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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Microwave Emission at High Galactic Latitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps to model Galactic microwave emission at high latitudes (|b| > 20 deg). Cross-correlation of the DMR maps with Galactic template maps detects fluctuations in the high-latitude microwave sky brightness with the angular variation of the DIRBE far-infrared dust maps and a frequency dependence consistent with a superposition of dust and free-free emission. We find no significant correlations between the DMR maps and various synchrotron templates. On the largest angular scales (e.g., quadrupole), Galactic emission is comparable in amplitude to the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The CMB quadrupole amplitude, after correction for Galactic emission, has amplitude $Q_{rms}$ = 10.7 uK with random uncertainty 3.6 uK and systematic uncertainty 7.1 uK from uncertainty in our knowledge of Galactic microwave emission.

A. Kogut; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; K. Gorski; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar regions have great sensitivity to climate forcing; however, understanding of the physical processes coupling the atmosphere and ocean in these regions is relatively poor. Improving our knowledge of high-latitude surface fluxes will require close ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Sarah T. Gille; Cecilia Bitz; David Carlson; Ivana Cerovecki; Carol Anne Clayson; Meghan F. Cronin; Will M. Drennan; Chris W. Fairall; Ross N. Hoffman; Gudrun Magnusdottir; Rachel T. Pinker; Ian A. Renfrew; Mark Serreze; Kevin Speer; Lynne D. Talley; Gary A. Wick

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimation of Surface Solar Global Radiation from NOAA AVHRR Data in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physical method for estimating the instantaneous global irradiance and daily cumulative insolation based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data was developed and tested at high latitudes in a boreal subarctic region. The satellite ...

Vesa Laine; Ari Venńlńinen; Martti Heikinheimo; Otto Hyvńrinen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High-Latitude Filtering in Global Grid-Point Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latitude-longitude grid-point models with explicit time schemes require filtering of unstable short waves at high latitudes to avoid the use of prohibitively short time steps. Using a shallow water model and a RossbyľHaurwitz wave as an initial ...

Lawrence L. Takacs; Ramesh C. Balgovind

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Impact of Urban Effects on Precipitation in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This numerical study examines the impact of urban growth and release of aerosols, moisture, and heat on precipitation for Fairbanks, Alaska, a remote city at high latitude. The remote location allows atmospheric changes to be attributed to the ...

Nicole M÷lders; Mark A. Olson

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Northern High-Latitude Heat Budget Decomposition and Transient Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models simulate a wide range of climate changes at high northern latitudes in response to increased CO2. They also have substantial disagreement on projected changes of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Here, two ...

Maria A. A. Rugenstein; Michael Winton; Ronald J. Stouffer; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert Hallberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A study of three molecular structures at high galactic latitude.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A systematic examination of three low-extinction, interstellar, molecular structures is presented in this thesis. Two of the clouds are high-latitude clouds: MBM03 and MBM40. Forů (more)

Chastain, Raymond Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regional Models of the Atmosphere in Middle Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review describes recent development in operational and research limited-area numerical weather prediction models in middle latitudes. The current skill of limited-area models is summarized through the use of conventional measures of ...

Richard A. Anthes

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Surface Air Temperature and Humidity from Intersatellite-Calibrated HIRS Measurements in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-latitude ocean surface air temperature and humidity derived from intersatellite-calibrated High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) measurements are examined. A neural network approach is used to develop retrieval algorithms. HIRS ...

Lei Shi; Ge Peng; John J. Bates

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermodynamic and Hydrological Impacts of Increasing Greenness in Northern High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite remote sensing data indicate that greenness has been increasing in the northern high latitudes, apparently in response to the warming of recent decades. To identify feedbacks of this land-cover change to the atmosphere, the authors ...

Jing Zhang; John E. Walsh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

An Observational Study of High-Latitude Stratospheric Planetary Waves in Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nimbus 4 and 5 radiances, representing temperatures in the upper and lower stratosphere, are analyzed to obtain power and coherence squared spectra at high latitudes during the winters of both hemispheres. The spectra for zonal wavenumbers 1ľ3 ...

David E. Venne; John L. Stanford

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Climatology of High-Latitude Air Pollution as Illustrated by Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High latitude communities frequently have severe air pollution problems. The usual situation is the release of moderate amounts of pollutants into an atmosphere with extremely poor dispersion. The poor dispersion is in turn a direct result of the ...

Sue Ann Bowling

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?  

SciTech Connect

Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Small-scale anisotropy and intermittency in high and low-latitude solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze low and high--latitude fast solar wind data from the Ulysses spacecraft from 1992 to 1994 using a a systematic method to analyse the anisotropic content of the magnetic field fluctuations. We investigate all available frequencies, 1-10^{-6} Hz, for both high and low--latitudes datasets and are able to quantify the relative importance of the anisotropic versus the isotropic fluctuations. We analyse, up to sixth order, longitudinal, transverse and mixed magnetic field correlations. Our results show that strongly intermittent and anisotropic events are present in the solar wind plasma at high frequencies/small scales, indicating the absence of a complete recovery of isotropy. Anisotropic scaling properties are compatible for high and low--latitude data, suggesting a universal behaviour in spite of the different rate of evolution of the fast solar wind streams in the two environments.

A. Bigazzi; L. Biferale; S. M. A. Gama; M. Velli

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Small-scale anisotropy and intermittency in high and low-latitude solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze low and high--latitude fast solar wind data from the Ulysses spacecraft from 1992 to 1994 using a a systematic method to analyse the anisotropic content of the magnetic field fluctuations. We investigate all available frequencies, 1-10^{-6} Hz, for both high and low--latitudes datasets and are able to quantify the relative importance of the anisotropic versus the isotropic fluctuations. We analyse, up to sixth order, longitudinal, transverse and mixed magnetic field correlations. Our results show that strongly intermittent and anisotropic events are present in the solar wind plasma at high frequencies/small scales, indicating the absence of a complete recovery of isotropy. Anisotropic scaling properties are compatible for high and low--latitude data, suggesting a universal behaviour in spite of the different rate of evolution of the fast solar wind streams in the two environments.

Bigazzi, A; Gama, S M A; Velli, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Large-Scale Energy Transformations in the High Latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetic energy balance and kinetic energy source are studied for high latitudes north of 55░N with twice daily upper air observations during a seven-year period from 1973 to 1979. Energy variables are presented for 5░ latitudinal zones from ...

E. C. Kung; S. E. Masters; J. A. M. Corte-Real

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Why sequence Marine sediments from high-latitude regions?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigators: Hebe Dionisi, Patagonian National Research Center, Argentina Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Marine sediments from...

20

The Structure and Predictability of the ôHigh-Latitude Modeö in the CSIRO9 General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CSIRO9 general circulation model shows a zonally symmetric mode of variability, which closely resembles the high-latitude mode (HLM) in middle and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. The leading EOF of the zonal mean zonal wind between ...

John W. Kidson; Ian G. Watterson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geomagnetic field behavior at high latitudes from a paleomagnetic record from Eltanin core 2721 in the Ross Sea sector, Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic field behavior at high latitudes from a paleomagnetic record from Eltanin core 27-term geomagnetic features, like the Cobb Mountain excursion, are resolved. The record from Eltanin 27┬ş21 provides new insights into the behavior of the geomagnetic field at high latitudes, about which very little

Acton, Gary

22

Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes  

SciTech Connect

High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

HIGH LATITUDE ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF THE H/HE INTENSITY RATIO UNDER SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We analyze measurements of the 0.5-1.0 MeV/nucleon H/He intensity ratio from the Ulysses spacecraft during its first (1992-94) and second (1999-2000) ascent to southern high latitude regions of the heliosphere. These cover a broad range of heliocentric distances (from 5.2 to 2.0 AU) and out-of-ecliptic latitudes (from 18{degree}S to 80{degree}S). During Ulysses' first southern pass, the HI-SCALE instrument measured a series of enhanced particle fluxes associated with the passage of a recurrent corotating interaction region (CIR). Low values ({approximately}6) of the H/He ratio were observed in these recurrent corotating events, with a clear minimum following the passage of the corotating reverse shock. When Ulysses reached high southern latitudes (>40{degree}S), the H/He ratio always remained below {approximately}10 except during two transient solar events that brought the ratio to high (>20) values. Ulysses' second southern pass was characterized by a higher average value of the H/He ratio. No recurrent pattern was observed in the energetic ion intensity which was dominated by the occurrence of transient events of solar origin. Numerous CIRs, many of which were bounded by forward and reverse shock pairs, were still observed in the solar wind and magnetic field data. The arrival of those CIRs at Ulysses did not always result in a decrease of the H/He ratio; on the contrary, many CIRs showed a higher H/He ratio than some transient events. Within a CIR, however, the H/He ratio usually increased around the forward shock and decreased towards the reverse shock. Throughout the second ascent to southern heliolatitudes, the H/He ratio seldom decreased below {approximately}10 even at high latitudes (>40{degree}S). We interpret these higher values of the H/He ratio in terms of the increasing level of solar activity together with the poor definition and short life that corotating solar wind structures have under solar maximum conditions. The global filling of the heliosphere by transient solar events and the fact that in 1999-2000 Ulysses observed only intermediate (<650 km s{sup {minus}1}) solar wind speed (whose contents in pick-up He is less energetic than in the fast solar wind streams observed in 1992-1994) favored the protons with respect to alpha particles. Hence the fact that the average values of the H/He ratio observed by Ulysses during the rising phase of the solar cycle (1999-2000) were higher than those observed during the declining phase (1992-1994).

J. GOSLING; D. LARIO; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parmaterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parameterization F. S. Boudala Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Q. Fu Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington Seattle, Washington G. A. Issac Meteorological Service of Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Introduction Single-scattering properties of ice clouds depend on both ice water content (IWC) and effective size of cloud particles (Fu 1996; Fu et al. 1998). However, only the IWC information is provided in numerical models. Stephens et al. (1990) showed that the ice cloud feedback on a CO 2 warming simulation could be either positive or negative depending on the value of the ice particle size assumed. Parameterizations

25

The Freshening of Surface Waters in High Latitudes: Effects on the Thermohaline and Wind-Driven Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of a freshening of surface waters in high latitudes on the deep, slow, thermohaline circulation have received enormous attention, especially the possibility of a shutdown in the meridional overturning that involves sinking of surface ...

Alexey Fedorov; Marcelo Barreiro; Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald Pacanowski; S. George Philander

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High-latitude F supergiant IRAS 18095 + 2704 - a proto-planetary nebula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper reports the discovery of a new high-latitude F supergiant, IRAS 18095 + 2704, which shows a large excess in the far-infrared. Ground-based observations have identified it as a V = 10.4 mag F3 Ib star which displays light and velocity variability. Comparison with the post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution model of Volk and Kwok suggests that it is an excellent candidate for a protoplanetary nebula. Model fitting of the spectrum of 18095 + 2704 from 0.35 to 100 microns suggests that it evolved from the AGB approximately 265 yr ago and had a mass-loss rate of 0.00003 solar mass/yr at the end of the AGB. 31 references.

Hrivnak, B.J.; Kwok, S.; Volk, K.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Changes in Climate at High Southern Latitudes: A Unique Daily Record at Orcadas Spanning 1903ľ2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate observations at Orcadas represent the only southern high-latitude site where data span more than a century, and its daily measurements are presented for the first time in this paper. Although limited to a single station, the observed ...

Natalia Zazulie; Matilde Rusticucci; Susan Solomon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

HI in NGC 5433 and its Environment: High-Latitude Emission in a Small Galaxy Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present HI synthesis maps of the edge-on starburst NGC 5433 and its environment, obtained with the VLA in its C and D configurations. The observations and spectral model residuals of the main disc emission in NGC 5433 reveal 3 extraplanar features. We associate 2 of these features with coherent extraplanar extensions across multiple spectral channels in our data, including a complete loop in position-velocity space. Interpreting the latter as an expanding shell we derive a corresponding input energy of 2 x 10^54 ergs, comparable to that for the largest supershells found in the Galaxy and those in other edge-on systems. NGC 5433 is in a richer environment than previously thought. We confirm that KUG 1359+326 is a physical companion to NGC 5433 and find two new faint companions, both with Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner identifications, that we label SIS-1 and SIS-2. Including the more distant IC 4357, NGC 5433 is the dominant member of a group of at least 5 galaxies, spanning over 750 kpc in a filamentary structure. A variety of evidence suggests that interactions are occurring in this group. While a number of underlying mechanisms are consistent with the morphology of the high-latitude features in NGC 5433, we argue that environmental effects may play a role in their generation.

K. Spekkens; J. A. Irwin; D. J. Saikia

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

Causes of spring vegetation greenness trends in the northern mid-high latitudes from 1982 to 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) is applied to explore the spatial temporal patterns of spring (April May) vegetation growth trends over the northern mid high latitudes (NMH) (>25 N) between 1982 and 2004. During the spring season through the 23 yr period, both the satellite-derived and simulated normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies show a statistically significant correlation and an overall greening trend within the study area. Consistently with the observed NDVI temperature relation, the CLM4 NDVI shows a significant positive association with the spring temperature anomaly for the NMH, North America and Eurasia. Large study areas experience temperature discontinuity associated with contrasting NDVI trends. Before and after the turning point (TP) of the temperature trends, climatic variability plays a dominant role, while the other environmental factors exert minor effects on the NDVI tendencies. Simulated vegetation growth is broadly stimulated by the increasing atmospheric CO2. Trends show that nitrogen deposition increases NDVI mostly in southeastern China, and decreases NDVI mainly in western Russia after the temperature TP. Furthermore, land use-induced NDVI trends vary roughly with the respective changes in land management practices (crop areas and forest coverage). Our results highlight how non-climatic factors mitigate or exacerbate the impact of temperature on spring vegetation growth, particularly across regions with intensive human activity.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Shilong, Dr. Piao [Peking University; Xuhui, Dr. Wang [Peking University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

Alford, J.; Engebretson, M. [Ausburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arnoldy, R. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Inan, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Low frequency geomagnetic eld uctuations at low latitude during the passage of a higher pressure solar wind region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low frequency geomagnetic ®eld ¯uctuations at low latitude during the passage of a higher pressure ¯uctuations in the frequency range (0.8±5.5 mHz) for both the horizontal geomagnetic ®eld components. Spectral of the geomagnetic ®eld components at L'Aquila (Italy, v 1X6, Francia and Villante, 1997) we found statistical

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

32

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

33

Options for improving the load matching capability of distributed photovoltaics: Methodology and application to high-latitude data  

SciTech Connect

At high latitudes, domestic electricity demand and insolation are negatively correlated on both an annual and a diurnal basis. With increasing integration of distributed photovoltaics (PV) in low-voltage distribution grids of residential areas, limits to the penetration level are set by voltage rise due to unmatched production and load. In this paper a methodology for determining the impacts of three options for increased load matching is presented and applied to high-latitude data. The studied options are PV array orientation, demand side management (DSM) and electricity storage. Detailed models for domestic electricity demand and PV output are used. An optimisation approach is applied to find an optimal distribution of PV systems on different array orientations and a best-case evaluation of DSM and a storage model are implemented. At high penetration levels, storage is the most efficient option for maximising the solar fraction, but at lower overproduction levels, the impact of DSM is equal or slightly better. An east-west orientation of PV arrays is suggested for high penetration levels, but the effect of the optimised orientation is small. Without an optimised storage operation, the overproduced power is more efficiently reduced by DSM than storage, although this is highly dependent on the applied DSM algorithm. Further research should be focused on the DSM potential and optimal operation of storage. (author)

Widen, Joakim; Waeckelgaard, Ewa [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lund, Peter D. [Advanced Energy Systems, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 HUT, Helsinki (Finland)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Predicting Total Ozone Based on GTS Data: Applications for South American High-Latitude Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regular occurrence during the 1990s has been the excursion of the edge of the springtime Antarctic ozone hole over the southernmost region of the South American continent. Given the essential role of atmospheric ozone in absorbing incoming ...

