Sample records for high occupancy toll

  1. An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appiah, Justice

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for high occupancy vehicle...

  2. An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appiah, Justice

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand ...

  3. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High...

  4. A Mathematical Model for Evaluating the Conversion of High Occupancy Vehicle Lane to High Occupancy/ Toll Lane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naga, Raghavender P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over three years. The capital cost estimate from MTC was putprocess (MTC estimates the capital cost of putting an HOT

  5. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  6. Potential shift from transit to single occupancy vehicle due to adaptation of a high occupancy vehicle lane to a high occupancy toll lane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chum, Geoffrey Linus

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed to park-and-ride bus passengers on the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway corridors in Houston. Passengers’ responses to questions regarding their trip characteristics, their socioeconomic characteristics, and stated preference scenarios were used...

  7. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shao-Yun, E-mail: jiangshaoyun@yahoo.com [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China)] [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China); Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China)] [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China); Deng, Jia-Yin, E-mail: yazhou2991@126.com [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China)] [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  8. Linear Tolls Suce: New bounds and algorithms for tolls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Lisa K.

    ; 1] ordered by their increasing willingness to pay tolls to reduce latency | their valuation of time. Cole, et al. give an algorithm that computes optimal tolls for a bounded number of agent valuations with optimal tolls is independent of the distribution of valuations of time of the users. In particular

  9. Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm for High Occupancy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Elagin; Pavel Murat; Alexandre Pranko; Alexei Safonov

    2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithms based on the particle flow approach are becoming increasingly utilized in collider experiments due to their superior jet energy and missing energy resolution compared to the traditional calorimeter-based measurements. Such methods have been shown to work well in environments with low occupancy of particles per unit of calorimeter granularity. However, at higher instantaneous luminosity or in detectors with coarse calorimeter segmentation, the overlaps of calorimeter energy deposits from charged and neutral particles significantly complicate particle energy reconstruction, reducing the overall energy resolution of the method. We present a technique designed to resolve overlapping energy depositions of spatially close particles using a statistically consistent probabilistic procedure. The technique is nearly free of ad-hoc corrections, improves energy resolution, and provides new important handles that can improve the sensitivity of physics analyses: the uncertainty of the jet energy on an event-by-event basis and the estimate of the probability of a given particle hypothesis for a given detector response. When applied to the reconstruction of hadronic jets produced in the decays of tau leptons using the CDF-II detector at Fermilab, the method has demonstrated reliable and robust performance.

  10. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  11. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Karotsis, Georgios [ORNL; Guthrie, Malcolm [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Pradhan, Neelam [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  12. Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly adults. The per-person sensible heat generation and occupancy profiles were mapped from previous studies lamp to simulate human occupancy; occupancy and lighting loads in other areas of the home were

  13. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  14. Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

  15. PRICING ENERGY DERIVATIVES BY LINEAR PROGRAMMING: TOLLING AGREEMENT CONTRACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    PRICING ENERGY DERIVATIVES BY LINEAR PROGRAMMING: TOLLING AGREEMENT CONTRACTS Valeriy Ryabchenko for pricing energy derivatives known as tolling agreement contracts. The pricing problem is reduced energy derivatives. The problem of pricing such contracts falls into the class of multiple optimal

  16. accidents occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What is Occupational Therapy? The occupational therapist is a highly specialized health care Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , cleaning, and dressing....

  17. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  18. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  19. Identity work and control in occupational communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Maanen, John

    This chapter is about three highly intertwined concepts. The first concerns occupational communities and the work cultures they nourish. The second concerns the work identities that are valued (and devalued) in such ...

  20. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

  1. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  2. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  3. J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391 Journal of Occupational Health Relationships of Job and Some National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm), U 420, IFR25-RFRH, Réseau Fédératif de disorders. (J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391) Key words: Occupational injury, Job, Sex, Age, Overweight

  4. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  5. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) | DepartmentINL E-IDROCCUPATIONAL *Occupational

  6. Pricing and Hedging Electricity Supply Contracts: a Case with Tolling Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pricing and Hedging Electricity Supply Contracts: a Case with Tolling Agreements Shi-Jie Deng Email Customized electric power contracts catering to specific business and risk management needs have gained increasing popularity among large energy firms in the restructured electricity in- dustry. A tolling

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR HUMAN TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 3 DOMINANT NEGATIVITY AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Matthew

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Toll-like receptors are an important part of the innate immune system and mediate infection via the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) recognizes foreign-derived double stranded RNA as its...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    travel in HOV and high occupancy toll (HOT) lanes. Qualifying vehicles must obtain a permit and display an HOV exemption decal and a toll transponder. CDOT reached its quota of...

  9. Section 5 -Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Section 5 - Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy 1. Housing and Dining privileges may be terminated by the University for cause. Cause includes, but is not limited to violating. 2. The University may terminate this agreement without cause with ten days written notice. 3

  10. Toll road public-private partnerships in Malaysia : using the CLIOS process for policy improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John L., 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malaysia has relied on private sector provision of toll roads for over twenty years using public- private partnerships (PPPs). While the program has been successful in providing close to 1,800 kilometers of highway in that ...

  11. An analysis of the current investment trend in the U.S. toll road sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, long term concessions through public-private partnerships (PPP's) in the US toll road sector have emerged and are expected to become a phenomenon in the near future. Up until now, only two large scale ...

  12. Team #32 Page 1 of 19 Modeling Toll Plaza Behavior Using Queuing Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    .2 Environmental Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.3 Traffic Capacity and Graphs 18 #12;Team #32 Page 3 of 19 1 Introduction Toll financing has been used throughout the history

  13. The impact of incentives on the use of toll roads by trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lin

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Mark W. Burris Committee Members, Luca Quadrifoglio David R. Ellis Head of Department, David V. Rosowsky... University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mark W. Burris States are increasingly using toll roads as a means of financing transportation capital needs as well as expanding transportation system capacity. Whether toll roads can attract trucks partially...

  14. Occupational Complexity and Lifetime Cognitive Abilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, Emily

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Associations were examined between complexity of main lifetime occupation and cognitive performance in later life. Occupational complexity ratings for data, people and things were collected from the Dictionary of Occupational ...

  15. Occupational neurotoxicology of organic solvents and solvent mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triebig, G. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of two field studies in painters and spray painters, the outcomes of examinations of workers with suspected work-related disease due to solvents, as well as data from an evaluation of an epidemiologic study in painters with confirmed occupational disease, are presented and discussed. The results of these studies and the experiences in occupational medicine in the Federal Republic of Germany do not support the assumption of high neurotoxic risks in solvent-exposed workers, which can be postulated from various epidemiologic studies from Scandinavian countries. Several factors may explain the different conclusions: (1) lower solvent exposures of German painters in the past decades; (2) false positive diagnosis of a toxic encephalopathy; (3) aetiological misclassification; (4) differences in legislation relevant for the acknowledgement of occupational diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for further well-designed epidemiologic studies in occupationally solvent-exposed workers. Suggestions regarding assessment of exposure and neurobehavioral tests are given.

  16. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  17. Environmental Studies & Ecology Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Relations Specialist Recreation Leader Renewable Energy Consultant Safety Inspector Sales Representative. Programs Farms/Ranches FEDERAL AGENCIES Department of Defense (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Environmental Conservationist Consultant Earth Scientist Ecologist Economic Analyst Energy Occupations Entomologist

  18. 2014OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Endowment Occupational Hearing Loss: Practical Approaches to Evaluation and Management Rodney C. Diaz, MD UC Health System Prevention of Infectious Disease in Health Care Workers Craig F. Conlon, MD, PhD Kaiser

  19. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  20. Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

  1. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

  2. The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll-free line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll-free line is always open. Call us if: · You think someone has been poisoned. · You have questions about any type of poison. · You want information about poison prevention. Storing Safely · Lock up poisonous products and medicines out of reach and out

  3. The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll free line is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll free line is always open. Call us if: · You think someone has been poisoned. · You have questions about any type of poison. · You want information about poison prevention. Storing Safely · Lock up poisonous products and medicines out of reach and out

  4. Andrew Odlyzko 2006 32 Chapter 4: Economic costs of toll access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odlyzko, Andrew M.

    © Andrew Odlyzko 2006 32 Chapter 4: Economic costs of toll access Andrew Odlyzko Introduction Many. The invention of printing lowered the costs of information dissemination, and largely eliminated the job costs are higher than those of libraries, and it enables new types of scholarly communication (as well

  5. microform I -I lJO&521-0600 toll-hee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    -343-5299 toll-hee from Canada Copiesof articles from this publicationare now available from UMI Article clients is granted by Kluwer Academic Publishers for users registered with the Copyright Clearance Center:Permission to photocopy must be obtained from the copyright owner. Please apply to Kluwer Academic Publishers. P.O. Box 17

  6. Conditions of Occupancy College Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Green and at Trinity Hall, Dartry, Dublin 6. There may be local differences in the Conditions of Occupancy between the main campus and Trinity Hall. Such differences will be described within to either the Warden of Trinity Hall in relation to rooms or residents at Trinity Hall or the Registrar

  7. Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Union Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 Jobs Jobs Transition Just Department #12;Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;#12;InternatIonal labour offIce · Geneva european commIssIon Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;photocomposed

  8. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure: 2004 Annual Report Exhibit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Classification (SOC) Manual (1980). Labor Category Occupation Code Occupation Name Agriculture 0562 0570 0580 Groundskeepers Forest Workers Misc. Agriculture Construction...

  9. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  10. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System...

  11. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  13. Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and DOE facility records and data are provided to DOL, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...

  14. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System-Fernald Historical Records System, Office of Legacy...

  15. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  16. Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging Abhijit Sarkar dynamic range CMOS video camera to integrate daylight harvesting and occupancy sensing functionalities by these sensors. The prototype involves three algorithms, daylight estimation, occupancy detection and lighting

  17. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  18. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  19. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

  20. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The...

  1. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

  2. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory VisitDosimBadgeTrckg-PIA.pdf...

  3. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New England Journal of Medicine 1993, 329, 7. S. v. Klot; A.34 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered35 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered

  4. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Telephone: 503-222-5161 Fax: 503-820-2370 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org JUDI DANIELSON CHAIR Idaho TOM KARIER VICE

  5. Wireless Sensor Technology to Optimize the Occupant's Dynamic Demand Pattern Within the Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is to look how the individual building occupants? movements, their staying on different locations within their building. Distributed information can be obtained by low-cost wireless sensor networks (Arens et al. 2005, Tse and Chan 2008), low-cost infrared..., could only be achieved if users could be located within the building. Low-budget wireless sensor networks with portable nodes show high potential for real-time localization and monitoring of building occupants ( Feldmeier and Paradiso 2010). Therefore...

  6. Structure of Human Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) Ligand-binding Domain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells ImpedesStructure ofHuman Toll-like

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  10. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Smart Occupancy Sensor Debuts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building energy performance. A photo of the Image Processing Occupancy Sensor, a white plastic device similar in size and shape to a smartphone. On the top left of the device is a...

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  12. Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

    Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising...

  13. Occupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    , hearing conservation, machine guarding, system safety, and environmental health. The workshop settingOccupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management Certificate Program Corporate) This course covers concepts used in the Environmental Management courses. The course emphasizes the practi

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  16. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  3. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  4. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the concept of the Occupant Energy Index. The Occupant Energy Index, a scale of 0 to 100, defines the full spectrum of influence that occupant behavior can have on the energy consumption of a home. A home designed to consume zero energy using... in the country, but also produces power onsite. How much might energy consumption increase when occupants return to this home? Past research has demonstrated that occupant behavior can have dramatic impacts on energy consumption. Maintained interior...

  5. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  6. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Value Pricing and Tolling Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Location and time-of-day variable tolling research, Mileage-based fee analysis, Travel demand modeling and transit planning, Congestion mitigation research, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

  7. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  8. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  9. Development and Validation of an Occupational Skills Assessment Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and validation of an occupational skills assessment instrument is described. The instrument was designed to describe accurately a participant's actual level of occupational skills in a variety of job-related ...

  10. Non-intrusive Occupancy Inferencing using Opportunistically Available Sensor Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Kevin H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Chen, Dong, et al. "Non-Intrusive Occupancy MonitoringACM, 15. Zoha, Ahmed, et al. "Non-intrusive load monitoringCalifornia Los Angeles Non-intrusive Occupancy Inferencing

  11. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Experience Program, requires collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. DOE System of...

  12. Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Bharathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and is designed with Smart Home applications in mind.Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes.

  13. Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Burke Parabola Architects Galen Staengl Staengl Engineering h HEATING, VENTILATION, AND cooling (HVAC required for heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) by 20%­30% by tailoring the conditioning of buildingsTowards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling Kamin Whitehouse, Juhi Ranjan, Jiakang Lu, Tamim

  14. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the extended Koopmans' Theorem. On the basis of Weyl's theorem we give a connection between the differentiability properties of the ground state wave function and the rate at which the natural occupations approach zero when ordered as a descending series. We show, in particular, that the presence of a Coulomb cusp in the wave function leads, in general, to a power law decay of the natural occupations, whereas infinitely differentiable wave-functions typically have natural occupations that decay exponentially. We analyze for a number of explicit examples of two-particle systems that in case the wave function is non-analytic at its spatial diagonal (for instance, due to the presence of a Coulomb cusp) the natural orbital occu...

  15. Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer§ and Anil K@cse.msu.edu Abstract The introduction of airbags into automobiles has significantly improved the safety of the occupants. Unfortunately, airbags can also cause fatal injuries if the occupant is a child smaller (in

  16. Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    , and ventilation actuation signals in order to identify a dynamic model. The building occupancy estimation problem Abstract We address the problem of estimating the occupancy lev- els in rooms using the information is formulated as a regularized deconvolution problem, where the estimated occupancy is the input that, when

  17. Textured Occupancy Grids for Monocular Localization Without Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parr, Ronald

    , and Ronald Parr Abstract-- A textured occupancy grid map is an extremely versatile data structure. It can map representation, the textured occupancy grid, can now be used for humans, robots with laser- dimensional textured occupancy grid map. In such a map, three-dimensional space is discretized into a set

  18. Stairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initial cost and publicize availability to lighting designers and contractors · Publicize energy savingsStairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells with high-wattage light fixtures (T12s or T8s), 24-hour use can lead to a significant and unnecessary waste of electricity

  19. Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation

  20. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); O`Dell, C. [USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his ``Ten Point Initiative`` charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent ``Tiger Teams`` are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  1. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); O'Dell, C. (USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his Ten Point Initiative'' charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent Tiger Teams'' are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  2. Research priorities for occupational radiation protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

  3. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  4. IEQ and the impact on building occupants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and its effects on health, comfort and performance of occupants is becoming increasingly essential. Facility managers are interested in IEQ's close relationship to energy use. Employers hope to enhance employee comfort and productivity, reduce absenteeism and health-care costs, and reduce risk of litigation. The rising interest in this field has placed additional pressure on the research community for practical guidelines on creating a safe, healthy and comfortable indoor environment.

