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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flat block of power, generation from natural gas fired CCGTsnatural gas plants. Even at high penetration adding power from a flat block does not displace any generation

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (Generation Sold at Low Prices PV Penetration (% AnnualTES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaics into the Distribution Grid on Oahu, Hawaii: Detailed Analysis of HECO Feeder WF1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable generation is growing at a rapid rate due to the incentives available and the aggressive renewable portfolio standard targets implemented by state governments. Distributed generation in particular is seeing the fastest growth among renewable energy projects, and is directly related to the incentives. Hawaii has the highest electricity costs in the country due to the high percentage of oil burning steam generation, and therefore has some of the highest penetration of distributed PV in the nation. The High Penetration PV project on Oahu aims to understand the effects of high penetration PV on the distribution level, to identify penetration levels creating disturbances on the circuit, and to offer mitigating solutions based on model results. Power flow models are validated using data collected from solar resources and load monitors deployed throughout the circuit. Existing interconnection methods and standards are evaluated in these emerging high penetration scenarios. A key finding is a shift in the level of detail to be considered and moving away from steady-state peak time analysis towards dynamic and time varying simulations. Each level of normal interconnection study is evaluated and enhanced to a new level of detail, allowing full understanding of each issue.

Stewart, E.; MacPherson, J.; Vasilic, S.; Nakafuji, D.; Aukai, T.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Deploying High Penetration Photovoltaic Systems: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system capacity penetration, or simply 'penetration,' is often defined as the rated power output of the aggregate PV systems on a distribution circuit segment divided by the peak load of that circuit segment. Industry experts agree that a single value defining high penetration is not universally applicable. However, it is generally agreed that a conservative value to designate high penetration is the condition when the ratio of aggregate PV systems ratings to peak load exceeds 15%. This case study illustrates the case of a distribution feeder which is able to accommodate a traditional capacity penetration level of 47%, and perhaps more. New maximum penetration levels need to be defined and verified and enhanced definitions for penetration on a distribution circuit need to be developed. The new penetration definitions and studies will help utility engineers, system developers, and regulatory agencies better agree what levels of PV deployment can be attained without jeopardizing the reliability and power quality of a circuit.

Coddington, M. H.; Baca, D.; Kroposki, B. D.; Basso, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage. Technical ReportCSP) with and without thermal energy storage (TES) are addedwith or without thermal energy storage at low penetration,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Porter. The cost of transmission for wind energy in theDA forecast error cost per unit of wind energy are somewhatcosts actually slightly decrease with increasing penetration per unit of wind energy.

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Transmission System Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is an assessment of the potential impact of high levels of penetration of photovoltaic (PV) generation on transmission systems. The effort used stability simulations of a transmission system with different levels of PV generation and load.

Achilles, S.; Schramm, S.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sunshot Initiative High Penetration Solar Portal  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of energy by the end of the decade. Reducing the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% will drive widespread large-scale adoption of this renewable energy and restore U.S. leadership in the global clean energy race. The High Penetration Solar Portal was created as a resource to aggregate the most relevant and timely information related to high penetration solar scenarios and integrating solar into the grid. The site is designed so that utilities, grant awardees, regulators, researchers, and other solar professionals can easily share data, case studies, lessons learned, and demonstration project findings. [copied from https://solarhighpen.energy.gov/about_the_high_penetration_solar_portal

10

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Future Grids Speaker(s): Johan Driesen Date: March 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint...

11

SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Penetration Solar Deployment High Penetration Solar Deployment to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High Penetration Solar Deployment on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Research, Development, & Demonstration Competitive Awards Solar Utility Networks: Replicable Innovations in Solar Energy High Penetration Solar Deployment Grid Integration Advanced Concepts

12

Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Forecasting the Wind to Reach Significant Penetration Levels of Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in atmospheric science are critical to increased deployment of variable renewable energy (VRE) sources. For VRE sources, such as wind and solar, to reach high penetration levels in the nation's electric grid, electric system operators and VRE ...

Melinda Marquis; Jim Wilczak; Mark Ahlstrom; Justin Sharp; Andrew Stern; J. Charles Smith; Stan Calvert

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support Features Electric Energy System #12;#12;Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV project titled "Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support

19

Cloud-Level Penetrative Compressible Convection in the Venus Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, nonlinear, fully compressible model of a perfect gas is used to simulate cloud-level penetrative convection in the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 60 km altitude. Three cases with different amounts of solar heating are considered: ...

R. David Baker; Gerald Schubert; Philip W. Jones

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Title Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhai, Pei, Peter H. Larsen, Dev Millstein, Surabi Menon, and Eric R. Masanet Journal Energy Volume 47 Start Page 443 Date Published 2012 Abstract This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO2, SO2 and NOx assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided emissions vary significantly across the country-mainly due to three state-specific factors: the existing resource mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emission intensity of existing fossil fuel power plants and the PV capacity factor within each state. The avoided emissions per solar PV capacity (g/W) - for ten U.S. states -ranged from 670 to 1500 for CO2, 0.01e7.80 for SO2 and 0.25e2.40 for NOx. In general, avoided emissions are likely to be higher in locations with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission of existing fossil fuel plants; and 3) higher PV capacity factor. To further illustrate the quantitative relationship between avoided emissions and the three state-specific factors, we conducted a sensitivity analysis. Finally, we estimated the change in avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying the operational constraints of fossil-fuel power plants. At the 10% penetration level avoided emissions were not constrained by the ramp rate limitations, but the minimum capacity requirement significantly affected the avoided emission estimates.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Determining the Adequate Level of Distributed Generation Penetration in Future Grids Speaker(s): Johan Driesen Date: March 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare In this talk, Johan will discuss the technical barriers met while deploying distributed generation (DG) technology in the grid. These are related to voltage quality, reliability, stability of the grid, but also safety, environmental and economic issues are important. Eventually, the question 'how far can you go ?' is addressed. The range from small-scale local DG such as photovoltaics to large-scale (off-shore) wind farms are dealt with, each with their specific issues. The talk is illustrated with examples from research projects at the KULeuven financied by national and European

22

Enabling Technologies for High Penetration of Wind and Solar Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High penetration of variable wind and solar electricity generation will require modifications to the electric power system. This work examines the impacts of variable generation, including uncertainty, ramp rate, ramp range, and potentially excess generation. Time-series simulations were performed in the Texas (ERCOT) grid where different mixes of wind, solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power provide up to 80% of the electric demand. Different enabling technologies were examined, including conventional generator flexibility, demand response, load shifting, and energy storage. A variety of combinations of these technologies enabled low levels of surplus or curtailed wind and solar generation depending on the desired penetration of renewable sources. At lower levels of penetration (up to about 30% on an energy basis) increasing flexible generation, combined with demand response may be sufficient to accommodate variability and uncertainty. Introduction of load-shifting through real-time pricing or other market mechanisms further increases the penetration of variable generation. The limited time coincidence of wind and solar generation presents increasing challenges as these sources provide greater than 50% of total demand. System flexibility must be increased to the point of virtually eliminating must-run baseload generators during periods of high wind and solar generation. Energy storage also becomes increasingly important as lower cost flexibility options are exhausted. The study examines three classes of energy storage - electricity storage, including batteries and pumped hydro, hybrid storage (compressed-air energy storage), and thermal energy storage. Ignoring long-distance transmission options, a combination of load shifting and storage equal to about 12 hours of average demand may keep renewable energy curtailment below 10% in the simulated system.

Denholm, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Voltage stability limits for weak power systems with high wind penetration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analysis of power system voltage stability has practical value in increasing wind penetration levels. As wind penetration levels increase in power systems, voltage stability challenges (more)

Tamimi, Ala

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Angle Instability Detection in Power Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration Using PMUs YC Zhang National Renewable Energy Laboratory Yingchen.zhang@nrel.gov 27/28 June 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration Using Synchrophasor Measurements  Project Objective * Utilize synchrophasor measurements to estimate the equivalent inertia of a power source such as synchronous generators or wind turbine generators * Develop angle instability detection method for a system with high wind penetration using the synchrophasor measurements 2 3 Background Submitted to IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics * In case of angular instability, some machines will have

25

PENETRATION OF COAL SLAGS INTO HIGH-CHROMIA REFRACTORIES  

SciTech Connect

Slagging coal gasifiers are used for the production of electricity and synthetic gases, as well as chemicals. High temperatures in the reaction chamber, typically between 1250C and 1600C, high pressure, generally greater than 400 psi, and corrosive slag place severe demands on the refractory materials. Slag produced during the combustion of coal flows over the refractory surface and penetrates the porous material. Slag penetration is typically followed by spalling of a brick that significantly decreases the service life of gasifier refractories. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the penetration depth of slags into high-chromia refractories as a function of time and temperature for various refractory-slag combinations.

Longanbach, Sara C.; Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of High Solar Penetration Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nicholas Miller, Kara Clark, Gary Jordan, and Zhi Gao GE Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-49667 December 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nicholas Miller, Kara Clark, Gary Jordan, and Zhi Gao GE Energy Prepared under Task No. SM101610

27

Evaluating Future Standards and Codes with a Focus on High Penetration Photovoltaic (HPPV) System Deployment (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster displaying solutions for evaluating future standards and codes for high penetration photovoltaic (HPPV) systems.

Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High Penetration, Grid Connected Photovoltaic Technology Codes and Standards: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the interim status in identifying and reviewing photovoltaic (PV) codes and standards (C&S) and related electrical activities for grid-connected, high-penetration PV systems with a focus on U.S. electric utility distribution grid interconnection.

Basso, T. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a limited set of advanced inverter functions.

Mather, B.; Neal, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

High-Penetration Photovoltaics Standards and Codes Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 20, 2010: Workshop Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effectively interconnecting high-level penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems requires careful technical attention to ensuring compatibility with electric power systems. Standards, codes, and implementation have been cited as major impediments to widespread use of PV within electric power systems. On May 20, 2010, in Denver, Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), held a workshop to examine the key technical issues and barriers associated with high PV penetration levels with an emphasis on codes and standards. This workshop included building upon results of the High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid workshop held in Ontario California on February 24-25, 2009, and upon the stimulating presentations of the diverse stakeholder presentations.

Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Herig, C.; Bower, W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

High Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service (APS) and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledgebase needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility and residential scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project - Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.5 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. The goal of this paper is to provide insight and lessons learned on the early stages of high penetration PV deployment. Primarily focusing on modeling and data acquisition, this paper describes the overall project, early results, and plans for future phases of the project.

Narang, D.; Hambrick, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

273 273 July 2009 Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential M. Milligan and B. Kirby National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Gramlich and M. Goggin American Wind Energy Association National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-550-46273 July 2009 Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential M. Milligan and B. Kirby National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Gramlich and M. Goggin American Wind Energy Association

33

Simulation of high speed impact, penetration and fragmentation problems on locally refined Cartesian grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques are presented to solve problems involving high speed material interactions that can lead to large deformations followed by fragmentation. To simulate such problems in an Eulerian framework on a fixed Cartesian mesh, interfaces (free surfaces ... Keywords: Cartesian grid methods, Elasto-plastic solids, Eulerian, Fragmentation, Ghost fluid method (GFM), High velocity impact, Level set methods, Penetration, Sharp interface methods, Shock interface interactions, Void collapse

S. Sambasivan; A. Kapahi; H. S. Udaykumar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California regulators recently approved a plan proposed by Southern California Edison (SCE) to install 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy in its utility service territory over the next 5 years. The installations will include 250 MW of utility-owned solar and 250 MW of independently owned solar. SCE expects that the majority of these systems will be commercial-scale rooftop PV systems connected at various points in the distribution system. Each of the SCE rooftop PV systems will typically have a rating of 1-3 MW. To understand the impact of high-penetration PV on the distribution grid, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE brought together a team of experts in resource assessment, distribution modeling, and planning to help analyze the impacts of adding high penetration of PV into the distribution system. Through modeling and simulation, laboratory testing, and field demonstrations, the team will address the issues identified in the analysis by fully examining the challenges, developing solutions, and transitioning those solutions to the field for large-scale deployment. This paper gives an update on the project and discusses technical results of integrating a large number of distributed PV systems into the grid.

Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hasper-Tuttle, J.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Design of resource to backbone transmission for a high wind penetration future.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In a high wind penetration future, transmission must be designed to integrate groups of new wind farms with a high capacity inter-regional ``backbone" transmission system. (more)

Slegers, James Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Wind energy and power system interconnection, control, and operation for high penetration of wind power .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High penetration of wind energy requires innovations in different areas of power engineering. Methods for improving wind energy and power system interconnection, control, and operation (more)

Liang, Jiaqi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators  

SciTech Connect

The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F. [and others] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Design and Performance of Solar Decathlon 2011 High-Penetration Microgrid: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The Solar Decathlon 2011 was held in Washington, D.C., from September 23 to October 2, 2011 . A high-penetration microgrid was designed, installed, and operated for the Solar Decathlon 2011 to grid-connect 19 highly energy-efficient, solar-powered competition houses to a single utility connection point. The capacity penetration of this microgrid (defined as maximum PV generation divided by maximum system load over a two-week period) was 74% based on 1-minute averaged data. Temporary, ground-laid conductors and electrical distribution equipment were installed to grid-connect the Solar Decathlon village, which included the houses as well as other electrical loads used by the event organizers. While 16 of the houses were connected to the 60 Hz microgrid, three houses from Belgium, China, and New Zealand were supplied with 50 Hz power. The design of the microgrid, including the connection of the houses powered by 50 Hz and a standby diesel generator, is discussed in this paper. In addition to the utility-supplied net energy meters at each house, a microgrid monitoring system was installed to measure and record energy consumption and PV energy production at 1-second intervals at each house. Bidirectional electronic voltage regulators were installed for groups of competition houses, which held the service voltage at each house to acceptable levels. The design and successful performance of this high-penetration microgrid is presented from the house, microgrid operator, and utility perspectives.

Stafford, B.; Coddington, M.; Butt, R.; Solomon, S.; Wiegand, G.; Wagner, C.; Gonzalez, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Policies and Programs to Integrate High Penetrations of Variable Renewable Energy (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this project are to highlight the diverse approaches for enabling high renewable energy penetration; synthesize lessons on effective policies and programs and present avenues for action to energy ministers and other stakeholders.

Cochran, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Power System Planning: Emerging Practices Suitable for Evaluating the Impact of High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report explores the impact of high-penetration renewable generation on electric power system planning methodologies and outlines how these methodologies are evolving to enable effective integration of variable-output renewable generation sources.

Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Numerical simulation of high-speed penetration-perforation dynamics in layered armor shields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penetration models and calculating algorithms are presented, describing the dynamics and fracture of composite armor shields penetrated by high-speed small arms. A shield considered consists of hard (metal or ceramic) facing and multilayered fabric backing. A simple formula is proved for the projectile residual velocity after perforation of a thin facing. A new plastic-flow jet model is proposed for calculating penetration dynamics in the case of a thick facing of ceramic or metal-ceramic FGM materials. By bringing together the developed models into a calculating algorithm, a computer tool is designed enabling simulations of penetration processes in the above-mentioned shields and analysis of optimization problems. Some results of computer simulation are presented. It is revealed in particular that strength proof of pliable backing can be better as compared with more rigid backing. Comparison of calculations and test data shows sufficient applicability of the models and the tool.

Ayzenberg-Stepanenko, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Numerical simulation of high-speed penetration-perforation dynamics in layered armor shields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penetration models and calculating algorithms are presented, describing the dynamics and fracture of composite armor shields penetrated by high-speed small arms. A shield considered consists of hard (metal or ceramic) facing and multilayered fabric backing. A simple formula is proved for the projectile residual velocity after perforation of a thin facing. A new plastic-flow jet model is proposed for calculating penetration dynamics in the case of a thick facing of ceramic or metal-ceramic FGM materials. By bringing together the developed models into a calculating algorithm, a computer tool is designed enabling simulations of penetration processes in the above-mentioned shields and analysis of optimization problems. Some results of computer simulation are presented. It is revealed in particular that strength proof of pliable backing can be better as compared with more rigid backing. Comparison of calculations and test data shows sufficient applicability of the models and the tool.

Mark Ayzenberg-Stepanenko; Grigory Osharovich

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling High-Penetration PV for Distribution Interconnection Studies: Smart Inverter Function Modeling in OpenDSS, Rev. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A great deal of work has been done by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and others with respect to the analysis of high-penetration photovoltaics at the distribution level (such as hosting capacity determinations). EPRI has also, over the past few years, been leading an effort to develop a common set of smart inverter grid-support functions. The objective of this project, summarized in this report, is an effort to combine these two initiatives by implementing the grid support functions ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the variable characteristics of solar power, as well as the accompanying grid dynamic performance and operational economics for a system with significant solar generation. The paper will show results of economic operational simulations of a very high solar generation future for the western half of the United States.

Lew, D.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Gao, Z.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced Voltage Control Strategies for High Penetration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research addresses advanced voltage control strategies for inverter-connected distributed generation. The emphasis is on photovoltaic (PV) generation, and results also apply to distributed wind, fuel cells, micro-turbines, and battery systems that are connected to the grid through an inverter. In related work, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) identified a set of high-priority functions for distributed generation. These included reactive power control such as intelligent and autonomous vo...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid, Workshop Report, February 24-25, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Outcomes from the EERE Solar Energy Technologies Program workshop on high penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems into the distribution grid, Feb. 24-25, 2009, Ontario, Calif.

Not Available

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained@ieor.berkeley.edu In this paper we present a unit commitment model for studying the impact of large-scale wind integration of renewable energy integration. Key words : unit commitment; stochastic programming; wind power; transmission

Oren, Shmuel S.

49

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

SciTech Connect

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sule, Petr [NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

SciTech Connect

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sule, Petr [NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Impact of High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Wind Power High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge, Debra Lew, and Michael Milligan Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52251 July 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Impact of High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge, Debra Lew, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WE110810 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52251 July 2011 NOTICE

52

Modeling High-Penetration PV for Distribution Interconnection Studies: Smart Inverter Function Modeling in OpenDSS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A great deal of work has been done by EPRI and others with respect to analysis of high-penetration PV at the distribution level (e.g, hosting capacity determinations). Likewise, EPRI has also, over the past few years, been leading an effort to develop a common set of smart inverter, grid-support functions. The objective of this project, and summarized in this report, is an effort to marry these two initiatives by implementing the grid support functions that have been identified within the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

956 956 April 2010 Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential Chris Helm and Kari Burman National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-47956 April 2010 Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential Chris Helm and Kari Burman Prepared under Task No. IDHW.9170 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

54

Impact of High-Penetration PV on Distribution System Performance: Example Cases and Analysis Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High penetration of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in the electric grid is beginning to challenge distribution planners and engineers. This technical update discusses the factors that can have a significant impact on a distribution feeder's response to PV generation. The report considers both the circuit and the photovoltaic generation characteristics. The circuit types and characteristics span the expected range of power delivery and control elements. Photovoltaic characteristics include syste...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis Methodology for Balancing Authority Cooperation in High Penetration of Variable Generation  

SciTech Connect

With the rapidly growing penetration level of wind and solar generation, the challenges of managing variability and the uncertainty of intermittent renewable generation become more and more significant. The problem of power variability and uncertainty gets exacerbated when each balancing authority (BA) works locally and separately to balance its own subsystem. The virtual BA concept means various forms of collaboration between individual BAs must manage power variability and uncertainty. The virtual BA will have a wide area control capability in managing its operational balancing requirements in different time frames. This coordination results in the improvement of efficiency and reliability of power system operation while facilitating the high level integration of green, intermittent energy resources. Several strategies for virtual BA implementation, such as ACE diversity interchange (ADI), wind only BA, BA consolidation, dynamic scheduling, regulation and load following sharing, extreme event impact study are discussed in this report. The objective of such strategies is to allow individual BAs within a large power grid to help each other deal with power variability. Innovative methods have been developed to simulate the balancing operation of BAs. These methods evaluate the BA operation through a number of metrics such as capacity, ramp rate, ramp duration, energy and cycling requirements to evaluate the performances of different virtual BA strategies. The report builds a systematic framework for evaluating BA consolidation and coordination. Results for case studies show that significant economic and reliability benefits can be gained. The merits and limitation of each virtual BA strategy are investigated. The report provides guidelines for the power industry to evaluate the coordination or consolidation method. The application of the developed strategies in cooperation with several regional BAs is in progress for several off-spring projects.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Malhara, Sunita V.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Du, Pengwei; Sastry, Chellury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Grid Reliability Considerations for High Levels of Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this white paper are to: (1) consider the unique characteristics of demand response relative to bulk electric system reliability needs and present contributions to system reliability, (2) identify potential bulk electric system reliability impacts of high levels of demand response without appropriate characterization of the resource over time and at increasing penetration levels, and (3) identify research needs to address these impacts so that the potential benefits of DR as system ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System, Phase 1 Update: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale photovoltaics (PV). Building upon the APS Community Power Project -- Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2011 IEEE PVSC conference that introduces the project and describes some of the preliminary consideration, as well as project plans and early results. This paper gives a status update of the project and presents selected results from Phase 2 of the project. It discusses baseline feeder modeling, load allocation, data acquisition, utility-scale PV integration, preliminary model validation, and plans for future phases.