Anna E. Jones; Tanya Bowden; John Turner

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup Ô??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup Ô??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

Qianlai Zhuang

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Final Report for High Latitude Climate Modeling: ARM Takes Us Beyond Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

The main thrust of this project was to devise a method by which the majority of North Slope of Alaska (NSA) meteorological and radiometric data, collected on a daily basis, could be used to evaluate and improve global climate model (GCM) simulations and their parameterizations, particularly for cloud microphysics. Although the standard ARM Program sensors for a less complete suite of instruments for cloud and aerosol studies than the instruments on an intensive field program such as the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), the advantage they offer lies in the long time base and large volume of data that covers a wide range of meteorological and climatological conditions. The challenge has been devising a method to interpret the NSA data in a practical way, so that a wide variety of meteorological conditions in all seasons can be examined with climate models. If successful, climate modelers would have a robust alternative to the usual ôcase studyö approach (i.e., from intensive field programs only) for testing and evaluating their parameterizationsĺ performance. Understanding climate change on regional scales requires a broad scientific consideration of anthropogenic influences that goes beyond greenhouse gas emissions to also include aerosol-induced changes in cloud properties. For instance, it is now clear that on small scales, human-induced aerosol plumes can exert microclimatic radiative and hydrologic forcing that rivals that of greenhouse gasľforced warming. This project has made significant scientific progress by investigating what causes successive versions of climate models continue to exhibit errors in cloud amount, cloud microphysical and radiative properties, precipitation, and radiation balance, as compared with observations and, in particular, in Arctic regions. To find out what is going wrong, we have tested the models' cloud representation over the full range of meteorological conditions found in the Arctic using the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) data.

Russell, Lynn M [Scripps/UCSD; Lubin, Dan [Scripps/UCSD

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Decadal Variability of the ENSO Teleconnection to the High-Latitude South Pacific Governed by Coupling with the Southern Annular Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal variability of the El Ni˝oľSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnection to the high-latitude South Pacific is examined by correlating the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-yr Re-Analysis (ERA-40) and observations ...

Ryan L. Fogt; David H. Bromwich

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for High School Students | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for High School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches...

40

Venture Capital, High Technology and Regional Developmentĺ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the role ofventure capital in technological innovation and regional development. Both aggregate data and a unique firm level data base are employed to determine the location of major centres of venture capital, flows of venture capital investments, and patterns of investment syndication or coinvestment among venture capital firms. Three major centres of venture capital arc identified: California (San Francisco-Silicon Valley); New York; and Ncw England (Massachusetts-Connecticut): as well as three minor venture capital centres: Illinois (Chicago); Texas; and Minnesota. Venture capital firms are found to cluster in areas with high concentrations of financial institutions and those with high concentrations of technology-intensive enterprises. Venture capital firms which are based in financial centres are typically export-oriented, while those in technology centres tend to invest in their own region and attract outside venture capital. Venture capital investmcnts flow predominantly toward established high technology areas such as Silicon Valley and Boston-Iioute 128, and venturc investing is also characterized by high degrees of intra-and inter-regional syndication or coinvestment. The venture capital industry displays a high level of agglomeration due to the information intensive nature of the investment process and the importance of venture capital networks in locating investments, mobilizing resources, and establishing business start-ups. The existence of well developed venture capital networks in technology-based regions significantly accelerates the pace of technological innovation and economic development in those regions.

Richard L. Florida; Martin Kenneyt

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

latitude | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

42 42 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278742 Varnish cache server latitude Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude Tilt Irradiance NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GIS global irradiance latitude

42

Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Earth's passage of the April 11, 1997 coronal ejecta: geomagnetic eld uctuations at high and low latitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth's passage of the April 11, 1997 coronal ejecta: geomagnetic ®eld ¯uctuations at high. An analysis of the low frequency geomagnetic ®eld ¯uctuations at an Antarctic (Terra Nova Bay) and a low geomagnetic noon, coherent ¯uctuations, at the same frequency (3.6 mHz) and with polarization characteris

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

44

Dynamic Assimilation of MODIS-Retrieved Humidity Profiles within a Regional Model for High-Latitude Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ôhot startö technique is applied to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityľNational Center for Atmospheric Research (PSUľNCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) to dynamically assimilate cloud properties and humidity profiles retrieved from the ...

Xingang Fan; Jeffrey S. Tilley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

UTPA Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas Regions UTPA Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

46

Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text...

47

DOE New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl! NO SCIENCE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2014 (All day) Science On Saturday DOE New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY LECTURE DUE TO THE NEW JERSEY REGIONAL SCIENCE BOWL COMPETITION,...

48

Florida Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Florida Regions Florida Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

49

Low-Latitude Reflection of Rossby Wave Trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear reflection of an isolated Rossby wave train at a low-latitude wave-breaking region is contrasted with the more familiar longitudinally periodic case. General theoretical arguments for nonlinear reflection based on absorptivity ...

G. Brunet; P. H. Haynes

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

51

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1, 2006 ┬ş February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

52

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

53

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

54

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME September 1st 2006 to November 30th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

55

West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science Bowl at PPPL A dramatic ending to High School Bowl sends local team to nationals By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February...

56

latitude tilt | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

latitude tilt latitude tilt Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for Nepal. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. Source U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released April 12th, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor GIS latitude tilt Nepal NREL solar SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 25.6 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 36.2 KiB)

57

South Central Ohio Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

South Central Ohio Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

58

North Texas Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

North Texas Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School...

59

BPA Regional Science Bowl - High School Edition | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oregon Regions BPA Regional Science Bowl - High School Edition National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School...

60

Redding Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

California Regions Redding Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science Bowl at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 25, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Next stop...

62

WIND DATA REPORT Old Rochester Regional High School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average Wind Speeds October 12, 2006 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 19 UniversityWIND DATA REPORT Old Rochester Regional High School Mattapoisett, Massachusetts June 1, 2005 version 2.0 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

On the electron temperatures in high-metallicity HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron temperatures of high-metallicity (12+log(O/H) > 8.2) HII regions have been studied. The empirical ff relations which express the nebular-to- auroral [OIII] line ratio Q_3,O (as well as the nebular-to-auroral [OII] line ratio Q_2,O, and the nebular-to-auroral [NII] line ratio Q_2,N) in terms of the nebular R_3 and R_2 line fluxes in spectra of high-metallicity HII regions are derived, and the electron temperatures t_3,O, t_2,O, and t_2,N in a number of extragalactic HII regions are also determined. Furthermore, the t_2 - t_3 diagram is discussed. It is found that there is a one-to-one correspondence between t_2 and t_3 electron temperatures for HII regions with a weak nebular R_3 lines (logR_ 0.5) do not follow this relation. A discrepancy between t_2,N and t_2,O temperatures is found, being the t_2,N temperatures systematically lower than t_2,O ones. The differences are small at low electron temperatures and increases with increasing electron temperatures up to 10% at t=1. The uncertainties in t...

Pilyugin, L S; VÝlchez, J M; Cedres, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

High temperature superconductivity in metallic region near Mott transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spin-singlet superconductivity without phonons is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the superconductivity requires not only the total correlation should be strong enough but also the density of state around Fermi energy should be large enough, which shows that the high temperature superconductivity could only be found in the metallic region near the Mott metal insulator transition (MIT). Other properties of superconductors are also discussed on these conclusions.

Tian De Cao

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Resolution limits and process latitude of comformable contact nano-lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conformable Contact Lithography enables researchers to attain high-resolution lithographic patterning at manageable cost. This thesis characterizes the minimum resolvable feature size and process latitude of Conformable ...

Fucetola, Corey Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday...

67

An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades ĺ worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 1986ľ2005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Simple Method for the Assessment of the Cloud Cover State in High-Latitude Regions by a Ground-Based Digital Camera  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the development of a simple method of field estimating the sky cloud coverage percentage for several applications at the Brazilian Antarctic Station, Ferraz (62░05?S, 58░23.5?W). The database of this method was acquired by a ...

M. P. Souza-Echer; E. B. Pereira; L. S. Bins; M. A. R. Andrade

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Arizona Regional High Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arizona Regions » Arizona Regional High Arizona Regions » Arizona Regional High Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Arizona Regions Arizona Regional High Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Castle Catherine Email: ccastle@wapa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

71

Alaska Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Alaska Regions » Alaska Regional High School Alaska Regions » Alaska Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Alaska Regions Alaska Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Cindy Carl Email: WellnessWorks_4u2@yahoo.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 12

72

Arkansas Regional High Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arkansas Regions » Arkansas Regional High Arkansas Regions » Arkansas Regional High Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Arkansas Regions Arkansas Regional High Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: David Burkey Email: david.burkey@uafs.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 16

73

DC Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

DC Regions » DC Regional High DC Regions » DC Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Washington DC Regions DC Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Jamie T. Scipio Email: jamie.scipio@hq.doe.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 12

74

SWPA Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Pennsylvania Regions » SWPA Regional High Pennsylvania Regions » SWPA Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Pennsylvania Regions SWPA Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Lilas Soukup Email: lilas.soukup@netl.doe.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 48

75

Wisconsin Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wisconsin Regions » Wisconsin Regional High Wisconsin Regions » Wisconsin Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Wisconsin Regions Wisconsin Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Julie Schuster Email: schuster@msoe.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20

76

Michigan Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Michigan Regions » Michigan Regional High Michigan Regions » Michigan Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Michigan Regions Michigan Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Andrew Chubb Email: achubb@svsu.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 15

77

Nevada Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nevada Regions » Nevada Regional High School Nevada Regions » Nevada Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Nevada Regions Nevada Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Daniel Burns Email: burnsdb@nv.doe.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

78

BPA Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oregon Regions » BPA Regional High School Oregon Regions » BPA Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Oregon Regions BPA Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Christy Adams Email: cfadams@bpa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 64 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

79

Maryland Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Maryland Regions » Maryland Regional High Maryland Regions » Maryland Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Maryland Regions Maryland Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Michael Mehalick Email: michael.mehalick@montgomerycollege.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 18, 2014

80

Maine Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Maine Regions » Maine Regional High School Maine Regions » Maine Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Maine Regions Maine Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Rob Sanford Email: rsanford@usm.maine.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Indiana Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Indiana Regions » Indiana Regional High School Indiana Regions » Indiana Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Indiana Regions Indiana Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Bala Dhungana Email: bkrishnad@hotmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 10

82

Kansas Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kansas Regions » Kansas Regional High School Kansas Regions » Kansas Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Kansas Regions Kansas Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Myra Everette Email: meverette@kcp.com Regional Event Information Date: February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

83

Iowa Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Iowa Regions » Iowa Regional High School Iowa Regions » Iowa Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Iowa Regions Iowa Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Steve Karsjen Email: karsjen@ameslab.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 40

84

Nebraska Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nebraska Regions » Nebraska Regional High Nebraska Regions » Nebraska Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Nebraska Regions Nebraska Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Todd Young Email: toyoung1@wsc.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 40

85

Montana Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Montana Regions » Montana Regional High School Montana Regions » Montana Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Montana Regions Montana Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Josie Daggett Email: daggett@wapa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 30

86

Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Virginia Regions » Virginia Regional High Virginia Regions » Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Virginia Regions Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Jan Tyler Email: tyler@jlab.org Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 23

87

Missouri Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Missouri Regions » Missouri Regional High Missouri Regions » Missouri Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Missouri Regions Missouri Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Myra Everette Email: meverette@kcp.com Regional Event Information Date: February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

88

Georgia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Georgia Regions » Georgia Regional High School Georgia Regions » Georgia Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Georgia Regions Georgia Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Donna Mullenax Email: donna.mullenax@armstrong.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 72

89

Florida Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Florida Regions » Florida Regional High School Florida Regions » Florida Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Florida Regions Florida Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Michael Chiang Email: michaelraymondchiang@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24

90

Colorado Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Colorado Region » Colorado Regional High Colorado Region » Colorado Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Colorado Region Colorado Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Linda Lung Email: linda.lung@nrel.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 48

91

Oklahoma Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oklahoma Regions » Oklahoma Regional High Oklahoma Regions » Oklahoma Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Oklahoma Regions Oklahoma Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Gail Bliss Email: gnbliss@carnegienet.net Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

92

Minnesota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minnesota Regions » Minnesota Regional High Minnesota Regions » Minnesota Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Barbara Donoho Email: bdonoho@mnmas.org Regional Event Information Date: Friday, January 24, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

93

West Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

West Virginia Regions » West Virginia Regional West Virginia Regions » West Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov West Virginia Regions West Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kirk Gerdes Email: Kirk.Gerdes@NETL.DOE.GOV Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014

94

Puerto Rico Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Puerto Rico Regions » Puerto Rico Regional Puerto Rico Regions » Puerto Rico Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Puerto Rico Regions Puerto Rico Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Julienne Sanchez Email: julienne.sanchez@upr.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014

95

Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mississippi Regions » Mississippi Regional Mississippi Regions » Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Mississippi Regions Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Dionne Fortenberry Email: dfortenberry@as.muw.edu Regional Event Information Date: Friday, January 31, 2014

96

Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Massachusetts Regions » Northeast Regional Massachusetts Regions » Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Massachusetts Regions Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kevin McLaughlin Email: kjm@engr.uconn.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014

97

South Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Daktoa Regions » South Dakota Regional Daktoa Regions » South Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov South Daktoa Regions South Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Lesley Berg Email: lberg@wapa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

98

Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl| U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Connecticut Regions » Connecticut Regional Connecticut Regions » Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Connecticut Regions Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kevin McLaughlin Email: kjm@engr.uconn.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014

99

North Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Dakota Regions » North Dakota Regional Dakota Regions » North Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov North Dakota Regions North Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Tom Atkinson Phone: 701-221-4559 Email: tatkinson@wapa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014

100

Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UIC Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

UIC Regional High School UIC Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Illinois Regions UIC Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Anita Ramirez Email: chicago.regional.science.bowl@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24

102

Tennessee Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Tennessee Regions » Tennessee Regional High Tennessee Regions » Tennessee Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Tennessee Regions Tennessee Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Martha Hammond Email: Martha.Hammond@orau.org Additional Contact: Name: Marolyn Randolph Email: Marolyn.Randolph@orau.org

103

West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kentucky Regions » West Kentucky Regional High Kentucky Regions » West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Kentucky Regions West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Robert Smith Email: robert.smith@lex.doe.gov Additional Contact: Name: Donald Dihel Email: don.dihel@lex.doe.gov

104

New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Jersey Regions » New Jersey Regional High Jersey Regions » New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New Jersey Regions New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Please Note: All slots for the High School Science Bowl have been filled. Any team registering after December 17, 2013, will be placed on the wait-list. Should a school drop out of the competition, a new team will be

105

U.S. Virgin Islands Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

U.S. Virgin Islands Regions » U.S. Virgin U.S. Virgin Islands Regions » U.S. Virgin Islands High School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov U.S. Virgin Islands Regions U.S. Virgin Islands High School Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Gerald Walters Email: gwalters@sttj.k12.vi Regional Event Information

106

Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Carolina Regions » Savannah River Carolina Regions » Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov South Carolina Regions Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kim Mitchell Email: kimberly.mitchell@srs.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014

107

North Carolina Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Carolina Regions » North Carolina Carolina Regions » North Carolina Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov North Carolina Regions North Carolina Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Fredrick Johnson Email: fjohnson@nccu.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014

108

Effective recombination coefficient and solar zenith angle effects on low-latitude D-region ionosphere evaluated from VLF signal amplitude and its time delay during X-ray solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess solar X-ray radiation during solar flares causes an enhancement of ionization in the ionospheric D-region and hence affects sub-ionospherically propagating VLF signal amplitude and phase. In first part of the work, using the well known LWPC technique, we simulated the flare induced excess lower ionospheric electron density by amplitude perturbation method. Unperturbed D-region electron density is also obtained from simulation and compared with IRI-model results. Using these simulation results and time delay as key parameters, we calculate the effective electron recombination coefficient ($\\alpha_{eff}$) at solar flare peak region. Our results match with the same obtained by other established models. In the second part, we dealt with the solar zenith angle effect on D-region during flares. We relate this VLF data with the solar X-ray data. We find that the peak of the VLF amplitude occurs later than the time of the X-ray peak for each flare. We investigate this so-called time delay ($\\bigtriangleup t$)....