  5. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  6. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  7. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  8. Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

  9. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Telephone: 503-222-5161 Fax: 503-820-2370 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org JUDI DANIELSON CHAIR Idaho TOM KARIER VICE 97204-1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org JUDI DANIELSON CHAIR Idaho TOM KARIER

  10. PROMOTING ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilms, W.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim Criteria for Energy Conservation in New Buildings",Robert and others, "Energy Conservation Program Guide forDivision Promoting Energy Conservation Through Occupational

  11. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS)...

  12. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  13. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ed. ) American Industrial Hygiene Association: 2008.occupational medicine and industrial hygiene is hampered byThe vast majority of industrial hygiene exposure limits for

  14. Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management...

  15. achieving effective occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deferred annuity, occupational pension scheme, derisking, two-pension fund separation, crisis. Charles Sutcliffe; Ecy Tz; Charles Sutcliffe; John Board; Peter Casson; Simone...

  16. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

  17. A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy, Guidance & Reports Worker Health & Safety A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees...

  18. assessment occupational health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Health Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to tuberculosis including health care workers, public safety workers, and employees with animal contact IIIMichigan...

  19. Systems and methods for sensing occupancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

  20. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  1. Occupational Safety Performance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM Policy AcquisitionWeatherization FundingFundingOccupational

  2. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  3. CROSS-CULTURAL EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN ASIAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Quoc (Thai) My

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    values and no significant relationship with level of acculturation. Results from the study yielded two newly developed measures of occupational engagement, the Occupational Engagement Scale-Asian American (OES-AA) and Occupational Engagement...

  4. MINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    , e.g. the Health Care Corporation, Basic Medical Sciences, Pharmacy, etc. and that no definite safetyMINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING Wednesday, February 7 as the Committee's newest member. Dr. LeFort has completed the Occupational Health & Safety Certification Training

  5. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    architects involved in energy-efficient design. It might beenergy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.energy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.

  6. Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building Manuel Yguel, Olivier Aycard for multi-resolution map building based on wavelets, which we call the wavelet occupancy grid (WavOG). Pai representation and data storage for large maps, under the constraints of multi-sensor real-time updates

  7. A technical framework to describe occupant behavior for building energy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner , William; Hong , Tianzhen

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Green buildings that fail to meet expected design performance criteria indicate that technology alone does not guarantee high performance. Human influences are quite often simplified and ignored in the design, construction, and operation of buildings. Energy-conscious human behavior has been demonstrated to be a significant positive factor for improving the indoor environment while reducing the energy use of buildings. In our study we developed a new technical framework to describe energy-related human behavior in buildings. The energy-related behavior includes accounting for individuals and groups of occupants and their interactions with building energy services systems, appliances and facilities. The technical framework consists of four key components: i. the drivers behind energy-related occupant behavior, which are biological, societal, environmental, physical, and economical in nature ii. the needs of the occupants are based on satisfying criteria that are either physical (e.g. thermal, visual and acoustic comfort) or non-physical (e.g. entertainment, privacy, and social reward) iii. the actions that building occupants perform when their needs are not fulfilled iv. the systems with which an occupant can interact to satisfy their needs The technical framework aims to provide a standardized description of a complete set of human energy-related behaviors in the form of an XML schema. For each type of behavior (e.g., occupants opening/closing windows, switching on/off lights etc.) we identify a set of common behaviors based on a literature review, survey data, and our own field study and analysis. Stochastic models are adopted or developed for each type of behavior to enable the evaluation of the impact of human behavior on energy use in buildings, during either the design or operation phase. We will also demonstrate the use of the technical framework in assessing the impact of occupancy behavior on energy saving technologies. The technical framework presented is part of our human behavior research, a 5-year program under the U.S. - China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency.

  8. Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    cadwallader, lee

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

  9. NCSU Box 7401 Raleigh, NC 27695 (919) 515-3480 Toll Free 1-800-33-NC SUN SOLAR CENTER INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Home #12;NorthCarolinaSolarCenter EnergyDivision,NCDepartmentofCommerce Box 7401, NCSU, Raleigh. At North Carolinas latitudes, this means that the area extending from 45o east of south to 45o westNCSU Box 7401 Raleigh, NC 27695 (919) 515-3480 Toll Free 1-800-33-NC SUN SOLAR CENTER

  10. SOLAR CENTER INFORMATION NCSU Box 7401 Raleigh, NC 27695 (919) 515-3480 Toll Free 1-800-33-NC SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR CENTER INFORMATION NCSU Box 7401 Raleigh, NC 27695 (919) 515-3480 Toll Free 1-800-33-NC SUN Summer Shading and Exterior Insulation for North Carolina Windows The same windows that provide window energy efficiency. A well-insulated window will never be as efficient as a well-insulated wall

  11. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  12. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  13. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

  14. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Telephone: 503-222-5161 Fax: 503-820-2370 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org JUDI DANIELSON CHAIR Idaho MELINDA S. EDEN VICE be found on the Council's web site www.nwcouncil.org . The Council invites comment on this issue paper

  15. In-situ measurement of electrodermal activity during occupational therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Elliott B. (Elliot Bruce)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physiological arousal is an important part of occupational therapy for children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) but therapists do not have a way to objectively measure how therapy affects arousal. We hypothesized ...

  16. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  17. Behavioral Assessment of Occupational Skills of Learning Disabled Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, using direct observation and measurement techniques, analyzed the differences in occupational skills among learning disabled youths and their non-learning disabled peers . The results showed low levels of ...

  18. agent causing occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency and Occupant Comfort Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Global warming, caused largely by energy consumption, has become a major problem. During the last...

  19. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  20. Occupational orientations of Mexican American youth in selected Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Edgar

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOU1'H IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Sociology OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A. Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR. Approved as to style and oontent by: Chairman of' Committee . -e . ~ - c...

  1. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , London W1T 3JH, UK Building Research & Information Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rbri20 Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation Mardelle Mc... published: 08 Aug 2012. To cite this article: Mardelle McCuskey Shepley , Zofia Rybkowski , Jennifer Aliber & Cathleen Lange (2012): Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 40:6, 700-712 To link...

  2. Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friebele, John Duncan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

  3. Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porta, Miquel [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)], E-mail: mporta@imim.es; Bosch de Basea, Magda [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica CIBERESP (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Benavides, Fernando G. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Tomas [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Fernandez, Esteve [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institut Catala d'Oncologia, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Esther [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Alguacil, Juan [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Puigdomenech, Elisa [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. Objective: To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane. Methods: Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Results: Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Conclusions: Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers.

  4. PHYSICAL EXAM FORM FOR HEALTH OCCUPATIONS PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    fever Chest pains/pressure Asthma Chronic cough Allergies to: (list) High blood pressure Rheumatic fever

  5. EditEd by Tony Hey, STewarT TanSley, and KriSTin Tolle F o u r t h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    EditEd by Tony Hey, STewarT TanSley, and KriSTin Tolle The F o u r t h P a r a d i g m Data-IntensIve scIentIfIc DIscovery #12;#12;T HE Fou rT H Pa radigm #12;#12;EDITED BY Tony Hey, STewarT Tan foreword Gordon Bell xvii jim gray on escience: a transformed scientific method Edited by Tony Hey, Stewart

  6. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabatino, María Eugenia; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Mascanfroni, Iván Darío; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología (CIBICI-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Gutiérrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia Inés [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); De Paul, Ana Lucía, E-mail: adepaul@cmefcm.uncor.edu [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-?B activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17?-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-?B after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-?B co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17?-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K-Akt and NF-?B signaling pathways. - Highlights: • In hyperplastic pituitaries, LPS triggered the lactotroph cell proliferation and IL-6 release. • Functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs. • Increases in TLR4 and CD14 intracellular expression levels were detected after an LPS challenge. • The proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release involved the PI3K-Akt pathway and NF-?B activation. • 17?-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 secretion.

  7. The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

  8. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

  9. Avoiding Sick Buildings while Assuring Occupant Productivity and Building Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Int-Hout, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 Fig 5 Thermal Comfort Envelopes It can be seen that a single setpoint, such as 75F 50% RH, will satisfy neither individual above. Another problem results from occupant?s misdiagnosis of what is troubling them. The individual on the left, (1....1 Met, 1.0 Clo) above, at 75F, will probably not complain of being too warm, as indicated, but will more likely complain of being ?Stuffy?. Building operators may be inclined to ignore these complaints, especially when the building...

  10. Success Story Contact: www.ornl.gov/partnerships; toll-free 866-221-2527

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Patricia Hoffman, DOE principal deputy assistant secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, said incorporating the high-temperature superconducting wires and power equipment into the nation secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Success Story #12;

  11. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  12. Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, Ryan Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

  13. Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

  14. Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

  15. Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

  16. OccupationalSafety andHealthResearchCenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Disorders, Safety, Slips/Trips/Falls, Work Organization w w w.oshrc.ic tas.vt.edu Separating humans from the safety and health of workers. OSHRC, formally known as the Center for Innova- tion in Construction Safety for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to innova- tively improve health and safety in the construction sector

  17. Occupancy Based Fault Detection on Building Level - a Feasibility Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuip, B.; Houten, M.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy based fault detection on building level ? a feasibility study B.G.C.C. Tuip BSc. dr.ir. M.A. v. Houten dr. Dipl.-Ing. M. Trcka prof.dr.ir. J.L.M. Hensen Unit Building Performance and Systems Eindhoven University of Technology...

  18. APPLIED ISSUES Salamander occupancy in headwater stream networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Winsor H.

    E. GREEN AND WINSOR H. LOWE§ *US Geological Survey ­ Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD into larger streams and rivers. For three of the four species, occupancy was lower in the urbanised region at Correspondence: Evan H. Campbell Grant, USGS-Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, 12100 Beech Forest Road, Laurel

  19. UTEP Master of Occupational Therapy Program Application Process and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    /Occupational Therapy Academic Services Building, Rm 223 University of Texas at El Paso 601 West Schuster El Paso, Texas 79968 (915) 747-5491 gradschool@utep.edu #12;Rev. 5/11 The University of Texas at El Paso College

  20. Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

  1. POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based to reach target temperatures and minimize ventilation requirements. Based on live tests of the system, we, Measurement, Performance Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation, Energy savings 1. INTRODUCTION Permission

  2. ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    to reduce energy consumption. In particular, heating, cooling, and ventilation systems, which account for 42 States has increased 53% [8]. In 2010, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning Both are primary co ventilation based on near real-time estimates of occupancy and temperature using conditioning schedules

  3. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  4. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  5. Occupational exposure to DDT among mosquito control sprayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Kasilo, O.J. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DDT, a broad action insecticide whose use is restricted or banned in most industrialized countries is still often used for vector control in many tropical and developing countries. Despite the fact that DDT is accumulative and persistant in the ecosystem use of such substitutes as malathion or propoxur is not popular because these increases costs by 3.4 to 8.5 fold. As such DDT is economically attractive to poorer countries. As far as can be ascertained no systemic poisoning has resulted from occupational exposure to DDT. Due to the large particle size, the amount of DDT inhaled by workers is far less than the amount reaching exposed portions of skin. As such occupational exposure is mainly dermal or tropical. Occupational exposure to DDT studies have been done before. The present study is an analysis of some characteristics, (i.e. age, body size, relationship between plasma vitamin A and DDE levels, and smoking habits), of occupational exposure to DDT among spraymen in a Zimbabwe population.

  6. Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures Sungkyoon) models to investigate nonlinear relationships between levels of benzene metabolites (E,E- muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid, phenol, hydroqui- none, and catechol) and benzene exposure among 386 exposed and control workers

  7. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  9. Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network James Howard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    of the forecasting algorithm for the different conditions. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the U.S. Department of Energy could take advantage of times when electricity cost is lower, to chill a cold water storage tankForecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network Data James Howard Colorado School of Mines

  10. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University and mixtures, and the risk of ecological damage due to their use or release. 3. It facilitates informed ingredient, actions to prevent health and environmental harm depend on accurate knowledge of product

  11. Ph. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    to three Divisions of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Morgantown officePh. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION A. Program Objectives: The principal objective of the Occupational Safety and Health Ph.D. major is to educate and train

  12. A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local that are challenging for a single vehicle system. In this paper, a new method for occupancy grid maps merging the proposed occupancy grid maps merging method is also introduced. Real-data tests are given to demonstrate

  13. Potential single-occupancy vehicle demand for the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway high-occupancy vehicle lanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lei

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    discrete choice model of transit mode choice access was developed by Loutzenheiser (54) in 1997, based on Bay Area Rapid Transit passenger surveys and station area characteristics. Loutzenheiser found that the individual?s characteristics 24 were more...

  14. Structural study of polyglutamine and molecular mechanism of toll-like receptor signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhuyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . They claimed that both the normal polyQ tract (22Q) and expanded polyQ tracts (41Q) adopt a random coil structure and no differences were observed between GST-Q22 and GST-41Q in NMR spectra. 7 A new linear lattice model was proposed by Bennet et al... structure accessible by multiple copies of ligand. A multivalent ligand can bind with high avidity by interacting with two of more binding sites simultaneously, thus distinguishing normal and pathologic polyQ (from Bennet et al., 2002). 8 Flanking...

  15. Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

  16. Job Seekers - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beam chargesJennifer AweJoanna S. Fowler, 1998/Job

  17. Hours of Operation - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / Texas A&MAbout HPMC

  18. How We Compare - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute /DoDepartment ofHowCompare

  19. IMAGE PROCESSING OCCUPANCY SENSOR - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall linkTreatmentI L

  20. Infectious Disease - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook linkProtectionsInfection

  1. Influenza Immunization Program - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link toInfluence of Topological

  2. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is to estimate savings relative to a “reference” home. However, in the case of zero energy homes it is absolute consumption, rather than relative savings, that is of interest. In such cases, a single set of operating assumptions will not suffice because... they impacted the heating, cooling, and water heating consumption. The customized internal gains distribution curve used for the baseline occupant profile is presented in figure 3. House Characteristic Base Case Area per Floor (ft 2 ) 2000 Number...