Hambrick, J.; Narang, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Benchmarking Utility Best Business Practices and Processes for Managing High Penetration PV: Case Studies and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed photovoltaic (PV) power systems are deploying into electric system distribution at increasing rates. The resulting rise in penetration of variable PV generation is, in turn, posing escalating utility grid management challenges, some more pronounced than others in specific pockets of the United States. Grid hosting studies and modeling efforts have helped to build foundational knowledge about the impacts of high penetration PV (HPPV). But, to date, there has been a relative dearth of ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

High pressure liquid level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Management of Active Distribution Networks with High Penetration of Distributed Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The penetration of distributed generation and wind power in particular is expected to increase significantly over the coming years, and a huge shift in control, (more)

Arram, Ahmed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

Li, Tingwen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Power Flow Management in a High Penetration Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power System with Short-Term Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is intended as an introduction to some of the control challenges faced by developers of high penetration wind-diesel systems, with a focus on the management of power flows in order to achieve precise regulation of frequency and voltage in the face of rapidly varying wind power input and load conditions. The control algorithms presented herein are being implemented in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) high penetration wind-diesel system controller that will be installed in the village of Wales, Alaska, in early 2000.

Drouilhet, S. M.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wales, Alaska High Penetration Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power System: Theory of Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce the cost of rural power generation and the environmental impact of diesel fuel usage, the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA), Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA, a rural Alaskan utility), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), began a collaboration in late 1995 to implement a high-penetration wind-diesel hybrid power system in a village in northwest Alaska. The project was intended to be both a technology demonstration and a pilot for commercial replication of the system in other Alaskan villages. During the first several years of the project, NREL focused on the design and development of the electronic controls, the system control software, and the ancillary components (power converters, energy storage, electric dump loads, communications links, etc.) that would be required to integrate new wind turbines with the existing diesels in a reliable highly automated system. Meanwhile, AEA and KEA focused on project development activities, including wind resource assessment, site selection and permitting, community relationship building, and logistical planning. Ultimately, the village of Wales, Alaska, was chosen as the project site. Wales is a native Inupiat village of approximately 160 inhabitants, with an average electric load of about 75 kW.

Drouilhet, S.; Shirazi, M.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Characterizing the Effects of High Wind Penetration on a Small Isolated Grid in Arctic Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the operating characteristics of the wind-diesel system in Kotzebue, Alaska, operated by Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA). KEA began incorporating wind power into its 100% diesel generating system in 1997 with three 66 kW wind turbines. In 1999, KEA added another seven 66 kW turbines, resulting in the current wind capacity of 660 kW. KEA is in the process of expanding its wind project again and ultimately expects to operate 2-3 MW of wind capacity. With a peak load of approximately 4 MW and a minimum load of approximately 1.6 MW, the wind penetration is significant. KEA is currently experiencing greater than 35% wind penetration, sometimes for several consecutive hours. This paper discusses the observed wind penetration at KEA and evaluates the effects of wind penetration on power quality on the KEA grid.

Randall, G; Vilhauer, R. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Thompson, C. (Thompson Engineering Company)

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DATES COVERED (From - To) Renewable Energy and EfficiencyModels Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy PenetrationWood (OnLocation) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COVERED (From - To) Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modelinga Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025OnLocation) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Optimal Inverter VAR Control in Distribution Systems with High PV Penetration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of the study detailed in this paper is to demonstrate the benefits of inverter var control on a fast timescale to mitigate rapid and large voltage fluctuations due to the high penetration of photovoltaic generation and the resulting reverse power flow. Our approach is to formulate the volt/var control as a radial optimal power flow (OPF) problem to minimize line losses and energy consumption, subject to constraints on voltage magnitudes. An efficient solution to the radial OPF problem is presented and used to study the structure of optimal inverter var injection and the net benefits, taking into account the additional cost of inverter losses when operating at non-unity power factor. This paper will illustrate how, depending on the circuit topology and its loading condition, the inverter's optimal reactive power injection is not necessarily monotone with respect to their real power output. The results are demonstrated on a distribution feeder on the Southern California Edison system that has a very ...

Farivar, Masoud; Clarke, Christopher; Low, Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Groundwater penetrating radar and high resolution seismic for locating shallow faults in unconsolidated sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediments, particularly in coastal plain settings, are very difficult to discern during subsurface exploration yet have critical impact to groundwater flow, contaminant transport and geotechnical evaluations. This paper presents a case study using cross-over geophysical technologies in an area where shallow faulting is probable and known contamination exists. A comparison is made between Wenner and dipole-dipole resistivity data, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic data. Data from these methods were verified with a cone penetrometer investigation for subsurface lithology and compared to existing monitoring well data. Interpretations from these techniques are compared with actual and theoretical shallow faulting found in the literature. The results of this study suggests that (1) the CPT study, combined with the monitoring well data may suggest that discontinuities in correlatable zones may indicate that faulting is present (2) the addition of the Wenner and dipole-dipole data may further suggest that offset zones exist in the shallow subsurface but not allow specific fault planes or fault stranding to be mapped (3) the high resolution seismic data will image faults to within a few feet of the surface but does not have the resolution to identify the faulting on the scale of our models, however it will suggest locations for upward continuation of faulted zones (4) offset 100 MHz and 200 MHz CMP GPR will image zones and features that may be fault planes and strands similar to our models (5) 300 MHz GPR will image higher resolution features that may suggest the presence of deeper faults and strands, and (6) the combination of all of the tools in this study, particularly the GPR and seismic may allow for the mapping of small scale, shallow faulting in unconsolidated sediments.

Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.; Waddell, M.G. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.; Sexton, B.G. [Microseeps Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

High level white noise generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blalock, Theron V. (Knoxville, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effective Ancillary Services Market Designs on High Wind Power Penetration Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power. Ancillary services markets have been developed in many of the restructured power system regions throughout the world. Ancillary services include the services that support the provision of energy to support power system reliability. The ancillary services markets are tied tightly to the design of the energy market and to the physics of the system and therefore careful consideration of power system economics and engineering must be considered in their design. This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power.

Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Navid, N.; Smith, J. C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oxidation of depleted uranium penetrators and aerosol dispersal at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Aerosols dispersed from depleted uranium penetrators exposed to air and air-CO/sub 2/ mixtures at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000/sup 0/C for 2- or 4-h periods were characterized. These experiments indicated dispersal of low concentrations of aerosols in the respirable size range (typically <10/sup -3/% of penetrator mass at 223 cm/s (5 mph) windspeed). Oxidation was maximum at 700/sup 0/C in air and 800/sup 0/C in 50% air-50% CO/sub 2/, indicating some self-protection developed at higher temperatures. No evidence of self-sustained burning was observed, although complete oxidation can be expected in fires significantly exceeding 4 h, the longest exposure of this series. An outdoor burning experiment using 10 batches of pine wood and paper packing material as fuel caused the highest oxidation rate, probably accelerated by disruption of the oxide layer accompanying broad temperature fluctuation as each fuel batch was added.

Elder, J.C.; Tinkle, M.C.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Penetration equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

Young, C.W. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

High temperature liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Importance of High Temporal Resolution in Modeling Renewable Energy Penetration Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, modeling investment and dispatch problems in electricity economics has been limited by computation power. Due to this limitation, simplifications are applied. One common practice, for example, is to reduce the temporal resolution of the dispatch by clustering similar load levels. The increase of intermittent electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) changes the validity of this assumption. RES-E already cover a certain amount of the total demand. This leaves an increasingly volatile residual demand to be matched by the conventional power market. This paper quantifies differences in investment decisions by applying three different time-resolution residual load patterns in an investment and dispatch power system model. The model optimizes investment decisions in five year steps between today and 2030 with residual load levels for 8760, 288 and 16 time slices per year. The market under consideration is the four zone ERCOT market in Texas. The results show that investment decisions significantly differ across the three scenarios. In particular, investments into base-load technologies are substantially reduced in the high resolution scenario (8760 residual load levels) relative to the scenarios with lower temporal resolution. Additionally, the amount of RES-E curtailment and the market value of RES-E exhibit noteworthy differences.

Nicolosi, Marco; Mills, Andrew D; Wiser, Ryan H

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

79

Methods of integrating a high penetration photovoltaic power plant into a micro grid.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The island of Lanai is currently one of the highest penetration PV micro grids in the world, with the 1.2 MWAC La Ola Solar Farm operating on a grid with a peak net load of 4.7 MW. This facility interconnects to one of Lanai's three 12.47 kV distribution circuits. An initial interconnection requirements study (IRS) determined that several control and performance features are necessary to ensure safe and reliable operation of the island grid. These include power curtailment, power factor control, over/under voltage and frequency ride through, and power ramp rate limiting. While deemed necessary for stable grid operation, many of these features contradict the current IEEE 1547 interconnection requirements governing distributed generators. These controls have been successfully implemented, tested, and operated since January 2009. Currently, the system is producing power in a curtailed mode according to the requirements of a power purchase agreement (PPA).

Stein, Joshua S.; Johnson, Lars (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Nelson, Lauren (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Robert. (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Operations-Based Planning for Placement and Sizing of Energy Storage in a Grid With a High Penetration of Renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the penetration level of transmission-scale time-intermittent renewable generation resources increases, control of flexible resources will become important to mitigating the fluctuations due to these new renewable resources. Flexible resources may include new or existing synchronous generators as well as new energy storage devices. The addition of energy storage, if needed, should be done optimally to minimize the integration cost of renewable resources, however, optimal placement and sizing of energy storage is a difficult optimization problem. The fidelity of such results may be questionable because optimal planning procedures typically do not consider the effect of the time dynamics of operations and controls. Here, we use an optimal energy storage control algorithm to develop a heuristic procedure for energy storage placement and sizing. We generate many instances of intermittent generation time profiles and allow the control algorithm access to unlimited amounts of storage, both energy and power, at a...

Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Backhaus, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A variation aware high level synthesis framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worst-case delay/power of function units has been used in traditional high level synthesis to facilitate design space exploration. As technology scales to nanometer regime, the impact of process variations increases. The degree of variability encountered ...

Feng Wang; Guangyu Sun; Yuan Xie

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Importance of High Temporal Resolution in Modeling Renewable Energy Penetration Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind power in a carbon constrained world, Energy Policy,Wind Power in the Danish liberalized power market Policy measures, price impact and investor incentives, Energy Policy,wind energy curtailment decisions, an assumption for the $-per-kWh level of policy

Nicolosi, Marco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Assessment of Non-Fuel, Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems to Support High Wind Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the RD&D work at EPRI on adiabatic no-fuel Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) for wind integration. Bulk energy storage (BES) has latent value in the electric grid, enhances grid reliability, and is well suited to address wind integration related challenges. Without storage, extensive ramping and spinning reserve backup of thermal generators is required, at associated high costs, poor thermal performance, poor down ramp capability and high emissions. Fu...

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Software Architecture for High Level Applications  

SciTech Connect

A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

Shen,G.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any com...

Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.) [ed.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

High-level radioactive waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

A summary of a comprehensive overview study of potential alternatives for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is presented. The concepts studied included disposal in geologic formations, disposal in seabeds, disposal in ice caps, disposal into space, and elimination by transmutation. (TFD)

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The CMS High-Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the 'High-Level Trigger'(HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, {tau} leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

Covarelli, R. [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

High-Level Real-Time Concurrency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of all real-time systems is predictability. Achieving this goal requires all levels of the system to be well de ned and have a xed worst-case execution time. These needs have resulted in the creation of overly restrictive commercial real-time systems providing only ad-hoc scheduling facilities and basic concurrent functionality. Ad-hoc scheduling makes developing, verifying, and maintaining a real-time system extremely dicult and time consuming. Basic concurrent functionality forces programmers to develop complex concurrent programs without the aid of high-level concurrency features.

Ashif S. Harji; C Ashif S. Harji

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation NREL, Ren Anderson Building America Technical Update Meeting July 25 th , 2012 Issue 5 - How Much Insulation is Too Much? How do we define the cost-effective limit for improvements in enclosure efficiency? Key Factors to Consider: -Cost of savings vs. cost of grid-supplied energy -Cost of efficiency savings vs. cost of savings from renewable generation. -Savings from envelope improvements vs. other efficiency options Context * It is widely believed that code-specified insulation levels also represent cost-effective limits. * However, the cost-effective insulation levels exceed IECC values in many climates. * The homeowner-driven value of modest increases in enclosure performance can create economies of scale that will reduce

92

High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on 24 July 2008 1 on 24 July 2008 1 Office of Environmental Management High-Level Waste Corporate Board Charter Purpose This Charter establishes the High- Level Waste (HLW) Corporate Board, (hereinafter referred to as the 'Board') within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The Board will serve as a consensus building body to integrate the Department of Energy (DOE) HLW management and disposition activities across the EM program and, with the coordination and cooperation of other program offices, across the DOE complex. The Board will identify the need for and develop policies, planning, standards and guidance and provide the integration necessary to implement an effective and efficient national HLW program. The Board will also evaluate the implications of HLW issues and their

93

High-Level Waste Melter Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a massive cleanup task in resolving the legacy of environmental problems from years of manufacturing nuclear weapons. One of the major activities within this task is the treatment and disposal of the extremely large amount of high-level radioactive (HLW) waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The current planning for the method of choice for accomplishing this task is to vitrify (glassify) this waste for disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes the results of the DOE-chartered independent review of alternatives for solidification of Hanford HLW that could achieve major cost reductions with reasonable long-term risks, including recommendations on a path forward for advanced melter and waste form material research and development. The potential for improved cost performance was considered to depend largely on increased waste loading (fewer high-level waste canisters for disposal), higher throughput, or decreased vitrification facility size.

Ahearne, J.; Gentilucci, J.; Pye, L. D.; Weber, T.; Woolley, F.; Machara, N. P.; Gerdes, K.; Cooley, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

Agostino, L.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Bauer, G.; /MIT, LNS; Beccati, B.; /CERN; Behrens, U.; /DESY; Berryhil, J.; Biery, K.; /Fermilab; Bose, T.; /Boston U.; Brett, A.; /Fermilab; Branson, J.; /UC, San Diego; Cano, E.; /CERN; Cheung, H.; /Fermilab /CERN /LLNL, Livermore /Minnesota U.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

The ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter high level triggers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector yields a huge sample of data from different sub-detectors. On-line data processing is applied to select and reduce the volume of the stored data. ALICE applies a multi-level hardware trigger scheme where fast detectors are used to feed a three-level (L0, L1, and L2) deep chain. The High-Level Trigger (HLT) is a fourth filtering stage sitting logically between the L2 trigger and the data acquisition event building. The EMCal detector comprises a large area electromagnetic calorimeter that extends the momentum measurement of photons and neutral mesons up to $p_T=250$ GeV/c, which improves the ALICE capability to perform jet reconstruction with measurement of the neutral energy component of jets. An online reconstruction and trigger chain has been developed within the HLT framework to sharpen the EMCal hardware triggers, by combining the central barrel tracking information with the shower reconstruction (clusters) in the calorimeter. In the present report the status and the functionality of the software components developed for the EMCal HLT online reconstruction and trigger chain will be discussed, as well as preliminary results from their commissioning performed during the 2011 LHC running period.

F. Ronchetti; F. Blanco; M. Figueredo; A. G. Knospe; L. Xaplanteris for the ALICE HLT Collaboration

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

High accuracy electronic material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch  

SciTech Connect

The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Mason, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A VERY HIGH LEVEL NEUTRAL BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Neutial Beam Control System we have elucidated theseHigh Level Neutral Beam Control System 8!. References 1. V.High-Level Neutral-Beam Control System Victor Elischer Van

Elischer, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Decontamination of high-level waste canisters  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces.

Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting March 13, 2006 - 11:48am Addthis...

104

High-level verification of system designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re?nement Checking of CSP Programs 6.8.2 SPARK: High-Levelcompression for model- checking csp or how to check 1020state-of-the-art tool to check CSP re? nements. The approach

Kundu, Sudipta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method and Case Study for Estimating the Ramping Capability of a Control Area or Balancing Authority and Implications for Moderate or High Wind Penetration: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In several regions of the United States there has been a significant increase in wind generation capability over the past several years. As the penetration rate of wind capacity increases, grid operators and planners are increasingly concerned about accommodating the increased variability that wind contributes to the system. In this paper we examine the distinction between regulation, load following, hourly energy, and energy imbalance to understand how restructured power systems accommodate and value inter-hour ramps. We use data from two restructured markets, California and PJM, and from Western Area Power Administration's (WAPA's) Rocky Mountain control area to determine expected load-following capability in each region. Our approach is to examine the load-following capability that currently exists using data from existing generators in the region. We then examine the levels of wind penetration that can be accommodated with this capability using recently collected wind farm data. We discuss how load-following costs are captured in restructured markets, what resources are available to meet these requirements, why there are no explicit load-following tariffs, and the societal importance of being able to access generator ramping capability. Finally, the implications for wind plants and wind integration costs are examined.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Monolithic ballasted penetrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

Hickerson, Jr., James P. (Cedar Crest, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Baldwin, Michael D. (Albuquerque, NM); Maguire, Michael C. (Worcester, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Infrared Thermography in High Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy, government-owned, company-operated industrial complex built in the 1950s to produce materials used in nuclear weapons. Five reactors were built to support the production of nuclear weapons material. Irradiated materials were moved from the reactors to one of the two chemical separation plants. In these facilities, known as ''canyons,'' the irradiated fuel and target assemblies were chemically processed to separate useful products from waste. Unfortunately, the by-product waste of nuclear material production was a highly radioactive liquid that had to be stored and maintained. In 1993 a strategy was developed to implement predictive maintenance technologies in the Liquid Waste Disposition Project Division responsible for processing the liquid waste. Responsibilities include the processing and treatment of 51 underground tanks designed to hold 750,000 to1,300,000 gallons of liquid waste and operation of a facility that vitrifies highly radioactive liquid waste into glass logs. Electrical and mechanical equipment monitored at these facilities is very similar to that found in non-nuclear industrial plants. Annual inspections are performed on electrical components, roof systems, and mechanical equipment. Troubleshooting and post installation and post-maintenance infrared inspections are performed as needed. In conclusion, regardless of the industry, the use of infrared thermography has proven to be an efficient and effective method of inspection to help improve plant safety and reliability through early detection of equipment problems.

GLEATON, DAVIDT.

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

The High Level Vibration Test Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the PWR primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis. 4 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Kawakami, S. (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center, Tokyo (Japan))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fermilab Tevatron high level rf accelerating systems  

SciTech Connect

Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Improving polyhedral code generation for high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-level synthesis (HLS) tools are now capable of generating high-quality RTL codes for a number of programs. Nevertheless, for best performance aggressive program transformations are still required to exploit data reuse and enable communication/computation ... Keywords: high-level synthesis, loop tiling, polyhedral compilation

Wei Zuo; Peng Li; Deming Chen; Louis-Nol Pouchet; Shunan Zhong; Jason Cong

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Value of storage with increased renewable penetration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem statement for this project is: (1) Renewable energy portfolio standards - (a) high penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation on the grid, (b) utilities constrained by NERC Control Performance Standards, (c) requires additional resources to match generation with load; and (2) mitigation of impacts with energy storage - at what level of renewable penetration does energy storage become an attractive value proposition. Use a simplified, yet robust dispatch model that: (a) incorporates New Mexico Balance Area load and wind generation data, (b) distributes the load among a suite of generators, (c) quantifies increased generation costs with increased penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation - fuel, startup, shut down, ramping, standby, etc., (d) tracks and quantifies NERC pentalties and violations, and (e) quantifies storage costs. Dispatch model has been constructed and it: (a) accurately distributes a load among a suite of generators, (b) quantifies duty cycle metrics for each of the generators - cumulative energy production, ramping and non ramping duration, spinning reserves, number of start-ups, and shut down durations, etc., (c) quantifies energy exchanges - cumulative exchanges, duration, and number of exchanges, (d) tracks ACE violations.

Brainard, James Robert; Roach, Jesse Dillon

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT_19507_1 DRAFT_19507_1 High-Level Waste Management Bryan Bower, DOE Director - WVDP DOE High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Savannah River Site April 1, 2008 West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project DRAFT_19507_2 West Valley High-Level Waste To solidify the radioactive material from approximately 600,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste into a durable, high-quality glass, both a pretreatment system to remove salts and sulfates from the waste and a vitrification system/process were designed. To solidify the radioactive material from approximately 600,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste into a durable, high-quality glass, both a pretreatment system to remove salts and sulfates from the waste and a vitrification system/process were designed.

116

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high levels of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight,...

117

SIGWX Charts - High Level Significant Weather | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Research Safety States Supply Chain SIGWX Charts - High Level Significant Weather Safety DataTools Apps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Safety You are here...

118

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California Title Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California Publication Type...

119

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Heuristic for Clock Selection in High-Level Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clock selection has a significant impact on the performance and quality of designs in high-level synthesis. In most synthesis systems, a convenient value of the clock is chosen or exact (and expensive) methods have been used for clock selection. This ... Keywords: high-level synthesis, clock selection, graph structure, design space exploration, heuristics

J. Ramanujam; Sandeep Deshpande; Jinpyo Hong; Mahmut Kandemir

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High-Level Power Minimization of Analog Sensor Interface Architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-level analog design and optimization tool was developed for the architectural synthesis of complex analog systems towards minimal power consumption. In this paper we will illustrate the use of this tool with the high-level design of an analog ...

Stphane Donnay; Georges Gielen; Willy Sansen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

In-place HEPA filter penetration test  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in- place penetration test is practical.

Bergman, W.; Wilson, kK.; Elliott, J.; Bettencourt, B.; Slawski, J.W.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices for energy and ancillary services. The day-aheadprices for energy and ancillary services using the shadowhourly prices for energy and ancillary services that reflect

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report, Utility Wind Integration Group, Reston, VA, Oct.B. Parsons. Utility wind integration and operating impactoperations: A review of wind integration studies to date.