Basak, Tamal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

JPL Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

JPL Regional High School JPL Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions JPL Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kimberly Lievense Email: Klievense@jpl.nasa.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 1

110

PNNL Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

PNNL Regional High School PNNL Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Washington Regions PNNL Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Beth Perry Email: bethperry13@msn.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

111

SHPE NYC Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SHPE NYC Regional High SHPE NYC Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions SHPE NYC Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Dora Maria Abreu Email: Doramaria@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

112

LADWP Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

LADWP Regional High LADWP Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions LADWP Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Walter Zeisl Email: walter.zeisl@ladwp.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 55 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2

113

Kern County Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kern County Regional High Kern County Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Kern County Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Thomas Meyer Email: tmeyer@csub.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

114

San Diego Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

San Diego Regional High San Diego Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions San Diego Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Ronald Lewis Email: sandiegonobcche@earthlink.net Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24

115

Sacramento Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sacramento Regional High Sacramento Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sacramento Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Anita Wiley Email: wiley@wapa.gov Regional Event Information Date: March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 26 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2

116

Modesto Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Modesto Regional High Modesto Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Modesto Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Mike Zweifel Email: mikez@mid.org Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2

117

North Texas Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

North Texas Regional High North Texas Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions North Texas Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Rommel Alonzo Email: rommel.alonzo@mavs.uta.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 15, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 12

118

Pantex Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Pantex Regional High School Pantex Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions Pantex Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Debra Halliday Email: dhallida@pantex.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 40 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

119

UTPA Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

UTPA Regional High School UTPA Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions UTPA Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Joel Ruiz Email: jruiz@utpa.edu Additional Contacts: Name: Jessica Salinas Email: lopezj@utpa.edu Name: Karen Dorado Email: kadorado@utpa.edu Regional Event Information

120

NOBCChE Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

NOBCChE Regional High NOBCChE Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions NOBCChE Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Thomas Whitt Email: twhitt523@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 10 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

San Antonio Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

San Antonio Regional High San Antonio Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions San Antonio Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Bobby Blount Email: bb@mitre.org Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 35 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

122

Redding Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Redding Regional High Redding Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Redding Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Matt Madison Email: mmadison@reupower.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 28 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

123

SLAC Regional High School Science Bowl| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SLAC Regional High School SLAC Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions SLAC Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Farah Rahbar Email: farah.rahbar@slac.stanford.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 18

124

STEP Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

STEP Regional High School STEP Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions STEP Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Peter Macchia Email: mrmacchia@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 16 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

125

We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday February 11, 2013 - 10:30am Addthis We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Economic Impact As part of the National Science Bowl, more than 9,500 high school students take place in 70 high school regional competitions around the United States and Puerto Rico. The winners of these regions advance to the National Science Bowl competition held every April in Chevy Chase, Maryland. On Saturday, February 9, the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity hosted the Washington, D.C. High School Regional Science Bowl competition at Cesar

126

Inland Northwest Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Inland Northwest Regional Inland Northwest Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Washington Regions Inland Northwest Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kaye Kamp Email: kkamp@whitworth.edu Regional Event Information Date: February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 42

127

Capital District Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Capital District Regional Capital District Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions Capital District Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Dominic Fulgieri Email: dominic.fulgieri@unnpp.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 18

128

South Central Ohio Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

South Central Ohio Regional South Central Ohio Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Ohio Regions South Central Ohio Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Greg Simonton Email: greg.simonton@lex.doe.gov Regional Event Information Date: Friday, March 7, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

129

Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Greater Cincinnati Regional Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Ohio Regions Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Betsy Volk Email: betsy.volk@emcbc.doe.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 22, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24

130

GEF. latitude tilt | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEF. latitude tilt GEF. latitude tilt Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders Source INPE (National Institute for Spatial Research) and LABSOLAR (Laboratory of Solar Energy/Federal University of Santa Catarina) - Brazil Date Released August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Brazil GEF. latitude tilt INPE LABSOLAR solar SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 706.1 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 999.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

131

Planning for a regional rail system : analysis of high speed and high quality rail in the Basque region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to provide guidance for regional rail network planning to achieve the maximum benefits in terms of economic growth, passenger satisfaction, and environmental sustainability. The hypothesis is ...

Lewis, Paul R. S. (Paul Robinson S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High School Regionals | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regionals Regionals National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School High School Regionals Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Team Registration For more information, please visit the High School Coach page. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

133

SLAC Regional High School Science Bowl| U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions SLAC Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds...

134

Kern County Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Kern County Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS...

135

Sacramento Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sacramento Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS...

136

San Diego Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions San Diego Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds...

137

San Antonio Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions San Antonio Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds...

138

El Paso Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions El Paso Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds...

139

Pantex Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions Pantex Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds...

140

Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Catherine Osiecki Email: Osiecki@bnl.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sandia National Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Timothy Shepodd Email: tjshepo@sandia.gov Regional Event Information Date: January 25, 2014

142

Assimilation of Circumpolar Wind Vectors Derived from Highly Elliptical Orbit Imagery: Impact Assessment Based on Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a well-recognized spatiotemporal meteorological observation gap at latitudes higher than 55░, especially in the region 55░ľ70░. A possible solution to address this issue is a constellation of four satellites in a highly elliptical orbit (...

L. Garand; J. Feng; S. Heilliette; Y. Rochon; A. P. Trishchenko

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NL-9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: emprecht@caltech.edu [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Northern and Mid-Latitude Soil Data Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mid-Latitude Soil Data Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Northern and Mid-Latitude Soil Database, Version 1." This data set was developed...

145

Tracer Equivalent Latitude: A Diagnostic Tool for Isentropic Transport Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area equivalent latitude based on potential vorticity (PV) is a widely used diagnostic for isentropic transport in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Here, an alternate method for calculating equivalent latitude is explored, namely, a ...

Douglas R. Allen; Noboru Nakamura

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Georgia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sites will be announced after registration. The top two teams from different high schools will be invited to the regional (State) competition to be held at Armstrong on Feb....

147

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

148

High-Resolution Simulations of Wintertime Precipitation in the Colorado Headwaters Region: Sensitivity to Physics Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the effects of various physics parameterizations on wintertime precipitation predictions using a high-resolution regional climate model. The objective was to evaluate the sensitivity of cold-season mountainous ...

Changhai Liu; Kyoko Ikeda; Gregory Thompson; Roy Rasmussen; Jimy Dudhia

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantifying transport between the tropical and mid-latitude lower stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne in situ observations of molecules with a wide range of lifetimes (methane, nitrous oxide, reactive nitrogen, ozone, chlorinated halocarbons, and halon-1211), used in a tropical tracer model, show that mid-latitude air is entrained into the tropical lower stratosphere within about 13.5 months; transport is faster in the reverse direction. Because exchange with the tropics is slower than global photochemical models generally assume, ozone at mid-latitudes appears to be more sensitive to elevated levels of industrial chlorine than is currently predicted. Nevertheless, about 45 percent of air in the tropical ascent region at 21 kilometers is of mid-latitude origin, implying that emissions from supersonic aircraft could reach the middle stratosphere. 49 refs., 5 figs.

Volk, C.M.; Dutton, G.S.; Gilligan, J.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy Requirement Analysis of Large-Scale Biogas Project in High-Cold Region of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean temperature is very low in high cold region of china. The insulating and heating measures on the basis of the energy requirement analysis of biogas project are needed to ensure the normal running of fermentation process. In this paper, ... Keywords: High-cold, Biogas, Fermentation, Heat

Yinsheng Yang; Lili Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solar Transients disturbing the Terrestrial Magnetic Environment at Higher Latitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic field variations during five major Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events of solar cycle 23 have been investigated in the present study. The SEP events of 01 oct 2001, 04 Nov 2001, 21 Apr 2002 and 14 May 2005 have been selected to study the geomagnetic field variations at two high-latitude stations, Thule and Resolute Bay of the northern polar cap. We have used the GOES protn flux in seven different energy channels. All the proton events were associated with geoeffective or Earth directed CMEs that caused intense geomagnetic storms in response to geospace. We have taken high-latitude indices, AE and PC, under consideration and found fairly good correlation of thees with the ground magnetic field records during the five proton events. The departure of H component during the events were calculated from the quietest day of the month for each event. The correspondence of spectral index, inferred from event integrated spectra, with ground magnetic signatures along with Dst and PC indices have been broug...

Khan, Parvaiz A; Troshichev, O A; Waheed, Malik A; M., Aslam A; Gwal, A K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF REGIONS AND STRUCTURES IN THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER (IBEX) SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

We study the spectral properties of different regions and structures in the energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps at energies from {approx}0.5 keV to {approx}6 keV from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission. We find that (1) an ankle-shaped break (spectrum hardens) between {approx}1 keV and {approx}2 keV characterizes the polar spectra and the right flank, while a knee-shaped break (spectrum softens) describes the ribbon, nose, and the front region spectra; (2) the spectral indices across full latitudinal range (tail and poles) comprise a dependence reflecting a knee break at mid latitudes and an ankle break at high latitudes. This latitudinal evolution has inflection points at {approx}40 deg. S and {approx}36 deg. N, and is strongly correlated with the solar wind speed structure obtained by the Ulysses/SWOOPS instrument during its fast latitude scan in 2007. Our study confirms that the ecliptic latitude predominantly orders the spectral signatures of ENA distributions. This ordering may reflect the average solar wind properties that vary characteristically with latitude around solar minimum. We report on the spectral analyses of six regions and two structures in the IBEX maps. We also discuss the spectral asymmetries between the north and the south polar regions, their correlation with solar wind measurements, and the implications of these observations. Thus, we show detailed connections between the IBEX energy spectra and latitudinal properties of solar wind.

Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Ebert, R. W.; Schwadron, N. A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Janzen, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B., E-mail: maldayeh@swri.edu [University of Montana, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Highlighting High Performance: Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School; Upton, Massachusetts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Blackstone Valley High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, and water conservation. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Monotone and Conservative Cascade Remapping between Spherical Grids (CaRS): Regular LatitudeľLongitude and Cubed-Sphere Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-order monotone and conservative cascade remapping algorithm between spherical grids (CaRS) is developed. This algorithm is specifically designed to remap between the cubed-sphere and regular latitudeľlongitude grids. The remapping approach ...

Peter H. Lauritzen; Ramachandran D. Nair

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Texas A&M Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas A&M Regional High School Texas A&M Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Texas Regions Texas A&M Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Vince Schielack Email: vinces@math.tamu.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 32

156

The electron temperatures of SDSS high-metallicity giant extragalactic HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectra of high-metallicity (12+log(O/H) > 8.2) HII regions where oxygen auroral lines are measurable in both the O+ and O++ zones, have been extracted from the Data Release 6 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our final sample consists of 181 SDSS spectra of HII regions in galaxies in the redshift range from ~0.025 to ~0.17. The t_2,O-t_3,O diagram is examined. In the SDSS HII regions, the electron temperature t_2,O is found to have a large scatter at a given value of the electron temperature t_3,O. The majority of the SDSS HII regions lie below the t_2,O-t_3,O relation derived for HII regions in nearby galaxies, i.e. the positions of the SDSS HII regions show a systematic shift towards lower t_2,O temperatures or/and towards higher t_3,O temperatures. The scatter and shift of the SDSS HII regions in the t_2,O-t_3,O diagram can be understood if they are composite nebulae excited by two or more ionizing sources of different temperatures.

Pilyugin, L S; Cedres, B; Thuan, T X

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

**NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 23, 2013, 8:00am February 23, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional High School Science Bowl

158

Letter to the Editor Geomagnetic storm eects at low latitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letter to the Editor Geomagnetic storm eects at low latitudes R. G. Rastogi School of Physics, Ahmedabad 380 009, India Received: 30 April 1998 / Accepted: 3 September 1998 Abstract. The geomagnetic corrected for geomagnetic latitudes. The disturbance daily variation of H at equatorial stations showed

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

159

Comparison of Year-Average Latitude, Longitude and Pressure of the Four Centers of Action with Air and Sea Temperature, 1899ľ1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average latitude, longitude and central pressure of the four centers of action (Icelandic low, Aleutian low, Azores high, Pacific high) have been estimated for each of the 80 years of the Northern Hemisphere Historical Weather Map Series (...

J. K. Angell; J. Korshover

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cosmic-ray latitude surveys in the Atlantic Ocean area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical cutoff rigidities were re-determined for the locations of the stratospheric balloon measurements made during the 22nd Soviet Antarctic Expedition (1975-1976). These cutoff rigidities were determined for the month of each measurement using a method that interpolates between the world grids of trajectory-derived vertical cutoff rigidities calculated for Epoch 1965.0 and Epoch 1980.0. In comparing these values with other calculated using the 1975.0 field models which under-estimated the secular variations, small increases in the vertical cutoff rigidities were noted in the North Atlantic area and small decreases were noted in the South Atlantic, consistent with the secular changes in the world grid of vertical cutoff rigidities. These results emphasize the necessity of determining cutoff rigidity values of the year in which latitude measurements are made if these measurements are in the region of the world (particularly the Atlantic Ocean area) where the cutoff-rigidity values are rapidly changing.

Shea, M.A.; Smart, D.F.; Stozhkov, Y.I.; Svirzhevsky, N.S.; Svirzhevskaya, A.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt irradiance GIS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)
Parameter: Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWhm2day)
Internet: http:eosweb.larc.nasa.govsse
Note 1:...

162

HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION  

SciTech Connect

The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Using data from 25 broadband stations located in the region, new estimates of crustal and upper mantle thickness, velocity structure, and attenuation are being developed. Receiver functions have been determined for all stations. Depth to Moho is estimated using slant stacking of the receiver functions, forward modeling, and inversion. Moho depths along the Caspian and in the Kura Depression are in general poorly constrained using only receiver functions due to thick sedimentary basin sediments. The best fitting models suggest a low velocity upper crust with Moho depths ranging from 30 to 40 km. Crustal thicknesses increase in the Greater Caucasus with Moho depths of 40 to 50 km. Pronounced variations with azimuth of source are observed indicating 3D structural complexity and upper crustal velocities are higher than in the Kura Depression to the south. In the Lesser Caucasus, south and west of the Kura Depression, the crust is thicker (40 to 50 km) and upper crustal velocities are higher. Work is underway to refine these models with the event based surface wave dispersion and ambient noise correlation measurements from continuous data. Regional phase (Lg and Pg) attenuation models as well as blockage maps for Pn and Sn are being developed. Two methods are used to estimate Q: the two-station method to estimate inter-station Q and the reversed, two-station, two event method. The results are then inverted to create Lg and Pg Q maps. Initial results suggest substantial variations in both Pg and Lg Q in the region. A zone of higher Pg Q extends west from the Caspian between the Lesser and Greater Caucasus and a narrow area of higher Lg Q is observed.