  3. Occupational Radiation Protection Record-Keeping and Reporting Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational radiation protection record-keeping and reporting program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  4. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  5. Identification of serum biomarkers for occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis induced by trichloroethylene using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Liu, Wei [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhang, Yanfang [Shenzhen Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Disease, Shenzhen 518001 (China); Huang, Peiwu; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Tang, Haiyan [Shenzhen Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Disease, Shenzhen 518001 (China); Zhou, Guifeng [Medical School of Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410006 (China); Huang, Xinfeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Liu, Jianjun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis induced by trichloroethylene (OMLDT) is an autoimmune disease and it has become a serious occupational health hazard. In the present study, we collected fasting blood samples from patients with OMLDT (n = 18) and healthy volunteers (n = 33) to explore serum peptidome patterns. Peptides in sera were purified using weak cation exchange magnetic beads (MB-WCX), and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ClinProTools bioinformatics software. The intensities of thirty protein/peptide peaks were significantly different between the healthy control and OMLDT patients. A pattern of three peaks (m/z 2106.3, 2134.5, and 3263.67) was selected for supervised neural network (SNN) model building to separate the OMLDT patients from the healthy controls with a sensitivity of 95.5% and a specificity of 73.8%. Furthermore, two peptide peaks of m/z 4091.61 and 4281.69 were identified as fragments of ATP-binding cassette transporter family A member 12 (ABCA12), and cationic trypsinogen (PRRS1), respectively. Our findings not only show that specific proteomic fingerprints in the sera of OMLDT patients can be served as a differentiated tool of OMLDT patients with high sensitivity and high specificity, but also reveal the novel correlation between OMLDT with ABC transports and PRRS1, which will be of potential value for clinical and mechanistic studies of OMLDT. - Highlights: • Identify 30 differential protein/peptide peaks between OMLDT and healthy control • The test sensitivity and test specificity were 95.5% and 73.8%, respectively. • ABCA12 and PRSS1 were identified as potential biomarkers in OMLDT patients.

  6. Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

  7. Low-cost coarse airborne particulate matter sensing for indoor occupancy detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekly, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy-efficient smart building, occupancy detection andare being added to smart buildings to ensure the quality ofvaluable information for smart buildings. An important next

  8. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ed. The Fairmont Press, Inc. EPRI. 1994. Occupancy sensors:Institute, Palo Alto, CA. EPRI BR-100323. Ekahau. Real TimePower Research Institute (EPRI) identified approximately 30%

  9. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems for Occupant Symptoms in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-61870 Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-for Occupant Symptoms in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-

  10. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Payne FW. Energy management control system handbook.5] F. W. Payne. Energy management control system hand- book.Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:

  11. Impact of different building ventilation modes on occupant expectations of the main IEQ factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupants satisfied Bonus Factor Proportional Factor Highthat Basic, Proportional and Bonus Factors have with overallNO Prop. YES Basic YES Bonus NO Prop. NO Prop. Satisfied

  12. Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

  13. Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Wen-Kuei; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy profile is one of the driving factors behind discrepancies between the measured and simulated energy consumption of buildings. The frequencies of occupants leaving their offices and the corresponding durations of absences have significant impact on energy use and the operational controls of buildings. This study used statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five-minute intervals, for a total of 200 open-plan (cubicle) offices. Five typical occupancy patterns were identified based on the average daily 24-hour profiles of the presence of occupants in their cubicles. These statistical patterns were represented by a one-square curve, a one-valley curve, a two-valley curve, a variable curve, and a flat curve. The key parameters that define the occupancy model are the average occupancy profile together with probability distributions of absence duration, and the number of times an occupant is absent from the cubicle. The statistical results also reveal that the number of absence occurrences decreases as total daily presence hours decrease, and the duration of absence from the cubicle decreases as the frequency of absence increases. The developed occupancy model captures the stochastic nature of occupants moving in and out of cubicles, and can be used to generate a more realistic occupancy schedule. This is crucial for improving the evaluation of the energy saving potential of occupancy based technologies and controls using building simulations. Finally, to demonstrate the use of the occupancy model, weekday occupant schedules were generated and discussed.

  14. Office of Occupational Medicine. FY 1993, Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, we have assessed every DOE site at least once, many twice. With the information collected during these visits, EH-43 is developing a solid understanding of the occupational medical program activities at each site and will be better able to monitor progress. The assessment staff provided more specific technical assistance than in the past, especially in the area of compliance. In addition, the cardiovascular medical guidelines are near completion and the personnel assurance, firefighters, and protective force personnel medical guidelines are ready for the concurrence process.

  15. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ: RelocationCriticalityFireofOccupational

  16. FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ:Department ofIndustrialOccupational Safety

  17. Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEM CommunicationsReporting Occupational

  18. Walk-In Medical Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD Contract No.List ofOccupational

  19. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MG. (2010). Balancing energy conservation and occupant needsReport   Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in

  20. Updated: 10/03/08! Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Updated: 10/03/08! ! ! ! TLL Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED) The Occupational Education Studies (OCED) option in the TLL is intended for professionals in the general field of workforce education and development. Teachers and administrators in career and technical education; personnel

  1. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  2. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  3. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 Management ENVHLTH 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health

  4. APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    for (check): Medical Studies Health Care Administration Dental Studies Occupational Therapy VeterinaryAPPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health You are able to complete this application by simply typing your information into the spaces

  5. Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback and workplace culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback years to their design, performance and evaluation. The successful delivery of green buildings requires within economic means. Occupant comfort and behaviour can have a significant impact on green building

  6. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  7. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  8. OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á & control General Terms Algorithms, Machine Learning, Measurement Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems[2]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC

  9. Job Characteristics, Occupational Status, and Ambulatory Cardiovascular Activity in Women Linda C. Gallo, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Job Characteristics, Occupational Status, and Ambulatory Cardiovascular Activity in Women Linda C. Moreover, the concurrent effects of occupational sta- tus and job characteristics have rarely been investigated. Some research is consistent with the idea that stressful job characteris- tics are especially

  10. Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1 A. K. McMahan,2 M. D a systematic analysis of the spectral properties of -plutonium with varying 5f occupancy. The LDA Hamiltonian properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, plutonium is probably the most complicated element

  11. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to ...

  12. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to understand the role...

  13. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure Available online 20 January 2009 Keywords: Benzene exposure Gene expression Human blood Toxicogenomics expression changes associated with well-characterized occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood

  14. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  15. Occupational and environmental human lead exposure in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paoliello, M.M.B. [Departamento de Patologia, Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas, Centro de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Avenida Robert Koch 60, 86038-440 Londrina, Parana (Brazil)]. E-mail: monibas@sercomtel.com.br; De Capitani, E.M. [Centro de Controle de Intoxicacoes, Hospital Universitario da UNICAMP, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review of data on assessment of exposure and adverse effects due to environmental and occupational lead exposure in Brazil. Epidemiological investigations on children lead exposure around industrial and mining areas have shown that lead contamination is an actual source of concern. Lead in gasoline has been phasing out since the 1980s, and it is now completely discontinued. The last lead mining and lead refining plant was closed in 1995, leaving residual environmental lead contamination which has recently been investigated using a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, there are hundreds of small battery recycling plants and secondary smelting facilities all over the country, which produce focal urban areas of lead contamination. Current regulatory limits for workplace lead exposure have shown to be inadequate as safety limits according to a few studies carried out lately.

  16. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, K., E-mail: klaus.schmid@ipp.mpg.de; Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12?H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  17. Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Kaiyu; Yan , Da; Hong , Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

  18. Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Yen-Ming

    This study employed simultaneous neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the relationship between changes in receptor occupancy measured by PET ...

  19. Occupancy and site distribution of europium in barium magnesium aluminate Eu Mossbauer spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boolchand, Punit

    Occupancy and site distribution of europium in barium magnesium aluminate by 151 Eu Mo¨ssbauer Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. Analysis of the Mo¨ssbauer line shapes reveals a pentamodal or higher site

  20. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    item/1pz2528w If energy consumption data are not availablewith both energy consumption data (in kWh or kBtu) andaffects energy consumption, and use occupant data to

  1. Towards Building Occupants Positioning: Track and Trace for Optimal Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Labeodan, T.; Bozem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -time occupancy detection systems comprising multiple sensors within a wireless network (WSN) using technologies such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and WIFI enabled devices have been proposed for use in large commercial office buildings. However due...

  2. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

  3. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

  4. Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Abstract Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed

  5. Environmental and occupational hazards of the anesthesia workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kole, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our present state of research and knowledge strongly suggests that the volatile agents, halothane, enflurane and isoflurane, present only a minimal threat to our environment. Nitrous oxide, however, has ozone-depleting potential as well as a greenhouse gas effect which may contribute much to the problem of global warming over the next few decades. Release of anesthetic gases into the atmosphere presents a small problem in contrast to other sources of ozone-depleting chemicals and greenhouse gases, but anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by reevaluating the use of N2O, using low flows of gases and exploring the use of activated charcoal absorption in the scavenging systems to remove volatile agents. Infectious waste, radiation, lasers, chemicals and waste gases pose possible occupational health hazards in the operating room. Each of us should play a critical role in monitoring harmful substances and should actively practice techniques which would lessen the hazards. We should be cognizant of the fact that sources not yet introduced into our environment may have adverse effects on our health and that vigilance and education are key factors in maintaining a safe work environment.24 references.

  6. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  7. Occupational employment in nuclear-related activities, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.G.; Olsen, K.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1981 employment in nuclear-related activities is described, and compared to previous years. Employment characteristics examined include detailed occupations of scientists, engineers, and technicians; worker involvement in research and development activities; employment by industrial segment (e.g., reactor operation and maintenance, weapons production, and commercial laboratory services); employment by establishment type (government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO), private, and nonprofit); regional employment; and employment by establishment size. Total 1981 nuclear-related employment is estimated to be 249,500 - a growth of 22,600 workers over the 1977 total. GOCO workers make up 36.9% of this total. Among all the nuclear-related workers, scientists comprise 5.1%, engineers, 15.3%; and technicians, 17.5%; the remaining 62.1% is composed of managers, skilled craft and clerical workers, and other support services. Research and development involvement has declined from the 1977 survey results, with 60.4% of scientists and 27.0% of engineers currently involved in R and D. The largest single industrial segment activity is weapons development (16.9% of total employment), followed closely by reactor operation and maintenance employment (16.7%). There has been considerable change in the distribution of employment by industrial segment from 1977 to 1981; the reactor and reactor component design and manufacturing segment fell by over 9700 workers while reactor operation and maintenance employment grew by over 24,000 workers.

  8. Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding energy use. These all constitute drivers for the adoption of more sustainable ways of securing our energy needs (Shuai et al., 2011). Approximately about 40% of the world?s energy is consumed by buildings (ASHRAE, 2007), of which roughly about... short-comings; Passive infrared (PIR) sensor is the most commonly used technology for occupancy sensing in non-domestic buildings especially for lighting control (Delaney et al., 2009), however it fails to detect stationary occupants, thus switching...

  9. A study of College Station visitor opinions regarding hotel occupancy tax expenditures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweifel, Eva Louise

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF COLLEGE STATION VISITOR OPINIONS REGARDING HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX EXPENDITURES A Thesis by EVA LOUISE ZWEIFEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development A STUDY OF COLLEGE STATION VISITOR OPINIONS REGARDING HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX EXPENDITURES A Thesis by EVA LOUISE ZWEIFEL Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Utilizing graduate follow-up studies for the identification of new and emerging occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isbell, Teresa Smith

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of respondent comments. 69 Analysis of addresses of respondents who expressed interest in other courses 69 Indicators of New and Emerging Occupations 70 IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 71 Summary Conclusions 71 73 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A...) life styles, and (e) resources. 'These factors singularly and in combination influence the types of jobs available" (p. 3). Nelson recommended that the information- gathering process begin early in the process of identifying a new occupation...

  11. Luminous Red Galaxies in Clusters: Central Occupation, Spatial Distributions, and Mis-centering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoshino, Hanako; Lackner, Claire; Hikage, Chiaki; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Mandelbaum, Rachel; More, Surhud; More, Anupreeta; Saito, Shun; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are considered among the best understood samples of galaxies, and they are employed in a broad range of cosmological studies. Because they form a relatively homogeneous population, with high stellar masses and red colors, they are expected to occupy halos in a relatively simple way. In this paper, we study how LRGs occupy massive halos via direct counts in clusters and we reveal several unexpected trends suggesting that the connection between LRGs and dark matter halos may not be straightforward. Using the redMaPPer cluster catalog, we derive the central occupation of LRGs as a function richness, Ncen({\\lambda}). Assuming no correlation between cluster mass and central galaxy luminosity at fixed richness, we show that clusters contain a significantly lower fraction of central LRGs than predicted from the two-point correlation function. At halo masses of 10^14.5 Msun, we find Ncen=0.73, compared to Ncen of 0.89 from correlation studies. Our central ...

  12. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  13. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe?(MoO?)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; et al

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe?(MoO?)? electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na? and Li?, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe?(MoO?)? and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites inmore »partially sodiated Fe?(MoO?)? are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe?(MoO?)? and Na/Fe?(MoO?)? cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.« less

  14. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe?(MoO?)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji-Li [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Zhou, Yong-Ning [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shi, Si-Qi [Shanghai Univ., Shanghai (China); Shadike, Zulipiya [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Huang, Xuan-Qi [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Luo, Jun [Shanghai Univ., Shanghai (China); Yang, Zhen-Zhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Li, Hong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fu, Zheng-Wen [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe?(MoO?)? electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na? and Li?, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe?(MoO?)? and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe?(MoO?)? are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe?(MoO?)? and Na/Fe?(MoO?)? cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of freeway median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facility conversion to rail guideway transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Matthew Evans

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evolution of the HOV corridor. A few states require that freeway HOV facilities be designed to allow conversion to rail transit modes. Although there have been no examples of this type of conversion, such a concept should be explored as a possible... of different transportation improvements at the corridor, system, and project level for the purpose of cross-modal comparisons. The model can be calibrated to local conditions, thus avoiding the use of national averages. A computerized model (MODECOST...