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Asset Management: Thermal Power Plant Cy- cling Costs.to invest in thermal power plants under increasing windthe dispatch of thermal power plants. De Jonghe et al. (

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operator Combined cycle gas turbine Continuous Emissionsin coal, combined-cycle gas turbines (CCGTs), simple cycleCCGTs, natural gas steam turbines, and CTs along with

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO,and J. Finn. Western Renewable Energy Zones, Phase 1: QRA6A2-46877, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

errors, and monthly hydro power generation budget arepower, coal power, large hydro power, natural outside ofand maintence Pumped hydro storage Power purchase agreement

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.1.2 Storage and Hydro Resource Dispatch . . . 3.1.323 Monthly hydro generation budget and min-flow . . . . .4.3 Hydropower and Pumped Hydro Storage . . 4.4 Thermal

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE). 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energysbased on California in 2030. Increasing amounts of wind,hourly load profile in 2030. Thermal generation parameters

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission were ignored. on the characteristics, constraints, and operating costs of generators, the availability

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and incentives to invest in thermal power plants under increasing wind energyand amount of energy sold at low prices for wind at 40%power prices: The case of wind electricity in spain. Energy

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Outlook 2010: Electrcity Market Module. Technicalto provide 37% of Europes electrcity in 2020 with wind and

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Net load and energy prices on peak days with increasing12 Net load and energy prices on peak days with increasingin hour t ? T (energy price) ? ns,t : nonspinning reserve

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCGTs, natural gas steam turbines, and CTs along withefficiency natural gas steam turbine plants remain in thevintage, one natural gas steam turbine vintage, geothermal,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas firing in the steam generator of a CSP plant norCycle Steam Nuclear Hydro None Table 14: Incumbent generator

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Voltage security assessment with high penetration levels of utility-scale doubly fed induction generator wind plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The interconnection requirements set forth by FERC in order 661-A mandate the operation of wind plants within a power factor range of 0.95 leading / (more)

Konopinski, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price. Two-tank molten salt storage for parabolic trough solar powerpower prices shifting from the late afternoon, when solarsolar, $2030/MWh higher than the average wholesale power price and

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal investments in power generation under centralizedwith significant wind power generation. IEEE Transactions onmodeling of a regional power generation system - integrating

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public benefits, or renewable energy costs in evaluating theof the benefits and costs of renewable energy, it providesof the benefits and costs of renewable energy, the findings

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case of wind electricity in spain. Energy Policy, 36:3345wind power in a carbon constrained world. Energy Policy, 34:wind power generation capacity in liberalized electricity markets. Energy Policy,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Operator Combined cycle gas turbine Continuousinclude natural gas combined cycle (CCGTs) and combustiona balance in RT. The combined-cycle vintage (CCGT) modeled

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between the real-time price and the actual real-2008) used historic real-time prices and simulated long-runin the real-time (RT) market at the RT price. Variable

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be reflected in energy market prices because the costs areVG. The DA market prices for energy and ancillary services (of the year the market price for energy is based on the

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Concentrating solar power Combustion turbine DayInvestment in Wind and Solar Power in California. Doctor offor parabolic trough solar power plants. Energy, 29(5-6):

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal analog of pumped storage for electrical demand4.3 Hydropower and Pumped Hydro Storage . . 4.4 Thermalnuclear, and pumped hydro storage (PHS). The investment

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions leads to more baseload capacity being replaced bymanner than strictly baseload (Brown, 1996; Grande et al. ,amount of inflexible baseload generation would increase and

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molten salt storage for parabolic trough solar power plants.Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems inoften based on solar trough or parabolic dish technology) to

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are applied for wind and solar (PV and CSP 0 ); a reasonablethe limits of solar photovoltaics (PV) in traditionalincreasing solar generation: additional PV and CSP 0 are

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M. Milligan. Wind energy and power system operations: Aand J. Hild. The value of wind energy as a function of windof IEA collaboration. Wind Energy, 14(2):179192, Mar. 2011.

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system - integrating wind power. Renewable Energy, 34(4):Malley. Capacity value of wind power, calculation, and dataof large amounts of wind power on design and operation of

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on peak days with increasing CSP 6 . . . . . . . . 13 ChangeAcronyms AS CAISO CCGT CEMS CSP CT DA EIA EPA EUE LCOE LOLPand concentrating solar power (CSP) with and without thermal

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hour t ? T e t : energy in pumped hydro storage reservoirNuclear Exist_Hydro Exist_Storage Note: Energy for existingcurtail non-hydro generation. Energy Prospects West, June

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

National high-level waste systems analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of budgetary impacts, constraints, and repository availability on the storage and treatment of high-level waste and on both existing and pending negotiated milestones. The impacts of the availabilities of various treatment systems on schedule and throughput at four Department of Energy sites are compared to repository readiness in order to determine the prudent application of resources. The information modeled for each of these sites is integrated with a single national model. The report suggests a high-level-waste model that offers a national perspective on all high-level waste treatment and storage systems managed by the Department of Energy.

Kristofferson, K.; Oholleran, T.P.; Powell, R.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on accommodating high levels of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight, waves, tidal forces, and some types of rivers) to generate electricity. Most renewablesfall into this category. Reliably integrating these resources into the bulk power system will require significant changes to traditional methods used for system planning and operation. Ongoing efforts brought together by NERC and its stakeholders

156

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Field Campaigns The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP ICE) was conducted near...

157

High-level test synthesis for delay fault testability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-level test synthesis (HLTS) method targeted for delay fault testability is presented. The proposed method, when combined with hierarchical test pattern generation for embedded modules, guarantees 100% delay test coverage for detectable faults ...

Sying-Jyan Wang; Tung-Hua Yeh

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Counsel's Notice of Inquiry concerning the preparation of a report to Congress on the Price-Anderson Act. Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level Radioactive...

159

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Act (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manitoba bars the storage of high-level radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel, not intended for research purposes, that was produced at a nuclear facility or in a nuclear reactor outside the...

160

Weld penetration and defect control  

SciTech Connect

Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

Chin, B.A.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

Cabeche, Dion Tunick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Climate Fluctuations and Record-High Levels of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Michigan reached record-high levels during 1985 and 1986 just 10 years after attaining its previous record highs of this century. The climate of the basin has become cloudier and cooler over the past 40 years, loading to decreased ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Array recovery and high-level transformations for DSP applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient implementation of DSP applications is critical for many embedded systems. Optimizing compilers for application programs, written in C, largely focus on code generation and scheduling, which, with their growing maturity, are providing diminishing ... Keywords: Pointer conversion, dataflow graphs, embedded processors, high-level transformations

Bjrn Franke; Michael O'boyle

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

THE XAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HIGH LEVEL CONTROL ROOM APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XAL is a Java programming framework for building high-level control applications related to accelerator physics. The structure, details of implementation, and interaction between components, auxiliary XAL packages, and the latest modifications are discussed. A general overview of XAL applications created for the SNS project is presented.

Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL; Allen, Christopher K [ORNL; Chu, Paul [Stanford University; Galambos, John D [ORNL; Pelaia II, Tom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

High-level synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microfluidic biochips offer a promising platform for massively parallel DNA analysis, automated drug discovery, and real-time biomolecular recognition. Current techniques for full-custom design of droplet-based digital biochips do not scale ... Keywords: High-level synthesis, biochips, microfluidics, scheduling, system-on-chip

Fei Su; Krishnendu Chakrabarty

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Exploring high-level features for detecting cyberpedophilia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we suggest a list of high-level features and study their applicability in detection of cyberpedophiles. We used a corpus of chats downloaded from http://www.perverted-justice.com and two negative datasets of different nature: cybersex ... Keywords: Cyberpedophilia, Emotion detection, Sentiment analysis

Dasha Bogdanova, Paolo Rosso, Thamar Solorio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A high-level abstraction of shared accesses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and use of the tape mechanism, a new high-level abstraction of accesses to shared data for software DSMs. Tapes consolidate and generalize a number of recent protocol optimizations, including update-based locks ... Keywords: DSM, programming libraries, shared memory, update protocols

Peter J. Keleher

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High Level Waste Corporate Board Newsletter - 09/11/08  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UPCOMING UPCOMING EVENTS: The Low-Level Waste Federal Review Group (LFRG) in Washington, DC on 16-18 September 2008. Contact Maureen O'Dell for details (MAUREEN.O'DELL@hq.doe.gov) Next High-Level Waste Corporate Board meeting will be held at DOE- RL on 6 November 2008. Meeting details will be presented here and e- mailed to those persons with an interest to participate. Topics for discussion include but are not limited to:  Results of the Tank Integrity Workshop  Strategic Initiative Briefing  Performance Assessment Guide Proposal NEWS ITEMS 3 June 2008: WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced submittal of a License Application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission seeking authorization to construct America's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. (http://www.ocrwm.doe.gov) 8

169

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

170

High-level waste management technology program plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Harmon, H.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Spring Meeting - May 15, 2012 Hilton Knoxville 501 West Church Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37902-2591 Agenda (Draft #1 - 4/18/12) ______________________________________________________________________________ Tuesday, May 15 - 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM / (need meeting room name) 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast - served in meeting room 9:00 a.m. Task Force Business Meeting - John Giarrusso, MEMA and Rich Pinney, NJDEP Co-chairs presiding  Welcome: Introductions; Agenda Review; Announcements  2012 funding  Co-Chair Election  Rules of Procedure  Membership: members & alternates appointment status  Legislative Liaisons  Staff Regional Meeting Attendance

172

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

173

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Level Waste Corporate Board High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Loews Hotel 1065 West Peachtree St, Atlanta, Georgia November 18, 2010 Time Topic Speaker 7:30 AM Closed Session - ratify Charter Board members 8:30 AM Welcome, Introduction, 2011 focus for HLW Corp Board Shirley Olinger 8:50 AM Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet  Show flowsheet w/ split locations  Describe recycle of LAW concept  Discuss baseline assumptions  Describe subsequent talks using flowsheet figure Gary Smith 9:15 AM Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP)  Tc/I split factors (w/ and w/o recycle)  Water management (w/ and w/o recycle) Albert Kruger 9:45 AM WTP Melter/Offgas Systems Decontamination Factors  Re as a stimulant for Tc  Issues that limit Tc incorporation in LAW glass

174

Review of High Level Waste Tanks Ultrasonic Inspection Data  

SciTech Connect

A review of the data collected during ultrasonic inspection of the Type I high level waste tanks has been completed. The data was analyzed for relevance to the possibility of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion. The review of the Type I tank UT inspection data has confirmed that the vapor space general corrosion is not an unusually aggressive phenomena and correlates well with predicted corrosion rates for steel exposed to bulk solution. The corrosion rates are seen to decrease with time as expected. The review of the temperature data did not reveal any obvious correlations between high temperatures and the occurrences of leaks. The complex nature of temperature-humidity interaction, particularly with respect to vapor corrosion requires further understanding to infer any correlation. The review of the waste level data also did not reveal any obvious correlations.

Wiersma, B

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack.

Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

Fox, K.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Life Extension of Aging High-Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) play a critical role in the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex, and therefore activities are underway to protect and better understand these tanks. The DST Life Extension Program is focused on both tank life extension and on evaluation of tank integrity. Tank life extension activities focus on understanding tank failure modes and have produced key chemistry and operations controls to minimize tank corrosion and extend useful tank life. Tank integrity program activities have developed and applied key technologies to evaluate the condition of the tank structure and predict useful tank life. Program results to date indicate that DST useful life can be extended well beyond the original design life and allow the existing tanks to fill a critical function within the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex. In addition the tank life may now be more reliably predicted, facilitating improved planning for the use and possible future replacement of these tanks.

Bryson, D.; Callahan, V.; Ostrom, M.; Bryan, W.; Berman, H.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

Sattler, L.R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

The ATLAS High Level Trigger Configuration and Steering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In March 2010 the four LHC experiments saw the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Still within the year a collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. At ATLAS, events of potential interest for ATLAS physics are selected by a three level trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first level (L1) is implemented in customized hardware, the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers. Within the ATLAS physics program more than 500 trigger signatures are defined. The HLT tests each signature on each L1-accepted event, the test outcome is recorded for later analysis. The HLT-Steering is responsible for this. It foremost ensures the independent test of each signature, guarantying unbiased trigger decisions. Yet, to minimize data readout and execution time, cached detector data and once-calculated trigger objects are reused to form the decision. Some signature tests are performed only on a scaled-down fraction of candidate events, in order to reduce the output rate a...

Stelzer, J; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures.

Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms [IPWF]) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as co-disposal. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister inserted in the center and/or one or more DOE SNF canisters displacing a HLW canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents.

N. E. Pettit

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of a High Level Waste Tank Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center was requested by it`s sister site, West Valley Nuclear Service (WVNS), to develop a remote inspection system to gather wall thickness readings of their High Level Waste Tanks. WVNS management chose to take a proactive approach to gain current information on two tanks t hat had been in service since the early 70`s. The tanks contain high level waste, are buried underground, and have only two access ports to an annular space between the tank and the secondary concrete vault. A specialized remote system was proposed to provide both a visual surveillance and ultrasonic thickness measurements of the tank walls. A magnetic wheeled crawler was the basis for the remote delivery system integrated with an off-the-shelf Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. A development program was initiated for Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to design, fabricate, and test a remote system based on the Crawler. The system was completed and involved three crawlers to perform the needed tasks, an Ultrasonic Crawler, a Camera Crawler, and a Surface Prep Crawler. The crawlers were computer controlled so that their operation could be done remotely and their position on the wall could be tracked. The Ultrasonic Crawler controls were interfaced with ABB Amdata`s I-PC, Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System so that thickness mapping of the wall could be obtained. A second system was requested by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), to perform just ultrasonic mapping on their similar Waste Storage Tanks; however, the system needed to be interfaced with the P-scan Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. Both remote inspection systems were completed 9/94. Qualifications tests were conducted by WVNS prior to implementation on the actual tank and tank development was achieved 10/94. The second inspection system was deployed at WSRC 11/94 with success, and the system is now in continuous service inspecting the remaining high level waste tanks at WSRC.

Appel, D.K.; Loibl, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, SC (United States); Meese, D.C. [Westinghouse West Valley Nuclear Services, West Valley, NY (United States)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

Corrosion and failure processes in high-level waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large amount of radioactive waste has been stored safely at the Savannah River and Hanford sites over the past 46 years. The aim of this report is to review the experimental corrosion studies at Savannah River and Hanford with the intention of identifying the types and rates of corrosion encountered and indicate how these data contribute to tank failure predictions. The compositions of the High-Level Wastes, mild steels used in the construction of the waste tanks and degradation-modes particularly stress corrosion cracking and pitting are discussed. Current concerns at the Hanford Site are highlighted.

Mahidhara, R.K.; Elleman, T.S.; Murty, K.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High-level waste melter alternatives assessment report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Program`s (hereafter referred to as HLW Program) Melter Candidate Assessment Activity performed in fiscal year (FY) 1994. The mission of the TWRS Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The goal of the HLW Program is to immobilize the HLW fraction of pretreated tank waste into a vitrified product suitable for interim onsite storage and eventual offsite disposal at a geologic repository. Preparation of the encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources for final disposal is also included in the HLW Program. As a result of trade studies performed in 1992 and 1993, processes planned for pretreatment of tank wastes were modified substantially because of increasing estimates of the quantity of high-level and transuranic tank waste remaining after pretreatment. This resulted in substantial increases in needed vitrification plant capacity compared to the capacity of original Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The required capacity has not been finalized, but is expected to be four to eight times that of the HWVP design. The increased capacity requirements for the HLW vitrification plant`s melter prompted the assessment of candidate high-capacity HLW melter technologies to determine the most viable candidates and the required development and testing (D and T) focus required to select the Hanford Site HLW vitrification plant melter system. An assessment process was developed in early 1994. This document describes the assessment team, roles of team members, the phased assessment process and results, resulting recommendations, and the implementation strategy.

Calmus, R.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ATW system impact on high-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

Arthur, E.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ATW system impact on high-level waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

Arthur, E.D.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Commissioning of the ALICE High-Level Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new era in experimental nuclear physics has begun with the start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and its dedicated heavy-ion detector system ALICE. Measuring the highest energy density ever produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions, the detector has been designed to study the properties of the created hot and dense medium, assumed to be a Quark-Gluon Plasma. Comprised of 18 high granularity sub-detectors, ALICE delivers data from a few million electronic channels of proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. The produced data volume can reach up to 26 GByte/s for central PbPb collisions at design luminosity of L = $10^{27} cm^{?2} s^{?1}$ , challenging not only the data storage, but also the physics analysis. A High-Level Trigger (HLT) has been built and commissioned to reduce that amount of data to a storable value prior to archiving with the means of data filtering and compression without the loss of physics information. Implemented as a large high performance compute cluster, the HLT is able to ...

Thder, Jochen; Lindenstruth, V

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final...

194

High Level Waste Corporate Board Newsletter - 06/03/08  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 June 2008 3 June 2008 UPCOMING EVENTS: Next High-Level Waste Corporate Board meeting will be held at DOE-ID on 24 July 2008. Meeting details will be presented here and e-mailed to those persons with an interest to participate. Topics for discussion include: * Strategic Planning Initiative * Technology Development / Needs Collection / Prioritization * Waste Acceptance Product Specification This meeting will include a members-only executive session OTHER NEWS DOE SELECTS WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS, LLC FOR TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT AT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has been selected as the tank operations contractor to store, retrieve and treat Hanford tank

195

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary step in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed preparation for the immobilization of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) is reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0), permitting steam stripping of the Hg. Denitrition and associated NOx evolution is a secondary effect of the use of formic acid as the mercury-reducing agent. Under certain conditions the presence of transition or noble metals can result in significant formic acid decomposition, with associated CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} evolution. These processes can result in varying redox properties of melter feed, and varying sequential gaseous evolution of oxidants and hydrogen. Electrochemical methods for monitoring the competing processes are discussed. Laboratory scale techniques have been developed for simulating the large-scale reactions, investigating the relative effectiveness of the catalysts, and the effectiveness of catalytic poisons. The reversible nitrite poisoning of formic acid catalysts is discussed.

Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.; Hsu, C.L.W.; Eibling, R.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

High-spin level scheme of {sup 194}Pb  

SciTech Connect

High-spin states in {sup 194}Pb have been populated in the {sup 168}Er({sup 30}Si,4n) reaction at 142 MeV. The emitted {gamma} rays were detected by the EUROBALL III multidetector array. The level scheme was considerably extended and many previously observed {gamma}-ray transitions were reordered. Four new magnetic rotational bands were observed. The energies and spins of the bandheads of all previously observed magnetic rotational bands were corrected based on the observation of new transitions. From nine observed bands, only one could not be connected to the lower lying states. Based on comparison systematics with neighboring Pb isotopes and tilted-axis cranking model calculations previously reported, configuration assignments to the observed bands have been made.

Kutsarova, T.; Stefanova, E. A.; Minkova, A.; Lalkovski, S.; Korichi, A.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hannachi, F.; Huebel, H.; Goergen, A.; Jansen, A.; Schoenwasser, G.; Khoo, T. L.; Herskind, B.; Bergstroem, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Podolyak, Z. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia 'St. Kliment Ohridski', BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); CSNSM Orsay, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91405 (France); HISKP, Helmholtz-Institute fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 (Germany); ISKP, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 (Germany); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro (Italy)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

High-level waste tank farm set point document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

Anthony, J.A. III

1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

4.5 Meter high level waste canister study  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EARTH PENETRATION  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear reactor apparatus for penetrating into the earth's crust is described. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical nuclear core operating at a temperature that is higher than the melting temperature of rock. A high-density ballast member is coupled to the nuclear core such that the overall density of the core-ballast assembly is greater than the density of molten rock. The nuclear core is thermally insulated so that its heat output is constrained to flow axially, with radial heat flow being minimized. In operation, the apparatus is placed in contact with the earth's crust at the point desired to be penetrated. The heat output of the reactor melts the underlying rock, and the apparatus sinks through the resulting magma. The fuel loading of the reactor core determines the ultimate depth of crust penetration. (AEC)

Adams, W.M.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the disposal container inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be a barrier made of high-nickel alloy. The defense HLW disposal container interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and the internal waste by transferring heat from the canisters to the external environment and by protecting the canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal container also interfaces with the canisters by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. A loaded and sealed disposal container (waste package) interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift waste package supports upon which the waste packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement /Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval for the disposal container/waste package.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

203

Universal penetration test apparatus with fluid penetration sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A universal penetration test apparatus is described for measuring resistance of a material to a challenge fluid. The apparatus includes a pad saturated with the challenge fluid. The apparatus includes a compression assembly for compressing the material between the pad and a compression member. The apparatus also includes a sensor mechanism for automatically detecting when the challenge fluid penetrates the material. 23 figs.