Mellors, R; Gok, R; Pasyanos, M; Skobeltsyn, G; Teoman, U; Godoladze, T; Sandvol, E

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt irradiance GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

irradiance GIS data at irradiance GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude Tilt Irradiance NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Note 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are regional averages; not point data.

164

STEP Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: New York State STEP students from schools NOT already participating in a regional event Team Approval Process Teams are...

165

Ecological surveys of the proposed high explosives wastewater treatment facility region  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposes to improve its treatment of wastewater from high explosives (HE) research and development activities. The proposed project would focus on a concerted waste minimization effort to greatly reduce the amount of wastewater needing treatment. The result would be a 99% decrease in the HE wastewater volume, from the current level of 6,760,000 L/mo (1,786,000 gal./mo) to 41,200 L/mo (11,000 gal./mo). This reduction would entail closure of HE wastewater outfalls, affecting some wetland areas that depend on HE wastewater effluents. The outfalls also provide drinking water for many wildlife species. Terminating the flow of effluents at outfalls would represent an improvement in water quality in the LANL region but locally could have a negative effect on some wetlands and wildlife species. None of the affected species are protected by any state or federal endangered species laws. The purpose of this report is to briefly discuss the different biological studies that have been done in the region of the project area. This report is written to give biological information and baseline data and the biota of the project area.

Haarmann, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

High-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer for the ultra-soft x-ray region  

SciTech Connect

A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 /angstrom/. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda/sub 0/ = 8/angstrom/. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic. 43 refs., 23 figs.

Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Walling, R.S.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

High-resolution Bent-crystal Spectrometer for the Ultra-soft X-ray Region  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 angstrom. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda{sub 0} = 8 angstrom. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic.

Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Walling, R. S.

1988-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

168

High-precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3%-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance-matching analysis, incorporating systematic uncertainties in the equation of state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2%-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations, which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments, which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar, the present measurements indicate that the mixed phase is a few percent more dense than what would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Eggert, J. H.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McWilliams, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Three-Apogee 16-h Highly Elliptical Orbit as Optimal Choice for Continuous Meteorological Imaging of Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly elliptical orbit (HEO) with a 16-h period is proposed for continuous meteorological imaging of polar regions from a two-satellite constellation. This orbit is characterized by three apogees (TAP) separated by 120░. The two satellites are ...

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Louis Garand; Larisa D. Trichtchenko

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Atmospheric Turbidity in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis is presented of 800 measurements of atmospheric monochromatic aerosol optical depth made poleward of 65░ latitude. The atmosphere of the southern polar region appears to be uncontaminated but is charged with a background aerosol having ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Very High-Resolution Regional Climate Simulations over ScandinaviaŚPresent Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrological cycle on a regional scale is poorly represented with a present-day coarse resolution general circulation model (GCM). With a dynamical downscaling technique, in which a regional higher-resolution climate model (RCM) is nested ...

Ole B. Christensen; Jens H. Christensen; Bennert Machenhauer; Michael Botzet

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl| U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kevin McLaughlin Email: kjm@engr.uconn.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014...

174

Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kevin McLaughlin Email: kjm@engr.uconn.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014...

175

A High-Resolution Numerical Simulation of the Wind Flow in the Ross Island Region, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed description of the characteristics of the three-dimensional wind flow for the Ross Island region of Antarctica is presented. This region of Antarctica has complex topographic features, and the wind flow is dependent on the topography ...

Mark W. Seefeldt; Gregory J. Tripoli; Charles R. Stearns

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

VLF heating of the lower ionosphere: Variation with magnetic latitude and electron density profile  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the results of calculations of ionospheric absorption of VLF heating radiation, in comparison with HF heating. This work was motivated by recent observations of the effects of VLF heating, which indicate that it is much more efficient than HF heating, at least for certain ionospheric conditions. The authors assume an ionospheric model which is consistent with that observed during the previous heating experiments. Their results are in basic agreement with the experimental observations. They find that the enhancement in efficiency of VLF heating over HF heating is a feature of low latitudes, where ionospheric density profiles favor this effect. In the polar regions, HF heating is more efficient.

Barr, R. (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand)); Stubbe, P. (Max Planck Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany))

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic that the geomagnetic ®eld is continuously disturbed in the high-speed stream in question. The geomagnetic disturbances, the observed intensities of the geomagnetic disturbances were dierent for each recur- rent period

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

178

Nevada Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

NA Regional Geographic Information: Nevada, Utah, and the following counties in California: Alpine, Inyo, Mono, Nevada, Plumas, Sierra Team Approval Process Teams are approved...

179

North Florida Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

180

Missouri Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

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181

Indiana Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

182

South Florida Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

183

Capital District Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

184

Puerto Rico Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

185

Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

186

Minnesota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

187

Oklahoma Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

188

Nebraska Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

189

Wisconsin Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

190

North Carolina Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

191

New Jersey Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

192

U.S. Virgin Islands Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S....  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

193

South Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

194

North Dakota Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams - the goal is to have as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

195

Michigan Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

196

SHPE NYC Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

197

Maryland Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

198

Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over second teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

199

Colorado Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Colorado Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

200

Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

1 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Virginia Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

West Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: West Virginia Team Approval Process: Please see the "Notes to Coaches" section below for a description of the Team...

202

Arkansas Regional High Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

3 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Arkansas Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

203

Iowa Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

School: 3 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Iowa Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

204

Montana Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

School: 2 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Montana Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

205

Arizona Regional High Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

School: 3 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Arizona Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

206

Maine Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2 Registration Fee: NA Regional Geographic Information: Maine Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a...

207

LADWP Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

the regional coordinator to participate. Competition Location Los Angeles Department of Water and Power headquarters 111 North Hope Street Los Angeles, California 90012 Notes to...

208

The Effect of Latitude on the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term (five-day) integrations of a nonlinear numerical model of the sea breeze at the equator, 20░N, 30░N and 45░N indicate the importance of latitude on the sea breeze circulation. During the hours of strong heating when friction is largest ...

Hong Yan; Richard A. Anthes

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High order accurate particular solutions of the biharmonic equation on general regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a fast, new method for evaluating particular solutions of the biharmonic equation on general two dimensional regions. The cost of our method is essentially twice the cost of solving Poisson's equation on a regular rectangular region in which ... Keywords: biharmonic equations, finite difference method, integral equations

Anita Mayo

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Coronal Mass Ejections from Sunspot and non-Sunspot Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originate from closed magnetic field regions on the Sun, which are active regions and quiescent filament regions. The energetic populations such as halo CMEs, CMEs associated with magnetic clouds, geoeffective CMEs, CMEs associated with solar energetic particles and interplanetary type II radio bursts, and shock-driving CMEs have been found to originate from sunspot regions. The CME and flare occurrence rates are found to be correlated with the sunspot number, but the correlations are significantly weaker during the maximum phase compared to the rise and declining phases. We suggest that the weaker correlation results from high-latitude CMEs from the polar crown filament regions that are not related to sunspots.

Gopalswamy, N; Yashiro, S; Makela, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Microphysical Characteristics of a Well-Developed Weak Echo Region in a High Plains Supercell Thunderstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical measurements in and near the weak echo region of a supercell thunderstorm are discussed. The observations were made in southeastern Montana with an armored T-28 aircraft, which has the capability to measure hydrometeors over almost ...

Dennis J. Musil; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul L. Smith

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Streamflow Data from Small Basins: A Challenging Test to High-Resolution Regional Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models and large-scale hydrological models provide the basis for studying impacts of climate and anthropogenic changes on continental- to regional-scale hydrology. Hence, there is a need for comparison and validation of simulated ...

Kerstin Stahl; Lena M. Tallaksen; Lukas Gudmundsson; Jens H. Christensen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Kansas Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

3 Registration Fee: 25 per team Regional Geographic Information: Kansas Team Approval Process Teams are approved on a first-come, first-served basis determined by the datetime...

214

Analysis of waste matrix material experiments mixed with highly enriched uranium on the thermal energy region  

SciTech Connect

The basic characteristics of waste materials such as silicon dioxide, aluminum and iron fueled with highly enriched uranium and moderated and reflected by polyethylene were investigated. These critical mass experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Criticality Experiments Facility (LACEF) on the Planet critical assembly. The primary intention of these experiments is to provide supplementary data that can be used to validate and improve criticality data for the Yucca Mountain and the Hanford Storage Waste Tanks Projects. The secondary intention of these experiments is to reduce the H/U ratio and increase the waste material/U ratio from previously published experiments. These experiments were designed to supply data for interlaced waste material/Fuel/Moderator systems on the thermal region. The experiments contained silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) mixed with 93.23% enriched uranium and moderated and reflected by polyethylene. A base case experiment was also performed with polyethylene-only. This analysis systematically examines uncertainties associated with the critical experiments as they affect the calculated multiplication factor. The systematic analysis is separated into uncertainties due to mass measurements, uncertainties due to fabrication and uncertainties due to composition. Each type of uncertainty is analyzed individually and a total combined uncertainty is derived. The SiO{sub 2}-HEU experiment had a measured k{sub eff} of 0.993, the Al-HEU experiment had a measured k{sub eff} of 0.990, the Fe-HEU had a measured k{sub eff} of 1.000 and the polyethylene-HEU had a measured k{sub eff} of 1.0025. The calculated k{sub eff} values tend to agree well with the experimental values. The sensitivity analysis of these critical experiments yielded a total combined uncertainty on the measured k{sub eff} of {+-}0.0024 for SiO{sub 2}, of {+-}0.0028 for Al, of {+-}0.0026 for Fe, of {+-}0.0020 for polyethylene. (authors)

Loaiza, D.; Sanchez, R. [MS J562, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the Annapurna and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the AnnapurnaOnlinePublication #12;HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010 27XX Research paper Microbial biomass and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas. We examined microbial biomass and activity as well as key

Hammerton, James

216

Assimilation of circumpolar wind vectors derived from highly elliptical orbit imagery: impact assessment based on observing system simulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a well recognized spatio-temporal meteorological observation gap at latitudes higher than 55░, especially in the region 55-70░. A possible solution to address this issue is a constellation of four satellites in a highly elliptical orbit (...

L. Garand; J. Feng; S. Heilliette; Y. Rochon; A. P. Trishchenko

217

Oscillation of High-Level Cirrus and Heavy Precipitation around Australian Region Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of 27 days of three-hourly GMS infrared data for 11 tropical cyclones in the Australian region has revealed that the area of the cirrus canopy executes a marked diurnal oscillation with maximum at +3 h of 0800 LMST Mean Solar Time (LMST) ...

F. A. Lajoie; I. J. Butterworth

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Impact of Energy Shortage and Cost on Irrigation for the High Plains and Trans Pecos Regions of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Plains and Trans Pecos regions of Texas are semi-arid crop production regions located in the western part of the state. Relatively low levels of rainfall are supplemented by irrigation from groundwater supplies. These regions produced 51 percent of the cotton, 42 percent of the grain sorghum, and 48 percent of the wheat produced in Texas in 1974 (Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service). Considering only irrigated production these percentages were 75, 85, and 91 percent of Texas irrigated crop production for cotton, grain sorghum and wheat respectively. The importance of the High Plains and Trans Pecos regions to Texas crop production are not limited to these three crops, however, these statistics do serve to illustrate the significance of these regions in the Texas agricultural economy. While it is easily seen that the majority of irrigated production (for the crops mentioned) in Texas occurs in these regions, it should be noted that the importance of irrigation in the High Plains and Trans Pecos regional economies is much greater than these statistics show. On the High Plains 86 percent of the cotton, 90 percent of the grain sorghum, and 75 percent of the wheat produced in 1974 was harvested from irrigated acreage. Rainfall is somewhat less in the Trans Pecos region and 100 percent of the production of these crops was under irrigation (Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service). More than 60 percent of the value of agricultural crops in Texas is produced on irrigated land (Knutson, et.al.). Thus, the crop production of these regions is vitally important to the Texas and respective regional economies. Crop yields are heavily dependent on groundwater irrigation and extremely sensitive to any factor which may affect the availability or cost of irrigation water. Availability and price of fuel used in pumping groundwater are the critical factors which directly affect the availability and cost of irrigation water. About 39 percent of the energy used in Texas agriculture in 1973 was utilized in pumping water, compared to 18 percent used in machinery operations. Of this irrigation fuel, 76 percent was natural gas, the majority of which was consumed in the High Plains (Coble and LePori). Current supplies and reserves of natural gas have reached critically low levels in recent years and producers in the High Plains and Trans Pecos regions are faced with possible curtailments of, and certain price increases for their irrigation fuel (Patton and Lacewell). The threat of possible curtailment of fuel supplies during the irrigation season imposes greatly increased risk to irrigated crop production since curtailment of natural gas supplies during a critical water use period would significantly reduce yields (Lacewell). This threat would also increase financial risk and restrict availability of credit. Continued price increases for natural gas will increase costs of pumping irrigation water and hence the costs of irrigated crop production (Patton and Lacewell). The Ogalalla aquifer underlying the High Plains and many of the alluvium aquifers underlying the Trans Pecos are exhaustible; i.e., there is a negligible recharge from percolation and other sources. Therefore, even with unchanged natural gas prices, these groundwater supplies are being "economically" exhausted over time as pumping depth increases. Increases in fuel prices will lead to reduced groundwater pumpage and result in less groundwater being economically recoverable. Although life of the physical supply will be exhausted, a greater quantity of groundwater will be economically unrecoverable for irrigation without significant product price increases.

Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Zavaleta, L.; Petty, J. A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT  

SciTech Connect

Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ('glint'), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected light curves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: (1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice; and (2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this 'latitude-albedo effect' will operate even for large obliquities: in that case the equator receives less orbit-averaged flux than the poles, and the equator is preferentially sampled at crescent phase. Using rotational and orbital color variations to map the surfaces of directly imaged planets and estimate their obliquity will therefore be a necessary pre-condition for properly interpreting their reflected phase variations. The latitude-albedo effect is a particularly convincing glint false positive for zero-obliquity planets, and such worlds are not amenable to latitudinal mapping. This effect severely limits the utility of specular reflection for detecting oceans on exoplanets.

Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Voigt, Aiko [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 53, D-20146, Hamburg (Germany)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Is the solar spectrum latitude dependent? An investigation with SST/TRIPPEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: In studies of the solar spectrum relative to spectra of solar twin stars, it has been found that the chemical composition of the Sun seems to depart systematically from those of the twins. One possible explanation is that the effect is due to the special aspect angle of the Sun when observed from Earth, as compared with the aspect angles of the twins. Thus, a latitude dependence of the solar spectrum, even with the heliocentric angle constant, could lead to effects of the type observed. Aim: We explore a possible variation in the strength of certain spectral lines, used in the comparisons between the composition of the Sun and the twins, at loci on the solar disk with different latitudes but at constant heliocentric angle. Methods: We use the TRIPPEL spectrograph at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on La Palma to record spectra in five spectral regions in order to compare different locations on the solar disk at a heliocentric angle of 45 deg. Equivalent widths and other parameters are measured for fi...

Kiselman, Dan; Gustafsson, Bengt; Asplund, Martin; MelÚndez, Jorge; Scharmer, G÷ran B; Langhans, Kai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of6 I.3. High-Speed RailOperating High-Speed Rail .. 22 VI. Impact on Regional

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

High-resolution crystal spectrometer for the 10-60 (angstrom) EUV region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vacuum crystal spectrometer with nominal resolving power approaching 1000 is described for measuring emission lines with wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet region up to 60 Angstroms. The instrument utilizes a flat octadecyl hydrogen maleate (OHM) crystal and a thin-window 1-D position-sensitive gas proportional detector. This detector employs a 1 {micro}m-thick 100 x8 mm{sup 2} aluminized polyimide window and operates at one atmosphere pressure. The spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The performance of the instrument is illustrated in measurements of the newly discovered magnetic field-sensitive line in Ar{sup 8+}.

Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Goddard, R; Wargelin, B J

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Proposed Standard Fog Collector for Use in High-Elevation Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collection of fog droplets by vegetation is an important wet deposition process. It can, in fact, dominate the chemical and hydrological input to certain high elevation watersheds. However, measurements of fog deposition are rarely made and, ...

Robert S. Schemenauer; Pilar Cereceda

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Role of Northern Lakes in a Regional Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many lakes of widely varying morphometry in northern latitudes. For this study region, in the central Mackenzie River valley of western Canada, lakes make up 37% of the landscape. The nonlake components of the landscape are divided into ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Claire J. Oswald; Jacqueline Binyamin; Christopher Spence; William M. Schertzer; Peter D. Blanken; Normand BussiŔres; Claude R. Duguay

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mid-latitude composition of mars from thermal and epithermal neutrons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Epithermal neutron data acquired by Mars Odyssey have been analyzed to determine global maps of water-equivalent hydrogen abundance. By assuming that hydrogen was distributed uniformly with depth within the surface, a map of minimum water abundance was obtained. The addition of thermal neutrons to this analysis could provide information needed to determine water stratigraphy. For example, thermal and epithermal neutrons have been used together to determine the depth and abundance of waterequivalent hydrogen of a buried layer in the south polar region. Because the emission of thermal neutrons from the Martian surface is sensitive to absorption by elements other than hydrogen, analysis of stratigraphy requires that the abundance of these elements be known. For example, recently published studies of the south polar region assumed that the Mars Pathfinder mean soil composition is representative of the regional soil composition, This assumption is partially motivated by the fact that Mars appears to have a well-mixed global dust cover and that the Pathfinder soil composition is representative of the mean composition of the Martian surface. In this study, we have analyzed thermal and epithermal neutron data measured by the neutron spectrometer subsystem of the gamma ray spectrometer to determine the spatial distribution of the composition of elements other than hydrogen. We have restricted our analysis to mid-latitude regions for which we have corrected the neutron counting data for variations in atmospheric thickness.

Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Elphic, R. C. (Richard C.); Boynton, W. V. (William V.); Bish, D. L. (David L.); Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Funsten, H. O. (Herbert O.); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); McKinney, G. W. (Gregg W.); Moore, K. R. (Kurt R.); Tokar, R. L. (Robert L.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A High-Resolution Simulation of the Year 2003 for Germany Using the Regional Model COSMO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the authors examine the effect of a high-resolution grid (grid resolution lower than 3 km) in the context of a realistic climate simulation. For this purpose global simulation results of the German Weather Service were dynamically ...

Martin KŘcken; Detlef Hauffe; Hermann Ísterle

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A New Microwave Temperature Profiler ┬ů First Measurements in Polar Regions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Measurements in Polar Regions E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev, and A. S. Viazankin Central Aerological Observatory Moscow, Russia A. Argentini, and A. Conidi Institute of Atmospheric Physics CNR, Italy Introduction Temperature inversions are a ubiquitous feature of the high latitude atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In Polar Regions, the temperature inversion is a complicated phenomenon involving interactions between surface radiative cooling, subsidence and warm air advection. In the period 1997-2002, several microwave temperature profilers were used to measure temperature inversion parameters at one of the three sites of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

228

High-Throughput Genetic Identification of Functionally Important Regions of the Yeast DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension (CTE) induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genetic selections, unigenic evolution, and analyses of in vivo splicing activity to comprehensively identify functionally important regions and permissible amino acid substitutions throughout Mss116p. The functionally important regions include those containing conserved sequence motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding or interdomain interactions, as well as previously unidentified regions, including surface loops that may function in protein-protein interactions. The genetic selections recapitulate major features of the conserved helicase motifs seen in other DEAD-box proteins but also show surprising variations, including multiple novel variants of motif III (SAT). Patterns of amino acid substitutions indicate that the RNA bend induced by the helicase core depends on ionic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the bound RNA; identify a subset of critically interacting residues; and indicate that the bend induced by the CTE results primarily from a steric block. Finally, we identified two conserved regions - one the previously noted post II region in the helicase core and the other in the CTE - that may help displace or sequester the opposite RNA strand during RNA unwinding.

Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Turner, Kathryn G.; Gilman, Benjamin; Wolf, Rachel Z.; Lambowitz, Alan M. (Texas)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

High-frequency absorption of the dynamic mixed state in the surface superconductivity region  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the absorption of a high-frequency electromagnetic field in the type II superconductor Pb{sub 0.8}In{sub 0.2} in magnetic fields H{sub c2} < H < H{sub c3}. The absorption component proportional to the rate of variation of the external magnetic field is detected. We assume that this absorption component is associated with the dynamic mixed state of the superconducting shell containing 2D magnetic flux vortices (Kulik vortices). The motion of these vortices under the action of the critical current ensures the required difference between the external and internal magnetic inductions of the superconducting shell upon a change in the external magnetic field. This model correctly describes the observed behavior of absorption of rf electromagnetic radiation.

Berezin, V. A., E-mail: berezin@iptm.ru; Tulin, V. A., E-mail: tulin@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity  

SciTech Connect

A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, A. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhao, K. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

BIPOLAR MAGNETIC REGIONS ON THE SUN: GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF THE SOHO/MDI DATA SET  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic flux that is generated by dynamo processes inside the Sun emerges in the form of bipolar magnetic regions. The properties of these directly observable signatures of the dynamo can be extracted from full-disk solar magnetograms. The most homogeneous, high-quality synoptic data set of solar magnetograms has been obtained with the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft during 1995-2011. We have developed an IDL program that has, when applied to the 73,838 magnetograms of the MDI data set, automatically identified 160,079 bipolar magnetic regions that span a range of scale sizes across nearly four orders of magnitude. The properties of each region have been extracted and statistically analyzed, in particular with respect to the polarity orientations of the bipolar regions, including their tilt-angle distributions and their violations of Hale's polarity law. The latitude variation of the average tilt angles (with respect to the E-W direction), which is known as Joy's law, is found to closely follow the relation 32.{sup 0}1 Multiplication-Sign sin (latitude). There is no indication of a dependence on region size that one may expect if the tilts were produced by the Coriolis force during the buoyant rise of flux loops from the tachocline region. A few percent of all regions have orientations that violate Hale's polarity law. We show explicit examples, from different phases of the solar cycle, where well-defined medium-size bipolar regions with opposite polarity orientations occur side by side in the same latitude zone in the same magnetogram. Such oppositely oriented large bipolar regions cannot be part of the same toroidal flux system, but different flux systems must coexist at any given time in the same latitude zones. These examples are incompatible with the paradigm of coherent, subsurface toroidal flux ropes as the source of sunspots, and instead show that fluctuations must play a major role at all scales for the turbulent dynamo. To confirm the profound role of fluctuations at large scales, we show explicit examples in which large bipolar regions differ from the average Joy's law orientation by an amount between 90 Degree-Sign and 100 Degree-Sign . We see no observational support for a separation of scales or a division between a global and a local dynamo, since also the smallest scales in our sample retain a non-random component that significantly contributes to the accumulated emergence of a north-south dipole moment that will lead to the replacement of the old global poloidal field with a new one that has the opposite orientation.

Stenflo, J. O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Kosovichev, A. G., E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: AKosovichev@solar.stanford.edu [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Influence of Meridional Shear on Planetary Waves. Part 2: Critical Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the simplifying assumption that the mean zonal wind is a function of latitude only, numerical and analytical methods are applied to study the effects of critical latitudes (where the Doppler-shifted frequency is 0) on planetary waves. On the ...

John P. Boyd

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region  

SciTech Connect

The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Chemical differentiation in regions of high mass star formation II. Molecular multiline and dust continuum studies of selected objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate systematic chemical differentiation of molecules in regions of high mass star formation. We observed five prominent sites of high mass star formation in HCN, HNC, HCO+, their isotopes, C18O, C34S and some other molecular lines, for some sources both at 3 and 1.3 mm and in continuum at 1.3 mm. Taking into account earlier obtained data for N2H+ we derive molecular abundances and physical parameters of the sources (mass, density, ionization fraction, etc.). The kinetic temperature is estimated from CH3C2H observations. Then we analyze correlations between molecular abundances and physical parameters and discuss chemical models applicable to these species. The typical physical parameters for the sources in our sample are the following: kinetic temperature in the range ~ 30-50 K (it is systematically higher than that obtained from ammonia observations and is rather close to dust temperature), masses from tens to hundreds solar masses, gas densities ~ 10^5 cm^{-3}, ionization...

Zinchenko, I; Pirogov, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.1 - High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOT-HUMID HOT-HUMID MIXED-HUMID COLD / VERY COLD HOT-DRY / MIXED-DRY MARINE PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory August 2010 August 2010 * PNNL-17211 CLIMATE REGIONS VOLUME 7.1 R HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME TECHNOLOGIES Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 7.1 High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael C. Baechler Jennifer Williamson, Theresa Gilbride, Pam Cole, and Marye Hefty

236

The Size Distribution and Mass-Weighted Terminal Velocity of Low-Latitude Tropopause Cirrus Crystal Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice crystal terminal velocities govern the lifetime of radiatively complex, climatologically important, low-latitude tropopause cirrus clouds. To better understand cloud lifetimes, the terminal velocities of low-latitude tropopause cirrus cloud ...

C. G. Schmitt; A. J. Heymsfield

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes  

SciTech Connect

The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Discovery of a New Low-Latitude Milky Way Globular Cluster using GLIMPSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spitzer Space Telescope imaging as part of the Galactic Legacy Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) reveals a previously unidentified low-latitude rich star cluster near l=31.3 degrees, b=-0.1 degrees. Near-infrared JHK' photometry from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory indicates an extinction of A_V ~ 15+/-3 mag for cluster members. Analysis of 13CO features along the same sightline suggests a probable kinematic distance of 3.1 -- 5.2 kpc. The new cluster has an angular diameter of ~1-2 pc, a total magnitude m_{K_0}=2.1 corrected for extinction, and a luminosity of M_K ~ -10.3 at 3.1 kpc. In contrast to young massive Galactic clusters with ages designate this object ``GLIMPSE-C01'' and classify it as a Milky Way globular cluster passing through the Galactic disk. We also identify a region of star formation and fan-shaped outflows from young stellar objects in the same field as the cluster. The cluster's passage through the Galactic molecular layer may have triggered this star formation activity.

Chip Kobulnicky; A. J. Monson; B. A Buckalew; J. M. Darnel; B. Uzpen; B. A. Whitney; R. Indebetouw; B. L. Babler; M. R. Meade; C. Watson; E. Churchwell; M. J. Wolff; M. G. Wolfire; D. P. Clemens; R. Shah; T. M. Bania; R. A. Benjamin; M. Cohen; K. E. Devine; J. M. Dickey; F. Heitsch; J. M. Jackson; A. P. Marston; J. S. Mathis; E. P. Mercer; J. R. Stauffer; S. R. Stolovy; J. P. Norris; A. Kutyrev; R. Canterna; M. J. Pierce

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Attribution of Seasonal and Regional Changes in Arctic Moisture Convergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal changes in high-latitude moisture convergence simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) are investigated. Moisture convergence is calculated using the ...

Natasa Skific; Jennifer A. Francis; John J. Cassano

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Stochastic Model for the Angular Momentum Budget of Latitude Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stochastic model of Weickmann et al. for the global angular momentum budget is modified to become applicable to latitude belts. In particular, a Langevin equation is added for the flux divergence of angular momentum in a belt. The friction ...

Joseph Egger

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for Bangladesh. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The

242

The Effect of Tropospheric Jet Latitude on Coupling between the Stratospheric Polar Vortex and the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dry general circulation model is used to investigate how coupling between the stratospheric polar vortex and the extratropical tropospheric circulation depends on the latitude of the tropospheric jet. The tropospheric response to an identical ...

Chaim I. Garfinkel; Darryn W. Waugh; Edwin P. Gerber

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

On the Linear Relationship between Loop Current Retreat Latitude and Eddy Separation Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear correlation exists between the retreat latitude of the Loop Current following eddy separation and the subsequent eddy separation period. This empirical relationship was first identified in satellite altimeter-derived Loop Current ...

Alexis Lugo-Fernßndez; Robert R. Leben

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Equatorward Energy Cascade, Critical Latitude, and the Predominance of Cyclonic Vortices in Geostrophic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostrophic turbulence exhibits features similar to those observed in the oceans: a movement of energy toward the equator, a critical latitude below which are alternating zonal flows and above which the flow is largely isotropic, and a ...

JŘrgen Theiss

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solar: monthly and annual latitude tilt horizontal GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

latitude tilt horizontal GIS data at 40km latitude tilt horizontal GIS data at 40km resolution for Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for Nepal. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The

246

First VUV full-Sun spectrum of the transition region with high spectral resolution compared to cool stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the first full-Sun vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission line profile originating from the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona. It is based on a raster scan of the whole solar disk using SUMER/SOHO. The full-Sun spectrum has a spectral resolution which allows an investigation of details in the line profile as well as a thorough comparison to stellar spectra as obtained, e.g. with FUSE or STIS/HST. The full-Sun spectrum shows enhanced emission in the wings, and is well described by a double Gaussian fit with a narrow and a broad component. It is shown that the broad component is due to structures on the solar surface, especially those related to the magnetic chromospheric network. Thus it is proposed that the broad components of other solar-like stars are also a consequence of the mixture of surface structures, and not necessarily a signature of small-scale heating processes like explosive events, as it is commonly argued. A comparison to spectra of luminous cool stars shows that the line asymmetries of these stars might also be a surface structure effect and not or only partly due to opacity effects in their cool dense winds. These comparisons show the potential of high quality full-Sun VUV spectra and their value for the study of solar-stellar connections. As an example, this study proposes that alpha Cen A has a considerably higher amount of magnetic flux concentrated in the chromospheric magnetic network than the Sun.

Hardi Peter

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

MEASUREMENTS OF THE RELATIVE ABUNDANCES OF HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI IN THE TeV/NUCLEON REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the relative abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei in the energy range of 500-3980 GeV/nucleon from the second flight of the Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass balloon-borne experiment. Particle energy was determined using a sampling tungsten/scintillating-fiber calorimeter, while particle charge was identified precisely with a dual-layer silicon charge detector installed for this flight. The resulting element ratios C/O, N/O, Ne/O, Mg/O, Si/O, and Fe/O at the top of atmosphere are 0.919 {+-} 0.123{sup stat} {+-} 0.030{sup syst}, 0.076 {+-} 0.019{sup stat} {+-} 0.013{sup syst}, 0.115 {+-} 0.031{sup stat} {+-} 0.004{sup syst}, 0.153 {+-} 0.039{sup stat} {+-} 0.005{sup syst}, 0.180 {+-} 0.045{sup stat} {+-} 0.006{sup syst}, and 0.139 {+-} 0.043{sup stat} {+-} 0.005{sup syst}, respectively, which agree with measurements at lower energies. The source abundance of N/O is found to be 0.054 {+-} 0.013{sup stat} {+-} 0.009{sup syst+0.010esc} {sub -0.017}. The cosmic-ray source abundances are compared to local Galactic (LG) abundances as a function of first ionization potential and as a function of condensation temperature. At high energies the trend that the cosmic-ray source abundances at large ionization potential or low condensation temperature are suppressed compared to their LG abundances continues. Therefore, the injection mechanism must be the same at TeV/nucleon energies as at the lower energies measured by HEAO-3, CRN, and TRACER. Furthermore, the cosmic-ray source abundances are compared to a mixture of 80% solar system abundances and 20% massive stellar outflow (MSO) as a function of atomic mass. The good agreement with TIGER measurements at lower energies confirms the existence of a substantial fraction of MSO material required in the {approx}TeV per nucleon region.

Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinin, A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Allison, P. S.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S. [Department of Physics, University of Siena and INFN, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Barbier, L. [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jeon, J. A.; Lee, J., E-mail: ipark@ewha.ac.k [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

p--p and p--d elastic and inelastic scattering in the high t-region in the new internal target laboratory  

SciTech Connect

re p - p and p - d elastic and inelastic scatteing in the high t-region in the new B-O Internal Target Laboratory. These measurements will continuously cover The t-region is covered from 0.2 up to at least 10 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ for p-p elastic scattering and up to 5 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ for p-d elastic scattering; it can be extended with future modifications. Magnetic spectrometers will be used to measure the angles and momenta of the recoil particle and the forward scattered particle. (auth)

Bartenev, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Morozov, B.; Nikitin, V.; Pilipenko, Y.; Zolin, L.; Malamud, E.; Yamada, R.; Loeffler, F.; Shibata, E.; Stanfield, K.; Tang, Y.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Solar: annual and seasonal average latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for latitude tilt GIS data (contours) for Brazil from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual and seasonal mean of Latitude Tilt Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day based on data from 1995 to 2002 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The cross-calibration process worked with data from 3 ground stations: Caic├│ (located in the Northeast of Brazil), Florian├│polis (located in the South) and Balbina (located in Amazonia). These data have been used for validation and comparison of radiation transfer models operated in SWERA to estimate the incidence of solar radiation on the surface of the country from satellite images

250

Solar Desalination in the Southwest United States: A Thermoeconomic Analysis Utilizing the Sun to Desalt Water in High Irradiance Regions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the Southwest.ů (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in theů (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Utilizing upper hybrid resonance for high density plasma production and negative ion generation in a downstream region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave-induced resonances are created by microwaves launched directly into a multicusp (MC) plasma device in the k Up-Tack B mode, where k is the wave vector and B is the static magnetic field. The resonance zone is identified as upper hybrid resonance (UHR), and lies r = {approx}22 mm away from the MC boundary. Measurement of radial wave electric field intensity confirms the right hand cutoff of the wave (r = 22.5-32.1 mm) located near the UHR zone. A sharp rise in the corresponding electron temperature in the resonance region by {approx}13 eV from its value away from resonance at r = 0, is favorable for the generation of vibrationally excited molecules of hydrogen. A transverse magnetic filter allows cold electrons ({approx}1-2 eV) to pass into the downstream region where they generate negative ions by dissociative attachment. Measurements of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) support the viewpoint. H{sup -} current density of {approx}0.26 mA/cm{sup 2} is obtained at a wave power density of {approx}3 W/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 mTorr pressure, which agrees reasonably well with results obtained from a steady state model using particle balance equations.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assimilation of High-Resolution Mode-S Wind and Temperature Observations in a Regional NWP Model for Nowcasting Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the beneficial impacts of high-resolution (in space and time) wind and temperature observations from aircraft on very short-range numerical weather forecasting are presented. The observations are retrieved using the tracking and ...

Siebren de Haan; Ad Stoffelen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sensitivity of the Latitude of the Surface Westerlies to Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity to surface friction of the latitude of the surface westerlies and the associated eddy-driven midlatitude jet is studied in an idealized dry GCM. The westerlies move poleward as the friction is reduced in strength. An increase in ...

Gang Chen; Isaac M. Held; Walter A. Robinson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An Observational Study on the Latitudes Where Wave Forcing Drives BrewerľDobson Upwelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) data are analyzed to demonstrate that wave forcing at lower latitudes plays a crucial role in driving the tropical upwelling portion of the BrewerľDobson circulation. It is shown that subtropical wave forcing ...

Tiehan Zhou; Marvin A. Geller; Wuyin Lin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dell Latitude 5000 Series Outstanding reliability and security in the world's most manageable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid state hybrid drives or performance solid state drive options for large, reliable storage capacity from a single source, the Latitude 5000 Series offer outstanding security. Protect data on any device out of the box with factory installation and simplify compliance with preset compliance templates

Sanderson, Yasmine

257

Verification of Low Latitude Ionosphere Effects on WAAS During October 2003 Geomagnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verification of Low Latitude Ionosphere Effects on WAAS During October 2003 Geomagnetic Storm S one of the strongest geomagnetic and ionospheric storms of the solar cycle. WAAS user integrity to be the case that this larger structure may exist due to the effects of the geomagnetic storm in the South

Stanford University

258

Computing the latitudes of sunspot trajectories and speed of sunspots with intelligent methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar sunspot rotation, latitudinal bands are studied based on intelligent computation methods. The benefices of image fusion and powerful tree decomposition are used in this study in order to achieve quantitative values about the latitudes of trajectories ... Keywords: image fusion, quad tree decomposition, sunspot image

Mostafa Bakhtiary; Ahmad Hamedi Yekta; Arash Attarzadeh

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial structure and temporal evolution of sea breeze and the latitudinal distribution of propagation and mixing of sea breeze driven near-inertial ocean response in the Gulf of Mexico are investigated using comprehensive data sets and a non-linear numerical model. Near 30?N, inertial oceanic response is significantly enhanced by a near-resonant condition between inertial and diurnal forcing frequencies. Observational results indicate that sea breeze variability peaks in summer and extends at least 300 km offshore with continuous seaward phase propagation. The maximum near-inertial oceanic response occurs in June when there is a shallow mixed layer, strong stratification, and an approximately 10-day period of continuous sea breeze forcing. Near-inertial current variance decreases in July and August due to the deepening of the mixed layer and a more variable phase relationship between the wind and current. River discharge varies interannually and can significantly alter the oceanic response during summer. During 1993, the ?great flood? of the Mississippi River deepens the summer mixed layer and reduces the sea breeze response. The near-inertial currents can provide considerable vertical mixing on the shelf in summer, as seen by the suppression of bulk Richardson number during strong near-inertial events. Three-dimensional idealized simulations show that the coastal oceanic response to sea breeze is trapped poleward of 30? latitude, however, it can propagate offshore as Poincare waves equatorward of 30? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near the critical latitude, leading to increased vertical mixing. This local dissipation is greatly reduced at other latitudes. Simulations with realistic bathymetry of the Gulf of Mexico confirm that a basin-wide ocean response to coastal sea breeze forcing is established in the form of Poincare waves. This enhanced vertical mixing is consistent with observations on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf. Comparison of the three-dimensional and one-dimensional models shows some significant limitations of one-dimensional simplified models for sea breeze simulations near the critical latitude.

Zhang, Xiaoqian

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

An Analysis of Daily Humidity Patterns at a Mountainous and Urban Site in a Tropical High-Altitude Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing ratio data of water vapor at different hours of the day in a high-altitude tropical plateau in Mexico are shown. The objective is to measure water vapor quantity in a mountainous zone, where no previous studies of this kind exist, and in ...

H. G. Padilla; A. C. Leyva; P. A. Mosi˝o

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dynamics of Isolated Convective Regions in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initially resting ocean of stratification N is considered, subject to buoyancy loss at its surface of magnitude B0 over a circular region of radius r, at a latitude where the Coriolis parameter is f. Initially the buoyancy loss gives rise to ...

Martin Visbeck; John Marshall; Helen Jones

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effects of solar wind magnetosphere coupling recorded at different geomagnetic latitudes: Separation of directly-driven and storage/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of solar wind magnetosphere coupling recorded at different geomagnetic latitudes November 2008. [1] The effect on geomagnetic activity of solar wind speed, compared with that of the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, differs with geomagnetic latitude. In this study we

Lockwood, Mike

263

Summertime Low-Level Jets over the High-Latitude Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of a simple analytic boundary layer model developed by Thorpe and Guymer did not produce good agreement with observational data for oceanic low-level jet observations even though this model has worked well for the predictions of ...

Douglas O. ReVelle; E. Douglas Nilsson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Analysis of Intense Poleward Water Vapor Transports into High Latitudes of Western North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant cool season precipitation along the western coast of North America is often associated with intense water vapor transport (IWVT) from the Pacific Ocean during favorable synoptic-scale flow regimes. These relatively narrow and intense ...

Alain Roberge; John R. Gyakum; Eyad H. Atallah

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Decadal Variability of the Aleutian Low and Its Relation to High-Latitude Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The JanuaryľFebruary mean central pressure of the Aleutian low is investigated as an index of North Pacific variability on interannual to decadal timescales. Since the turn of the century, 37% of the winter interannual variance of the Aleutian ...

James E. Overland; Jennifer Miletta Adams; Nicholas A. Bond

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Zonal Wavenumber 3 Pattern of Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Planetary Wave Variability at High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prominent pattern of variability of the Northern Hemisphere wintertime tropospheric planetary waves, referred to here as the Wave3 pattern, is identified from the NCEPľNCAR reanalysis. It is worthy of attention because its structure is similar ...

Haiyan Teng; Grant Branstator

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Energy and Water Cycles in a High-Latitude, North-Flowing River System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MacKenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study, Phase 1, seeks to improve understanding of energy and water cycling in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) and to initiate and test atmospheric, hydrologic, and coupled models that ...

W. R. Rouse; E. M. Blyth; R. W. Crawford; J. R. Gyakum; J. R. Janowicz; B. Kochtubajda; H. G. Leighton; P. Marsh; L. Martz; A. Pietroniro; H. Ritchie; W. M. Schertzer; E. D. Soulis; R. E. Stewart; G. S. Strong; M. K. Woo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

GPS phase scintillation and proxy index at high latitudes during a moderate geomagnetic storm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amplitude and phase scintillation indices are customarily obtained by specialised GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitors (GISTMs) from L1 signal recorded at the rate of 50 Hz. The scintillation indices S[subscript ...

Prikryl, P.

270

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as ôphase changeö) and ice physics; (3)2.8.1). 2.3.1.2 Phase Change and Ice in the Lake Body Theany time ice occurs below water after phase change has been

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Interdecadal Variability of the Thermohaline Circulation and High-Latitude Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized North Atlantic Ocean model is forced by climatological wind stress, restoring temperature, and a diagnosed salinity flux. Both centennial and interdecadal oscillations are sustained in the model if the diagnosed salinity flux is ...

Fei Chen; Michael Ghil

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effects of Cloudiness on the High-Latitude Surface Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of hourly data on radiation, cloud and temperature collected at Resolute, Canada (75░N) show that with respect to clear skies: (i) clouds of all types, heights and extents heat the surface when it is snow-covered; (ii) low clouds ...

J. Graham Cogley; A. Henderson-Sellers

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-order systems. No significant cloud-to-cloud difference has been found, except for the fact that all companions to low-mass Orion protostars are found within 100 AU of their primaries whereas companions found in other clouds span the whole range probed here. Based on this survey, we conclude that core fragmentation always yields a high initial multiplicity rate, even in giant molecular clouds such as the Orion cloud or in clustered stellar populations as in Serpens, in contrast with predictions of numerical simulations. The lower multiplicity rate observed in clustered Class II and Class III populations can be accounted for by a universal set of properties for young systems and subsequent ejections through close encounters with unrelated cluster members.

G. Duchŕne; S. Bontemps; J. Bouvier; P. AndrÚ; A. A. Djupvik; A. M. Ghez

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures: Part 2. Arctic Regions, 1881ľ1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe annual and seasonal changes in air temperatures over high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during the period 1881ľ1980. Trends (that is, fluctuations on time scales greater than 20 years) in the average temperature of the Arctic ...

P. M. Kelly; P. D. Jones; C. B. Sear; B. S. G. Cherry; R. K. Tavakol

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Effects of Soil Moisture on the Responses of Soil Temperatures to Climate Change in Cold Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At high latitudes, changes in soil moisture could alter soil temperatures independently of air temperature changes by interacting with the snow thermal rectifier. The authors investigated this mechanism with model experiments in the Community Land ...

Zachary M. Subin; Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn; David M. Lawrence; Sean C. Swenson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 550 samples of fine grained carbonates, collected every 0.5 to 1.0 m from the Bloom Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation at Gallagher Peak, Idaho, were analyzed to determine the high-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy. To constrain for diagenesis, thin sections were petrographically analyzed and viewed using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using an electron microprobe. Average delta18O and delta13C values from the Bloom Member are -4.5% +/- 1.6% (1 sigma) and 2.1% +/- 1.1%, respectively. Maximum delta13C values are about 1% higher for the Desmoinesian and Missourian than the Morrowan and Atokan, similar to results from the Yukon Territory. delta18O and delta13C values are lowest for crystalline mosaic limestones and siltstones, moderate for packstones, wackestones, and mudstones, and highest for boundstones and grainstones. The delta13C profile from Gallagher Peak consists of high frequency 1% oscillations with several larger excursions. No large delta13C increase at the base of the section suggests the Mid-Carboniferous boundary is in the underlying Bluebird Mountain formation. delta13C of Gallagher Peak and Arrow Canyon, NV, correlate well from 318 to 310 Ma, but correlation becomes more difficult around 310 Ma. This may result from increased restriction of the Snaky Canyon platform beginning in the Desmoinesian. Most of the short term (<1 Ma) isotopic excursions are the result of diagenesis. Two of the largest negative excursions at Gallagher Peak correlate with two large negative excursions at Big Hatchet Peak, NM, possibly due to sea level lowstands of the Desmoinesian. Phylloid algal mounds at Gallagher Peak are associated with positive excursions because of original aragonite composition and increased open marine influence. Positive excursions related to other facies characteristics also result from increased marine influence. The delta13C curve for the upper half of Gallagher Peak contains three repeated cycles of increasing delta13C over 1-1.5 Ma, which are possibly related to long-term sea level fluctuations. Given the complexity of each local environment, without detailed biostratigraphy, detailed rock descriptions, and analysis of the various rock components, delta13C stratigraphy of whole rocks can be misinterpreted.

Jolley, Casey

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-or...

Duchŕne, G; Bouvier, J; AndrÚ, P; Djupvik, A A; Ghez, A M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude, for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal Structure of the Mesopause Region (80ľ105 km) at 40░N Latitude. Part II: Diurnal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium wind/temperature lidar measurements taken throughout the diurnal and annual cycles at Urbana, Illinois (40░N, 88░W), from February 1996 through January 1998 are used to characterize the seasonal behavior of solar thermal tides in the ...

Robert J. States; Chester S. Gardner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Thermal Structure of the Mesopause Region (80ľ105 km) at 40░N Latitude. Part I: Seasonal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium wind/temperature lidar measurements taken throughout the diurnal and annual cycles at Urbana, Illinois (40░N, 88░W), from February 1996 through January 1998 are used to characterize the seasonal variations of the mesospheric temperature ...

Robert J. States; Chester S. Gardner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

South America Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model (developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) and the ARCVIEW software were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory. The BRASIL-SR model is not validated for areas covered by snow.

284

STARSPOTS, SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT, AND ACTIVE LATITUDES IN THE HAT-P-11 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the analysis of four months of Kepler photometry of the K4V star HAT-P-11, including 26 transits of its 'super-Neptune' planet. The transit data exhibit numerous anomalies which we interpret as passages of the planet over dark starspots. These spot-crossing anomalies preferentially occur at two specific phases of the transit. These phases can be understood as the intersection points between the transit chord and the active latitudes of the host star, where starspots are most abundant. Based on the measured characteristics of spot-crossing anomalies and previous observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find two solutions for the stellar obliquity {psi} and active latitude l: either {psi} = 106{sup +15}{sub -11} and l = 19.7{sup +1.5}{sub -2.2}, or {psi} = 97{sup +8}{sub -4} and l = 67{sup +2}{sub -4} (all in degrees). If the active latitude changes with time analogous to the 'butterfly diagram' of the Sun's activity cycle, future observations should reveal changes in the preferred phases of spot-crossing anomalies.

Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low-latitude Western North Atlantic climate variability during the past millennium : insights from proxies and models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of natural climate variability during the past millennium provide a frame of reference in which to assess the significance of recent changes. This thesis investigates new methods of reconstructing low-latitude ...

Saenger, Casey Pearce

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evidence for the existence of a stable, highly fluidized-pressurized region of deep, jointed crystalline rock from Fenton Hill hot dry rock test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated several times at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal test site, that large volumes of naturally jointed Precambrian crystalline rock can be stably maintained at pressures considerably above the least principal earth stress in the surrounding rock mass. In particular, for the deeper, larger, and tighter of the two HDR reservoirs tested at this site in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, testing was carried out for a cumulative period of 11 months without evidence of fracture extension at the boundaries of the pressure-stimulated region, even though a very high reservoir inlet circulating pressure of 27.3 MPa (3960 psi) above hydrostatic was maintained throughout the testing, considerably in excess of the least principal stress in the surrounding rock mass of about 10 MPa above hydrostatic at a depth of 3500 m. The author reviews and summarizes information concerning the earth stresses at depth and the test data relative to the containment of pressurized fluid, particularly the data showing the declining rate of water loss and the absence of microseismicity--the two principal indicators of a stable, pressurized reservoir region. The author then provides a coherent and concise evaluation of this and other evidence supporting his assertion that one can indeed maintain large volumes of jointed rock at pressures considerably in excess of the least principal earth stress. In addition, a discussion is presented concerning the initial state of stress at depth beneath Fenton Hill and then possible changes to the stress state resulting from the very large volumes of injected high-pressure water and the accompanying shear displacements--and shear dilation--associated with these pressurizations.

Brown, D.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A New Catalog of Radio Compact HII Regions in the Milky Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We utilize new VLA Galactic plane catalogs at 5 and 1.4 GHz covering the first Galactic quadrant (350added new observations and re-reduced the data with significantly improved calibration and mosaicing procedures, resulting in a tripling of the number of 5 GHz sources detected. Comparison of the new 5 GHz catalog and the MSX6C Galactic plane catalog resulted in a sample of 687 matches, out of which we estimate only 15 to be chance coincidences. Most of the matches show red MSX colors and a thermal radio spectrum. The scale height of their Galactic latitude distribution is very small (FWHM of 16' or ~40 pc). These properties suggest that the sample is dominated by young ultra-compact HII regions, most of which are previously uncataloged. High reliability and low reliability source lists are available for download with the paper.

Uriel Giveon; Robert H. Becker; David J. Helfand; Richard L. White

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

288

Water-bearing minerals on mars: source of observed mid-latitude water?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Odyssey spacecraft documented the existence of heterogeneously distributed hydrogen at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound H20 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3 .8% equivalent H20. Shallow occurrences of water ice are not stable near the martian equator, making the hydrogen deposits at these latitudes somewhat enigmatic. Clay minerals and zeolites have both been proposed as possible water-bearing constituents on Mars, and both are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable to those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide good evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust [6] . The nature of the hydrogen-containing material observed in the equatorial martian regolith is of particular importance to the question of whether hydrous minerals have formed in the past on Mars. Also, whether these minerals exist in a hydrated (i .e., containing H2O molecules in their structures) or dehydrated state is a crucial question . The existence of hydrous minerals is also important in connection with their possible role in affecting the diurnal variation of the martian atmosphere, in their potential role in unraveling the paleohydrology and paleobiology of Mars, and in their possible use as a water resource to support exploration of the martian mid-latitudes.

Bish, D. L. (David L.); Carey, J. W. (James W.); Fialips, C. I. (Clair I.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling Using a High Horizontal Grid Resolution over a Complex Coastal Terrain and a Wine Region of South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to assess local air circulation patterns over the wine-producing Stellenbosch region of South Africa. Numerical simulations using four nested grids (25, 5, and 1 km, and 200 m of horizontal ...

V. Bonnardot; S. Cautenet

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

STEP Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

York Regions STEP Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School...

291

Arkansas Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arkansas Regions Arkansas Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

292

Missouri Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Missouri Regions Missouri Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

293

Georgia Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Georgia Regions Georgia Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

294

Kansas Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kansas Regions Kansas Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

295

Maine Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Maine Regions Maine Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School...

296

Michigan Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Michigan Regions Michigan Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

297

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

298

Regional Maps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States Census Divisions Figure 2.Electricity Market Module (EMM)Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure...

299

Generalized Region Connection Calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Region Connection Calculus (RCC) is one of the most widely referenced system of high-level (qualitative) spatial reasoning. RCC assumes a continuous representation of space. This contrasts sharply with the fact that spatial information obtained from ... Keywords: (Generalized) Boolean connection algebra, (Generalized) Region Connection Calculus, Continuous space, Discrete space, Mereology, Mereotopology, Qualitative spatial reasoning

Sanjiang Li; Mingsheng Ying

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from NREL China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for China. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The QUEST RR Lyrae Survey: III. The Low Galactic Latitude Catalogue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for the QUEST RR Lyrae Survey at low galactic latitude, conducted entirely with observations obtained with the QUEST mosaic camera and the 1.0/1.5m J\\"urgen Stock Schmidt telescope at the National Observatory of Venezuela. The survey spans an area of 476 sq. deg on the sky, with multi-epoch observations in the V, R and I photometric bands for 6.5x10^6 stars in the galactic latitude range 3095 per cent and ~85 per cent for RRab and RRc stars respectively. Photometric metallicities were computed based on the light curves and individual extinctions calculated from minimum light colours for each RRab star. Distances were obtained with typical errors ~7 per cent. The RR Lyrae survey simultaneously spans a large range of heliocentric distances 0.5<= R_hel(kpc)<=40 and heights above the plane -15<=z(kpc)<=+20, with well known completeness across the survey area, making it an ideal set for studying the struc ture of the Galactic thick disk.

Mateu, Cecilia; Downes, Juan JosÚ; Brice˝o, CÚsar; Zinn, Robert; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Can hydrous minerals account for the observed mid-latitude water on Mars?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Great interest was generated with the discovery by the Odyssey spacecraft OC heterogeneously distributed hydrogcn at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound 1120 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3.8% equivalent H20. More recent interpretations of the Odyssey data using new calibrations suggest that some near-equatorial areas, such as Arabia Terra, contain up to 8.5f I .3% water-equivalent hydrogen. Such shallow occurrences (latitudes. A number of potentially hydrous silicate phases, notably clay minerals and zeolites, have been proposed as possible M20-bearing constituents on Mars, and both groups of minerals are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable io those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust, and concluded that spectral deconvolution of MGS TES and Mariner 9 IRIS data is consistent with the presence of zeolite in the martian surface dust.

Bish, D. L. (David L.); Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Fialips, C. I. (Clair I.); Carey, J. W. (James W.); Feldman, W. C. (William C.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

304

Neogene Low-latitude Seasonal Environmental Variations: Stable Isotopic and Trace Elemental Records in Mollusks from the Florida Platform and the Central American Isthmus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Ph.D. dissertation integrates stable isotope and trace element geochemistry in modern and fossil gastropod shells to study low-latitude marine paleoenvironments. First, stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) and Sr/Ca ratios are used to examine low-latitude temperature and salinity variations recorded in Plio-Pleistocene (3.5-1.6 Ma) fossils from western Florida during periods of high-latitude warming and "global" cooling. The middle Pliocene Pinecrest Beds (Units 7 and 4) and the overlaying Plio-Pleistocene Caloosahatchee Formation generate significantly different delta18O-derived paleotemperatures but identical Sr/Ca ratios. High delta18O values, together with low delta13C values and brackish fauna, indicate that Unit 4 was deposited in a lagoonal environment similar to modern Florida Bay. In contrast, relatively low delta18O and high delta13C values in Unit 7 and Caloosahatchee Formation represent deposition in an open-marine environment. The observed Unit 7 and Caloosahatchee paleotemperatures are inconsistent with middle Pliocene warming event, but consistent with the Plio-Pleistocene cooling trend. To quantify modern upwelling and freshening signals and contrast these signals between the tropical eastern Pacific (TEP) and southwestern Caribbean (SWC), methodologies are developed for reconstructing seasonal upwelling and freshening patterns from modern tropical gastropod shells from Panama using: 1) paired oxygen and carbon isotopic profiles and delta18O-delta13C (delta-delta) correlations, and 2) deviation from baseline delta18O values that represent conditions free of seasonal upwelling or freshening influences. Shell delta18O values normalized to the baseline faithfully record modern conditions of little or no upwelling in SWC and Gulf of Chiriqui, and strong upwelling in the Gulf of Panama, as well as strong freshwater input in most areas. The baseline and delta-delta methods are applied to identify and quantify changes in upwelling and freshening in the Neogene TEP and SWC seawaters associated with the final closure of Central American Isthmus. The records reveal significant upwelling in late Miocene SWC and mid Pliocene TEP waters, strong freshening in SWC waters from 5.7-2.2 Ma, and minimal seasonal upwelling and/or freshening variations in Plio-Pleistocene SWC waters. The reconstructed paleotemperatures agree with the global cooling trend through the late Miocene, but lack evidence for middle Pliocene warming or late Neogene global cooling.

Tao, Kai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

306

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana from NREL Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for Ghana. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to

307

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase

308

Louisiana Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Louisiana Regions Louisiana Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

309

Chicago Regional Science Bowl - HS | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois Regions Chicago Regional Science Bowl - HS National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

310

Wisconsin Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wisconsin Regions Wisconsin Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

311

Northeast Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Connecticut Regions Northeast Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

312

Greater Cincinnati Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ohio Regions Greater Cincinnati Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

313

South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ohio Regions South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

314

Mid-Holocene Orbital Forcing of Regional-Scale Climate: A Case Study of Western North America Using a High-Resolution RCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, paleoclimate modeling has become a key technique for studying climate system responses to changes in external forcing. Of current interest is the response of regional-scale climate to global-...

Noah S. Diffenbaugh; Lisa C. Sloan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the High-speed Rail, Korea Research Institute for Humanof High-Speed Rail, Korea Research Institute for Humanhigh-speed rail (Korea Railway Research Institute) Improving

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE Justin C. Kasper,1 Michael L. Stevens, and Alan J. Lazarus Kavli Institute for Astrophysics of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind

Richardson, John

317

A Numerical Study of Sea-Breeze-Driven Ocean Poincare Wave Propagation and Mixing near the Critical Latitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near the vicinity of 30░ latitude, the coincidence of the period of sea breeze and the inertial period of the ocean leads to a maximum near-inertial ocean response to sea breeze. This produces a propagating inertial internal (Poincare) wave ...

Xiaoqian Zhang; David C. Smith IV; Steven F. DiMarco; Robert D. Hetland

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Interannual Relationship between the Latitude of the Eddy-Driven Jet and the Edge of the Hadley Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong correlation between the latitudes of the eddy-driven jet and of the Hadley cell edge, on interannual time scales, is found to exist during austral summer, in both the NCEPľNCAR reanalysis and the models participating in the Coupled Model ...

Sarah M. Kang; Lorenzo M. Polvani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Regional Opportunities in New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico Regional Opportunities in New Mexico The Technology Transfer Division facilitates a number of programs designed to stimulate high-tech start-ups and other company creation,...

320

Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

322

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

323

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources incountries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates providedby the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

324

South Dakota Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

WDTS Home NSB Home High School High School Regionals South Daktoa Regions South Dakota Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High...

325

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

326

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a TransportMinistry of Transport Seoul, Korea and Visiting ScholarDevelopment in Korea 13 III.1.

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

328

Sacramento Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sacramento Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules,...

329

SLAC Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SLAC Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and...

330

Central Valley Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Central Valley Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules,...

331

Eastern Idaho Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Eastern Idaho Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules,...

332

Western Idaho Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Western Idaho Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules,...

333

LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

Low- and mid-latitude coronal holes (CHs) observed on the Sun during the current solar activity minimum (from 2006 September 21, Carrington rotation (CR) 2048, to 2009 June 26, CR 2084) were analyzed using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and STEREO-A SECCHI EUVI data. From both the observations and Potential Field Source Surface modeling, we find that the area occupied by CHs inside a belt of +-40{sup 0} around the solar equator is larger in the current 2007 solar minimum relative to the similar phase of the previous 1996 solar minimum. The enhanced CH area is related to a recurrent appearance of five persistent CHs, which survived during 7-27 solar rotations. Three of the CHs are of positive magnetic polarity and two are negative. The most long-lived CH was being formed during 2 days and existed for 27 rotations. This CH was associated with fast solar wind at 1 AU of approximately 620 +- 40 km s{sup -1}. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling for this time period shows an open field structure above this CH. We conclude that the global magnetic field of the Sun possessed a multi-pole structure during this time period. Calculation of the harmonic power spectrum of the solar magnetic field demonstrates a greater prevalence of multi-pole components over the dipole component in the 2007 solar minimum compared to the 1996 solar minimum. The unusual large separation between the dipole and multi-pole components is due to the very low magnitude of the dipole component, which is three times lower than that in the previous 1996 solar minimum.

Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Luhmann, Janet; Lee, Christina O. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Gravity Wave Characteristics in the Southern Hemisphere Revealed by a High-Resolution Middle-Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity wave characteristics in the middle- to high-latitude Southern Hemisphere are analyzed using simulation data over 3 yr from a high-resolution middle-atmosphere general circulation model without using any gravity wave parameterizations. ...

Kaoru Sato; Satoshi Tateno; Shingo Watanabe; Yoshio Kawatani

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region  

SciTech Connect

A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of {approx}8 to {approx}120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

Plogmaker, Stefan; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Rensmo, Haakan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Linusson, Per [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Eland, John H. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Baker, Neville [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

Yazdani, Iman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Annual Range of Southern Hemisphere SST: Comparison with Surface Heating and Possible Reasons for the High-Latitude Falloff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the seasonal cycle is the largest single component of observed sea surface temperature (SST) variability, yet it is still not fully understood. Herein, the degree to which the structure of the seasonal cycle of Southern Hemisphere SST ...

A. M. Chiodi; D. E. Harrison

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Correction of the High-Latitude Rain Day Anomaly in the NCEPľNCAR Reanalysis for Land Surface Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spurious wavelike pattern in the monthly rain day statistics exists within the National Centers for Environmental PredictionľNational Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEPľNCAR) reanalysis precipitation product. The anomaly, which is an ...

Justin Sheffield; Alan D. Ziegler; Eric F. Wood; Yangbo Chen

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Boundary Layer Response to Recent Arctic Sea Ice Loss and Implications for High-Latitude Climate Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study documents and evaluates the boundary layer and energy budget response to record low 2007 sea ice extents in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) using 1-day observationally constrained forecasts and 10-yr runs with a freely ...

J. E. Kay; K. Raeder; A. Gettelman; J. Anderson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

To What Extent Does High-Latitude Wave Forcing Drive Tropical Upwelling in the BrewerľDobson Circulation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The causes of the annual cycle and nonseasonal variability in the globally averaged, equator-to-pole BrewerľDobson circulation (BDC; defined here as the equatorially symmetric component of the Lagrangian-mean meridional circulation) are ...