  16. Automatic Passenger Counting in the High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) I. Pavlidis P. Symosek B. Fritz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Fritz Honeywell Technology Center 3660 Technology Drive MN65-2500 Minneapolis, MN 55418 Tel. (612) 951-7338 Fax (612) 951-7438 (pavlidis, symosek, fritz)@htc.honeywell.com R. Sfarzo N. P. Papanikolopoulos phenomenology and arrangement for the task and our plans for the future. Introduction The Honeywell Technology

  17. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  18. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's APTAPFinal Report | Open

  19. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackley, Catherine M.; Walker, Marion F.; Burton, Chris R.; Watkins, Caroline L.; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    or drug addiction. Care home man- agers were offered a full explanation of the study. No care homes were actively delivering occupational ther- apy as a component of standard care. Once the managers had given informed consent, care home staff searched... to the treatment allo- cation of care homes. intervention and control Residents in the control arm received usual care. This did not involve an occupational therapy component. The occupational therapy intervention at the level of the care home resident followed...

  20. Gender and snow crab occupational asthma in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howse, Dana [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., Canada A1B 3V6 (Canada); Gautrin, Denyse [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Neis, Barbara [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., A1B 3V6 (Canada)]. E-mail: bneis@mun.ca; Cartier, Andre [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Horth-Susin, Lise [Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville, NS, B4N 5E3 (Canada); Jong, Michael [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University and Health Labrador Corporation, Happy Valley, NL, AOP 1EO (Canada); Swanson, Mark C. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish and shellfish processing employs many thousands of people globally, with shellfish processing becoming more important in recent years. Shellfish processing is associated with multiple occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. Snow crab occupational asthma (OA) is work-related asthma associated with processing snow crab. We present a gender analysis of findings from a 3-year multifaceted study of snow crab OA in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The study was carried out in four snow crab processing communities between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous survey questionnaire on knowledge, beliefs, and concerns related to processing snow crab administered to 158 workers attending community meetings at the start of the research found that women were significantly more likely than men to associate certain health problems, especially chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and cough, with crab processing (P<0.001). Worker health assessments carried out with 215 processing workers (187 current/28 former; 120 female/95 male) found that female participants were more likely to be diagnosed as almost certain/highly probable snow crab OA and allergy (P=0.001) and to be sensitized to snow crab (P=0.01) than male participants. Work histories from the health assessments were used to classify processing jobs as male or female. Allergen sampling (211 allergen samples: 115 area, 96 personal breathing zone) indicated that the plant areas where these male jobs were concentrated were associated with lower levels of aerosolized crab allergens (the agents responsible for OA to snow crab) than areas associated with female jobs. This difference was statistically significant in the two plants with poor ventilation (p<0.001 and P=0.017 for these plants). A gender analysis of work history data showed that female health assessment participants were likely to have worked longer processing snow crab than males (5 years versus 3.5 years, respectively). Cross-referencing of work history results with allergen sampling data for male and female job areas showed a gender difference in median cumulative exposures (duration of exposurexlevel of exposures) for health assessment participants. Health assessment participants with estimated higher median cumulative exposures were more likely to receive a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable OA and allergy. Semistructured interviews with 27 health assessment participants (24 female/ 3 male) with a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable or possible snow crab OA indicated that these workers can experience substantial quality of life impacts while working and that they seek to reduce the economic impact of their illness by remaining at their jobs as long as possible. Indications of selection bias and other study limitations point to the need for more research exploring the relationship between the gender division of labor and knowledge, beliefs, and concerns about snow crab processing, as well as gender differences in prevalence, quality of life, and socioeconomic impact.

  1. Occupational exposures during routine activities in coal-fueled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, M.J.; MacIntosh, D.L.; Williams, P.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Science

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited information is available on occupational exposures during routine, nonoutage work activities in coal-fueled power plants. This study evaluated occupational exposures to the principal contaminants in the facilities, including respirable dust (coal dust), arsenic, noise, asbestos, and heat stress. The data were collected over a 3-month period, during the summer of 2001. Each of the 5 facilities was divided into 5 similar exposure groups based on previous exposure assessments and job tasks performed. Of the nearly 400 air samples collected, only 1 exceeded the allowable occupational exposure value. For the noise samples, 55 (about 18%) were equal to or greater than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour hearing conservation program level of 85 dBA, and 12 (about 4%) were equal to or greater than the OSHA 8-hour permissible exposure level of 90 dBA. Heat stress monitoring at the facilities indicates that 26% of the 1-hour TWAs were exceeded for one or all of the recommended heat stress limits. The data also concluded that some work sites were above the heat stress ceiling values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Four of the 20 employees personally monitored exceeded the recommended limits for heart rate or body core temperature. This suggests there is a potential for heat strain if signs and symptoms are ignored. Recommendations are made to better control the heat stress exposure.

  2. Occupational safety data and casualty rates for the uranium fuel cycle. [Glossaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Hoy, H.C.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational casualty (injuries, illnesses, fatalities, and lost workdays) and production data are presented and used to calculate occupational casualty incidence rates for technologies that make up the uranium fuel cycle, including: mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment of uranium; fabrication of reactor fuel; transportation of uranium and fuel elements; generation of electric power; and transmission of electric power. Each technology is treated in a separate chapter. All data sources are referenced. All steps used to calculate normalized occupational casualty incidence rates from the data are presented. Rates given include fatalities, serious cases, and lost workdays per 100 man-years worked, per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output, and per other appropriate units of output.

  3. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  4. Statistical Methods and Software for the Analysis of Occupational Exposure Data with Non-detectable Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frome, EL

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental exposure measurements are, in general, positive and may be subject to left censoring; i.e,. the measured value is less than a ''detection limit''. In occupational monitoring, strategies for assessing workplace exposures typically focus on the mean exposure level or the probability that any measurement exceeds a limit. Parametric methods used to determine acceptable levels of exposure, are often based on a two parameter lognormal distribution. The mean exposure level, an upper percentile, and the exceedance fraction are used to characterize exposure levels, and confidence limits are used to describe the uncertainty in these estimates. Statistical methods for random samples (without non-detects) from the lognormal distribution are well known for each of these situations. In this report, methods for estimating these quantities based on the maximum likelihood method for randomly left censored lognormal data are described and graphical methods are used to evaluate the lognormal assumption. If the lognormal model is in doubt and an alternative distribution for the exposure profile of a similar exposure group is not available, then nonparametric methods for left censored data are used. The mean exposure level, along with the upper confidence limit, is obtained using the product limit estimate, and the upper confidence limit on an upper percentile (i.e., the upper tolerance limit) is obtained using a nonparametric approach. All of these methods are well known but computational complexity has limited their use in routine data analysis with left censored data. The recent development of the R environment for statistical data analysis and graphics has greatly enhanced the availability of high-quality nonproprietary (open source) software that serves as the basis for implementing the methods in this paper.

  5. Computer Science This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Computer Science This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career Occupations Computer Operations Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager Design & Manufacturing, Engineering Computer Applications

  6. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving IAQ and Energy Conservation Goals with ASHRAEBalancing energy conservation and occupant needs in  500-99-013 Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs

  7. ROBERT J. BUDNITZ Occupation: Physicist in Energy/Environmental Research and Nuclear Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    ROBERT J. BUDNITZ Occupation: Physicist in Energy/Environmental Research and Nuclear Safety Birth December 2004 to September 2007 (in Livermore): Leader, Nuclear & Risk Science Group, Energy & Environment Directorate Associate Program Leader for Nuclear Systems Safety and Security, E&E Directorate October 2002

  8. EH&S GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT MANAGERS: Minimizing Impacts on Local Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EH&S GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT MANAGERS: Minimizing Impacts on Local Building Occupants I. BACKGROUND; · shutting off the ventilation to the affected areas; · conducting the project after hours or on weekends: · increasing the building ventilation; · installing temporary fans; · conducting the project after hours

  9. A methodology for identifying and improving occupant behavior in residential Zhun (Jerry) Yu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fung, Benjamin C. M.

    : Occupant behavior Building energy consumption Data mining Evaluation Identification a b s t r a c significantly reducing building energy consumption. Moreover, given that the proposed method is partly based Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Currently, residential sector building energy

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO A Low-Cost, Low-Power, Wireless Occupancy Sensing Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fiction writers to dream of "smart buildings", buildings that intelligently adapt to the needs of their human occupants[1]. There are many valuable applications of smart building technologies. A building of smart buildings is energy conservation. The US Department of Energy estimates that buildings account

  11. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    A Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University.Cerpa, University of California, Merced Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 35% energy usage in the United and Prediction for Building Energy Management and Auditing. ACM Trans. Sensor Netw. V, N, Article A (August 2012

  12. The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction · Biofuel: ­ National Security ­ Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production ­ Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

  13. Procedural Level Generation Using Occupancy-Regulated Extension Peter Mawhorter, Michael Mateas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Procedural Level Generation Using Occupancy-Regulated Extension Peter Mawhorter, Michael Mateas Abstract-- Existing approaches to procedural level generation in 2D platformer games are, with some notable at arbitrary scales. I. INTRODUCTION A good procedural level generator must satisfy complex constraints

  14. Occupational Health & Safety Directorate Queen Mary, University of London Fire Induction Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Occupational Health & Safety Directorate Queen Mary, University of London ­ Fire Induction Form June 2011 Note: In order to conform with Paragraph 21-(1) Regulatory Reform (F.S) Order 2005, the Head that the necessary information has been provided. This form must be retained by the department (copied to health

  15. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

  16. Occupation fluctuation noise: A fundamental source of linewidth broadening in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahala, K.; Yariv, A.

    1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we consider the effect of fast thermal fluctuations of electronic state occupancy on the field spectrum of semiconductor lasers and derive for the first time an expression for the resulting power independent linewidth contribution. The magnitude and temperature dependence of this linewidth component agree reasonably well with measurements of a power independent linewidth made by Welford and Mooradian.

  17. Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy, And Comparison with C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy of Chemistry, New York UniVersity, New York, New York 10003, Department of Chemistry, Brown UniVersity, ProVidence, Rhode Island 02912, and Department of Chemistry, Columbia UniVersity, New York, New York 10027 Received

  18. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety ­ Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene ­ Associate EVHS 10010 Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 GEOL 21062 Environmental Geology 3

  19. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Occupational and Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility.

  20. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety -Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene -Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety - Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene - Associate Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 2 1 Kent Core Requirement 3 KBS EVHS 21010 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 DG GEOL 21062

  1. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety ­ Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene ­ Associate 3 EVHS 10004 Toxicology 3 EVHS 10010 Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State Sciences EVHS 21010 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 GEOL 21062

  2. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management VARICK L. ERICKSON, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    -conditioning (HVAC) systems [EIA 2010]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC energy can be saved by setting: Occupancy-based system for efficient reduction of HVAC energy," in Proceedings of the 10th International control strategy," in Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing Systems for Energy

  3. BJOG . Author manuscript Occupational predictors of pregnancy outcomes in Irish working women in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and working conditions. Data including pregnancy outcomes were also obtained from clinical hospital recordsBJOG . Author manuscript Page /1 12 Occupational predictors of pregnancy outcomes in Irish working and pregnancy outcomes in a prospective cohort of Irish pregnant women. Design This study has a prospective

  4. Sensitivity of Building Energy Simulation with Building Occupancy for a University Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhajed, Shreyans

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas A&M University. The energy model for the building was created using the DOE-2 engine and validated with actual energy consumption data. As constructed building characteristics and occupancy loading data were used in the DOE-2 model. Parametric runs...

  5. Sensitivity of Building Energy Simulation with Building Occupancy for a University Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhajed, Shreyans

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas A&M University. The energy model for the building was created using the DOE-2 engine and validated with actual energy consumption data. As constructed building characteristics and occupancy loading data were used in the DOE-2 model. Parametric runs...

  6. OCCUPATION DU SOL ET GESTION DE Modlisation prospective en paysage agricole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    OCCUPATION DU SOL ET GESTION DE L'EAU Modélisation prospective en paysage agricole fragmenté Thomas locales. De même, la gestion de l'eau constitue une compétence partagée par une multitude d'organismes, relevant d'un mille-feuille de règles. Cela ne facilite pas une gestion de l'eau efficiente qui ne se

  7. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy management, smart home, energy efficiency, thermostat strategy, heating setback Corresponding, a heating control system may require some time to heat a home to a comfortable temperature after itsPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  8. The Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Introduction Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the largest energy consumer in the home- grammable thermostats can reduce the energy needed to heat and cool a home by 10-30% without reducingThe Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns Ge

  9. Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial.agarwal@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Commercial buildings contribute to 19% of the primary energy consumption in the US, with HVAC systems accounting for 39.6% of this usage. To reduce HVAC energy use, prior studies have pro- posed using

  10. RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System Tamim Sookoor & Kamin. In this paper we present a CPS that enables a centralized Heating, Ventila- tion, and Air Conditioning (HVAC application due to residential HVAC systems ac- counting for over 15% of all U.S. energy usage, making it one

  11. SF 4040-DOP (5-2011) Supersedes (7-2010) issue DECLARATION of OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE PROVIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    , standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), American National Standards Institute medicine services to workers employed at DOE-controlled premises. To assist in ensuring contractors meet. Work on a DOE site for more than 30 days in a 12-month period; OR 2. Are enrolled for any length

  12. Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouch, Matthew J.

    E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

  13. SoPC based Smart Home Embedded Computer Capable of Caring for the Home Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Gul N.

    SoPC based Smart Home Embedded Computer Capable of Caring for the Home Occupants G. N. Khan and J. Toronto, Ontario Canada M5B 2K3 Abstract--We present a Smart-Home Embedded Computer (SHEC) system Ethernet network. A home simulator software incorporating virtual appliances and devices models the smart

  14. This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Annals of occupational hygiene following peer review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in The Annals of occupational hygiene following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Annals of Occupational Hygiene, doi:10.1093/annhyg/mel080 is available online at: http HALauthormanuscriptinserm-00141242,version1 HAL author manuscript Annals of Occupational Hygiene 2007;51(3):337-44 #12

  15. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  16. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  17. Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking downDosimetry Report Annual

  18. Human Reliability Program (HRP) - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins ResourcesHuman

  19. Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook linkProtection »

  20. Infection Control & Immunizations - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook linkProtectionsInfection Control

  1. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  2. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect IAQ negatively (health + productivity) InappropriateIAQ standards that support occupant comfort, health, productivity, and

  3. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642­650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545 equivalent to those based on the Land's method. We want to draw the attention of the industrial hygiene

  4. Tapping into social resources to address occupational health : a network analysis of Vietnamese-owned nail salons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Tam Minh-Thi, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Social networks in the Vietnamese nail salon industry were studied for their utility in addressing occupational health risks. Major findings include heavy reliance on family networks for fundamental needs, an extensive ...

