaskaDatabaseSearchTipsWith the rapid

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbing EnergySeeingAboutNewsletterAbout

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbing EnergySeeingAboutNewsletterAbout6

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbing EnergySeeingAboutNewsletterAbout67

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbing EnergySeeingAboutNewsletterAbout678

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbing

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-08

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-087

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-0874

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-08745

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-087456

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065 ANL/ER/NL-05-02

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657 ANL/EVS/NL-07-02

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657 ANL/EVS/NL-07-025

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657 ANL/EVS/NL-07-0256

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578 ANL/EVS/NL-08-01

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578 ANL/EVS/NL-08-015

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065787 ANL/EVS/NL-07-07

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065787

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657876

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578767

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065787675

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657876757

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578767578

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065787675785

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657876757856

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 2006578767578567

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 20065787675785676

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept. 200657876757856767

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept.

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept.6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-10

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept.6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-107

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept.6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-1075

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThree FoundryProbingAug./Sept.6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-10757

  6. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top ScientificTechnologies | Blandine

  7. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4 AnnualApril

  8. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4

  9. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4July 2004

  10. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4July 2004June

  11. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4July

  12. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4JulyMay 2004

  13. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4JulyMay

  14. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet) Sold4JulyMayOctober

  15. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet)

  16. Northern Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|in the subsurface isProject |News MediaEnergy TheNorthern G

  17. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuilding K-25Kyle Travis, left and

  18. Electromagnetic Probes at RHIC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David; R. Rapp; Z. Xu

    2008-04-25

    We summarize how future measurements of electromagnetic (e.m.) probes at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), in connection with theoretical analysis, can advance our understanding of strongly interacting matter at high energy densities and temperatures. After a brief survey of the important role that e.m. probes data have played at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, CERN) and RHIC to date, we identify key physics objectives and observables that remain to be addressed to characterize the (strongly interacting) Quark-Gluon Plasma (sQGP) and associated transition properties at RHIC. These include medium modifications of vector mesons via low-mass dileptons, a temperature measurement of the hot phases via continuum radiation, as well as gamma-gamma correlations to characterize early source sizes. We outline strategies to establish microscopic matter and transition properties such as the number of degrees of freedom in the sQGP, the origin of the hadron masses and manifestations of chiral symmetry restoration, which will require accompanying but rather well-defined advances in theory. Increased experimental precision, order of magnitude higher statistics than currently achievable, as well as a detailed scan of colliding species and energies are then mandatory to achieve sufficient discrimination power in theoretical interpretations. This increased precision can be achieved with hardware upgrades to the large RHIC detectors (PHENIX and STAR) along with at least a factor of ten as increase in luminosity over the next few years as envisioned for RHIC-II.

  19. Analysis of Chemical Storage and Transit Times to Characterize Water Movement Through a Thick Unsaturated Zone Overlying the High Plains Aquifer, Northwestern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Britney S.

    2014-12-31

    not associated to precipitation or pumping. This indicated a previously unknown source of recharge to the aquifer and the need to further investigate water movement processes through the thick unsaturated zone above it. The roles of irrigation, land use...

  20. An HST COS 'SNAPSHOT' spectrum of the K supergiant ? Vel (K4Ib-II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G. [NASA/GSFC Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ayres, Thomas R. [University of Colorado, CASA, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kober, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister E.; Wahlgren, Glenn M., E-mail: Kenneth.G.Carpenter@nasa.gov [Deptartment of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the K4 Ib-II supergiant ? Vel obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as a part of the SNAPshot program 'SNAPing coronal iron' (GO 11687). The observation covers a wavelength region (1326-1467 Å) not previously recorded for ? Vel at a spectral resolving power of R ? 20,000 and displays strong emission and absorption features, superposed on a bright chromospheric continuum. Fluorescent excitation is responsible for much of the observed emission, mainly powered by strong H I Ly? and the O I (UV 2) triplet emission near ?1304. The molecular CO and H{sub 2} fluorescences are weaker than in the early-K giant ? Boo while the Fe II and Cr II lines, also pumped by H I Ly?, are stronger in ? Vel. This pattern of relative line strengths between the two stars is explained by the lower iron-group element abundance in ? Boo, which weakens that star's Fe II and Cr II emission without reducing the molecular fluorescences. The ? Vel spectrum shows fluorescent Fe II, Cr II, and H{sub 2} emission similar to that observed in the M supergiant ? Ori, but more numerous well-defined narrow emissions from CO. The additional CO emissions are visible in the spectrum of ? Vel since that star does not have the cool, opaque circumstellar shells that surround ? Ori and produce broad circumstellar CO (A-X) band absorptions that hide those emissions in the cooler star. The presence of Si IV emission in ? Vel indicates a ?8 × 10{sup 4} K plasma that is mixed into the cooler chromosphere. Evidence of the stellar wind is seen in the C II ??1334,1335 lines and in the blueshifted Fe II and Ni II wind absorption lines. Line modeling using Sobolev with Exact Integration for the C II lines indicates a larger terminal velocity (?45 versus ?30 km s{sup –1}) and turbulence (?27 versus <21 km s{sup –1}) with a more quickly accelerating wind (? = 0.35 versus 0.7) at the time of this COS observation in 2010 than derived from Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data obtained in 1994. The Fe II and Ni II absorptions are blueshifted by 7.6 km s{sup –1} relative to the chromospheric emission, suggesting formation in lower levels of the accelerating wind and their widths indicate a higher turbulence in the ? Vel wind compared to ? Ori.