Johnson, P.W.; Stampfer, J.F.; Bradley, O.D.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Studies of Mercury in High Level Waste Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nuclear weapons production, nuclear reactor target and fuel rods were processed in F- and H-Canyons. For the target rods, a caustic dissolution of the aluminum cladding was performed prior to nitric acid dissolution of the uranium metal targets in the large canyon dissolvers. To dissolve the aluminum cladding and the U-Al fuel, mercury in the form of soluble mercury (II) nitrate was added as a catalyst to accelerate the dissolution of the aluminum. F-Canyon began to process plutonium-containing residues that were packaged in aluminum cans and thus required the use of mercury as a dissolution catalyst. Following processing to remove uranium and plutonium using the solvent extraction process termed the Plutonium-Uranium Recovery by Extraction (PUREX) process, the acidic waste solutions containing fission products and other radionuclides were neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The mercury used in canyon processing is fractionated between the sludge and supernate that is transferred from the canyons to the tank farm. The sludge component of the waste is currently vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The vitrified waste canisters are to be sent to the federal repository for High Level Waste. The mercury in the sludge, presumably in an oxide or hydroxide form is reduced to elemental mercury by the chemical additions and high temperatures, steam stripped and collected in the Mercury Collection Tank. The mercury in the dilute supernate is in the form of mercuric ion and is soluble. During evaporation, the mercuric ion is reduced to elemental mercury, vaporizes into the overheads system and is collected as a metallic liquid in the Mercury Removal Tank.

Wilmarth, W.R.

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hanford high-level waste melter system evaluation data packages  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System is selecting a reference melter system for the Hanford High-Level Waste vitrification plant. A melter evaluation was conducted in FY 1994 to narrow down the long list of potential melter technologies to a few for testing. A formal evaluation was performed by a Melter Selection Working Group (MSWG), which met in June and August 1994. At the June meeting, MSWG evaluated 15 technologies and selected six for more thorough evaluation at the Aug. meeting. All 6 were variations of joule-heated or induction-heated melters. Between the June and August meetings, Hanford site staff and consultants compiled data packages for each of the six melter technologies as well as variants of the baseline technologies. Information was solicited from melter candidate vendors to supplement existing information. This document contains the data packages compiled to provide background information to MSWG in support of the evaluation of the six technologies. (A separate evaluation was performed by Fluor Daniel, Inc. to identify balance of plant impacts if a given melter system was selected.)

Elliott, M.L.; Shafer, P.J.; Lamar, D.A.; Merrill, R.A.; Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year.

Zapp, P.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

THE HIGH-ENERGY IMPULSIVE GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied short-lived (21 minute average duration), highly anisotropic pulses of cosmic rays that constitute the first phase of 10 large ground-level enhancements (GLEs), and which extend to rigidities in the range 5-20 GV. We provide a set of constraints that must be met by any putative acceleration mechanism for this type of solar-energetic-particle (SEP) event. The pulses usually have very short rise-times (three to five minutes) at all rigidities, and exhibit the remarkable feature that the intensity drops precipitously by 50% to 70% from the maximum within another three to five minutes. Both the rising and falling phases exhibit velocity dispersion, which indicates that there are particles with rigidities in the range 1 90 MeV gamma-ray bursts, indicating that freshly accelerated SEPs had impinged on higher-density matter in the chromosphere prior to the departure of the SEP pulse for Earth. This study was based on an updated archive of the 71 GLEs in the historic record, which is now available for public use.

McCracken, K. G. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Moraal, H. [Centre for Space Research, School for Physical and Chemical Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Shea, M. A. [CSPAR, University of Alabama at Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

High Level Waste Feed Certification in Hanford Double Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOEs River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (1 million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing of HLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch to batch operational adjustments that reduces operating efficiency and has the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

Thien, Micheal G.; Wells, Beric E.; Adamson, Duane J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current baseline assumption is that packaging as is and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels in the hydroceramic grout process (i.e., 21 m) appears to be about the same as that estimated by the Direct Cementitious Waste Process in 1998, for which a conceptual design was developed. Some of the conceptual design efforts in the 1998 study may be applicable to the stabilizer processes addressed in this EDF. (e) The gamma radiation fields near the process vessels handling HLW calcine would vary from a range of about 300-350 R/hr at a distance of 2.5 cm from the side of the vessels to a range of about 50-170 R/hr at a distance of 100 cm from the side of the vessels. The calculations were made for combined calcine, which was defined as the total HLW calcine inventory uniformly mixed. (f) The gamma radiation fields near the stabilized waste in canisters would range from about 25-170 R/hr at 2.5 cm from the side of the canister and 5-35 R/hr at 100 cm from the side of the canister, depending on the which bin set was the source of calcine.

T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Measurements of the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries. A number of tests were conducted at relative humidities of 20%, 50%, and 80%, with sampling times of 20, 40, and 60 min. The radio-aerosol consisted of polystyrene particles with a diameter of 0.1 {micro}m. The ultrafine capillaries had a diameter of 250 {micro}m. The data from these tests varied significantly. These results made the identification of radio-aerosol penetration trends inconclusive. The standard deviation for all penetration data ranged from 3% to 30%. The results of this study suggest that a better control of the experimental parameters was needed to obtain more accurate data from experiments associated with radio-aerosol penetration in the presence of moisture. The experimental parameters that may have contributed to the wide variance of data, include aerosol flow, radio-aerosol generation, capillary characteristics, humidity control, and radiation measurements. It was the uncertainty of these parameters that contributed to the poor data which made conclusive deductions about radio-aerosol penetration dependence on humidity difficult. The application of this study is to ultrafine leaks resulting from stress fractures in high-level nuclear waste transportation casks under accident scenarios.

Cullen, C.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

D.C. Richardson

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

High-Level Waste Systems Plan. Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revision of the High-Level Waste (HLW) System Plan aligns SRS HLW program planning with the DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) Ten Year Plan (QC-96-0005, Draft 8/6), which was issued in July 1996. The objective of the Ten Year Plan is to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within the next ten years. The two key principles of the Ten Year Plan are to accelerate the reduction of the most urgent risks to human health and the environment and to reduce mortgage costs. Accordingly, this System Plan describes the HLW program that will remove HLW from all 24 old-style tanks, and close 20 of those tanks, by 2006 with vitrification of all HLW by 2018. To achieve these goals, the DWPF canister production rate is projected to climb to 300 canisters per year starting in FY06, and remain at that rate through the end of the program in FY18, (Compare that to past System Plans, in which DWPF production peaked at 200 canisters per year, and the program did not complete until 2026.) An additional $247M (FY98 dollars) must be made available as requested over the ten year planning period, including a one-time $10M to enhance Late Wash attainment. If appropriate resources are made available, facility attainment issues are resolved and regulatory support is sufficient, then completion of the HLW program in 2018 would achieve a $3.3 billion cost savings to DOE, versus the cost of completing the program in 2026. Facility status information is current as of October 31, 1996.

Brooke, J.N.; Gregory, M.V.; Paul, P.; Taylor, G.; Wise, F.E.; Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Liquidus Temperature Studies for High Level Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

220

Determining Thermal Conductivity of Simulated Feed for High Level ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Community of Practice John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director 21 May 2009 Denver, CO Office of Waste Processing...

222

A Scalable Methodology for Cost Estimation in a Transformational High-Level Design Space Exploration Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective of the methodology presented in this paper is to perform design space exploration on a high level of abstraction by applying high-level transformations. To realize a design loop which is close and settled on upper design levels, a high-level estimation step is integrated. In this paper, several estimation methodologies fixed on different states of the high-level synthesis process are examined with respect to their aptitude on controlling the transformational design space exploration process.

Gerlach

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

High level waste interim storge architecture selection - decision report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities (RL 1996a). This plan contains a two-phased approach. Phase I is a proof-of-principle/connnercial demonstration- scale effort and Phase II is a fiill-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE fumished. The high-level waste (BLW) interim storage options, or alternative architectures, were identified and evaluated to provide the framework from which to select the most viable method of Phase I BLW interim storage (Calmus 1996). This evaluation, hereafter referred to as the Alternative Architecture Evaluation, was performed to established performance and risk criteria (technical merit, cost, schedule, etc.). Based on evaluation results, preliminary architectures and path forward reconunendations were provided for consideration in the architecture decision- maldng process. The decision-making process used for selection of a Phase I solidified BLW interim storage architecture was conducted in accordance with an approved Decision Plan (see the attachment). This decision process was based on TSEP-07,Decision Management Procedure (WHC 1995). The established decision process entailed a Decision Board, consisting of Westinghouse Hanford Company (VY`HC) management staff, and included appointment of a VTHC Decision Maker. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation results and preliminary recommendations were presented to the Decision Board members for their consideration in the decision-making process. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation was prepared and issued before issuance of @C-IP- 123 1, Alternatives Generation and Analysis Procedure (WI-IC 1996a), but was deemed by the Board to fully meet the intent of WHC-IP-1231. The Decision Board members concurred with the bulk of the Alternative Architecture Evaluation results and recommendations. However, the Board required changes to some criteria definitions and weightings in establishing its own recommendation basis. This report documents information presented to the Decision Board, and the Decision Board`s recommendations and basis for these recommendations. The Board`s recommendations were fully adopted by the WHC Decision Maker, R. J. Murkowski, Manager, TWRS Storage and Disposal. The Decision Board`s recommendation is as follows. The Phase I BLW Interim storage concept architecture will use Vaults 2 and 3 of the Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, being located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area, and include features to faciliate addition of one or more vaults at a later date.

Calmus, R.B.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Rooftop Photovoltaics Market Penetration Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to model the market penetration of rooftop photovoltaics (PV) in the United States under a variety of scenarios, on a state-by-state basis, from 2007 to 2015.

Paidipati, J.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Kurrasch, A.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ?10-?m crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation of the crystal-tolerant HLW glasses for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the glass discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the glass beads was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the beads, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the glass bead and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for glass beads and spinel crystals, respectively.

Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Event:World Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Scale-up Low-Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png World Bank-High-Level Dialogue on...

230

Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed facades. Many studies suggest that the energy needed to keep the interior conditions at required comfort levels in buildings depends on several factors such as physical and optical properties of building elements, indoor and outdoor climate and behaviour of the occupants, etc. Moreover depending on the different orientation of building facade, the impact of these parameters might vary. The buildings are usually designed without paying much attention to this fact. The needs of each building zone might differ greatly and in order to achieve better indoor environment, different actions might be needed to taken considering the individual characteristics of each zone. In the proposed research the possibilities of evaluating building energy and comfort performance simultaneously taking into account the impact of facade orientation with use of whole building energy simulation tools are investigated through a case study.

Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Map of the United States of America showing the locations of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

232

Sulfate Retention in High Level Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... Atomistic Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Disposal ... Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Applications.

233

Effective scheduling techniques for high-level parallel programming languages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the not-so-distant past, parallel programming was mostly the concern of programmers specializing in high-performance computing. Nowadays, on the other hand, many of today's (more)

Rainey, Michael Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Indranil Das

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

235

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Das, Indranil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

Production and Properties of Solidified High-Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of glass composition. A high concentration of B2 0, or substitution of sodium with lithium diminishes viscosity of the molten glasses even at the refining temperatures. Small gas bubbles is another type of in of the glass. The weight of the cylinder is recorded continuously during the casting operation. The viscosity

238

Effective scheduling techniques for high-level parallel programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the not-so-distant past, parallel programming was mostly the concern of programmers specializing in high-performance computing. Nowadays, on the other hand, many of today's desktop and laptop computers come equipped with a species of shared-memory ...

Michael Alan Rainey / John H. Reppy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Polygenic Resistance In The Highly DDT-resistant 91-R Strain Of Drosophila Melanogaster Involves Decreased Penetration, Increased Metabolism And Direct Excretion Of DDT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Resistance to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster is extremely high compared to the susceptible Canton-S strain (>1500 times). Oxidative detoxification is (more)

Strycharz, Joseph P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

High Level Architecture (HLA) federation with Umbra and OPNET federates.  

SciTech Connect

Network-centric systems that depend on mobile wireless ad hoc networks for their information exchange require detailed analysis to support their development. In many cases, this critical analysis is best provided with high-fidelity system simulations that include the effects of network architectures and protocols. In this research, we developed a high-fidelity system simulation capability using an HLA federation. The HLA federation, consisting of the Umbra system simulator and OPNET Modeler network simulator, provides a means for the system simulator to both affect, and be affected by, events in the network simulator. Advances are also made in increasing the fidelity of the wireless communication channel and reducing simulation run-time with a dead reckoning capability. A simulation experiment is included to demonstrate the developed modeling and simulation capability.

Oppel, Fred John III; Hart, Brian; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated 01-14 Building in 2013. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated

242

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste West Valley Demonstration Project Prepares to Relocate High-Level Waste December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste canisters will be relocated to interim onsite storage. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project’s high-level waste. The first group of eight concrete storage casks for the West Valley Demonstration Project's high-level waste. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated 01-14 Building in 2013. Site subcontractor American DND completed demolition of the contaminated

243

Fracturing of simulated high-level waste glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

Waste-glass castings generated from engineering-scale developmental processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are generally found to have significant levels of cracks. The causes and extent of fracturing in full-scale canisters of waste glass as a result of cooling and accidental impact are discussed. Although the effects of cracking on waste-form performance in a repository are not well understood, cracks in waste forms can potentially increase leaching surface area. If cracks are minimized or absent in the waste-glass canisters, the potential for radionuclide release from the canister package can be reduced. Additional work on the effects of cracks on leaching of glass is needed. In addition to investigating the extent of fracturing of glass in waste-glass canisters, methods to reduce cracking by controlling cooling conditions were explored. Overall, the study shows that the extent of glass cracking in full-scale, passively-cooled, continuous melting-produced canisters is strongly dependent on the cooling rate. This observation agrees with results of previously reported Pacific Northwest Laboratory experiments on bench-scale annealed canisters. Thus, the cause of cracking is principally bulk thermal stresses. Fracture damage resulting from shearing at the glass/metal interface also contributes to cracking, more so in stainless steel canisters than in carbon steel canisters. This effect can be reduced or eliminated with a graphite coating applied to the inside of the canister. Thermal fracturing can be controlled by using a fixed amount of insulation for filling and cooling of canisters. In order to maintain production rates, a small amount of additional facility space is needed to accomodate slow-cooling canisters. Alternatively, faster cooling can be achieved using the multi-staged approach. Additional development is needed before this approach can be used on full-scale (60-cm) canisters.

Peters, R.D.; Slate, S.C.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

245

PHIL Inverter Test Report: Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of PV into the Distribution Grid in California, March 12 - March 16, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes power hardware-in-the-loop simulation testing of a 500 kW Satcon photovoltaic inverter, conducted at the Center for Advanced Power Systems at Florida State University from March 12th through March 16th, 2012. Testing was led by a team from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The report reviews the results of data captured during the course of testing. The tests were used to demonstrate operation of and gather data from the inverter in a simulated operational environment. Testing demonstrated the ability of the inverter to operate in either a Power Factor Control Mode or a Reactive Power Command Mode, and to respond to real power limits.

Kromer, M.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Auto-tuning on the macro scale : high level algorithmic auto-tuning for scientific applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we describe a new classification of auto-tuning methodologies spanning from low-level optimizations to high-level algorithmic tuning. This classification spectrum of auto-tuning methods encompasses the space ...

Chan, Cy P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

EIS-0303: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure 03: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure EIS-0303: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure SUMMARY This EIS evaluates alternatives for closing 49 high-level radioactive waste tanks and associated equipment such as evaporator systems, transfer pipelines, diversion boxes, and pump pits. DOE selected the preferred alternative identified in the Final EIS, Stabilize Tanks-Fill with Grout, to guide development and implementation of closure of the high-level waste tanks and associated equipment at the Savannah River Site. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 5, 2012 EIS-0303: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure, SC July 8, 2011 EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

248

An Investigation of the Utilization of Smart Meter Data to Adapt Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution Systems with a High Penetration of Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of electric power distribution systems (DSs) is one that incorporates extensive amounts of advanced metering, distribution automation, and distributed generation technologies. Most DSs were designed to be radial systems and the major philosophies of their protection, namely, selectivity and sensitivity, were easily achieved. Settings for overcurrent protective devices (OCPDs) were static and based on the maximum load downstream of its location, with little concern of major configuration changes. However, the integration of distribution generators (DGs) in radial distributions systems (RDSs) causes bidirectional power flows and varying short circuit currents to be sensed by protective devices, thereby affecting these established protection principles. Several researchers have investigated methods to preserve the selectivity of overcurrent protection coordination in RDSs with DGs, but at the expense of protective device sensitivity due to an inherent change in system configuration. This thesis presents an investigation to adapt the pickup settings of the substation relay, based on configuration changes in a DS with DGs, using smart meter data from the prior year. An existing protection scheme causes the faulted areas of DSs with DGs to revert to a radial configuration, thereby allowing conventional OCPDs to isolate faults. Based on the location of the fault, the created radial segments are known and vary in length. The proposed methodology involves using demand information available via smart metering, to determine the seasonal maximum diversified demands in each of the radial segments that are formed. These seasonal maximum diversified demands are used to yield several pickup settings for the substation overcurrent relay of the DS. The existing protection approach enables the selectivity of radial overcurrent protection coordination to be maintained; the sensitivity of the substation relay is improved by adapting its pickup settings based on seasonal demand and system configuration changes. The results of the studies are reported through simulation in EMTP /PSCAD using a multi-feeder test system that includes DGs and smart meters located at the secondary distribution load level. The results show that using seasonal settings for the substation relay based on configuration changes in a DS with DGs can improve the sensitivity of the substation relay.

Douglin, Richard Henry

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Break Throughs in High-Level Waste Vitrification for the Hanford ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Throughs in High-Level Waste Vitrification for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant ... Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b .

250

Life Estimation of High Level Waste Tank Steel for H-Tank Farm ...  

the tanks is not considered in the analysis. Life Estimation of High Level Waste Tank ... conservative scenario in which the concrete vault has completely

251

Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy: This document responds to DOE questions regarding smart grid policy. The approach followed herein is to write concise comments addressing the overall RFI document at a higher level. High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy More Documents & Publications Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Re: NBP RFI-Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart

252

Comparison of the Climatologies of High-Level Clouds from HIRS and ISCCP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparison of individually matched analyses of high-level cloudiness from the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS) CO2-slicing analysis and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) analysis of satellite data for 4 months ...

Yao Jin; William B. Rossow; Don P. Wylie

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Parametric studies of penetration events : a design and analysis of experiments approach.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical screening study of the interaction between a penetrator and a geological target with a preformed hole has been carried out to identify the main parameters affecting the penetration event. The planning of the numerical experiment was based on the orthogonal array OA(18,7,3,2), which allows 18 simulation runs with 7 parameters at 3 levels each. The strength of 2 of the array allows also for two-factor interaction studies. The seven parameters chosen for this study are: penetrator offset, hole diameter, hole taper, vertical and horizontal velocity of the penetrator, angle of attack of the penetrator and target material. The analysis of the simulation results has been based on main effects plots and analysis of variance (ANOVA), and it has been performed using three metrics: the maximum values of the penetration depth, penetrator deceleration and plastic strain in the penetrator case. This screening study shows that target material has a major influence on penetration depth and penetrator deceleration, while penetrator offset has the strongest effect on the maximum plastic strain.

Chiesa, Michael L.; Marin, Esteban B.; Booker, Paul M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A thread partitioning algorithm in low power high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a thread partitioning algorithm in low power high-level synthesis. The algorithm is applied to high-level synthesis systems. In the systems, we can describe parallel behaving circuit blocks(threads) explicitly. First it focuses on ...

Jumpei Uchida; Nozomu Togawa; Masao Yanagisawa; Tatsuo Ohtsuki

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

WILLIS, W.L.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

User interface prototyping based on UML scenarios and high-level Petri nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we suggest a requirement engineering process that generates a user interface prototype from scenarios and yields a formal specification of the system in form of a high-level Petri net. Scenarios are acquired in the form of sequence diagrams ... Keywords: high-level petri net, scenario specification, unified modeling language, user interface prototyping

Mohammed Elkoutbi; Rudolf K. Keller

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

High-level synthesis of asynchronous systems by data-driven decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for decomposing a high-level program description of a circuit into a system of concurrent modules that can each be implemented as asynchronous pre-charge half-buffer pipeline stages (the circuits used in the asynchronous R3000 MIPS ... Keywords: asynchronous VLSI, high-level synthesis

Catherine G. Wong; Alain J. Martin

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the High-Level Waste Data Base  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes spent fuel and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the High-Level Waste Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. 3 figs.

Jones, K.E. (DataPhile, Inc., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Salmon, R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0287 (September 2002)

260

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition 7: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 12, 2010 EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition January 4, 2010

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SystemC-AMS high-level modeling of linear analog blocks with power consumption information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SystemC-AMS allows the modeling of complex heterogeneous systems at different levels of abstraction using different modeling styles, called Models of Computation (MoC). This work presents an approach for including energy consumption information in high-level ... Keywords: passive fourth-order low pass filter, systemC-AMS high-level modeling, linear analog blocks, power consumption information, energy consumption information, linear electrical circuits, systemC-AMS linear signal flow MoC, SPICE netlist, state space representation extraction, LSF description level

L. Bousquet; F. Cenni; E. Simeu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Measurement of highly enriched uranium metal buttons with the high-level neutron coincidence counter operating in the active mode  

SciTech Connect

The portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter is used in the active mode with the addition of AmLi neutron sources to assay the /sup 235/U content of highly enriched metal pieces or buttons. It is concluded that the portable instrument is a practical instrument for assaying uranium metal buttons with masses in the range 1.5 to 4 kg.

Foley, J.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A high-level approach to synthesis of high-performance codes for quantum chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses an approach to the synthesis of high-performance parallel programs for a class of computations encountered in quantum chemistry and physics. These computations are expressible as a set of tensor contractions and arise in electronic ...