  5. The influence of occupational value orientations on the vocational development of East Texas youth: A longitudinal study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Nelson Loyd

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occupational status attainment (among the more relevant: Kohout and Rothney, 1964; Kuvlesky and Bealer, 1967; Bohlen and Yoesting, 1968; Portes, et al. , 1968; and Sewell, et al. , 1969), there exists a general lack of agreement concerning the nature...

  6. Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans in Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrabanek, R. L.; Rapton, Avra

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from farm work towarcl the blue-collar jobs. A few farm laborers became operators of their own farm. Among household heads who had started their careers in nonfarm jobs, however, there was little up- ward occupational mobility. Among the San... their skills sufficiently to match those of the total popu- lation, and they occupied a position midway between their parents and the total population. For example, a. in San Antonio the proportion of laborers, both farm and nonfarm, among male younger...

  7. Statistical Analysis of Occupational Safety Data of Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and Non-VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) was originally developed by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1982 to foster greater ownership of safety and health in the workplace. The Department of Energy (DOE) adopted VPP in 1992; currently 23 sites across the DOE complex participate in the program. As its name implies, it is a voluntary program; i.e. not required by laws or regulations.

  8. Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noye,S.; North,R.; Fisk, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -site Commissioning • Balancing • Setting to work • Compliance • Health and safety ESL-IC-14-09-22a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 8Systems deliver comfort at low energy cost... 1 Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning Sarah Noye1 PhD candidate Dr. Robin North Lecturer Prof. David Fisk Professor Laing O’Rourke Centre for System Engineering and Innovation...

  9. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ, Vol. I-2-5 The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter Jiaolin Wang Lu Chen Postgrauate Master... surface temperature decline to reduce the body?s heat loss. Meanwhile shudder will promote the body?s heat production. So the temperature of organism doesn?t drop with decline of the environmental temperature. But if organism stays at cool environment...

  10. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, Michael D.; Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.; Lin, Yiqing; Brahme, Rohini; Surana, Amit; Narayanan, Satish; Cerpa, Alberto; Ericson, Varick; Kamthe, Ankur

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the University of California Merced (UCM), and the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) conducted field studies and modeling analyses in the Classroom and Office Building (COB) and the Science and Engineering Building (S&E) at the University of California, Merced. In the first year, of a planned multiyear project, our goal was to study the feasibility and efficacy of occupancy-based energy management. The first-year research goals were twofold. The first was to explore the likely energy savings if we know the number and location of building occupants in a typical commercial building. The second was to model and estimate people movement in a building. Our findings suggest that a 10-14percent reduction in HVAC energy consumption is possible over typical HVAC operating conditions when we know occupancy throughout the building. With the conclusion of the first-year tasks, we plan to review these results further before this group pursues follow-on funding.

  11. Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schott, M.; Scheib, J.; Long, N.; Fleming, K.; Benne, K.; Brackney, L.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many studies have reported energy savings after installing a dashboard, but dashboards provide neither individual feedback to the occupant nor the ability to report individual comfort. The Building Agent (BA) provides an interface to engage the occupant in a conversation with the building control system and the building engineer. Preliminary outcomes of the BA-enabled feedback loop are presented, and the effectiveness of the three display modes will be compared to other dashboard studies to baseline energy savings in future research.

  12. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages from three middle Holocene sites located in the Bodega Dunes, and from three late Holocene sites, including Kili (CASON-299), the oldest known village site in the region. Bodega Bay (38 degrees 19 minutes N, 123 degrees 03 minutes W) is situated about 90 km north of San Francisco Bay, California (Figure 1). The Pacific, in conjunction with prominent geomorphological features, has given rise to a series of coastal habitats (e.g. semi-protected and protected shorelines) around Bodega Bay that are rather unique for the unprotected, surf swept rocky shores of northern California. This stretch of coastline also lies within a zone of particularly strong seasonal upwelling between Point Reyes Peninsula and Cape Mendocino; a region characterized by high Ekman transport (Huyer 1983), and high coastal concentrations of the nutrients silica and phosphate (van Geen and Husby 1996). The interaction between land and sea results in a productive marine ecosystem that has attracted hunter-gatherers for much of the Holocene.

  13. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  14. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  15. A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM MAINTAINING THE US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Merrill; L. C. Cadwallader; M. Dagher

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This ORE analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for maintenance activities anticipated for the US DCLL TBM concept and its ancillary systems. Identification of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and estimates of the time required to perform these tasks were developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This paper details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  16. Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noye,S.; North,R.; Fisk, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -cost data for pop-up monitoring™ • Initial characterisation test on low power sensors show suitable accuracy and the ability to detect relevant building properties for commissioning • Deployment on major project this autumn Thank you for your attention... on the availability of a low-cost set of appropriate data. This paper presents the initial development phase of a pop-up monitoringTM toolkit using a wireless sensor network system to perform commissioning during the initial year of occupation of a building...

  17. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Programs 88 Students in a class on solar photovoltaic design and installation prepare to mount solar panels academic unit, a course may be taken more than once toward fulfilling endorsement requirements. However is course credit earned through any unit of UAF. Formal classroom instruction, correspondence study

  18. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Programs 87 Students in a class on solar photovoltaic design and installation prepare to mount solar panels academic unit, a course may be taken more than once toward fulfilling endorsement requirements. However is course credit earned through any unit of UAF. Formal classroom instruction, correspondence study

  19. Occupational Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ? The general population may be exposed to radon in indoor and outdoor air and drinking water. ? The primary source of indoor radon is from soil; radon in the soil can enter the home through cracks in the floors, walls, or foundations. The release of radon from water may also contribute to indoor levels. ? Exposures to radon gas are accompanied by exposure to radon progeny which are the decay products of radon-222 [e.g., bismuth-214 ( 214 Bi), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), 214 Pb, polonium-210 ( 210 Po), and 218 Po.

  20. Occupation Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization FundingObserving

  1. Networks Inferred from Biochemical Data Reveal Profound Differences in Toll-like Receptor and Inflammatory Signaling between Normal and Transformed Hepatocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.

    Systematic study of cell signaling networks increasingly involves high throughput proteomics, transcriptional profiling, and automated literature mining with the aim of assembling large-scale interaction networks. In ...

  2. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  3. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  4. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  5. Radiation-Generating Devices Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a sealed radioactive source accountability and control program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart M of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  6. Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunce, Peter L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First US Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934 2003 by Peter L . Bunce This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly... of the First US Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1935” Institute of Haitian Studies University of Kansas. 2003. Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml Occasional Paper N° 27 Peter L. Bunce Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First US...

  7. International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 10 No1 June 2011 Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 10 No1 June 2011 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 49 Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences Dorthe K. Mortensen1, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure

  8. Cross-Section Designs for the Safety Performance of Buffer-Separated High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Kitae; Kang, Sanghyeok; Seo, Jongwon; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Internalization. Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol.fit and theory, Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 37(binomial regressions, Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol.

  9. On the initial-occupancy dependence of some luminescence phenomena under the one-trap-one-recombination-center (OTOR) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Reuven

    2010 Accepted 6 February 2010 Keywords: Thermoluminescence (TL) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL and archaeological and geological dating, on the initial occupancy of the relevant traps, n0, within the OTOR (also. We also consider the behavior of CW-OSL and phosphorescence in a transformed form, as well as TL

  10. Enabling Building Energy Auditing Using Adapted Occupancy Ankur Kamthe, Varick Erickson, Miguel A. Carreira-Perpi~nan and Alberto Cerpa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Enabling Building Energy Auditing Using Adapted Occupancy Models Ankur Kamthe, Varick Erickson the overall energy usage numbers. A common way to estimate energy savings is through building energy auditing. A detailed energy audit [12] is comprehensive, time-consuming and involves inspection and analysis

  11. Fourth IEEE Workshop on Applications of Computer Vision, October 1998, Princeton, New Jersey, USA Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumm, John

    Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment John Krumm and Greg Kirk Intelligent Systems & Robotics Center Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Abstract When an airbag deploys on a rear-facing infant seat, it can injure or kill the infant. When an airbag deploys on an empty seat, the airbag

  12. CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 106, NO. 5, 10 MARCH 2014668 Occupational health hazard in India: need for surveillance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    The National Health Policy of India 1983 and 2002 has outlined the urgent need to prevent and treat diseasesCOMMENTARY CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 106, NO. 5, 10 MARCH 2014668 Occupational health hazard in India fall into the ears of the more powerful, i.e. the employers and the policy makers. There is poor

  13. The occupational endorsement certification in welding and materials technology is designed for beginning students who want to learn to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    WELDING & MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY The occupational endorsement certification in welding and materials technology is designed for beginning students who want to learn to cut and weld, as well as students seeking more advanced courses who would like to take their welding skills further. Our program emphasizes

  14. Accomodation and Travel Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Accomodation and Travel GST PST Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST Accomodation: short term (less than 30 days) 5% 8% + 2% MRDT tax where applicable Accomodation: under $30 per day or $210 or less per week No GST No PST, no MRDT BC Ferry fares No GST No PST

  15. Design, Construction, Transportation, Operation and Post-Occupancy Analysis for the Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Ramirez, E.; Im, P.; Cho, S.; Canez, J.; Haberl, J.; Schaider, N.; Fisk, P.; Feigenbaum, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design, construction, transportation, operation and post occupancy analysis of the 2007 Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House (TAMU SD house). The TAMU SD house was developed to be a modular house that could grow into varying...

  16. doi: 10.1136/oem.60.11.e13 2003 60: e13Occup Environ Med

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doi: 10.1136/oem.60.11.e13 2003 60: e13Occup Environ Med N Lamond, J Dorrian, G D Roach, et al Lamond, J Dorrian, G D Roach, K McCulloch, A L Holmes, H J Burgess, A Fletcher, D Dawson

  17. Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Rubinstein, Nesrin Colak, Judith Jennings, and Danielle Neils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Introduction Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings [1 sensors for reducing peak demand, 2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting

  18. Why occupancy-responsive adaptive thermostats do not always save -and the limits for when they should

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Why occupancy-responsive adaptive thermostats do not always save - and the limits for when thermostats do not guarantee energy savings. As a result, EPA ended EnergyStar certification of programmable, and adaptive control schemes have shown significant annual HVAC savings on the order of 10-20%. However

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6 used by Photon Sciences to ensure that the ESH policies of the Laboratory are met in our activities and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6/6/12 Page 2 of 2

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Calderon

    1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

  1. Methods for testing interactions, with applications to occupational exposures, smoking, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.C.; Whittemore, A.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various approaches to assessing the interaction between smoking and occupational exposures are described. The definition of interaction depends on the measure of association under consideration and can be expressed in terms of disease risk, time, or dose. Simple descriptive methods and maximum likelihood model fitting methods are presented for analyzing interactions in terms of joint effects on disease risk. Methods for assessing the influence of exposures on times to disease, using appropriate denominators, are also described. The various approaches are illustrated with published data on lung cancer in relation to asbestos, radon daughters, chloromethyl ethers, and arsenic. Some of the mechanisms that can be invoked to explain the observed patterns include initiation and promotion, lung clearance, transport across cell membranes, and mucous secretion.

  2. Evaluation of S-101 courses Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T S

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' (S-101) which was conducted August 5 to 8, 1991 at Hanford, in Richland, Washington. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  3. Occupational and traning requirements for expanded coal production (as of October 1980). [Forecasting to 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated because of the anticipated rapid growth in trained personnel requirements in bituminous coal mining, and because the industry had already experienced significant problems in recruiting skilled manpower in the course of its employment expansion during the 1970's. Employment in bituminous coal mining is projected to nearly double, from 234,000 in 1977 to 456,000 in 1995, as the net result of a projected threefold increase in coal output to nearly 2.0 billion in 1995 and of an expected significant improvement in overall productivity. A large proportion of current coal mining employees are in occupations which require significant amounts of training for effective work performance. Employment growth to 1955 will be most rapid in those occupations requiring the greatest training or educational preparation. The new training infrastructure which has emerged to meet these needs includes both internal, company-operated training programs and those offered by various external providers. Among the latter are: Vocational schools, community colleges, and university extension departments; public agencies, such as MSHA and state mining departments; coal industry trade associations; and vendors or training consultant groups. The Conference Board survey of coal industry training programs, conducted in late 1979, was designed to provide comprehensive data on the scope of the coal industry's own training activities and on related training issues, based on a mail questionnaire survey addressed to all companies producing 300,000 or more tons per year. The training programs are described with emphasis on time changes, regional effects and implications for a coordinated plan.

  4. NCSU Box 7401 Raleigh, NC 27695 (919) 515-3480 Toll Free 1-800-33-NC SUN Passive Solar Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Options For North Carolina Homes SOLAR CENTER INFORMATION If you're planning to build or buy a new home includes: · a method to collect solar energy; · a way of storing that energy; · a system to distribute the living spaces. The passive solar home should always be built to high energy conservation standards. Also

  5. Methodology for the Preliminary Design of High Performance Schools in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Piljae

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................... 5 CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW ................................................................. 7 2.1 Energy Efficiency Studies of Schools ............................................ 7 2.2 IAQ in Schools... of ASHRAE Transactions. 2 ? Increased occupant comfort and health. ? Increased employee productivity. Not surprisingly, schools are one of the popular target buildings for high performance applications. In particular, in a school, the energy...

  6. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  7. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  8. Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halatek, Tadeusz [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: halatek@imp.lodz.pl; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina [Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Disease, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Rabieh, Sasan [Faculty of Biology, Chemistry, and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Wasowicz, Wojciech [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m{sup 3}). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m{sup 3}). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 {mu}g/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x{sub a} 39.0 {mu}g/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum {beta}{sub 2}M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

  9. A recent study of meteorological conditions around the Pentagon will support development of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack. I nFEBRUARY 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | #12;of the most likely targets for a future terrorist attack

  10. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  11. vy physical work). Some white-collar jobs may share these characteris-tics, but these factors overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations. Often blue-collar jobs tend to be dirty, dangerous, and of a confiscated driver's license. Loaning money and covering for behav- ioral problems are also not uncommon. Some

  12. Energy retrofit and occupant behaviour in protected housing: A case study of the Brunswick Centre in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Ben; Steemers, Koen

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    , and window opening schedule. In addition, occupancy number and flat orientation, that influence the internal gains and solar radiations of the flats, are included. By comparing energy use and behaviour patterns, their interrelationship can be further... show that the variance resulting from the comparison of West and East orientation ranges from 0.23% to 0.97%, with east facing flats having marginally higher energy use. This might be due to different effects of solar radiation on different...

  13. Radiation Safety Training Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiation safety training program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart J of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  14. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  15. Prioritized schedule for review of industrial safety and occupational health programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the rationale and criteria for developing a schedule for reviewing the Industrial Safety and Occupational Health programs for the Management and Operating Contractor (MOC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The reviews will evaluate the MOC`s compliance with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders and regulatory requirements. The scope of this task includes developing prioritization criteria, determining the review priority of each program based upon the criteria, identifying review requirements for each program, and preparing a detailed review schedule. In keeping with the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) structure for the review of site activities, these review activities will be addressed as surveillances, although the original basis for this requirement refers to these activities as appraisals. Surveillances and appraisals are the same within this document. Surveillances are defined as: ``The act of monitoring or observing to verify whether an item, activity, system, or process conforms to specified requirements. Surveillance of a technical work activity is normally done in real time, i.e., the surveillance is accomplished as the work is being performed.``

  16. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  17. UMTRA Project Office Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Program Plan. Final draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, B.H.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with the applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1 B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.1A. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES&H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES&H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites, and defines the ES&H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES&H program and covers only the federal employees working on the UMTRA Project.

  18. UMTRA project office federal employee occupational safety and health program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.lA. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES&H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES&H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites and defines the ES&H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES&H program and covers only federal employees working on the UMTRA Project.

  19. Thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory with generalized-gradient approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, Jeng-Da, E-mail: jdchai@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Center for Theoretical Sciences, and Center for Quantum Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, Center for Theoretical Sciences, and Center for Quantum Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the recently proposed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154104 (2012)] to generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation density functionals. Relative to our previous TAO-LDA (i.e., the local density approximation to TAO-DFT), the resulting TAO-GGAs are significantly superior for a wide range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, and reaction energies. For noncovalent interactions, TAO-GGAs with empirical dispersion corrections are shown to yield excellent performance. Due to their computational efficiency for systems with strong static correlation effects, TAO-LDA and TAO-GGAs are applied to study the electronic properties (e.g., the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinities, fundamental gaps, and symmetrized von Neumann entropy) of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 100), which is very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. The ground states of acenes are shown to be singlets for all the chain lengths studied here. With the increase of acene length, the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, and fundamental gaps decrease monotonically, while the vertical electron affinities and symmetrized von Neumann entropy (i.e., a measure of polyradical character) increase monotonically.

  20. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. II. ARBITRARY PHASE-SPACE OCCUPATION NUMBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Eric I. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States); Williams, Liliya L. R., E-mail: barnes.eric@uwlax.edu, E-mail: llrw@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institue for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of two thermodynamic techniques for determining equilibria of self-gravitating systems. One is the Lynden-Bell (LB) entropy maximization analysis that introduced violent relaxation. Since we do not use the Stirling approximation, which is invalid at small occupation numbers, our systems have finite mass, unlike LB's isothermal spheres. (Instead of Stirling, we utilize a very accurate smooth approximation for ln x{exclamation_point}.) The second analysis extends entropy production extremization to self-gravitating systems, also without the use of the Stirling approximation. In addition to the LB statistical family characterized by the exclusion principle in phase space, and designed to treat collisionless systems, we also apply the two approaches to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) families, which have no exclusion principle and hence represent collisional systems. We implicitly assume that all of the phase space is equally accessible. We derive entropy production expressions for both families and give the extremum conditions for entropy production. Surprisingly, our analysis indicates that extremizing entropy production rate results in systems that have maximum entropy, in both LB and MB statistics. In other words, both thermodynamic approaches lead to the same equilibrium structures.

  1. Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  2. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  3. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  4. Higher occupancy humanism : the trade-offs for encouraging middle income housing in a global city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konishi, Ryunosuke, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high density urban areas where the land acquisition and construction cost components are significant relative to total development costs, the market typically supplies a high-income housing product in order to justify ...

  5. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore »measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  6. Biface reduction and blade manufacture at the Gault site (41bl323): a Clovis occupation in Bell County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, William A.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    COUNTY, TEXAS A Dissertation by WILLIAM A. DICKENS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee... at the Gault Site (41BL323): A Clovis Occupation in Bell County, Texas. (December 2005) William A. Dickens, B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University; M.A., Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr Harry J. Shafer Dr. Michael R. Waters...

  7. Iron site occupancies in magnetite-ulvospinel solid solution: A new approach using XMCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, C. I.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Telling, N. D.; Pattrick, R. A.D.; Vaughan, D. J.; Charnock, J. M.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Coker, V.S.; Laan, G. van der

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordering of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} between octahedral (Oh) and tetrahedral (Td) sites in synthetic members of the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) - ulvoespinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) solid-solution series was determined using Fe L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) coupled with electron microprobe and chemical analysis, Ti L-edge spectroscopy, Fe K-edge EXAFS and XANES, Fe{sub 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy, and unit cell parameters. Microprobe analysis, cell edges and chemical FeO determinations showed that the bulk compositions of the samples were stoichiometric magnetite-ulvoespinel solid-solutions. Surface sensitive XMCD showed that the surfaces of these oxide minerals were more sensitive to redox conditions and some samples required re-equilibration with suitable solid-solid buffers. Detailed site-occupancy analysis of these samples gave XMCD-Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios very close to stoichiometric values. L{sub 2,3}-edge spectroscopy showed that Ti{sup 4+} was restricted to Oh sites. XMCD results showed that significant Fe{sup 2+} only entered Td when the Ti content was > 0.40 apfu while Fe{sup 2+} in Oh increased from 1 a.p.f.u in magnetite to a maximum of {approx}1.4 apfu in USP45. As the Ti content increased from this point, the steady increase in Fe{sup 2+} in Td sites was clearly observable in the XMCD spectra, concurrent with a slow decrease in Fe{sup 2+} in Oh sites. Calculated magnetic moments showed a steady decrease from magnetite (4.06 {mu}{sub B}) to USP45 (1.5 {mu}{sub B}) and then a slower decrease towards the value for ulvoespinel (0 {mu}{sub B}). Two of the synthesized samples were also partially maghemitized by re-equilibrating with an oxidizing Ni-NiO buffer and XMCD showed that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation only occurred at Oh sites, with concomitant vacancy formation restricted to this site. This study shows the advantage of using XMCD as a direct measurement of Fe oxidation state in these complex magnetic spinels. These results can be used to rationalize the magnetic properties of titanomagnetites, and their oxidized titanomaghemitized analogues, in Earth's crustal rocks.

  8. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Thakur, Sachin [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Presently at, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Banerjee, Basu Dev [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Pasha, Syed Tazeen [National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Rai, Arvind, E-mail: arvindrai.nicd@gmail.com [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19 {+-} 39.36 vs. 241.52 {+-} 42.32 nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74 {+-} 17.37 vs. 134.28 {+-} 25.49 {mu}mol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1{sub 192}QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p > 0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p < 0.001). For PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p < 0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p < 0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1 gene, which might have an important role in the identification of individual risk factors in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

  9. Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

  10. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  11. What School Buildings Can Teach Us: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with indoor environmental quality in green buildings.In Proceedings of Healthy Buildings (Vol. 3, pp. 365–370).Bernstein, Tobie, 2003. Building Healthy, High Performance

  12. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 7. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.L.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 7) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Occupational Safety and Health, and Environmental Protection.

  13. Revue Archologique du Centre de la France, Tome 43, 2004 : 115-147. Mots-cls : Arverne, Limagne, Marbre, Occupation du sol, Priurbain, Villae.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) permet d'offrir, pour la première fois, un tableau précis de l'occupation de la plaine de la Limagne à l'objet de publications. Il faut attendre les années 1980 pour qu'un chercheur s'enhardisse à cartographier complémentaires 3. L'OCCUPATION DE LA PLAINE DE LA LIMAGNE � L'�POQUE ROMAINE 3.1. Présentation générale 3.2. Des

  14. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Ernst & Young Federal Express Federal Reserve Bank Federated Systems Group General Electric General on Find Occupations) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career NCR Corporation Omni Hotels Powerplan Consultants Powerserve International Proctor & Gamble Co

  15. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    of accounting classes to provide the basic tools to enter an accounting position. Should a student wish://online.onetcenter.org (click on Find Occupations) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www.linkedin.com. What can I do with a major in Accounting

  16. 2009 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Bowers Michelle Diane Highly Distinguished Bowling Joseph David Highly Distinguished Ashley Highly Distinguished Bryant Catherine Clancy Highly Distinguished Buckheister Elaine A Highly

  17. Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program that complies with U.S. DOE requirements specified in Title 10 CFR Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Cancels DOE G 441.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  18. doi: 10.1136/oem.2008.044024 2009 66: 848-853 originally published online SeptemberOccup Environ Med

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and occupational exposure to benzene and toluene among exposed workers. The minp test assessed the association, leukaemia and lymphoma among 250 workers exposed to benzene and 140 unexposed controls in a cross regions with altered WBC counts among benzene- exposed workers, after accounting for multiple compar

  19. Posting and Labeling for Radiological Control Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiological hazard posting and labeling program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  20. Evaluation and Control of Radiation Dose to the Embryo/Fetus Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a program to control fetal exposure to ionizing radiation and evaluate the resultant dose that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835.

  1. FALL 2012, WINTER 2013 UNFURNISHED APARTMENT LICENSE AGREEMENT HOUSING DATES OF OCCUPANCY: You will receive written communication from the Office of Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Apartments. I acknowledge that I have reviewed the pamphlet entitled "Protect Your Family from Lead in Your will receive written communication from the Office of Housing and Residential Life regarding your approved dates of occupancy based on your requested dates. This Unfurnished Apartment Housing License Agreement

  2. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  3. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Vermeulen, Roel; Chen, Jinsong; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene is an established cause of leukemia and a possible cause of lymphoma in humans but the molecular pathways underlying this remain largely undetermined. This study sought to determine if the use of two different microarray platforms could identify robust global gene expression and pathway changes associated with occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression of a population of shoe-factory workers with well-characterized occupational exposures to benzene. Microarray data was analyzed by a robust t-test using a Quantile Transformation (QT) approach. Differential expression of 2692 genes using the Affymetrix platform and 1828 genes using the Illumina platform was found. While the overall concordance in genes identified as significantly associated with benzene exposure between the two platforms was 26% (475 genes), the most significant genes identified by either array were more likely to be ranked as significant by the other platform (Illumina = 64%, Affymetrix = 58%). Expression ratios were similar among the concordant genes (mean difference in expression ratio = 0.04, standard deviation = 0.17). Four genes (CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN and PF4), which we previously identified by microarray and confirmed by real-time PCR, were identified by both platforms in the current study and were among the top 100 genes. Gene Ontology analysis showed over representation of genes involved in apoptosis among the concordant genes while Ingenuity{reg_sign} Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified pathways related to lipid metabolism. Using a two-platform approach allows for robust changes in the PBMC transcriptome of benzene-exposed individuals to be identified.

  4. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

    1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  5. 2011 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Elizabeth Campbell Highly Distinguished Bowker Ripley Eden Highly Distinguished Brandfass Lara Rose Highly Distinguished Brotherton Cara Price Highly Distinguished Brown Anna Laughlin Highly Distinguished Brown Chloe Alix Highly Distinguished Brown Kelsey Michelle Highly Distinguished Brown Kyle Truman Highly

  6. Hair Self Shadowing and Transparency Depth Ordering Using Occupancy maps Erik Sintorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assarsson, Ulf

    approximate visibility function for high frequency semi- transparent geometry such as hair. We can then reconstruct the vis- ibility for any fragment without the expensive compression needed by Deep Shadow Maps cylinders or as line primitives, the two main challenges are the self-shadowing effects within the volume

  7. Relation between occupation in the first coordination shells and Widom line in Core-Softened Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    , at atmospheric pres- sure, an increase of isobaric heat capacity upon cooling35,36 . For the case of water) potentials have been attracting attention due to their connections with the anomalous behavior of liquid it was suggested that there are two liquid phases, a low density liquid (LDL) and a high density liquid (HDL)45

  8. 2012 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Beck Misty Nicole Highly Distinguished Beckett Ethan Patrick Highly Distinguished Sara Nicole Highly Distinguished Borland Kelly Nicole Highly Distinguished Bosshardt Zachary Michael

  9. Commissioning for High Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meline, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Commissioning established by the National Conference on Building Commissioning ESL-KT-13-12-46 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Types of Commissioning ® Registered trademark of Texas A... Benefits of Cx Owners can achieve savings in operations of $4.00 over the first years of occupancy 5 as a direct result of every invested in commissioning* $1.00 * Data from Whole Building Design Guide – a program of National...

  10. High-performance commercial building systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

  11. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) | DepartmentINL E-IDROCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL

  12. Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas andSurface;

  13. 2012 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Distinguished Andersen Meredith Esther Highly Distinguished Anderson Anna Kathleen Highly Distinguished Anderson Leah Ellen Highly Distinguished Anderson Lucy Paige Highly Distinguished Andrews James Matheson Highly Distinguished Aquino Jeri-Lynn Highly Distinguished Armistead Mary Chandler Highly Distinguished Armstrong Jessa

  14. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

  15. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) testimony to DOL (Department of Labor) on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's proposed rule on the control of hazardous energy sources (lockout/tagout) by R. W. Niemeier, September 8, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The testimony addressed the proposed rule on control of hazardous energy sources and was offered in support of the position of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on this issue. Provisions already in existence for cranes, derricks, and power presses require lockout provisions for electrical connections. The proposed rule will extend these protections to nonelectric power sources and add a requirement for isolating nonelectric hazards. The new rule requires a written procedure and training program. NIOSH opposed the use of tags instead of locks, as tags only provide a warning and are subject to several abuses including removal before maintenance is complete and negligence in removing the tag by the service operator when maintenance is completed. Over 20 electrically related fatalities were noted where a deenergized locked-out electrical circuit would have prevented the fatality. In a review of 160 responses concerning injuries where the equipment was turned off, six indicated the equipment was tagged out. Concern was also expressed over the simple tagout permitted for mechanical power transmission systems. NIOSH recommends that each worker should apply and remove his or her own lock.