Gerald Baumgartner; David E. Bernholdt; Daniel Cociorva; Robert Harrison; So Hirata; Chi-Chung Lam; Marcel Nooijen; Russell Pitzer; J. Ramanujam; P. Sadayappan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting March 13, 2006 - 11:48am Addthis Discuss Pakistan's energy opportunities; Follows United States-Pakistan Strategic Partnership launched by President Bush earlier this month WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today visited Pakistan, the first stop in his four-nation swing where he will discuss ways that the U.S. and Pakistan can increase cooperation on energy-related issues. The Secretary's visit follows President Bush's pledge earlier this month to hold a high-level meeting between U.S. and Pakistani officials to collaborate on solutions to Pakistan's energy sources. "The U.S. and Pakistan are strong allies and America supports the people of

266

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

267

EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive 023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

268

Floorplan Driven High Level Synthesis for Crosstalk Noise Minimization in Macro-cell Based Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In DSM regime, due to higher interconnect densities, the coupling noise between adjacent signals is aggravated and can lead to many timing violations. In traditional high-level synthesis (HLS), due to lack detailed physical details, it is difficult to ...

Hariharan Sankaran; Srinivas Katkoori

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

On lower bounds for scheduling problems in high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents new results on lower bounds for the scheduling problem in high-level synthesis. While several techniques exist for lower bound estimation, comparisons among the techniques have been experimental with few guarantees on the quality ...

M. Narasimhan; J. Ramanujam

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparison of high level design methodologies for algorithmic IPs : Bluespec and C-based synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High level hardware design of Digital Signal Processing algorithms is an important design problem for decreasing design time and allowing more algorithmic exploration. Bluespec is a Hardware Design Language (HDL) that ...

Agarwal, Abhinav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, ...

Kanwisher, Nancy

272

Event:ECOWAS High-Level Forum: Paving the Way for Sustainable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for All in West Africa through Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png ECOWAS High-Level Forum: Paving...

273

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

274

Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Reading Between the Lines: Learning to Map High-level Instructions to Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the task of mapping high-level instructions to commands in an external environment. Processing these instructions is challengingthey posit goals to be achieved without specifying the steps required ...

Branavan, Satchuthanan R.

276

Feasibility of lateral emplacement in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy recently filed a motion to withdraw the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license application for the High Level Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. As the U.S. has focused exclusively ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Sutton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE G 435.1-1 Chapter 2, High-Level Waste Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multiple implementations of a microprocessor from a single high-level design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors discuss the use of the interactive design language (IDL) for the design of three distinctly different physical implementations of a control microprocessor. The high-level, implementation-independent design and the simulation were done once in IDL. This one high-level design was transformed (more or less routinely) into an IBM NMOS custom version, and into a TTL lab version driven by IBM masterslice PLAS. 3 references.

Brown, M.W.; Kimmel, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

High-Level Synthesis of Analog Sensor Interface Front-Ends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we compare three different methodologies for analog high-level synthesis. Two optimization-based methods-one with simulations in the loop, the other with equations-and a library-based approach are discussed and illustrated with experimental ... Keywords: sensors, analog high-level synthesis, analog sensor interface front-ends, optimization-based methods, library-based approach, radiation detector interface ASIC

S. Donnay; G. Gielen; W. Sansen; W. Kruiskamp; D. Leenaerts; W. Van Bokhoven

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Event:World Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Scale-up Low-Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png World Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Scale-up Low-Emissions Development: 9:00am Eastern Time on 2011/07/13 High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Scale-up Low-Emissions Development Event Details Name World Bank-High-Level Dialogue on International Architecture to Scale-up Low-Emissions Development Date 2011/07/13 Time 9:00am Eastern Time Location Washington, District of Columbia Organizer World Bank Tags LEDS, CLEAN Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Event:World_Bank-High-Level_Dialogue_on_International_Architecture_to_Scale-up_Low-Emissions_Development&oldid=3681

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

Fellinger, A.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Slag Penetration into Refractory Lining of Slagging Coal Gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The impurities in coal are converted into molten slag typically containing SiO2, FeO, CaO, and Al2O3 when coal feedstock is burned in slagging gasifiers. The slag flows down the gasifier sidewalls, dissolves, and penetrates and reacts with the refractory lining that protects the stainless steel shell of the gasifier from elevated temperatures (13001600C). Refractories composed primarily of Cr2O3 have been found most resistant to slag corrosion, but they continue to fail performance requirements because of low resistance to spalling. Post-mortem analysis of high-chromia refractory bricks collected from commercial gasifiers suggests that the spalling is affected by the depth of slag penetration that is in turn affected by the wettability and interconnected porosity of the refractory as well as the slag viscosity. Laboratory tests were conducted to measure the viscosity of slags (Wyoming Powder River Basin [PRB], Pocahontas #3, and Pittsburgh #8), their contact angle on refractories (chromia-alumina [Aurex 75SR] and high-chromia [Serv 95 and Aurex 95P]), and the apparent porosity of selected refractories. In addition, the depth of slag penetration as a function of time and temperature was determined for various refractory-slag combinations. The results of laboratory tests were used to develop a refractory material that has high resistance to penetration by molten slag and thus has a potential to have a substantially longer service life than the materials currently being used.

Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Event:ECOWAS High-Level Forum: Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Level Forum: Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for Level Forum: Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for All in West Africa through Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png ECOWAS High-Level Forum: Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for All in West Africa through Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: on 2012/10/29 "ECREEE in cooperation with the Global Forum for Sustainable Energy (GSFE), and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), are organizing a three-day High Level Forum on the theme: "Paving the Way for Sustainable Energy for All in West Africa through Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency". Hosted by the Government of Ghana, the forum will contribute to the UN Sustainable Energy For All Initiative and will follow-up on the key decisions of the Rio+20 Summit". Participants will

284

A high level power model for Network-on-Chip (NoC) router  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a high level power estimation methodology for a Network-on-Chip (NoC) router, that is capable of providing cycle accurate power profile to enable power exploration at system level. Our power macro model is based on the number of flits ... Keywords: Interconnection network, Multi-processor System-on-Chip (MPSoC), Network-on-Chip (NoC), Power model

Seung Eun Lee; Nader Bagherzadeh

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission All proposed nuclear power generation facilities must be certified by the Public Utilities Commission under this statute prior to construction and

286

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; Record of Decision (ROO). This Record of Decision has been prepared pursuant to the Council on Environme~tal Quality ~egulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Pol icy Act (NEPAl (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). It is based on DOE's "Environmental Impact Statement for the Oi sposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes'' (OOE/EIS-0113) and consideration of ~11 public and agency comments received on the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). fJECISION The decision is to implement the ''Preferred Alternative'' as discussed in

287

Solvent extraction in the treatment of acidic high-level liquid waste : where do we stand?  

SciTech Connect

During the last 15 years, a number of solvent extraction/recovery processes have been developed for the removal of the transuranic elements, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste. These processes are based on the use of a variety of both acidic and neutral extractants. This chapter will present an overview and analysis of the various extractants and flowsheets developed to treat acidic high-level liquid waste streams. The advantages and disadvantages of each extractant along with comparisons of the individual systems are discussed.

Horwitz, E. P.; Schulz, W. W.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

Definition: Penetration Rate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Penetration Rate Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Penetration Rate The Rate of penetration, abbreviated as ROP as used in the drilling industry, is the speed at which a drill bit breaks the rock under it to deepen the borehole. It is normally measured in feet per minute or meters per hour, but sometimes it is expressed in minutes per foot.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Rate of penetration, abbreviated as ROP as used in the drilling industry, is the speed at which a drill bit breaks the rock under it to deepen the borehole. Also known as penetration rate or drill rate. It is normally measured in feet per minute or meters per hour, but sometimes it is expressed in minutes per foot.

289

SHAM: High-level seismic tests of piping at the HDR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the second phase of vibrational/earthquake investigations at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, high-level simulated seismic tests (SHAM) were performed during April--May 1988 on the VKL (Versuchskreislauf) in-plant piping system with two servohydraulic actuators, each capable of generating 40 tons of force. The purpose of these experiments was to study the behavior of piping subjected to seismic excitation levels that exceed design levels manifold and may result in failure/plastification of pipe supports and pipe elements, and to establish seismic margins for piping and pipe supports. The performance of six different dynamic pipe support systems was compared in these tests and the response, operability, and fragility of dynamic supports and of a typical US gate valve were investigated. Data obtained in the tests are used to validate analysis methods. Very preliminary evaluations lead to the observation that, in general, failures of dynamic supports (in particular snubbers) occur only at load levels that substantially exceed the design capacity. Pipe strains at load levels exceeding the design level threefold are quite small, and even when exceeding the design level eightfold are quite tolerable. Hence, under seismic loading, even at extreme levels and in spite of multiple support failures, pipe failure is unlikely. 5 refs., 16 figs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D.; Steinhilber, H.; Costello, J.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Photoconductivity and luminescence in GaSe crystals at high levels of optical excitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photoconductivity and luminescence of GaSe layered crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. The specific features observed in the photoconductivity and photoluminescence spectra are controlled by the nonlinear optical absorption in the region of excitonic resonance.

Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M., E-mail: vagif_salmanov@yahoo.com; Salmanova, A. A. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Alieva, A. M.; Ibaeva, R. Z. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

Han, F.C.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Formal Verification Method of Scheduling in High-level Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a formal method for checking the equivalence between the finite state machine with data path (FSMD) model of the high-level behavioural specification and the FSMD model of the behaviour transformed by the scheduler. The method consists ...

C Karfa; C Mandal; D Sarkar; S R. Pentakota; Chris Reade

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A scheduling algorithm for optimization and early planning in high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexities of applications implemented on embedded and programmable systems grow with the advances in capacities and capabilities of these systems. Mapping applications onto them manually is becoming a very tedious task. This draws attention to using ... Keywords: Scheduling, bipartite matching, data flow graph, high-level synthesis

Seda Ogrenci Memik; Ryan Kastner; Elaheh Bozorgzadeh; Majid Sarrafzadeh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Exploiting off-chip memory access modes in high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Memory-intensive behaviors often contain large arrays that are synthesized into off-chip memories. With the increasing gap between on-chip and off-chip memory access delays, it is imperative to exploit the efficient access mode features of modern-day ... Keywords: Memory Synthesis, DRAM, High Level Synthesis

Preeti Ranjan Panda; Nikil D. Dutt; Alexandru Nicolau

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design of equipment used for high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The equipment as designed, started, and operated for high-level radioactive waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project in western New York State is described. Equipment for the processes of melter feed make-up, vitrification, canister handling, and off-gas treatment are included. For each item of equipment the functional requirements, process description, and hardware descriptions are presented.

Vance, R.F.; Brill, B.A.; Carl, D.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

298

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

A humidity temperature test on the HLNC (high-level neutron coincidence counter) instrument  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the findings of a laboratory study made to determine the effects of unusual climatic conditions on high-level neutron coincidence counters (HLNCs). The capability of the instrument, when undesirable temperatures and/or humidities are present, the change in count rate as temperature and humidity increase, and the extent of humidity/temperature interaction are examined.

Goldman, A.; Augustson, R.; Karlin, E.W.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lead-iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste

Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

Bauer, G; Behrens, U; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; O'dell, V; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Lipeles, E; Perez, J L; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mlot, E G; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of a Real-Time, High-Speed Distribution Level Data Acquisition System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of smart grids and the deployment of their enabling technologies, improved data acquisition will be needed at the distribution level to understand the full impact of these changes. With this in mind, NREL has developed a high-speed measurement and data collection network targeted specifically at the distribution level. This network is based around adaptable, rugged measurement devices designed for deployment at a variety of low and medium voltage locations below the sub-station. Each of these devices is capable of real-time data transmission via an Internet connection. Additionally, several analysis and visualization applications have been developed around the incoming data streams.

Bank, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Temporary fire sealing of penetrations on TFTR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radiation shielding provided for TFTR for D-D and D-T operation will be penetrated by numerous electrical and mechanical services. Eventually, these penetrations will have to be sealed to provide the required fire resistance, tritium sealability, pressure integrity and radiation attenuation. For the initial hydrogen operation, however, fire sealing of the penetrations in the walls and floor is the primary concern. This report provides a discussion of the required and desirable properties of a temporary seal which can be used to seal these penetrations for the hydrogen operation and then subsequently be removed and replaced as required for the D-D and D-T operations. Several candidate designs are discussed and evaluated and recommendations are made for specific applications.

Hondorp, H.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiosonde Penetration of an Undilute Cumulonimbus Anvil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An example is presented of the serendipitous radiosonde penetration through the western edge of a rapidly growing undilute cumulonimbus anvil above 200 mb by an operationally released radiosonde balloon. The sounding is supportive of deep ...

Lance F. Bosart; John W. Nielsen

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE-EA-0179; Waste Form Selection for Savannah River Plant High-Level Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48326 (F.R.) 48326 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Compliance With the National Environmental Policy Act Proposed Finding of No Significant Impact, Selection of Borosilicate Glass as the Defense Waste Processing Facility Waste Form for High -Level Radioactive Wastes Savanah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina Thursday, July 29, 1982 *32778 AGENCY: Energy Department. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA- 0179) on the proposed selection of borosilicate glass as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste form for the immobilization of the high -level radioactive wastes generated and stored at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP), Aiken, South Carolina. DOE recently decided to immobilize

307

Title: An Advanced Solution for the Storage, Transportation and Disposal of Vitrified High Level Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 Presented at Global 99, Jackson, Wyoming, August 29 - September 2, 1999 1 AN ADVANCED SOLUTION FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT FUEL AND VITRIFIED HIGH LEVEL WASTE William J. Quapp Teton Technologies, Inc. 860 W. Riverview Dr. Idaho Falls, ID 83401 208-535-9001 ABSTRACT For future nuclear power deployment in the US, certain changes in the back end of the fuel cycle, i.e., disposal of high level waste and spent fuel, must become a real options. However, there exists another problem from the front end of the fuel cycle which has until recently, received less attention. Depleted uranium hexafluoride is a by-product of the enrichment process and has accumulated for over 50 years. It now represents a potential environmental problem. This paper describes a

308

An Istrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested, which is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the neutrons produced by the transuranics, primarily via (?,n) reactions, in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. Correct operation of the monitor was demonstrated in a hot cell utilizing an actual sample of high-level waste. Results of that demonstration are given, and suggestions for improvements in the next generation system are discussed.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R. A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah O.; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Michael R.; Walker, Darrell D.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described.

Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

West Valley demonstration project: alternative processes for solidifying the high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the West Valley Solidification Project as the result of legislation passed by the US Congress. The purpose of this project was to carry out a high level nuclear waste management demonstration project at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York. The DOE authorized the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, to assess alternative processes for treatment and solidification of the WNYNSC high-level wastes. The Process Alternatives Study is the suject of this report. Two pretreatment approaches and several waste form processes were selected for evaluation in this study. The two waste treatment approaches were the salt/sludge separation process and the combined waste process. Both terminal and interim waste form processes were studied.

Holton, L.K.; Larson, D.E.; Partain, W.L.; Treat, R.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

DOE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI project "Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar Phase II," also called the "GPiR Project," started in August 1998 at Schlumberger-Doll Research, a division of Schlumberger Technology Corporation. Its goal was to determine if modern ground-penetrating radar (GPR) could make three-dimensional (3D) images of buried utility lines accurate and detailed enough to help utility companies better manage their underground infrastructure. Work began with a comparison of commercial and prototype GPR systems in the lab...

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Technology Maturity and Market Penetration Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents technology maturity curves and market penetration charts that were developed to assess the current and future state of development for a range of technologies. Technology maturity curves were developed for 17 technology categories covering the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity and customer technologies. Market penetration charts were then developed for a subset of "game-changing" technologies to show the key steps to market entry for these technologies. Antici...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development of a new noncytopathic Semliki Forest virus vector providing high expression levels and stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alphavirus vectors express high levels of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but their cytopathic nature makes this expression transient. In order to generate a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) noncytopathic vector we introduced mutations previously described to turn Sindbis virus noncytopathic into a conserved position in an SFV vector expressing LacZ. Interestingly, mutant P718T in replicase nsp2 subunit was able to replicate in only a small percentage of BHK cells, producing {beta}-gal-expressing colonies without selection. Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase (pac) gene was used to replace LacZ in this mutant allowing selection of an SFV noncytopathic replicon containing a second mutation in nsp2 nuclear localization signal (R649H). This latter mutation did not confer a noncytopathic phenotype by itself and did not alter nsp2 nuclear translocation. Replicase synthesis was diminished in the SFV double mutant, leading to genomic and subgenomic RNA levels that were 125-fold and 66-fold lower than in wild-type vector, respectively. Interestingly, this mutant expressed {beta}-gal levels similar to parental vector. By coexpressing pac and LacZ from independent subgenomic promoters this vector was able to generate stable cell lines maintaining high expression levels during at least 10 passages, indicating that it could be used as a powerful system for protein production in mammalian cells.

Casales, Erkuden; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R.; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Razquin, Nerea; Cuevas, Yolanda; Prieto, Jesus [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Smerdou, Cristian [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)], E-mail: csmerdou@unav.es

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

High-level directives to drive the allocation of parallel object-oriented applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the Abstract Configuration Language (ACL) implemented within the Parallel Objects object oriented parallel programming environment. ACL defines a set of directives that allow users to specify the allocation needs of his/her application ... Keywords: ACL, ACL directives, Abstract Configuration Language, Parallel Objects object oriented parallel programming environment, allocation decisions, allocation needs, application components, high level directives, parallel languages, parallel object oriented application allocation, run time support, testbed application

A. Corradi; L. Leenardi; F. Zambonelli

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Alternatives generation and analysis for the phase 1 high-level waste pretreatment process selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of enhanced sludge washing and sludge washing without caustic leaching during the preparation of the Phase 1 high-level waste feeds. The pretreatment processing alternatives are evaluated against their ability to satisfy contractual, cost minimization, and other criteria. The information contained in this report is consistent with, and supplemental to, the Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan (Kirkbride et al. 1997).

Manuel, A.F.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system.

Altenhofen, M.K. [Altenhofen (M.K.), Richland, WA (United States); Eslinger, P.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparison of selected foreign plans and practices for spent fuel and high-level waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the major parameters for management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes in selected foreign countries as of December 1989 and compares them with those in the United States. The foreign countries included in this study are Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All the countries are planning for disposal of spent fuel and/or high-level wastes in deep geologic repositories. Most countries (except Canada and Sweden) plan to reprocess their spent fuel and vitrify the resultant high-level liquid wastes; in comparison, the US plans direct disposal of spent fuel. The US is planning to use a container for spent fuel as the primary engineered barrier. The US has the most developed repository concept and has one of the earliest scheduled repository startup dates. The repository environment presently being considered in the US is unique, being located in tuff above the water table. The US also has the most prescriptive regulations and performance requirements for the repository system and its components. 135 refs., 8 tabs.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Hazelton, R.F.; Bradley, D.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Progress in resolving Savannah River Site high-level waste tank safety issues  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina, approximately 35 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste are stored in 51 underground, carbon steel waste tanks. These tanks and associated facilities are distributed between the F and H areas, two processing areas at SRS, and are called the F- and H-area high-level waste tank farms. Within the last few years, issues have been raised about the safety of high-level waste tank farms throughout the DOE complex, including those at SRS. Plans for resolution of these issues were reported at the Waste Management 192 conference. This paper addresses progress made at SRS since 1992. Most of the efforts for resolving the six safety issues identified at SRS have concentrated on (1) preparing the tanks for waste removal and (2) completing construction, testing, and starting up three key facilities. These facilities will transform the waste into forms suitable for final disposal, specifically borosilicate glass and saltstone (grout). Removing the waste from the tanks and processing it is needed to resolve three of the safety issues. Two facilities -- In-Tank Precipitation and the Defense Waste Processing Facility -- are undergoing non-radioactive simulant testing (``cold runs``) at this time. The third facility -- Sludge Processing -- began testing with actual waste in October 1993. In Tank Precipitation is scheduled to be operating by the end of 1994.

d`Entremont, P.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Safety analysis report vitrified high level waste type B shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report describes the design, analyses, and principle features of the Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) Cask. In preparing this report a detailed evaluation of the design has been performed to ensure that all safety, licensing, and operational goals for the cask and its associated Department of Energy program can be met. The functions of this report are: (1) to fully document that all functional and regulatory requirements of 10CFR71 can be met by the package; and (2) to document the design and analyses of the cask for review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The VHLW Cask is the reusable shipping package designed by GNSI under Department of Energy contract DE-AC04-89AL53-689 for transportation of Vitrified High Level Waste, and to meet the requirements for certification under 10CFR71 for a Type B(U) package. The VHLW cask has been designed as packaging for transport of canisters of Vitrified High Level Waste solidified at Department of Energy facilities.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing - 14194  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok?'s accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

Kelly, Steven E.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advancing Wind Integration Study Methodologies: Implications of Higher Levels of Wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on the evolution of techniques to better model high penetrations (generally, 20% or more energy penetration) of wind energy.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Wan, Y. H.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009 for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009 Outline · Background work #12;3/193rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009

Engelmann, Christian

331

Separation of strontium-90 from Hanford high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Current guidelines for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site call for vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) in borosilicate glass and disposing the glass canisters in a deep geologic repository. Disposition of the low-level waste (LLW) is yet to be determined, but it will likely be immobilized in a glass matrix and disposed of on site. To lower the radiological risk associated with the LLW form, methods are being developed to separate {sup 90}Sr from the bulk waste material so this isotope can be routed to the HLW stream. A solvent extraction method is being investigated to separate {sup 90}Sr from acid-dissolved Hanford tank wastes. Results of experiments with actual tank waste indicate that this method can be used to achieve separation of {sup 90}Sr from the bulk waste components. Greater than 99% of the {sup 90}Sr was removed from an acidic dissolved sludge solution by extraction with di-tbutylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 in 1-octanol (the SREX process). The major sludge components were not extracted.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Jones, E.O.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables.

McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.; Juhas, M.C.; Logan, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Low-level dynamic system formation with high-level automation: extending UML in support of UPnP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way of defining system evolvability is in terms of the lowlevel discrete-systems composition and dynamic bindings. Evidently, direct low-level implementation has its drawbacks and might be expensive for the performance of system formation process ... Keywords: UPnP, abstractions, complex systems, conceptual modeling, design patterns, dynamic binding, evolvable systems, framework, methodologies, modeling, network interoperability, open systems, software architecture, software engineering, specification, system integration

Behzad Bastani

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The ATLAS High Level Trigger Steering Framework and the Trigger Configuration System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector system installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is designed to study proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions with a maximum centre of mass energy of 14 TeV at a bunch collision rate of 40MHz. In March 2010 the four LHC experiments saw the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Still within the year a collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. At ATLAS, events of potential interest for ATLAS physics are selected by a three-level trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first level (L1) is implemented in custom hardware; the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers, running on large farms of standard computers and network devices. Within the ATLAS physics program more than 500 trigger signatures are defined. The HLT tests each signature on each L1-accepted event; the test outcome is recorded for later analysis. The HLT-Steering is responsible for this. It foremost ensures the independent test of each signature, guarantying u...

Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-level seismic tests of piping at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the second-phase testing at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), high-level seismic experiments, designated SHAM, were performed on an in-plant piping system during the period of 19 April to 27 May 1988. The objectives of the SHAM experiments were to (1) study the response of piping subjected to seismic excitation levels that exceed design levels manifold and which may result in failure/plastification of pipe supports and pipe elements; (2) provide data for the validation of linear and nonlinear pipe response analyses; (3) compare and evaluate, under identical loading conditions, the performance of various dynamic support system, ranging from very flexible to very stiff support configurations; (4) establish seismic margins for piping, dynamic pipe supports, and pipe anchorages; and (5) investigate the response, operability, and fragility of dynamic supports and of a typical US gate valve under extreme levels of seismic excitation. A brief description of the SHAM tests is provided, followed by highlights of the test results that are given primarily in the form of maximum response values. Also presented are very limited comparisons of experimental data and pretest analytical predictions. 6 refs., 8 figs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Costello, J.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Technical Exchange on Improved Design and Performance of High Level Waste Melters - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SIA Radon is responsible for management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Central Russia. In cooperation with Minatom organizations Radon carries out R and D programs on treatment of simulated high level waste (HLW) as well. Radon scientists deal with a study of materials for LILW, HLW, and Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) wastes immobilization, and development and testing of processes and technologies for waste treatment and disposal. Radon is mostly experienced in LILW vitrification. This experience can be carried over to HLW vitrification especially in field of melting systems. The melter chosen as a basic unit for the vitrification plant is a cold crucible. Later on Radon experience in LILW vitrification as well as our results on simulated HLW vitrification are briefly described.

SK Sundaram; ML Elliott; D Bickford

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Experiences with High-Level Programming Directives for Porting Applications to GPUs  

SciTech Connect

HPC systems now exploit GPUs within their compute nodes to accelerate program performance. As a result, high-end application development has become extremely complex at the node level. In addition to restructuring the node code to exploit the cores and specialized devices, the programmer may need to choose a programming model such as OpenMP or CPU threads in conjunction with an accelerator programming model to share and manage the difference node resources. This comes at a time when programmer productivity and the ability to produce portable code has been recognized as a major concern. In order to offset the high development cost of creating CUDA or OpenCL kernels, directives have been proposed for programming accelerator devices, but their implications are not well known. In this paper, we evaluate the state of the art accelerator directives to program several applications kernels, explore transformations to achieve good performance, and examine the expressiveness and performance penalty of using high-level directives versus CUDA. We also compare our results to OpenMP implementations to understand the benefits of running the kernels in the accelerator versus CPU cores.

Hernandez, Oscar R [ORNL; Ding, Wei [University of Houston, Houston; Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston, Houston; Kartsaklis, Christos [ORNL; Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Graham, Richard L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Progress in resolving Hanford Site high-level waste tank safety issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interim storage of alkaline, high-level radioactive waste, from two generations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, has resulted in the accumulation of 238 million liters of waste in Hanford Site single and double-shell tanks. Before the 1990`s, the stored waste was believed to be: (1) chemically unreactive under its existing storage conditions and plausible accident scenarios; and (2) chemically stable. This paradigm was proven incorrect when detailed evaluation of tank contents and behavior revealed a number of safety issues and that the waste was generating flammable and noxious gases. In 1990, the Waste Tank Safety Program was formed to focus on identifying safety issues and resolving the ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, high heat, noxious vapor, and criticality issues. The tanks of concern were placed on Watch Lists by safety issue. This paper summarizes recent progress toward resolving Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank safety issues, including modeling, and analyses, laboratory experiments, monitoring upgrades, mitigation equipment, and developing a strategy to screen tanks for safety issues.

Babad, H.; Eberlein, S.J.; Johnson, G.D.; Meacham, J.E.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Turner, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Separating and Stabilizing Phosphate from High-Level Radioactive Waste: Process Development and Spectroscopic Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Removing phosphate from alkaline high-level waste sludges at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State is necessary to increase the waste loading in the borosilicate glass waste form that will be used to immobilize the highly radioactive fraction of these wastes. We are developing a process which first leaches phosphate from the high-level waste solids with aqueous sodium hydroxide, and then isolates the phosphate by precipitation with calcium oxide. Tests with actual tank waste confirmed that this process is an effective method of phosphate removal from the sludge and offers an additional option for managing the phosphorus in the Hanford tank waste solids. The presence of vibrationally active species, such as nitrate and phosphate ions, in the tank waste processing streams makes the phosphate removal process an ideal candidate for monitoring by Raman or infrared spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired for all phases during a test of the process with actual tank waste. Quantitative determination of phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate in the liquid phases was achieved by Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the monitoring of these species in the tank waste process streams.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Peterson, James M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development and application of a conceptual approach for defining high-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a conceptual approach to defining high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and a preliminary quantitative definition obtained from an example implementation of the conceptual approach. On the basis of the description of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, we have developed a conceptual model in which HLW has two attributes: HLW is (1) highly radioactive and (2) requires permanent isolation via deep geologic disposal. This conceptual model results in a two-dimensional waste categorization system in which one axis, related to ''requires permanent isolation,'' is associated with long-term risks from waste disposal and the other axis, related to ''highly radioactive,'' is associated with short-term risks from waste management and operations; this system also leads to the specification of categories of wastes that are not HLW. Implementation of the conceptual model for defining HLW was based primarily on health and safety considerations. Wastes requiring permanent isolation via deep geologic disposal were defined by estimating the maximum concentrations of radionuclides that would be acceptable for disposal using the next-best technology, i.e., greater confinement disposal (GCD) via intermediate-depth burial or engineered surface structures. Wastes that are highly radioactive were defined by adopting heat generation rate as the appropriate measure and examining levels of decay heat that necessitate special methods to control risks from operations in a variety of nuclear fuel-cycle situations. We determined that wastes having a power density >200 W/m/sup 3/ should be considered highly radioactive. Thus, in the example implementation, the combination of maximum concentrations of long-lived radionuclides that are acceptable for GCD and a power density of 200 W/m/sup 3/ provides boundaries for defining wastes that are HLW.

Croff, A.G.; Forsberg, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Cohen, J.J.; Smith, C.F.; Miller, D.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Market penetration of biodiesel and ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the influence that economic and technological factors have on the penetration of biodiesel and ethanol into the transportation fuels market. This dissertation focuses on four aspects. The first involves the influence of fossil fuel prices, because biofuels are substitutes and have to compete in price. The second involves biofuel manufacturing technology, principally the feedstock-to-biofuel conversion rates, and the biofuel manufacturing costs. The third involves prices for greenhouse gas offsets. The fourth involves the agricultural commodity markets for feedstocks, and biofuel byproducts. This dissertation uses the Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model-Greenhouse Gas (FASOM-GHG) to quantitatively examine these issues and calculates equilibrium prices and quantities, given market interactions, fossil fuel prices, carbon dioxide equivalent prices, government biofuel subsidies, technological improvement, and crop yield gains. The results indicate that for the ranges studied, gasoline prices have a major impact on aggregate ethanol production but only at low prices. At higher prices, one runs into a capacity constraint that limits expansion on the capacity of ethanol production. Aggregate biodiesel production is highly responsive to gasoline prices and increases over time. (Diesel fuel price is proportional to the gasoline price). Carbon dioxide equivalent prices expand the biodiesel industry, but have no impact on ethanol aggregate production when gasoline prices are high again because of refinery capacity expansion. Improvement of crop yields shows a similar pattern, expanding ethanol production when the gasoline price is low and expanding biodiesel. Technological improvement, where biorefinery production costs decrease over time, had minimal impact on aggregate ethanol and biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government subsidies have a large expansionary impact on aggregate biodiesel production, but only expand the ethanol industry at low gasoline prices. All of these factors increase agricultural welfare with most expanding producer surplus and mixed effects on consumers.

Szulczyk, Kenneth Ray

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)); Steinhilber, H. (Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany)); Costello, J.F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Steinhilber, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Value of Storage with Increased Penetration of Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Storage with of Storage with Increased Renewable Penetration Presenter: Jim Brainard Jesse Roach Sandia National Laboratories Energy Infrastructure and DER John Boyes (Manager) Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Problem Statement  Renewable energy portfolio standards - High penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation on the grid - Utilities constrained by NERC Control Performance Standards - Requires additional resources to match

346

High Levels of Winter Air Pollution under the Influence of the Urban Heat Island along the Shore of Tokyo Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wintertime small-scale sea breeze associated with high levels of air pollution is described, in which the urban heat island plays an important role.

Hiroshi Yoshikado; Makoto Tsuchida

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Dr. Inᅢᄅs Triay  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management High-Level Waste Corporate Board April 1, 2008 safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management What Are Corporate Issues? * They usually occur at multiple sites * They usually have an impact that exceeds their initial point of application. Thus, they impact: - Policies - Planning - Standards & Guidance - EM's relationship with other agencies both internal and external to DOE safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Corporate Issues * Performance Assessment * Quality Assurance * Methods to Determine the Waste Inventory * Chemical Processing * Waste Forms * Actual Disposition of Waste * Waste Treatment safety v

348

Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms - 14210  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed.

Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilty  

SciTech Connect

High-Level Functional & Operational Requirements for the AFCF -This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy.

Charles Park

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Phase 1 High Level Waste Feed Tanks Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent revision of the US. Department of Energy privatization contract for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) at Hanford necessitates the investigation of alternative waste feed sources to meet contractual feed requirements. This analysis identifies wastes to be considered as HLW feeds and develops and conducts alternative analyses to comply with established criteria. A total of 12,426 cases involving 72 waste streams are evaluated and ranked in three cost-based alternative models. Additional programmatic criteria are assessed against leading alternative options to yield an optimum blended waste feed stream.

CRAWFORD, T.W.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Tangible Interface for High-Level Direction of Multiple Animated Characters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many training, education, and visualization environments would benefit from realistic animated characters. Unfortunately, interfaces for character motion specification are often complex and ill-suited to non-experts. We present a tangible interface for basic character manipulation on planar surfaces. In particular, we focus on interface aspects specific to 2D gross character animation such as path and timing specification. Our approach allows for character manipulation and high-level motion specification through a natural metaphor the figurine. We present an example interface for designing and visualizing strategy in the sport of American football and discuss usability studies of this interface. Key words: tangible interfaces, animation 1

Ronald A. Metoyer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Instrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested that is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the ({alpha},n) neutrons in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. A multiplicity counter is used in data acquisition to reject the large fraction of coincident and highly variable cosmic-ray-engendered background events and results in a S/N ratio {approx}1.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah OA; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, D

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Hydrogen generation rates in Savannah River Site high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste (HLW) is stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as alkaline, high-nitrate slurries in underground carbon steel tanks. Hydrogen is continuously generated in the waste tanks as a result of the radiolysis of water. Hydrogen generation rates have recently been measured in several waste tanks containing different types of waste. The measured rates ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 cubic feet per million Btu of decay heat. The measured rates are consistent with laboratory data which show that the hydrogen generation rate depends on the nitrate concentration and the decay heat content of the waste. Sampling at different locations indicated that the hydrogen is uniformly distributed radially within the tank.

Hobbs, D.T.; Norris, P.W.; Pucko, S.A.; Bibler, N.E.; Walker, D.D.; d'Entremont, P.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications.

Bickford, D F; Corbett, R A; Morrison, W S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Gender Gap in Secondary School Mathematics at High Achievement Levels: Evidence from the American Mathematics Competitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses a new data source, American Mathematics Competitions, to examine the gender gap among high school students at very high achievement levels. The data bring out several new facts. There is a large gender gap ...

Ellison, Glenn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Diagnostic Systems and Resources utilization of the ATLAS High Level Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the LHC started colliding protons in December 2009, the ATLAS trigger has operated very successfully with a collision rate which has increased by several orders of magnitude. The trigger monitoring and data quality infrastructure was essential to this success. We describe the software tools used to monitor the trigger system performance and assess the overall quality of the trigger selection during collisions running. ATLAS has broad physics goals which require a large number of different active triggers due to complex event topology, requiring quite sophisticated software structures and concepts. The trigger of the ATLAS experiment is built as a three level system. The first level is realized in hardware while the high level triggers (HLT) are software based and run on large PC farms. The trigger reduces the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz, at design, to an average event rate of about 200 Hz for storage. Since the ATLAS detector is a general purpose detector, the trigger must be sensitive to a large numb...

zur Nedden, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Ospanov, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

Larson, D.E. (ed.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Survey review of models for use in market penetration analysis: utility sector focus  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate benefits of federal expenditures in research and development for new technologies are dependent upon the degree of acceptance of these technologies. Market penetration considerations are central to the problem of quantifying the potential benefits. These benefits are inputs to the selection process of projects competing for finite R and D funds. Market penetration is the gradual acceptance of a new commodity or technology. The Office of Coal utilization is concerned with the specialized area of market penetration of new electric power generation technologies for both replacement and new capacity. The common measure of market penetration is the fraction of the market serviced by the challenging technology for each time point considered. The methodologies for estimating market penetration are divided into three generic classes: integrated energy/economy modeling systems, utility capacity expansion models, and technology substitution models. In general, the integrated energy/economy modeling systems have three advantages: they provide internally consistent macro, energy-economy scenarios, they account for the effect of prices on demand by fuel form, and they explicitly capture the effects of population growth and the level and structure of economic activity on energy demand. A variety of deficiencies appear in most energy-economy systems models. All of the methodologies may be applied at some level to questions of market penetration of new technologies in the utility sector; choice of methods for a particular analysis must be conditioned by the scope of the analysis, data availability, and the relative cost of alternative analysis.

Groncki, P.J.; Kydes, A.S.; Lamontagne, J.; Marcuse, W.; Vinjamuri, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A look-ahead synthesis technique with backtracking for switching activity reduction in low power high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research work done has shown that power consumption in digital integrated circuits can be effectively reduced by reducing the switching activity occurring on the functional modules. High-level synthesis of digital integrated circuits for low power often ... Keywords: High-level synthesis, Low power, Simultaneous scheduling and binding, Switching activity

Xianwu Xing; Ching Chuen Jong

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Use of Phosphates to Reduce Slag Penetration in CR203-Based Refractories  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-chromium refractory material that provides improved resistance to coal slag penetration is presented. The refractory mixture comprises a blend of chromium oxide, aluminum oxide and phosphates. The refractory mixture may be blended with an aggregate and cured. In addition a phosphorus oxide may be blended with chromium oxide and aluminum oxide and additionally an aggregate. The refractory mixture reduces the rate of coal slag penetration into the surface of the cured refractory.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Dogan, Cynthia P.; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.; Petty, Arthur V.

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Use of phosphates to reduce slag penetration in Cr2O3-based refractories  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-chromium refractory material that provides improved resistance to coal slag penetration is presented. The refractory mixture comprises a blend of chromium oxide, aluminum oxide and phosphates. The refractory mixture may be blended with an aggregate and cured. In addition a phosphorous oxide may be blended with chromium oxide and aluminum oxide and additionally an aggregate. The refractory mixture reduces the rate of coal slag penetration into the surface of the cured refractory.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Dogan, Cynthia P.; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.; Petty, Arthur V.

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

371

Modeling the corrosion of high-level waste containers: CAM-CRM interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 are favored. This publication addresses the development of models to account for corrosion of Alloy C-22 surfaces exposed directly to the Near Field Environment (NFE), as well as to the exacerbated conditions in the CAM-CRM crevice.

Farmer, J. C., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

High-Level Specification and Automatic Generation of IP Interface Monitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A central problem in functional verification is to check that a circuit block is producing correct outputs while enforcing that the environment is providing legal inputs. To attack this problem, several researchers have proposed monitor-based methodologies, which offer many benefits. This paper presents a novel, high-level specification style for these monitors, along with a linear-size, linear-time translation algorithm into monitor circuits. The specification style naturally fits the complex, but well-specified interfaces used between IP blocks in systems-on-chip. To demonstrate the advantage of our specification style, we have specified monitors for various versions of the Sonics OCP protocol as well as the AMBA AHB protocol, and have developed a prototype tool that automatically translates specifications into Verilog or VHDL monitor circuits.

Marcio T. Oliveira; Alan J. Hu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Source terms for analysis of accidents at a high level waste repository  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an approach to identifying source terms from possible accidents during the preclosure phase of a high-level nuclear waste repository. A review of the literature on repository safety analyses indicated that source term estimation is in a preliminary stage, largely based on judgement-based scoping analyses. The approach developed here was to partition the accident space into domains defined by certain threshold values of temperature and impact energy density which may arise in potential accidents and specify release fractions of various radionuclides, present in the waste form, in each domain. Along with a more quantitative understanding of accident phenomenology, this approach should help in achieving a clearer perspective on scenarios important to preclosure safety assessments of geologic repositories. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

Mubayi, V.; Davis, R.E.; Youngblood, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}d) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition, and the spinel solubility (c{sub o}) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of T{sub L} as a function of composition are based on T{sub L} measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c{sub o} versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates T{sub L} as a function of composition based on c{sub o} data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Statement of work for the immobilized high-level waste transportation system, Project W-464  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Statement of Work (SOW) is to present the scope, the deliverables, the organization, the technical and schedule expectations for the development of a Package Design Criteria (PDC), cost and schedule estimate for the acquisition of a transportation system for the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). This transportation system which includes the truck, the trailer, and a shielded cask will be used for on-site transportation of the IHLW canisters from the private vendor vitrification facility to the Hanford Site interim storage facility, i.e., vaults 2 and 3 of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This Statement of Work asks Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations, to provide Project W-464 with a Design Criteria Document, plus a life-cycle schedule and cost estimate for the acquisition of a transportation system (shielded cask, truck, trailer) for IHLW on-site transportation.

Mouette, P.

1998-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

380

Seismic design and analysis considerations for high level nuclear waste repositories  

SciTech Connect

A high level nuclear waste repository, like the one at Nevada`s Yucca Mountain that is being investigated for site suitability, will have some unique seismic design and analysis considerations. These are discussed, and a design philosophy that can rationally account for the unique performance objectives of such facilities is presented. A case is made for the use of DOE`s performance goal-based seismic design and evaluation methodology that is based on a hybrid ``deterministic`` and ``probabilistic`` concept. How and to what extent this methodology should be modified to adopt it for a potential site like Yucca Mountain is also outlined. Finally, the issue of designing for seismic fault rupture is discussed briefly, and the desirability of using the proposed seismic design philosophy in fault rupture evaluation is described.

Hossain, Q.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comparison of sugar molecule decomposition through glucose and fructose: a high-level quantum chemical study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient chemical conversion of biomass is essential to produce sustainable energy and industrial chemicals. Industrial level conversion of glucose to useful chemicals, such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, and levulinic acid, is a major step in the biomass conversion but is difficult because of the formation of undesired products and side reactions. To understand the molecular level reaction mechanisms involved in the decomposition of glucose and fructose, we have carried out high-level quantum chemical calculations [Gaussian-4 (G4) theory]. Selective 1,2-dehydration, keto-enol tautomerization, isomerization, retro-aldol condensation, and hydride shifts of glucose and fructose molecules were investigated. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses indicate that, for acyclic glucose and fructose molecules, the dehydration and isomerization require larger activation barriers compared to the retro-aldol reaction at 298 K in neutral medium. The retro-aldol reaction results in the formation of C2 and C4 species from glucose and C3 species from fructose. The formation of the most stable C3 species, dihydroxyacetone from fructose, is thermodynamically downhill. The 1,3-hydride shift leads to the cleavage of the C-C bond in the acyclic species; however, the enthalpy of activation is significantly higher (50-55 kcal/mol) than that of the retro-aldol reaction (38 kcal/mol) mainly because of the sterically hindered distorted four-membered transition state compared to the hexa-membered transition state in the retro-aldol reaction. Both tautomerization and dehydration are catalyzed by a water molecule in aqueous medium; however, water has little effect on the retro-aldol reaction. Isomerization of glucose to fructose and glyceraldehyde to dihydroxyacetone proceeds through hydride shifts that require an activation enthalpy of about 40 kcal/mol at 298 K in water medium. This investigation maps out accurate energetics of the decomposition of glucose and fructose molecules that is needed to help find more efficient catalysts for the conversion of hexose to useful chemicals.

Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Analysis of vapor samples from the Organice PISA high level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

Analyses for organic materials in vapor samples taken from the eight High Level Waste tanks (26F, 33F, 46F, 11H, 22H, 32H, 39H, and 43H) have been completed. Of these tanks, 26F, 33F, and 43H are designated 'organic'' tanks. Samples were collected on solvent desorption (SD) tubes (containing activated charcoal) from various heights above the tank waste. Tank ventilation was stopped for one hour prior to sampling and was not reinitiated until sample collection was complete. The results indicate that the concentration of organic materials is extremely low in all samples. Some organic materials were found in the vapor samples but in nanogram/liter (ng/L) quantities. These materials were present in the samples within the practical quantitation limit (PQL), which represents a practical and routinely achievable detection limit with a relatively good certainty that any reported value is reliable. Because of the low levels and the fact that no field background analysis was run (laboratory background analyses were run), the researchers cannot absolutely determine whether the materials were actually taken from the waste tanks or whether they are from environmental background. In any case, the quantities of material found are several orders magnitude below that which would comprise a flammability concern.

Swingle, R.F. II

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

SAGA: A Simple API for Grid Applications -- High-Level ApplicationProgramming on the Grid  

SciTech Connect

Grid technology has matured considerably over the past fewyears. Progress in both implementation and standardization is reaching alevel of robustness that enables production quality deployments of gridservices in the academic research community with heightened interest andearly adoption in the industrial community. Despite this progress, gridapplications are far from ubiquitous, and new applications require anenormous amount of programming effort just to see first light. A keyimpediment to accelerated deployment of grid applications is the scarcityof high-level application programming abstractions that bridge the gapbetween existing grid middle-ware and application-level needs. The SimpleAPI for Grid Applications (SAGA [1]) is a GGF standardization effort thataddresses this particular gap by providing a simple, stable, and uniformprogramming interface that integrates the most common grid programmingabstractions. These most common abstractions were identified through theanalysis of several existing and emerging Grid applications. In thisarticle, we present the SAGA effort, describe its relationship to otherGrid API efforts within the GGF community, and introduce the first draftof the API using some application programming examples.

Goodale, Tom; Jha, Shantenu; Kaiser, Hartmut; Kielmann, Thilo; Kleijer, Pascal; von Laszewski, Gregor; Lee, Craig; Merzky, Andre; Rajic,Hrabri; Shalf, John

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

[Study of institutional issues relating to transportation of high level waste]. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the ``seventh`` and final Quarterly Report under the scope of work for cooperative agreement between the Western Interstate Energy Board and the US Department of Energy. The report covers the period January--March 1993. The cooperative agreement was to expire in June 1992, but DOE granted an extension through March 24, 1993. Since this is the last Quarterly Report under the expired cooperative agreement, most tasks are noted as being completed. Two final items, however, will soon be sent to DOE -- final minutes from the March 9--11 High- Level Radioactive Waste Committee meeting, and the Year-End Technical Report. Some highlights from the quarter: The Committee decided on a preferred format for the revised Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. The document would be 100- 200 pages, accompanied by a series of white papers on key transportation elements. A 25--30 page handbook for educating western state elected officials would also be prepared. On March 24, the Committee sent a letter to DOE commenting on the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure report findings. The Committee is concerned that infrastructure limitations may limit the rail shipping option in many instances, even after upgrades have been implemented. The NSTI findings may also have significant relevance to the decision to develop multi-purpose canisters. On April 1, the Committee sent DOE the white paper, Transportation Implications of Various NWPA Program Options, which determined that DOE cannot develop a national transportation system by 1998 for shipments to an MRS or other federal storage facility.

Not Available

1993-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Methods of calculating the post-closure performance of high-level waste repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended as an overview of post-closure performance assessment methods for high-level radioactive waste repositories and is designed to give the reader a broad sense of the state of the art of this technology. As described here, ''the state of the art'' includes only what has been reported in report, journal, and conference proceedings literature through August 1987. There is a very large literature on the performance of high-level waste repositories. In order to make a review of this breadth manageable, its scope must be carefully defined. The essential principle followed is that only methods of calculating the long-term performance of waste repositories are described. The report is organized to reflect, in a generalized way, the logical order to steps that would be taken in a typical performance assessment. Chapter 2 describes ways of identifying scenarios and estimating their probabilities. Chapter 3 presents models used to determine the physical and chemical environment of a repository, including models of heat transfer, radiation, geochemistry, rock mechanics, brine migration, radiation effects on chemistry, and coupled processes. The next two chapters address the performance of specific barriers to release of radioactivity. Chapter 4 treats engineered barriers, including containers, waste forms, backfills around waste packages, shaft and borehole seals, and repository design features. Chapter 5 discusses natural barriers, including ground water systems and stability of salt formations. The final chapters address optics of general applicability to performance assessment models. Methods of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis are described in Chapter 6, and natural analogues of repositories are treated in Chapter 7. 473 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Ross, B. (ed.)

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Polysiloxane Encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: 1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; 2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, 3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

Loomis, Guy George

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Silicon-Polymer Encapsulation of High-Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: (1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; (2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, (3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

G. G. Loomis; C. M. Miller; J. A. Giansiracusa; R. Kimmel; S. V. Prewett

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Marker ReDistancing/Level Set Method for High-Fidelity Implicit Interface Tracking  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid of the Front-Tracking (FT) and the Level-Set (LS) methods is introduced, combining advantages and removing drawbacks of both methods. The kinematics of the interface is treated in a Lagrangian (FT) manner, by tracking markers placed at the interface. The markers are not connected instead, the interface topology is resolved in an Eulerian (LS) framework, by wrapping a signed distance function around Lagrangian markers each time the markers move. For accuracy and efficiency, we have developed a high-order anchoring algorithm and an implicit PDE-based re-distancing. We have demonstrated that the method is 3rd-order accurate in space, near the markers, and therefore 1st-order convergent in curvature; in contrast to traditional PDE-based re-initialization algorithms, which tend to slightly relocate the zero Level Set and can be shown to be non-convergent in curvature. The implicit pseudo-time discretization of the re-distancing equation is implemented within the Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) framework combined with ILU(k) preconditioning. We have demonstrated that the steady-state solutions in pseudo-time can be achieved very efficiently, with iterations (CFL ), in contrast to the explicit re-distancing which requires 100s of iterations with CFL . The most cost-effective algorithm is found to be a hybrid of explicit and implicit discretizations, in which we apply first 10-15 iterations with explicit discretization (to bring the initial guess to the ball of convergence for the Newtons method) and then finishing with 2-3 implicit steps, bringing the re-distancing equation to a complete steady-state. The eigenscopy of the JFNK-ILU(k) demonstrates the efficiency of the ILU(k) preconditioner, which effectively cluster eigenvalues of the otherwise extremely ill-conditioned Jacobian matrices, thereby enabling the Krylov (GMRES) method to converge with iterations, with only a few levels of ILU fill-ins. Importantly, due to the Level Set localization, the bandwidth of the Jacobian matrix is nearly constant, and the ILU preconditioning scales as , which implies efficiency and good scalability of the overall algorithm. The numerical examples include the well-established tests for interface kinematics under translational, rotational and tearing/stretching motion. We have shown that the mass conservation is not an issue anymore, as demonstrated using the Rider&Kothes time-reversed tests with extreme deformation. We are able to stretch interface structures to the under-resolved/subgrid (on the chosen Eulerian mesh) scales, and recover them back without any change in shape/loss of mass.

Robert Nourgaliev; Samet Kadioglu; Vincent Mousseau; Dana Knoll

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Iron Phosphate Glass as Potential Waste Matrix for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Iron Phosphate Glass (IPG) is investigated as the alternative final waste form for High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) in U.S. This study is aimed to investigate feasibility of IPG to HLW arising from commercial reprocessing in Japan. In order to evaluate favorable preparation conditions, maximum waste loading and property of IPG, the melting tests were carried. From the results of melting tests, the favorable preparation conditions was with matrix of Fe/P 0.43 (mole ratio in products) and melting at 1200{sup o} for 4h. The products of 10-20mass% waste loading of simulated HLW were glassy and had no crystal peaks, however the product of 30mass% waste loading showed some crystal peaks by XRD analysis. IPG and Borosilicate glass (BG) had about the same thermal properties. As a result, IPG had enough potential for high waste loading and the extremely good chemical durability for consideration as a waste form for Japanese HLW.

Fukui, T.; Ishinomori, T.; Endo, Y.; Sazarashi, M.; Ono, S.; Suzuki, K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

A COMPARISON OF HANFORD AND SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This study is a simple comparison of high-level waste from plutonium production stored in tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Savannah River principally used the PUREX process for plutonium separation. Hanford used the PUREX, Bismuth Phosphate, and REDOX processes, and reprocessed many wastes for recovery of uranium and fission products. Thus, Hanford has 55 distinct waste types, only 17 of which could be at Savannah River. While Hanford and Savannah River wastes both have high concentrations of sodium nitrate, caustic, iron, and aluminum, Hanford wastes have higher concentrations of several key constituents. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford salt waste than in Savannah River waste are 67 for {sup 241}Am, 4 for aluminum, 18 for chromium, 10 for fluoride, 8 for phosphate, 6 for potassium, and 2 for sulfate. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford sludges than in Savannah River sludges are 3 for chromium, 19 for fluoride, 67 for phosphate, and 6 for zirconium. Waste composition differences must be considered before a waste processing method is selected: A method may be applicable to one site but not to the other.

HILL RC PHILIP; REYNOLDS JG; RUTLAND PL

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

Dees, L.A.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Lagrangian finite element analysis of the penetration of earth penetrating weapons  

SciTech Connect

Buried targets, such as hardened missile silos, that are resistant to the effects of air blast from above-ground or surface-burst explosions may be vulnerable to the effects of ground motion produced by nearby underground explosions. An earth penetrating weapon (EPW) is being developed to exploit this phenomena. To design the EPW system, loads on the weapon due to the penetration event must be determined. This paper presents the methodology for performing Lagrangian finite-element analysis of the penetration event in two and three dimensions. In order to describe the methodology, results from analyses done for a particular EPW impacting a particular target medium are presented. The results for impacts with nonzero angles of incidence and nonzero angles of attack show the importance of being able to calculate three dimensional penetration loads. 62 figs.

Rosinsky, R.W.

1985-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Composition of simulants used in the evaluation of electrochemical processes for the treatment of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

Four simulants are being used in the evaluation of electrochemical processes for the treatment of high-level wastes (HLW). These simulants represent waste presently stored at the Hanford, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River sites. Three of the simulants are highly alkaline salt solutions (Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River), and one is highly acidic (Idaho Falls).

Hobbs, D.T.

1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDUCTIVITY PROBE FOR MONITORING CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN POWER PLANT BOILER WATER.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A high temperature/high pressure flow through probe was designed to measure high temperature electrical conductivity of aqueous (aq) dilute electrolyte solutions, an application which can (more)

Hipple, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Impacts of Varying Penetration of Distributed Resources with & without Volt/Var Control: Case Study of Varying Load Types  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a follow-up to an earlier one on impacts of distributed energy resources (DR) on distribution feeders. As DR penetration level on the feeder increases, there can be impacts to distribution system/feeder capacity, line losses, and voltage regulation. These can vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system or loading. The question is how high of a DR level can be accommodated without any major changes to system operation, system design and protection. Our objective for this work was to address the question of how the DR impacts vary in regards to both DR voltage regulation capability and load mix. A dynamic analysis was used to focus on the impacts of DR with and without volt/var control with different load composition on the distribution feeder. The study considered an example 10MVA distribution feeder in which two inverter-based DRs were used to provide voltage regulation. The results due to DR without voltage regulation capability are compared with DR capable of providing local (at its bus) voltage regulation. The analysis was repeated for four different feeder load compositions consisting of (1) constant power, (2) constant impedance, (3) constant current and (4) ZIP (equal combination of previous three).

Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Characterization and reaction behavior of ferrocyanide simulants and Hanford Site high-level ferrocyanide waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonradioactive waste simulants and initial ferrocyanide tank waste samples were characterized to assess potential safety concerns associated with ferrocyanide high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). Chemical, physical, thermodynamic, and reaction properties of the waste simulants were determined and compared to properties of initial samples of actual ferrocyanide wastes presently in the tanks. The simulants were shown to not support propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. The simulant with the greatest ferrocyanide concentration was shown to not support a propagating reaction that would involve surrounding waste because of its high water content. Evaluation of dried simulants indicated a concentration limit of about 14 wt% disodium mononickel ferrocyanide, below which propagating reactions could not occur in the ambient temperature bulk tank waste. For postulated localized hot spots where dried waste is postulated to be at an initial temperature of 130 C, a concentration limit of about 13 wt% disodium mononickel ferrocyanide was determined, below which propagating reactions could not occur. Analyses of initial samples of the presently stored ferrocyanide waste indicate that the waste tank ferrocyanide concentrations are considerably lower than the limit for propagation for dry waste and that the water content is near that of the as-prepared simulants. If the initial trend continues, it will be possible to show that runaway ferrocyanide reactions are not possible under present tank conditions. The lower ferrocyanide concentrations in actual tank waste may be due to tank waste mixing and/or degradation from radiolysis and/or hydrolysis, which may have occurred over approximately 35 years of storage.

Jeppson, D.W.; Simpson, B.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site selection and safety assessment.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high penetration levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Market penetration of new energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and, for some, the mathematical formulas of forecasting methods that can be used to forecast the market penetration of renewable energy technologies. Among the methods studied are subjective estimation, market surveys, historical analogy models, cost models, diffusion models, time-series models, and econometric models. Some of these forecasting methods are more effective than others at different developmental stages of new technologies.

Packey, D.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Methodology for Automated Verification of Synthesized RTL Designs and Its Integration with a High-Level Synthesis Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-level synthesis tools generate RTL designs from algorithmic behavioral specifications and consist of well defined tasks. Widely used algorithms for these tasks retain the overall control flow structure of the behavioral specification allowing limited ...

Nazanin Mansouri; Ranga Vemuri

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hydro-mechanical behaviour of bentonite-based materials used for high-level radioactive waste disposal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study deals with the hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted bentonite-based materials used as sealing materials in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The pure MX80 bentontie, mixtures (more)

Wang, Qiong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix A Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-1 A.1 Introduction A-1 A.2 Methodology A-1 A.3 High-Level Waste Treatment and Interim Storage Site Selection A-3 A.3.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-3 A.3.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-3 A.3.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-3 A.3.4 Evaluation Process A-4 A.3.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-6 A.4 Low-Activity Waste Disposal Site Selection A-6 A.4.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-7 A.4.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-8 A.4.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-8 A.4.4 Evaluation Process A-8 A.4.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-9 A.4.6 Final Selection of a Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility

405

An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening high-level waste tanks for flammable gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at Hanford have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. AR models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. The authors performed a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening. They found that the effort to implement such a model was acceptable and that computational requirements were reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts.

Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ESTIMATING HIGH LEVEL WASTE MIXING PERFORMANCE IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of high level waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tank Operations Contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is currently demonstrating mixing, sampling, and batch transfer performance in two different sizes of small-scale DSTs. The results of these demonstrations will be used to estimate full-scale DST mixing performance and provide the key input to a programmatic decision on the need to build a dedicated feed certification facility. This paper discusses the results from initial mixing demonstration activities and presents data evaluation techniques that allow insight into the performance relationships of the two small tanks. The next steps, sampling and batch transfers, of the small scale demonstration activities are introduced. A discussion of the integration of results from the mixing, sampling, and batch transfer tests to allow estimating full-scale DST performance is presented.

THIEN MG; GREER DA; TOWNSON P

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FEED CERTIFICATION IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (l million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing ofHLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch-to-batch operational adjustments that reduce operating efficiency and have the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

THIEN MG; WELLS BE; ADAMSON DJ

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the US Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing possible ecosystem effects of radionuclides as well as possible health effects to man from radionuclides which may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure; benthic community metabolism; the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers; the faunal composition of midwater nekton; rates of microbial processes; and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms which may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore, a multi-compartment foodweb model is being developed which considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact on the ocean environment and on man of potential releases of radionuclides.

Gomez, L.S.; Hessler, R.R.; Jackson, D.W.; Marietta, M.G.; Smith, K.L. Jr.; Talbert, D.M.; Yayanos, A.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the US Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing possible ecosystem effects of radionuclides as well as possible health effects to man from radionuclides which may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure; benthic community metabolism; the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers; the faunal composition of midwater nekton; rates of microbial processes, and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms which may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore, a multi-compartment foodweb model is being developed which considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact on the ocean environment and on man of potential releases of radionuclides.

Gomez, L.S.; Hessler, R.R.; Jackson, D.W.; Marietta, M.G.; Smith, K.L. Jr.; Talbert, D.M.; Yayanos, A.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PLANT AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification melter was shut down in September 2002 after being used to vitrify High Level Waste (HLW) and process system residuals for six years. Processing of the HLW occurred from June 1996 through November 2001, followed by a program to flush the remaining HLW through to the melter. Glass removal and shutdown followed. The facility and process equipment is currently in a standby mode awaiting deactivation. During HLW processing operations, nearly 24 million curies of radioactive material were vitrified into 275 canisters of HLW glass. At least 99.7% of the curies in the HLW tanks at the WVDP were vitrified using the melter. Each canister of HLW holds approximately 2000 kilograms of glass with an average contact dose rate of over 2600 rem per hour. After vitrification processing ended, two more cans were filled using the Evacuated Canister Process to empty the melter at shutdown. This history briefly summarizes the initial stages of process development and earlier WVDP experience in the design and operation of the vitrification systems, followed by a more detailed discussion of equipment availability and failure rates during six years of operation. Lessons learned operating a system that continued to function beyond design expectations also are highlighted.

Petkus, Lawrence L.; Paul, James; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene; May, Joseph

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Data acquisition and control system for the High-Level Waste Tank Farm at Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Nuclear Waste Storage Tank 241-SY-101 periodically releases flammable gasses. Mitigation experiments to release the gasses continuously to avoid a catastrophic build-up are planned for FY93 and beyond. Los Alamos has provided a data acquisition and control system (DACS) to monitor and control mitigation experiments on SY-101. The DACS consists of a data acquisition trailer to house the electronic components and computers in a friendly environment, a computer system running process control software for monitoring and controlling the tests, signal conditioners to convert the instrument signals to a usable form for the DACS, programmable logic controllers to process sensor signals and take action quickly, a fast data acquisition system for recording transient data, and a remote monitoring system to monitor the progress of the experiment. Equipment to monitor the release of the gasses was also provided. The first experiment involves a mixer pump to mix the waste and allow the gasses to be released at the surface of the liquid as the gas is being formed. The initial tests are scheduled for July 1993.

Hoida, H.W.; Hatcher, C.R.; Trujillo, L.T.; Holt, D.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vargo, G.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Martin, J.; Stastny, G.; Echave, R. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Eldridge, K. [Eldridge Engineering, Spokane, WA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

LHCb: LHCb High Level Trigger design issues for post Long Stop 1 running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb High Level Trigger uses two stages of software running on an Event Filter Farm (EFF) to select events for offline reconstruction and analysis. The first stage (Hlt1) processes approximately 1 MHz of events accepted by a hardware trigger. In 2012, the second stage (Hlt2) wrote 5 kHz to permanent storage for later processing. Following the LHC's Long Stop 1 (anticipated for 2015), the machine energy will increase from 8 TeV in the center-of-mass to 13 TeV and the cross sections for beauty and charm are expected to grow proportionately. We plan to increase the Hlt2 output to 12 kHz, some for immediate offline processing, some for later offline processing, and some ready for immediate analysis. By increasing the absolute computing power of the EFF, and buffering data for processing between machine fills, we should be able to significantly increase the efficiency for signal while improving signal-to-background ratios. In this poster we will present several strategies under consideration and some of th...

Albrecht, J; Raven, G; Sokoloff, M D; Williams, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technical considerations for evaluating substantially complete containment of high-level waste within the waste package  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with technical information that is considered essential for demonstrating the ability of the high-level radioactive waste package to provide substantially complete containment'' of its contents (vitrified waste form or spent light-water reactor fuel) for a period of 300 to 1000 years in a geological repository environment. The discussion is centered around technical considerations of the repository environment, materials and fabrication processes for the waste package components, various degradation modes of the materials of construction of the waste packages, and inspection and monitoring of the waste package during the preclosure and retrievability period, which could begin up to 50 years after initiation of waste emplacement. The emphasis in this report is on metallic materials. However, brief references have been made to other materials such as ceramics, graphite, bonded ceramic-metal systems, and other types of composites. The content of this report was presented to an external peer review panel of nine members at a workshop held at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, April 2--4, 1990. The recommendations of the peer review panel have been incorporated in this report. There are two companion reports; the second report in the series provides state-of-the-art techniques for uncertainty evaluations. 97 refs., 1 fig.