  16. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy's occupational safety and health program for its government-owned contractor-operated facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational safety and health programs for its government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities was completed by the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in response to DOE's request for assistance. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide DOE with a blueprint for strengthening these programs. Under the leadership of Secretary of Energy James Watkins, DOE has launched a number of significant initiatives designed to instill a new culture of safety and health accountability within the Department. The Secretary of Energy's personal concern for safety and health was not being reflected in the priorities, resource allocation decisions and planning of DOE and GOCO managers. The report recommends that DOE consider major organizational changes, changes in priorities, and the development of operationally meaningful safety and health goals and objectives together with the accountability systems necessary to measure progress.

  17. Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

  18. Development of a High-Performance Office Building Simulation Model for a Hot and Humid Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

    -performance measures applicable to office buildings in hot and humid climates and to develop a high-performance (maximum energy-efficient) building model that only uses technologies readily available in the contemporary market. The high-performance model showed... requirements. This base-case model consumed a total of 7,721 GJ/yr. As shown in Figure 22, the implementation of occupancy sensors impacted the energy consumption the most, saving 11.2% of the total energy consumption. By this measure, indoor lights were...

  19. Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program (RPP) that complies with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1A.

  20. Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

  1. Neutron occupancy of the 0d5/2 orbital and the N=16 shell closure in 24O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tshoo; Y. Satou; C. A. Bertulani; H. Bhang; S. Choi; T. Nakamura; Y. Kondo; S. Deguchi; Y. Kawada; Y. Nakayama; K. N. Tanaka; N. Tanaka; Y. Togano; N. Kobayashi; N. Aoi; M. Ishihara; T. Motobayashi; H. Otsu; H. Sakurai; S. Takeuchi; K. Yoneda; F. Delaunay; J. Gibelin; F. M. Marqués; N. A. Orr; T. Honda; T. Kobayashi; T. Sumikama; Y. Miyashita; K. Yoshinaga; M. Matsushita; S. Shimoura; D. Sohler; J. W. Hwang; T. Zheng; Z. H. Li; Z. X. Cao

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One-neutron knockout from 24O leading to the first excited state in 23O has been measured for a proton target at a beam energy of 62 MeV/nucleon. The decay energy spectrum of the neutron unbound state of 23O was reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 22O fragment and emitted neutron. A sharp peak was found at Edecay=50$\\pm$3 keV, corresponding to an excited state in 23O at 2.78$\\pm$0.11 MeV, as observed in previous measurements. The longitudinal momentum distribution for this state was consistent with d -wave neutron knockout, providing support for a J{\\pi} assignment of 5/2+. The associated spectroscopic factor was deduced to be C2S(0d5/2)=4.1$\\pm$0.4 by comparing the measured cross section (View the MathML source) with a distorted wave impulse approximation calculation. Such a large occupancy for the neutron 0d5/2 orbital is in line with the N=16 shell closure in 24O.

  2. The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs II. Halo Occupation Distribution Modeling of the Cross Correlation Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison L; Aceves, Hector

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of AGNs in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS Broad-line AGNs with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16

  3. Effects of multiple occupancy and inter-particle interactions on selective transport through narrow channels: theory versus experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Zilman

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Many biological and artificial transport channels function without direct input of metabolic energy during a transport event and without structural rearrangements involving transitions from a 'closed' to an 'open' state. Nevertheless, such channels are able to maintain efficient and selective transport. It has been proposed that attractive interactions between the transported molecules and the channel can increase the transport efficiency and that the selectivity of such channels can be based on the strength of the interaction of the specifically transported molecules with the channel. Herein, we study the transport through narrow channels in a framework of a general kinetic theory, which naturally incorporates multi-particle occupancy of the channel and non-single-file transport. We study how the transport efficiency and the probability of translocation through the channel are affected by inter-particle interactions in the confined space inside the channel, and establish conditions for selective transport. We compare the predictions of the model with the available experimental data - and find good semi-quantitative agreement. Finally, we discuss applications of the theory to the design of artificial nano-molecular sieves.

  4. Estimates of occupational safety and health impacts resulting from large-scale production of major photovoltaic technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, T.; Ungers, L.; Briggs, T.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to estimate both quantitatively and qualitatively, the worker and societal risks attributable to four photovoltaic cell (solar cell) production processes. Quantitative risk values were determined by use of statistics from the California semiconductor industry. The qualitative risk assessment was performed using a variety of both governmental and private sources of data. The occupational health statistics derived from the semiconductor industry were used to predict injury and fatality levels associated with photovoltaic cell manufacturing. The use of these statistics to characterize the two silicon processes described herein is defensible from the standpoint that many of the same process steps and materials are used in both the semiconductor and photovoltaic industries. These health statistics are less applicable to the gallium arsenide and cadmium sulfide manufacturing processes, primarily because of differences in the materials utilized. Although such differences tend to discourage any absolute comparisons among the four photovoltaic cell production processes, certain relative comparisons are warranted. To facilitate a risk comparison of the four processes, the number and severity of process-related chemical hazards were assessed. This qualitative hazard assessment addresses both the relative toxicity and the exposure potential of substances in the workplace. In addition to the worker-related hazards, estimates of process-related emissions and wastes are also provided.

  5. 2013 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Anderson Chelsea Mariah Highly Distinguished Anderson Madison Olivia Highly Distinguished Andrews James Askew Mary Frances Highly Distinguished Augustine Andrew William Highly Distinguished Austin Adrian Bailes Mary Elizabeth Highly Distinguished Bailey Erika Leigh Highly Distinguished Bailey Margaret

  6. High e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke ne rgy data s am

  7. Possible options for reducing occupational dose from the TMI-2 basement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, L. F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harty, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major sources of exposure in the basement include the enclosed stairwell/elevator shaft structure, water and sludge in the elevator shaft, cast concrete walls, concrete floor slab, water and sludge on the floor, and activity in the paint and loose surface contamination. The sources were identified using data obtained by the utility from water processing, water and solid samples, remote video inspections and radiation monitoring with a robot, and strings of thermoluminescent dosimeters lowered from upper elevations. The area dose rates in the basement range from approximately 4 R/hr (in the NE quadrant) to over 1100 R/hr (near the enclosed stairwell/elevator shaft structure). It is estimated that the basement contains between 11,000 and 21,000 curies of /sup 137/Cs. Specific decontamination and cleanup techniques are discussed. These techniques include flushing with water, high-pressure water blasting, leaching, scabbling and chemical cleaning. The applicability of these techniques to the major sources of radiation are discussed, and possible approaches and work sequences for basement cleanup are given.

  8. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Requirements Identification Document (RID) describes an Occupational Health and Safety Program as defined through the Relevant DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, industry guidance documents and, as appropriate, good industry practice. The definition of an Occupational Health and Safety Program as specified by this document is intended to address Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendations 90-2 and 91-1, which call for the strengthening of DOE complex activities through the identification and application of relevant standards which supplement or exceed requirements mandated by DOE Orders. This RID applies to the activities, personnel, structures, systems, components, and programs involved in maintaining the facility and executing the mission of the High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms.

  9. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1994. Twenty-seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). Annual reports for 1994 were received from a total of 303 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 303 licensees indicated that 152,028 individuals were monitored, 79,780 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 24,740 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 15% decrease from the 1993 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem) for 1994. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. In 1994, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 198 person-cSv (person-rem). This represents a 18% decrease from the 1993 value of 242 person-cSv (person-rem). The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 327 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 131 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 18,178 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1994, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.28 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem).

  10. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  11. Commissioning for High Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meline, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M Energy Systems Laboratory Type of Cx Previously Cx’d? Performance Monitoring Req’d? Functional Testing Req’d? Re-Cx Yes No Yes Retro-Cx No No Yes CC® Yes/No Yes No Monitoring-Based Cx Yes/No Yes No • New Building Commissioning ? Process Commissioning... Benefits of Cx Owners can achieve savings in operations of $4.00 over the first years of occupancy 5 as a direct result of every invested in commissioning* $1.00 * Data from Whole Building Design Guide – a program of National...

  12. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

  13. Program desk manual for occupational safety and health -- U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations, Office of Environment Safety and Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musen, L.G.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The format of this manual is designed to make this valuable information easily accessible to the user as well as enjoyable to read. Each chapter contains common information such as Purpose, Scope, Policy and References, as well as information unique to the topic at hand. This manual can also be provided on a CD or Hanford Internet. Major topics include: Organization and program for operational safety; Occupational medicine; Construction and demolition; Material handling and storage; Hoisting and rigging; Explosives; Chemical hazards; Gas cylinders; Electrical; Boiler and pressure vessels; Industrial fire protection; Industrial hygiene; and Safety inspection checklist.

  14. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Argonne, Illinois, August 18--21, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted August 18--21 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 1.3 provides written comments, and section 1.4 provides the attendees examination results. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. The students commented that both instructors were knowledgeable and interesting. This is reflected in the ratings. Appendix B provides the trainee evaluation form.

  15. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Argonne, Illinois, August 18--21, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted August 18--21 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 1.3 provides written comments, and section 1.4 provides the attendees examination results. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. The students commented that both instructors were knowledgeable and interesting. This is reflected in the ratings. Appendix B provides the trainee evaluation form.

  16. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 26--29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted October 26--29, 1992 at EG&G Measurement, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide examination results, and recommendations for improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete.

  17. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 26--29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted October 26--29, 1992 at EG G Measurement, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide examination results, and recommendations for improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete.

  18. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, June 23, 1992--June 26, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted June 23---26 at Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Section 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course.

  19. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, June 23, 1992--June 26, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted June 23---26 at Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Section 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course.

  20. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Kansas City, Missouri, August 4--7, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted August 4--7, 1992 at Allied Signal, in Kansas City, Missouri. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 1.3 summarizes the trainees written comments on the course and Section 1.4 provides examination results. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents the trainee evaluation form which students were asked to complete.

  1. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Kansas City, Missouri, August 4--7, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted August 4--7, 1992 at Allied Signal, in Kansas City, Missouri. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 1.3 summarizes the trainees written comments on the course and Section 1.4 provides examination results. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments and Appendix B presents the trainee evaluation form which students were asked to complete.

  2. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) and Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) - Agency Roles/Programs for Assisting DOE Covered Workers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergy Policy Act ofRegionalDepartment of Occupational

  3. Occupational Safety Performance Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Quarterly TRC and DART Case Rates EM Quarterly TRC and DART Case Rates NNSA Quarterly TRC and DART Case Rates SC Quarterly TRC and DART Case Rates

  4. Occupational Safety Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil Research |Funding and Energy Efficiency11 JulyQ1

  5. HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal848 Unlimited Release PrintedDeputy Group

  6. Council's Occupational Excellence Achievement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts of Crude4-Year

  7. Occupational Medicine Variance Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas andSurface;|

  8. Mn Occupations in Ga1-xMnxN Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors Probed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shiqiang; Yan Wensheng; Sun Zhihu; Liu Qinghua; Zhong Wenjie [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Oyanagi, H. [Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 1-1-1 Umezono Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is used to study the characteristics of different sites of Mn in the Ga1-xMnxN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) with zinc-blende structure. The XANES spectra of representative Mn occupation sites (substitutional MnGa, interstitial MnI, MnGa-MnI dimer and Mn cluster) in GaN lattice are theoretically calculated and compared with experimental results. The substitutional Mn in GaN is characterized by a pre-edge peak at 2.0 eV and a post-edge multiple-scattering peak at 29.1 eV. The peaks shift in position and drop in intensity dramatically for the interstitial MnI and MnGa-MnI dimmer, and disappear completely for Mn clusters. We propose that the distinct characteristics of Mn K-edge XANES spectra for different Mn sites favor to discriminate Mn occupations in GaMnN DMS.

  9. National Best Practices Manual for Building High Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    compounded by quick occupation after construction or installation of carpets. Site pollution from nearby parking lots or loading areas. Relocatable classrooms should be subject...

  10. The effect of sociocultural factors on the quality of relations of the United States with Hispaniola: analysis of the American military occupation of Haiti and the Dominican Republic (1915-1934)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Fausto B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SOCIOCULTURAL FACTORS ON THE QUALITY OF RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH HISPANIOLA: ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN MILITARY OCCUPATION OF HAITI AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (1915-1934) A Thesis By FAUSTO B. ALVAREZ Submitted... WITH HISPANIOLA: ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN MILITARY OCCUPATION OF HAITI AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (1915-1934) A Thesis by FAUSTO B. ALVAREZ Approved as to style and content by: C arrperson o Co ee) ames H. Copp (Member) Wm. Alex McIntosh (Member) James...

  11. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  12. 8 Kerr Administration Building (541) 737-4085 www.oregonstate.edu/career One of the best sources for gathering information about what's happening in an occupation or an industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    . What do you think of the experience I've had so far in terms of entering this field? 16. From your of the interview. NOTE: Always analyze the information you've gathered. Adjust your job search, resume, and career in this occupation? 11. What special advice would you give a person entering this field? 12. What types of training

  13. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    and biological sciences. Agricultural economics provides a strong theoretical background for those entering) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search

  14. Internships provide you with an opportunity to explore interests, occupations and work environments; apply classroom knowledge; learn new skills; make contacts; expand your resume and much more! They're an important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Internships provide you with an opportunity to explore interests, occupations and work environments and think about what will be best for your needs, interests and future. WHAT IS AN INTERNSHIP? Is it truly, career-related work that extends the student's learning beyond the classroom. Is carefully monitored

  15. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  16. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE`` taught in Amarillo, Texas May 19--22, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted May 19--22 at the Pantex Plant, in Amarillo, Texas. Section 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  17. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE'' taught in Amarillo, Texas May 19--22, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted May 19--22 at the Pantex Plant, in Amarillo, Texas. Section 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  18. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' orientation to occupational safety in DOE'' taught at Rocky Flats, Colorado, April 23--May 2, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted twice at the Rocky Flats facility between April 23, 1991 and May 2, 1991. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendices A and B. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  19. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy's occupational safety and health program for its government-owned contractor-operated facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present to Secretary of Energy James Watkins the findings and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) evaluation of the Department of Energy's (DOE) programs for worker safety and health at DOE's government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) nuclear facilities. The OSHA evaluation is based on an intensive and comprehensive review and analysis of DOE's worker safety and health programs including: written programs; safety and health inspection programs; and the adequacy of resource, training, and management controls. The evaluation began on April 10, 1990 and involved over three staff years before its conclusion. The evaluation was initiated by former Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole in response to Secretary of Energy James Watkins' request that OSHA assist him in determining the actions needed to assure that DOE has an exemplary safety and health program in place at its GOCOs. 6 figs.

  20. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Upton, New York, November 17--20, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angyus, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,`` (S-101) which was conducted November 17--20, 1992 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in Upton, New York. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 presents examination results. Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  1. Evaluation of P-101 course Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE'' taught in Amarillo, Texas, May 7, 1991--May 17, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,'' which was conductd May 7, 1991 -- May 17, 1991 at Amarillo, Texas. The first part of the report summaries the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments in Appendix A. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Examination results on the final examination indicate that appropriate knowledge was gained by students attending the course.

  2. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Richland, Washington, May 20--May 23, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted May 20--23, 1991 at Richland, Washington. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendix A. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  3. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Upton, New York, November 17--20, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angyus, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' (S-101) which was conducted November 17--20, 1992 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in Upton, New York. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 presents examination results. Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  4. Evaluation of P-101 course Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE'' Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois July 16, 1991--July 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, D.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,'' (P-101) which was conducted July 16 to 26, 1991 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  5. Evaluation of P-101 course ``Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE`` Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois July 16, 1991--July 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, D.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,`` (P-101) which was conducted July 16 to 26, 1991 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  6. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  7. Optimal Toll Design: A Lower Bound Framework for the Asymmetric ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    some additive approximations. Example 4. Let ? ? RN , bi,U ..... Inventory Routing. Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, 5:348–371, 2003. 15 ...

  8. Modulators of Toll-like Receptors-4 and -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the need to develop alternate strategies for LPS sequestration. 24 The solution structure of PMB has been determined both in its free, aqueous, (Figure 5) as well as LPS-bound states.67;68 The cyclic moiety of aqueous PMB in its 6 Phe -D... relationship between intercationic distance and affinity toward lipid A was observed, with a sharp increase from 11Å, leveling off at about 13Å (Figure 7). This coincides, within experimental error, to the inter- phosphate distance in energy-minimized models...

  9. Transportation Center Seminar "Cost Recovery from Congestion Tolls with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    of Business University of British Columbia Thurs. Feb. 28, 2013 4:00 ­ 5:00 pm Location: Transportation Center discounted investment costs over a facility's lifetime. If the marginal cost of investment is constant of Business at UBC. His research interests include road pricing, traffic congestion models, financing roads

  10. automated toll collection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automated Data Collection Systems, such as Automated Fare Collection (AFC) and Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL), provides ... Schil, Mickal (Mickal Ren Jerme) 2012-01-01...

  11. Modulators of Toll-like Receptors -7 and -8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shukla, Nikunj M.

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    RIG retinoic acid inducible gene RNA ribonucleic acid sAP secreted alkaline phosphatase SAR structure activity relationship SNAr aromatic nucleophilic substitution SSC side scatter ssRNA single stranded RNA TGF-? transforming growth...

  12. Network Based Evaluation Method for Financial Analysis of Toll Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajdic, Nevena

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    the network improvement actions add to the complexity of these agreements. The objective of this research is to develop a method which will allow an assessment of the effect that network improvement actions have on the project’s financial feasibility. Three...

  13. Perceived and reported occupational stressors and coping strategies of selected community college business faculty members in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Genevieve J.

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in understanding such stress. Another purpose of this study was to measure and to compare for possible relationships among stressors, coping strategies, and selected demographic characteristics. Participants who received a three-part survey questionnaire... experienced high levels of stress from issues involving reward and recognition, time constraints, college/departmental influence, professional identity, and student interaction. 2. Community college business faculty members responded by identifying...

  14. 172 Newark High School 83 Reynoldsburg High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    AU09 HS 172 Newark High School 83 Reynoldsburg High School 71 Heath High School 69 Granville High School 57 Licking Valley High School 54 Northridge High School 54 Watkins Memorial High Scho 51 Sheridan High School 50 Lincoln High School 49 Mount Vernon High School 46 Tri-valley High School 43 Utica High

  15. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

  16. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AGNs. II. HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L., E-mail: miyaji@astrosen.unam.mx [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS broad-line AGNs with SDSS luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36 that was calculated in Paper I. In our HOD modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a 'typical' AGN host halo mass, M{sub h}, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M{sub h} more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper limit to the slope ({alpha}) of the AGN HOD that is far below unity. The other two models have a central component, which has a step function form, where the HOD is constant above a minimum mass, without (Model B) or with (Model C) an upper mass cutoff, in addition to the truncated power-law satellite component, similar to the HOD that is found for galaxies. In these two models we find that the upper limits on {alpha} are still below unity, with {alpha} {approx}< 0.95 and {alpha} {approx}< 0.84 for Models B and C, respectively. Our analysis suggests that the satellite AGN occupation increases slower than, or may even decrease with, M{sub h}, in contrast to the satellite HODs of luminosity-threshold samples of galaxies, which, in contrast, grow approximately as (N{sub s}) {proportional_to} M{sup {alpha}}{sub h} with {alpha} {approx} 1. These results are consistent with observations that the AGN fraction in groups and clusters decreases with richness.

  17. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

  18. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature,...

  19. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  20. First-principles study of site occupancy of 3d, 4d and 5d transition-metal elements in L10TiAl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chao [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a statistical-mechanical Wagner-Schottky model parametrized by first-principles density-functional (DFT-GGA) calculations on 32-atom supercells, we predict the lattice site occupancy of 3d (Ti-Cu), 4d (Zr-Ag) and 5d (Hf-Au) transition-metal elements in L10 TiAl intermetallic compound as a function of both alloy composition and temperature. The effects of local atomic relaxations, anisotropic lattice distortions, as well as magnetism on point defect energetics are fully taken into account. Our calculations show that, at all alloy compositions and temperatures, Zr and Hf consistently show a preference for the Ti sublattice, while Co, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Pt and Au consistently show a preference for the Al sublattice. In contrast, the site preference of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ta and W strongly depend on both alloy stoichiometry and temperature. Our calculated results compare favorably with the existing theoretical and experimental studies in the literature.

  1. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  2. HIGH-POWER, HIGH-EFFICIENCY FELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Kumada, "Scaling of the FEL-ID Equations", ELF Note 128,Instability in a High-power, Short- Wavelength FEL", Proc.of the Ninth FEL" Conference, Williamsburg (1988), and

  3. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  4. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements...

  6. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric...

  7. High Voltage Safety Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage...

  8. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated with increased headache (OR=1.6). Fair or poor condition of duct liner was associated with increased upper respiratory symptoms (OR=1.4). Most of the many potential risk factors assessed here had not been investigated previously, and associations found with single symptoms may have been by chance, including several associations that were the reverse of expected. Risk factors newly identified in these analyses that deserve attention include outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground, lack of operable windows, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lack of scheduled inspection for HVAC systems. Infrequent cleaning of cooling coils and drain pans were associated with increases in several symptoms in these as well as prior analyses of BASE data. Replication of these findings is needed, using more objective measurements of both exposure and health response. Confirmation of the specific HVAC factors responsible for increased symptoms in buildings, and development of prevention strategies could have major public health and economic benefits worldwide.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. ACEEE Int. J. on Network Security, Vol. 01, No. 03, Dec 2010 2010 ACEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and application like airline baggage tracking, automated vehicle identification and toll collection. A RFID system & Container Tracking Microwave Frequency > 1 GHz Medium range (10+ feet) Automated Toll Collection Vehicle-10 feet) Medium reading speed Access Control Airline Baggage ID Library automation Ultra High Frequency

  11. High-performance combinatorial algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mathematics, and high performance computing. The numericalalgorithms on high performance computing platforms.algorithms on high performance computing platforms, which

  12. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  13. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.B. [comp.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  14. High Performance Computing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

  15. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 81-415-1385, High Voltage Maintenance Corporation, Mentor, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kominsky, J.R.; Lipscomb, J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1981 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was requested to evaluate exposures to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and to chlorinated benzenes and ethanes for electricians at High Voltage Maintenance (HVM) Corp., Mentor, Ohio. The HVM Corp. services electrical power transformers and capacitors on a contract basis with the work performed both in the field and at the Mentor facilities. On the basis of the data collected, NIOSH concludes that workers were exposed to potentially toxic concentrations of airborne 1,1,1-trichloroethane and PCBs. Significant PCB contamination of work surfaces demonstrate a potential for continued exposure to PCBs via skin contact and ingestion. PCB blood levels also indicate excessive absorption of PCBs. Recommendations for decontamination of the buildings and exposure controls are offered in Section VIII of this report.

  17. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  18. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  19. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  20. Many classroom lighting systems provide mediocre lighting quality and have high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , superintendents, principals, architects, lighting designers, utility staff, and code officials can use information community and school officials about the system's availability. · Document system performance and occupant

  1. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, Wlliam J.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the results of detailed monitoring completed under Program Element 6 of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's High Performance Commercial Building Systems (HPCBS) PIER program. The purpose of the Energy Simulations and Projected State-Wide Energy Savings project is to develop reasonable energy performance and cost models for high performance relocatable classrooms (RCs) across California climates. A key objective of the energy monitoring was to validate DOE2 simulations for comparison to initial DOE2 performance projections. The validated DOE2 model was then used to develop statewide savings projections by modeling base case and high performance RC operation in the 16 California climate zones. The primary objective of this phase of work was to utilize detailed field monitoring data to modify DOE2 inputs and generate performance projections based on a validated simulation model. Additional objectives include the following: (1) Obtain comparative performance data on base case and high performance HVAC systems to determine how they are operated, how they perform, and how the occupants respond to the advanced systems. This was accomplished by installing both HVAC systems side-by-side (i.e., one per module of a standard two module, 24 ft by 40 ft RC) on the study RCs and switching HVAC operating modes on a weekly basis. (2) Develop projected statewide energy and demand impacts based on the validated DOE2 model. (3) Develop cost effectiveness projections for the high performance HVAC system in the 16 California climate zones.

  2. High Resolution EELS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EELS EMSL's ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface chemistry-high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) system is designed to study the molecular-level chemistry...

  3. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  4. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ever-demanding workloads 13:01 Gary Grider, HPC Divison Leader The High Performance Computing (HPC) Division supports the Laboratory mission by managing world-class...

  5. Beverly Hills High Emily Bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    Students Ali Abadi Beverly Hills High Emily Bloom Bakersfield High Camila Castro Rodriguez Mills E. Godwin High Nafiz'Ammar Fatani Da Vinci Science High Diana Felix San Marino High Karen Girdner

  6. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  7. Video occupant detection and classification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumm, John C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining when it is not safe to arm a vehicle airbag by storing representations of known situations as observed by a camera at a passenger seat; and comparing a representation of a camera output of the current situation to the stored representations to determine the known situation most closely represented by the current situation. In the preferred embodiment, the stored representations include the presence or absence of a person or infant seat in the front passenger seat of an automobile.

  8. Safety and Occupational Health Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of Environment, Security, Safety and Health, under the Deputy Assistant Secretary (DAS) for Business Operations/Chief Operating Officer (COO). The Office of...

  9. Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Banks Custodial Care Facility Drug Abuse Facilities Free-standing Emergency Centers Health Maintenance Organization Home Health Care Hospital/Nursing Home Care Insurance Companies Medical/Dental Group Practice...................................................IIA CF-S3 Careers in Counseling and Human Services..................IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  10. Safety and Occupational Health Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energys Carlsbad Field Office has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National Transuranic (TRU) Program. WIPP is located in the Chihuahuan...

  11. Occupational Medicine | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access to scienceScientificObservation of aObserving the Sparks

  12. Ergonomics - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation100Health Education &

  13. Ergonomics - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation100Health Education

  14. Radon - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations:Radiological

  15. Beryllium - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOTDiagnostic

  16. Diabetes - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu, James Cowin PNNLDevice UWat

  17. Directions - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirectDirect-WriteDirections About

  18. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  19. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  20. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHighDISCLAIMER

  1. Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li , Cheng; Hong , Tianzhen

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumed by buildings accounts for one third of the world?s total primary energy use. Associated with the conscious of energy savings in buildings, High Performance Buildings (HPBs) has surged across the world, with wide promotion and adoption of various performance rating and certification systems. It is valuable to look into the actual energy performance of HPBs and to understand their influencing factors. To shed some light on this topic, this paper conducted a series of portfolio analysis based on a database of 51 high performance office buildings across the world. Analyses showed that the actual site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of the 51 buildings varied by a factor of up to 11, indicating a large scale of variation of the actual energy performance of the current HPBs. Further analysis of the correlation between EUI and climate elucidated ubiquitous phenomenon of EUI scatter throughout all climate zones, implying that the weather is not a decisive factor, although important, for the actual energy consumption of an individual building. On the building size via EUI, analysis disclosed that smaller buildings have a tendency to achieving lower energy use. Even so, the correlation is not absolute since some large buildings demonstrated low energy use while some small buildings performed opposite. Concerning the technologies, statistics indicated that the application of some technologies had correlations with some specific building size and climate characteristic. However, it was still hard to pinpoint a set of technologies which was directly correlative with a group of low EUI buildings. It is concluded that no a single factor essentially determines the actual energy performance of HPBs. To deliver energy-efficient buildings, an integrated design taking account of climate, technology, occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance should be implemented.

  2. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingashoter2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  3. RECHARGEABLE HIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Eshman, High-Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleS. Sudar, High Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleHIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES Elton J. Cairns January 1981 TWO-

  4. High-Tc Superconductor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School footballHigh-Pressure MOFDonghui Lu, Kyle

  5. High-fidelity Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School footballHigh-PressureBiofuel Production

  6. High-speed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School footballHigh-PressureBiofuelEnergyspeed

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  8. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) requirements of DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-6.

  9. High pressure furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  10. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  11. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  12. Creating high performance enterprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanke, Alexis K. (Alexis Kristen), 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How do enterprises successfully conceive, design, deliver, and operate large-scale, engineered systems? These large-scale projects often involve high complexity, significant technical challenges, a large number of diverse ...

  13. High pressure counterflow CHF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walkush, Joseph Patrick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report of the experimental results of a program in countercurrent flow critical heat flux. These experiments were performed with Freon 113 at 200 psia in order to model a high pressure water system. An internally ...

  14. High pressure furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  15. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  16. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ruoyi (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Embury, John David (Hamilton, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

  17. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  18. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  19. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Iannace, S. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy) and Technological District on Polymeric and Composite Materials Engineering and Structures (IMAST), P.le E.Fermi 1, location Porto del Granatello, 80055 Portici (Naples)

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery System Based on Zintl Phase Materials with Embedded Nanoparticles Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...