Manaktala, H.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses); Interrante, C.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of High-Level Waste Management)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

US Department of Energy Storage of Spent Fuel and High Level Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) storage management. Like commercial reactor fuel, DOE's SNF and HLW were destined for the Yucca Mountain repository. In March 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to withdraw the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain. A new repository is now decades away. The default for the commercial and DOE research reactor fuel and HLW is on-site storage for the foreseeable future. Though the motion to withdraw the license application and delay opening of a repository signals extended storage, DOE's immediate plans for management of its SNF and HLW remain the same as before Yucca Mountain was designated as the repository, though it has expanded its research and development efforts to ensure safe extended storage. This paper outlines some of the proposed research that DOE is conducting and will use to enhance its storage systems and facilities.

Sandra M Birk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Should high-level nuclear waste be disposed of at geographically dispersed sites?  

SciTech Connect

Consideration of the technical feasibility of Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the site for a high-level nuclear waste repository has led to an intense debate regarding the economic, social, and political impacts of the repository. Impediments to the siting process mean that the nuclear waste problem is being resolved by adhering to the status quo, in which nuclear waste is stored at scattered sites near major population centers. To assess the merits of alternative siting strategies--including both the permanent repository and the status quo- we consider the variables that would be included in a model designed to select (1) the optimal number of disposal facilities, (2) the types of facilities (e.g., permanent repository or monitored retrievable facility), and (3) the geographic location of storage sites. The objective function in the model is an all-inclusive measure of social cost. The intent of the exercise is not to demonstrate the superiority of any single disposal strategy; uncertainties preclude a conclusive proof of optimality for any of the disposal options. Instead, we want to assess the sensitivity of a variety of proposed solutions to variations in the physical, economic, political, and social variables that influence a siting strategy.

Bassett, G.W. Jr. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Economics; Hemphill, R.; Kohout, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Studies Related to Chemical Mechanisms of Gas Formation in Hanford High-Level Nuclear Wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a more detailed mechanistic understanding of the thermal reactions that lead to gas production in certain high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford, Washington site. Prediction of the combustion hazard for these wastes and engineering parameters for waste processing depend upon both a knowledge of the composition of stored wastes and the changes that they undergo as a result of thermal and radiolytic decomposition. Since 1980 when Delagard first demonstrated that gas production (H2and N2O initially, later N2 and NH3)in the affected tanks was related to oxidative degradation of metal complexants present in the waste, periodic attempts have been made to develop detailed mechanisms by which the gases were formed. These studies have resulted in the postulation of a series of reactions that account for many of the observed products, but which involve several reactions for which there is limited, or no, precedent. For example, Al(OH)4 has been postulated to function as a Lewis acid to catalyze the reaction of nitrite ion with the metal complexants, NO is proposed as an intermediate, and the ratios of gaseous products may be a result of the partitioning of NO between two or more reactions. These reactions and intermediates have been the focus of this project since its inception in 1996.

E. Kent Barefield; Charles L. Liotta; Henry M. Neumann

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

PERFORMANCE OF A BURIED RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS AFTER 24 YEARS  

SciTech Connect

A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in the SRS burial ground for 24 years but lysimeter data was only available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed and analyzed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed the durability response. The laboratory results indicated that the glass was very durable as did analysis of the lysimeter data. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with the results of the laboratory and field tests. No detectable Pu, Am, Cm, Np, or Ru leached from the glass into the surrounding sediment. Leaching of {beta}/{delta} from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in the glass was diffusion controlled. Less than 0.5% of the Cs and Sr in the glass leached into the surrounding sediment, with >99% of the leached radionuclides remaining within 8 centimeters of the glass pellet.

Jantzen, C; Daniel Kaplan, D; Ned Bibler, N; David Peeler, D; John Plodinec, J

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

TWRS retrieval and disposal mission, immobilized high-level waste storage plan  

SciTech Connect

This project plan has a two fold purpose. First, it provides a plan specific to the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Immobilized High-Level Waste (EMW) Storage Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1996) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan. Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 (DOE 1992a) and 430.1 (DOE 1995)). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the plan`s dual purpose. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

Calmus, R.B.

1998-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development and Deployment of Advanced Corrosion Monitoring Systems for High-Level Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a collaborative technology development program, sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area, to use electrochemical noise (EN) for corrosion monitoring in underground storage tanks. These tanks, made of carbon or stainless steels, contain high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) generated by weapons production or radioactive liquid waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage measurements associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems measure and record these fluctuations over time from electrodes immersed in the environment of interest--in this case, radioactive tank waste. The resulting EN signals have characteristic patterns for different corrosion mechanisms. In recent years, engineers and scientists from several DOE sites, in collaboration with several private companies, have conducted laboratory studies and field applications to correlate the EN signals with corrosion mechanisms active in the radioactive waste tanks. The participating DOE sites are Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The commercial vendors have included HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc., EIC Laboratories, Inc., and AEA Technologies. Successful deployment of the EN technology will yield improved information of waste tank corrosion conditions, better tank management, and lower overall cost.

Terry, M. T.; Edgemon, G. L.; Mickalonis, J. I.; Mizia, R. E.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Development and deployment of advanced corrosion monitoring systems for high-level waste tanks.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a collaborative technology development program, sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area, to use electrochemical noise (EN) for corrosion monitoring in underground storage tanks. These tanks, made of carbon or stainless steels, contain high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) generated by weapons production or radioactive liquid waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage measurements associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems measure and record these fluctuations over time from electrodes immersed in the environment of interest - in this case, radioactive tank waste. The resulting EN signals have characteristic patterns for different corrosion mechanisms. In recent years, engineers and scientists from several DOE sites, in collaboration with several private companies, have conducted laboratory studies and field applications to correlate the EN signals with corrosion mechanisms active in the radioactive waste tanks. The participating DOE sites are Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge Reservation and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The commercial vendors have included HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc., EIC Laboratories, Inc., and M A Technologies. Successful deployment of the EN technology will yield improved information of waste tank corrosion conditions, better tank management, and lower overall cost.

Terry, M. T. (Michael T.); Edgemon, G. L. (Glenn L.); Mickalonis, J. I. (John I.); Mizia, R. E. (Ronald E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Caustic leaching of high-level radioactive tank sludge: A critical literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) must treat and safely dispose of its radioactive tank contents, which can be separated into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. Since the unit costs of treatment and disposal are much higher for HLW than for LLW, technologies to reduce the amount of HLW are being developed. A key process currently being studied to reduce the volume of HLW sludges is called enhanced sludge washing (ESW). This process removes, by water washes, soluble constituents such as sodium salts, and the washed sludge is then leached with 2--3 M NaOH at 60--100 C to remove nonradioactive metals such as aluminum. The remaining solids are considered to be HLW while the solutions are LLW after radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs have been removed. Results of bench-scale tests have shown that the ESW will probably remove the required amounts of inert constituents. While both experimental and theoretical results have shown that leaching efficiency increases as the time and temperature of the leach are increased, increases in the caustic concentration above 2--3 M will only marginally improve the leach factors. However, these tests were not designed to validate the assumption that the caustic used in the ESW process will generate only a small increase (10 Mkg) in the amount of LLW; instead the test conditions were selected to maximize leaching in a short period and used more water and caustic than is planned during full-scale operations. Even though calculations indicate that the estimate for the amount of LLW generated by the ESW process appears to be reasonable, a detailed study of the amount of LLW from the ESW process is still required. If the LLW analysis indicates that sodium management is critical, then a more comprehensive evaluation of the clean salt process or caustic recycle would be needed. Finally, experimental and theoretical studies have clearly demonstrated the need for the control of solids formation during and after leaching.

McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Hunt, R.D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Shale disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste disposal in shale within the United States. The U.S. has many possible clay/shale/argillite basins with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar geologic formations have been extensively studied by international programs with largely positive results, over significant ranges of the most important material characteristics including permeability, rheology, and sorptive potential. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in shale media. We develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes identified by international investigators, to support a generic conclusion regarding post-closure safety. Requisite assumptions for these analyses include waste characteristics, disposal concepts, and important properties of the geologic formation. We then apply lessons learned from Sandia experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Project and the Yucca Mountain Project to develop a disposal strategy should a shale repository be considered as an alternative disposal pathway in the U.S. Disposal of high-level radioactive waste in suitable shale formations is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable and self-sealing, conditions are chemically reducing, and sorption tends to prevent radionuclide transport. Vertically and laterally extensive shale and clay formations exist in multiple locations in the contiguous 48 states. Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical calculations indicate that temperatures near emplaced waste packages can be maintained below boiling and will decay to within a few degrees of the ambient temperature within a few decades (or longer depending on the waste form). Construction effects, ventilation, and the thermal pulse will lead to clay dehydration and deformation, confined to an excavation disturbed zone within a few meters of the repository, that can be reasonably characterized. Within a few centuries after waste emplacement, overburden pressures will seal fractures, resaturate the dehydrated zones, and provide a repository setting that strongly limits radionuclide movement to diffusive transport. Coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations indicate maximum extents of radionuclide transport on the order of tens to hundreds of meters, or less, in a million years. Under the conditions modeled, a shale repository could achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios. The performance analyses described here are based on the assumption that long-term standards for disposal in clay/shale would be identical in the key aspects, to those prescribed for existing repository programs such as Yucca Mountain. This generic repository evaluation for shale is the first developed in the United States. Previous repository considerations have emphasized salt formations and volcanic rock formations. Much of the experience gained from U.S. repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, is applied here to scoping analyses for a shale repository. A contemporary understanding of clay mineralogy and attendant chemical environments has allowed identification of the appropriate features, events, and processes to be incorporated into the analysis. Advanced multi-physics modeling provides key support for understanding the effects from coupled processes. The results of the assessment show that shale formations provide a technically advanced, scientifically sound disposal option for the U.S.

Sassani, David Carl; Stone, Charles Michael; Hansen, Francis D.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Martinez, Mario J.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Gaither, Katherine N.; Holland, John Francis; Brady, Patrick Vane

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) INTEGRITY PROJECT HIGH LEVEL WASTE CHEMISTRY OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of River Protection (ORP) has a continuing program for chemical optimization to better characterize corrosion behavior of High-Level Waste (HLW). The DOE controls the chemistry in its HLW to minimize the propensity of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitrate-containing solutions. By improving the control of localized corrosion and SCC, the ORP can increase the life of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) carbon steel structural components and reduce overall mission costs. The carbon steel tanks at the Hanford Site are critical to the mission of safely managing stored HLW until it can be treated for disposal. The DOE has historically used additions of sodium hydroxide to retard corrosion processes in HLW tanks. This also increases the amount of waste to be treated. The reactions with carbon dioxide from the air and solid chemical species in the tank continually deplete the hydroxide ion concentration, which then requires continued additions. The DOE can reduce overall costs for caustic addition and treatment of waste, and more effectively utilize waste storage capacity by minimizing these chemical additions. Hydroxide addition is a means to control localized and stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel by providing a passive environment. The exact mechanism that causes nitrate to drive the corrosion process is not yet clear. The SCC is less of a concern in the newer stress relieved double shell tanks due to reduced residual stress. The optimization of waste chemistry will further reduce the propensity for SCC. The corrosion testing performed to optimize waste chemistry included cyclic potentiodynamic volarization studies. slow strain rate tests. and stress intensity factor/crack growth rate determinations. Laboratory experimental evidence suggests that nitrite is a highly effective:inhibitor for pitting and SCC in alkaline nitrate environments. Revision of the corrosion control strategies to a nitrite-based control, where there is no constant depletion mechanism as with hydroxide, should greatly enhance tank lifetime, tank space availability, and reduce downstream reprocessing costs by reducing chemical addition to the tanks.

WASHENFELDER DJ

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue for the Hanford site high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the approach used to resolve the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue for the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Although operational controls have been in place at the Hanford Site throughout its operating life to minimize the amount of fissile material discarded as waste, estimates of the total amount of plutonium that entered the waste tanks range from 500 to 1,000 kg. Nuclear criticality safety concerns were heightened in 1991 based on a review of waste analysis results and a subsequent U.S. Department of Energy 1399 review of the nuclear criticality program. Although the DOE review team concluded that there was no imminent risk of a criticality at the Hanford Site tank farms, the team also stated its concern regarding the lack of definitive knowledge of the fissile material inventory and distribution within the waste tanks and the lack of sufficient management support for the overall criticality safety program. An in-depth technical review of the nuclear criticality safety of the waste tanks was conducted to develop a defensible technical basis to ensure that waste tanks are subcritical. The review covered all relevant aspects of nuclear criticality safety including neutronics and chemical and physical phenomena of the waste form under aging waste conditions as well as during routine waste management operations. This paper provides a review of the technical basis to support the conclusion that given current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality is incredible. The DOE has been requested to close the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board is currently reviewing the technicalbasis.

Bratzel, D.R.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE management of high-level waste at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 60 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste--caustic liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludges--are stored in underground tanks at the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. At least one-third of the tanks are known to have leaked waste into the enviroranent, and there are many unresolved tank safety issues. In order to resolve the environmental and safety concerns, the Department plans to retrieve the waste, immobilize it, and dispose of it in a permanent geologic repository. Processing all of the tank waste in this manner could cost $40 billion, including $1.2 billion to construct the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. The purpose of our audit was to examine the reasons for cost estimate increases and schedule delays on the Hanford vitrification program. We also wanted to report on outstanding technical, safety, and environmental issues that could make the project even more costly and further delay its completion. We found that the Department managed the Hanford remediation system as a number of separate projects not fully integrated into one major system acquisition. Total costs have, therefore, been obscured, and the Department has not yet clearly defined system requirements or developed overall cost and schedule baselines. This lack of visibility could result in additional cost growth and schedule delays. We also noted a vast array of technical uncertainties, including tank safety and inadequate information about the makeup of tank waste, that could significantly affect the program`s cost and ultimate success. To increase visibility of program cost and schedule, we are recommending that all separate projects relating to tank waste be included in a single major system acquisition, and that the Department complete its ongoing baselining effort to the extent practical before making major funding commitments. Management concurred with our finding and recommendations.

Not Available

1993-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Expected environments in high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in salt  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the expected environments associated with high-level waste (HLW) and spent fuel (SF) repositories in salt formations. These environments include the thermal, fluid, pressure, brine chemistry, and radiation fields predicted for the repository conceptual designs. In this study, it is assumed that the repository will be a room and pillar mine in a rock-salt formation, with the disposal horizon located approx. 2000 ft (610 m) below the surface of the earth. Canistered waste packages containing HLW in a solid matrix or SF elements are emplaced in vertical holes in the floor of the rooms. The emplacement holes are backfilled with crushed salt or other material and sealed at some later time. Sensitivity studies are presented to show the effect of changing the areal heat load, the canister heat load, the barrier material and thickness, ventilation of the storage room, and adding a second row to the emplacement configuration. The calculated thermal environment is used as input for brine migration calculations. The vapor and gas pressure will gradually attain the lithostatic pressure in a sealed repository. In the unlikely event that an emplacement hole will become sealed in relatively early years, the vapor space pressure was calculated for three scenarios (i.e., no hole closure - no backfill, no hole closure - backfill, and hole closure - no backfill). It was assumed that the gas in the system consisted of air and water vapor in equilibrium with brine. A computer code (REPRESS) was developed assuming that these changes occur slowly (equilibrium conditions). The brine chemical environment is outlined in terms of brine chemistry, corrosion, and compositions. The nuclear radiation environment emphasized in this report is the stored energy that can be released as a result of radiation damage or crystal dislocations within crystal lattices.

Claiborne, H.C.; Rickertsen, L.D., Graham, R.F.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular example of fast motion through a classical barrier. One can unexectedly conclude that, in principle, nature allows fast penetration through classical barriers which against common sense. The phenomenon may be responsible for a variety of processes in labs and nature. For example, tunneling in solids may occur with a different scenario, in biophysics and chemistry one can specify conditions for unusual reactions, and evanescent optical waves may strongly change their properties. In condensed matter and cosmic physics there are phenomena with misterious reasons of an energy emission, for instance, gamma-ray bursts. One can try to treat them in the context of fast escape from under some barriers.

B. Ivlev

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTEs using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTEs and found relatively low TRLs for each of them: Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRLs are low for most of these CTEs (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRLs are listed below: Complete this TMP Perform a preliminary engineering study Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing Melter and off-gas testing with simulants Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses Canister testing Decontamination system testing Issue a requirements document Issue a risk management document Complete preliminary design Integrated pilot testing Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4.9 2017 2 3 3 2 4 2 9.8 2018 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.9 2019 3 3 3 3 4 3 5.1 2020 3 3 3 3 4 3 14.6 2021 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.3 2022 3 3 3 3 4 3 8.8 2023 4 4 4 4 4 4 9.1 2024 5 5 5 5 5 5 6.9 2025 6 6 6 6 6 6 6.9 CCC = canister cooling and crystallization; FMP = feeding, melting, and pouring; GCF = glass ceramic formulation; MSA = mixing, sampling, and analyses. This TMP is intended to guide the development of the glass ceramics waste form and process to the point where it is ready for industrialization.

Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Impact of Alkali Source on Vitrification of SRS High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Savannah River Site is currently immobilizing high level nuclear waste sludge by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The processing strategy involves blending a large batch of sludge into a feed tank, washing the sludge to reduce the amount of soluble species, then processing the large ''sludge batch'' through the DWPF. Each sludge batch is tested by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using simulants and tests with samples of the radioactive waste to ''qualify'' the batch prior to processing in the DWPF. The DWPF pretreats the sludge by first acidifying the sludge with nitric and formic acid. The ratio of nitric to formic acid is adjusted as required to target a final glass composition that is slightly reducing (the target is for {approx}20% of the iron to have a valence of two in the glass). The formic acid reduces the mercury in the feed to elemental mercury which is steam stripped from the feed. After a concentration step, the glass former (glass frit) is added as a 50 wt% slurry and the batch is concentrated to approximately 50 wt% solids. The feed slurry is then fed to a joule heated melter maintained at 1150 C. The glass must meet both processing (e.g., viscosity and liquidus temperature) and product performance (e.g., durability) constraints The alkali content of the final waste glass is a critical parameter that affects key glass properties (such as durability) as well as the processing characteristics of the waste sludge during the pretreatment and vitrification processes. Increasing the alkali content of the glass has been shown to improve the production rate of the DWPF, but the total alkali in the final glass is limited by constraints on glass durability and viscosity. Two sources of alkali contribute to the final alkali content of the glass: sodium salts in the waste supernate and sodium and lithium oxides in the glass frit added during pretreatment processes. Sodium salts in the waste supernate can be reduced significantly by washing the solids to remove soluble species. The ''washing strategy'' for future sludge batches can be controlled to limit the soluble sodium remaining in the waste stream while balancing the alkali content of the frit to maintain acceptable glass properties as well as improve melter processing characteristics.

LAMBERT, D. P.; MILLER, D. H.; PEELER, D. K.; SMITH, M. E.; STONE, M. E.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Summertime Low-Level Jets over the High-Latitude Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of a simple analytic boundary layer model developed by Thorpe and Guymer did not produce good agreement with observational data for oceanic low-level jet observations even though this model has worked well for the predictions of ...

Douglas O. ReVelle; E. Douglas Nilsson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the waste. The difference in the two models has led to the questions of how different are the results predicted by the two models and which model predicts the more conservative (larger) G values. More conservative G values would predict higher H{sub 2} generation rates that would require higher ventilation rates in the SRS tanks. This report compares predictions based on the two models at various nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS HLW tanks for both beta/gamma and for alpha radiation. It also compares predicted G values with those determined by actually measuring the H{sub 2} production from four SRS HLW tanks (Tanks 32H, 35H, 39H, and 42H). Lastly, the H{sub 2} generation rates predicted by the two models are compared for the 47 active SRS high level waste tanks using the most recent tank nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads for each tank. The predictions of the models for total H{sub 2} generation rates from the 47 active SRS waste were, for the most part, similar. For example, the predictions for both models applied to 25 tanks agreed within {+-}10% of each other. For the remaining 22 tanks, the SRS prediction was more conservative for 9 tanks (maximum 29% higher) and the Hanford prediction was more conservative for 13 tanks (maximum 19% higher). When comparing G values predicted by the equations presuming only alpha radiation or only beta/gamma was present the results were somewhat different. The results of predictions for alpha radiation, at the 47 current nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS tanks indicated that all the SRS predictions were higher (up to 30%) than the Hanford predictions and thus more conservative. For beta/gamma radiation the predictions for both models agreed to {+-}10% for 18 of the combinations, the Hanford model predicted higher values (11 up to 17%) for 25 of the concentrations considered, and the SRS model predicted higher G values for the remaining two combinations (12 and 17%). For the four SRS tanks, where we compared measured G values to those predicted by the two differen

Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics, without any new assumptions. The calculations are only more exact than those usually found in the literature. When photons penetrate a cold and dense electron plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, through Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and through Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But when the plasma is very hot and has low density, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift, which is an interaction with the electron plasma. The energy loss of a photon per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photons energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. This energy loss (plasma redshift of the photons) consists of very small quanta, which are absorbed by the plasma and cause a significant heating. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the solar corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains

Ari Brynjolfsson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HLW is the highly radioactive material resulting from the reprocessing of SNF. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federal government is responsible for the disposal...

439

Establishing an inventory management process to meet high customer service levels in a vaccines organization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inventory management is a complex aspect of Supply Chain Management that is frequently discussed and debated due to the fact that it has a high (more)

Wonsowicz, Johanna Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fab