Rei Ueyama; John M. Wallace

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Model Study of the Role of High-Latitude Topography in the Climatic Response to Orbital Insolation Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a combined global zonal-averaged energy balance model and a continental ice-sheet model to insulation anomalies produced by orbital perturbations is examined. Although the role of ice sheet dynamics is included in the model, this ...

G. E. Birchfield; Johannes Weertman; Albert T. Lunde

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Accumulation and Emanation at Low Latitudes. Part III: Forward and Backward Accumulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short equatorially trapped Rossby waves are usually thought to he trapped and dissipated nea the region of creation because of their relatively slow group speeds and because of the relatively low amplitude basic state within which they reside. ...

Hai-Ru Chang; Peter J. Webster

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Forcing and Sampling of Ocean General Circulation Models: Impact of High-Frequency Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant inertial oscillations are present in all primitive equation ocean general circulation models when they are forced with high-frequency (period order of days) wind stress fields. At specific latitudes the energy of the wind stress ...

Steven R. Jayne; Robin Tokmakian

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Three-Dimensional Turbulent Bottom Density Currents from a High-Order Nonhydrostatic Spectral Element Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overflows are bottom gravity currents that supply dense water masses generated in high-latitude and marginal seas into the general circulation. Oceanic observations have revealed that mixing of overflows with ambient water masses takes place over ...

Tamay M. Ízg÷kmen; Paul F. Fischer; Jinqiao Duan; Traian Iliescu

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Model-aided Study of the Origin and Evolution of the Anomalously High Potential vorticity in the Inner Region of a Rapidly Deepening Marine Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High spatial and temporal resolution fields generated by a mesoscale prediction model are used to study a case of rapid marine cyclogenesis (26 mb in 12 h) within the context of potential vorticity (PV) thinking. The case, which occurred on 23 ...

Richard J. Reed; Mark T. Stoelinga; Ying-Hwa Kuo

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Regional University Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance Alliance Developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with NETL-Regional University Alliance WVU National Research Center for Coal and Energy Fossil Consulting Services, Inc. The AVESTAR(tm) Center provides a state-of- the-art, highly realistic, dynamic simulator for a coal-fired power plant using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology with CO 2 capture. The system is based on Invensys' DYNSIM ® software

348

Region 9: Pacific Rim Region, Regional Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION Regional Sustainability Plan Presented by Ruth Cox Region 9 Regional Administrator Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) May 22 nd , 2013 REGION 9 INFORMATION MANAGE Federal space ´ü 36 million RSF in Region Nine * 173 owned buildings, 955 leased buildings * 100,000 Federal workers housed DESIGN & CONSTRUCT new Federal buildings ´üÂ$1.4 billion in FY12 capital construction projects ´üÂ$318 million in FY13 - Los Angeles Courthouse project PROVIDE PROCUREMENT LEADERSHIP across the Federal government ´ü $1.24 billion in total GSA Schedule sales in FY12 ´ü $468 million to small businesses ´ü 34,000 fleet vehicles, 53% of which are Alternative Fuel Vehicles Pacific Rim Profile - CA, AZ, NV, HI

349

Booz Allen and Hamilton Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas Regions Booz Allen and Hamilton Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School...

350

Western Idaho Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SC Home Programs WDTS Home NSB Home High School High School Regionals Idaho Regions Western Idaho Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home...

351

The Impact of Satellite-Derived Polar Winds on Lower-Latitude Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) in NWP models continues to be an important source of information in data-sparse regions. These AMVs are derived from a time sequence of images from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. NWP ...

David Santek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mass spectrometric study of high-temperature dehydroxylation of disperse silicas and the interpretation of their IR spectra in the region of Si-O stretching vibrations  

SciTech Connect

Field-desorption mass spectrometry has been used to determine the lower boundary of the temperature interval for the removal of surface hydroxyl groups of aerosil. Both in the regime of cation desorption and in the regime of anion desorption, at temperatures above 900/sup 0/K, OH ions of the corresponding sign are registered. It is concluded that the thermal decomposition of the surface bonds triple bond Si-OH is homolytic in character. A mechanism is proposed for the dehydroxylation of SiO/sub 2/, according to which the initially formed radical centers triple bond Si and triple bond SiO change into ions: triple bond Si/sup +/ (I) and triple bond SiO/sup -/ (II). The bands at 888 and 908 cm/sup -1/ in the IR spectra of silicas obtained at high temperatures are assigned to vibrations of Si-O bonds in I and II, respectively.

Nazarenko, V.A.; Furman, V.I.; Guzikevich, A.G.; Gorlov, Yu.I.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The NMC Nested Regional Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nested primitive equation regional spectral model is developed. The model consists of two componentsŚa low-resolution global spectral model and a high-resolution regional spectral model. The two components have identical vertical structure and ...

Hann-Ming Henry Juang; Masao Kanamitsu

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Interaction Region Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta as the major author (unless noted): R. Gupta, et. al, "React & Wind Nb3Sn Common Coil Dipole", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA . *** Click Here for Talk ***. R. Gupta, "Modular Design and Modular Program for High Gradient Quadrupoles", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA. *** Click Here for Poster ***. Racetrack Magnet Designs and Technologies, WAMDO@CERN, April 2-6, 2006 (Click here for the oral presentation). R. Gupta, et. al, "Optimization of Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR Upgrade," Presented at the 2005 Particle Accelerator Conference, Knoxville, TN, USA (2005). *** Click Here for Poster *** R. Gupta, et al., “Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR

355

High-Frequency Planetary Waves in the Polar Middle Atmosphere as Seen in a Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 4-day wave often dominates the large-scale wind, temperature, and constituent variability in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere winter near the stratopause. This study examines the winter Southern Hemisphere vortex of 1998 using 4-times-...

L. Coy; I. Őtajner; A. M. DaSilva; J. Joiner; R. B. Rood; S. Pawson; S. J. Lin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Extreme Drought Event during WinterľSpring of 2011 in East China: Combined Influences of Teleconnection in Midhigh Latitudes and Thermal Forcing in Maritime Continent Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in China experienced an extremely severe and persistent drought event from January to May of 2011. Using both the observational data and NCEPľNCAR reanalysis, features of the drought event ...

Dachao Jin; Zhaoyong Guan; Weiya Tang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Extreme Drought Event during Winter-Spring of 2011 in East China: Combined Influences of Teleconnection in Midhigh Latitudes and Thermal Forcing in Maritime Continent Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in China experienced an extremely severe and persistent drought event from January through May of 2011. Using both the observational data and NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, features of the drought ...

Dachao Jin; Zhaoyong Guan; Weiya Tang

358

A COMPANION AS THE CAUSE OF LATITUDE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN THE WIND OF ETA CARINAE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae binary system obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS. Eta Car is enshrouded by the dusty Homunculus nebula, which scatters light emitted by the central binary and provides a unique opportunity to study a massive binary system from different vantage points. We investigate the latitudinal and azimuthal dependence of H{alpha} line profiles caused by the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity created by the companion star. Using two-dimensional radiative transfer models, we find that the wind cavity can qualitatively explain the observed line profiles around apastron. Regions of the Homunculus which scatter light that propagated through the WWC cavity show weaker or no H{alpha} absorption. Regions scattering light that propagated through a significant portion of the primary wind show stronger P Cygni absorption. Our models overestimate the H{alpha} absorption formed in the primary wind, which we attribute to photoionization by the companion, not presently included in the models. We can qualitatively explain the latitudinal changes that occur during periastron, shedding light on the nature of Eta Car's spectroscopic events. Our models support the idea that during the brief period of time around periastron when the primary wind flows unimpeded toward the observer, H{alpha} absorption occurs in directions toward the central object and Homunculus SE pole, but not toward equatorial regions close to the Weigelt blobs. We suggest that observed latitudinal and azimuthal variations are dominated by the companion star via the WWC cavity, rather than by rapid rotation of the primary star.

Groh, J. H. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Madura, T. I.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kruip, C. J. H., E-mail: jose.groh@unige.ch [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students |...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students...

360

Oklahoma Regional Science Bowl - Middle School Edition | U.S...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oklahoma Regions Oklahoma Regional Science Bowl - Middle School Edition National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Argonne National Laboratory Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois Regions Argonne National Laboratory Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle...

362

Regional companies eye growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional companies eye growth Regional companies eye growth Adaptive Radio Technologies, Los Alamos Visualization Associates, Mesa Tech International Inc., and ThermaSun Inc. were...

363

REGIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM MASTER Regional Issue Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from these Federal Region totals. Energy sources addressed were coal, nuclear, oil, oil shale, gas, geothermal, . - - - hydroelectric and solar. Six of the national laboratories,...

364

A case-study of the low-latitude thermosphere during geomagnetic storms and its new representation by improved MSIS model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case-study of the low-latitude thermosphere during geomagnetic storms and its new representation geomagnetically disturbed periods are known to exhibit signi®cant deviations from atmospheric model predictions station in India, are successfully reproduced for two moderate geomagnetic storms. Key words. Low

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

365

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.  

SciTech Connect

A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

Balasingam, Pirahas (University of Arizona); Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, during the late stages of production of NCEP-NCAR Global Reanalysis (GR), exploration of a regional reanalysis project was suggested by the GR project's Advisory Committee, ôparticularly if the RDAS [Regional Data Assimilation System] is ...

Fedor Mesinger; Geoff DiMego; Eugenia Kalnay; Kenneth Mitchell; Perry C. Shafran; Wesley Ebisuzaki; DuÜan Jovi?; Jack Woollen; Eric Rogers; Ernesto H. Berbery; Michael B. Ek; Yun Fan; Robert Grumbine; Wayne Higgins; Hong Li; Ying Lin; Geoff Manikin; David Parrish; Wei Shi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Texas A&M Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas A&M Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules,...

369

Alaska Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alaska Geothermal Region Details Areas (54) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[2] References ÔćĹ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" ÔćĹ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Alaska Area 1,717,854 km┬▓1,717,854,000,000 m┬▓ 663,091.644 mi┬▓ 18,490,808,670,600 ft┬▓ 2,054,553,384,000 yd┬▓ 424,490,312.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 677 MW677,000 kW

370

Western Regional Partnership Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Overview Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview ´éĘ WRP Background ´éĘ Importance of Region ´éĘ WRP Tribal Relations Committee ´éĘ WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness ´éĘ 5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean ´éĘ Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains ´éĘ Significant State Trust Landholdings ´éĘ Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes ´éĘ Significant amounts of Federally managed land ´éĄ According to GSA 2004 study, WRP states range from 41.8% - 84.5% of total state land WRP Region's Importance to DoD ´éĘ Extensive Training Ranges ´éĄ Interconnected ground/air ranges provide unmatched warfighter training opportunities

371

Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation, and Asymmetry of Price Pass-Through in U.S. Gasoline Markets MICHAEL YE*, JOHN ZYREN**, JOANNE SHORE**, AND MICHAEL BURDETTE** Abstract Spot to retail price pass-through behavior of the U.S. gasoline market was investigated at the national and regional levels, using weekly wholesale and retail motor gasoline prices from January 2000 to the present. Asymmetric pass-through was found across all regions, with faster pass-through when prices are rising. Pass-through patterns, in terms of speed and time for completion, were found to vary from region to region. Spatial aggregation was investigated at the national level and the East Coast with the aggregated cumulative pass-through being greater than the volume-weighted regional pass-through when spot prices increase. These results are useful to the petroleum industry, consumers,

372

Regional Education Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern New Mexico and LANL through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director...

373

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information & Modeling Print E-mail The specific impacts and vulnerabilities posed by climate change are largely defined by regional differences 9in things like geography,...

374

Hawaii Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Hawaii Regions Hawaii Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Hawaii Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Hawaii Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

375

Delaware Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Delaware Regions Delaware Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Delaware Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Delaware Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

376

Utah Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Utah Regions Utah Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Utah Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Utah Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

377

Arkansas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arkansas Regions Arkansas Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Arkansas Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Arkansas Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

378

Minnesota Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Minnesota Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Minnesota Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

379

Tennessee Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Tennessee Regions Tennessee Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Tennessee Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Tennessee Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

380

Connecticut Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Connecticut Regions Connecticut Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Connecticut Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Connecticut Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Massachusetts Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Massachusetts Regions Massachusetts Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Massachusetts Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Massachusetts Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

382

Alaska Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Alaska Regions Alaska Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Alaska Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Alaska Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

383

Ohio Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ohio Regions Ohio Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Ohio Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Ohio Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

384

Kentucky Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kentucky Regions Kentucky Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Kentucky Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Kentucky Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

385

Pennsylvania Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Pennsylvania Regions Pennsylvania Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Pennsylvania Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Pennsylvania Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

386

Indiana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Indiana Regions Indiana Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Indiana Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Indiana Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

387

Oklahoma Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oklahoma Regions Oklahoma Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Oklahoma Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Oklahoma Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

388

Michigan Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Michigan Regions Michigan Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Michigan Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Michigan Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

389

Iowa Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Iowa Regions Iowa Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Iowa Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Iowa Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

390

Washington Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Regions Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Washington Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Washington Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

391

Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arizona Regions Arizona Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Arizona Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Arizona Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

392

Nebraska Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nebraska Regions Nebraska Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Nebraska Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Nebraska Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

393

Oregon Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oregon Regions Oregon Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Oregon Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Oregon Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

394

Louisiana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Louisiana Regions Louisiana Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Louisiana Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Louisiana Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

395

Kansas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Kansas Regions Kansas Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Kansas Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Kansas Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

396

Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Wyoming Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wyoming Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

397

Idaho Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Idaho Regions Idaho Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Idaho Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Idaho Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

398

Vermont Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Vermont Regions Vermont Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Vermont Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Vermont Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

399

Georgia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Georgia Regions Georgia Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Georgia Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Georgia Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

400

Colorado Region | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Colorado Region Colorado Region National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Colorado Region Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Colorado Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Missouri Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Missouri Regions Missouri Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Missouri Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Missouri Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

402

Texas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas Regions Texas Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Texas Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Texas Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

403

California Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

California Regions California Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals California Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page California Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

404

Mississippi Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mississippi Regions Mississippi Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Mississippi Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Mississippi Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

405

Maine Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Maine Regions Maine Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Maine Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Maine Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

406

Wisconsin Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wisconsin Regions Wisconsin Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Wisconsin Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wisconsin Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

407

Montana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Montana Regions Montana Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Montana Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Montana Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

408

Virginia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Virginia Regions Virginia Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Virginia Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Virginia Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

409

Nevada Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nevada Regions Nevada Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Nevada Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Nevada Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

410

Florida Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Florida Regions Florida Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Florida Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Florida Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

411

Illinois Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois Regions Illinois Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Illinois Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Illinois Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

412

Maryland Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Maryland Regions Maryland Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Maryland Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Maryland Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

413

Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Alabama Regions Alabama Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Alabama Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Alabama Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

414

Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGIONAL REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhD Melissa Klingenberg, PhD Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Resource Dynamics Corporation (RDC) Tradeoff/Sensitivity Analyses of Hydrogen Delivery Approaches EDO Fiber Science High Pressure/High Strength Composite Material Development and Prototyping CTC * Program Management * Hydrogen Delivery - CH 4 /H 2 co-transport - H 2 separation - Delivery approaches * Advanced Materials - Characterization - Testing/Analyses - Predictive Modeling * Sensors SRNL Pipeline Life Management Program Develop infrastructure technology for a H 2 economy Aims to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen

415

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

416

Observations of seasonal variations in atmospheric greenhouse trapping and its enhancement at high sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between observed values of atmospheric greenhouse trapping and sea surface temperature is found to vary seasonally. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping is defined here as the difference between infrared emissions from the earth's surface and infrared emissions from the top of the atmosphere through cloudless skies. Infrared surface emissions are calculated from known sea surface temperatures; emissions from the top of the atmosphere are taken from direct satellite measurements. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping at the same sea surface temperature is greater in the winter than in the summer over temperate oceans. In subtropical latitudes, the opposite is true. At surface temperatures above approximately 298 K, atmospheric greenhouse trapping is found to increase even more rapidly from regions of lower sea surface temperature to regions of higher surface temperature than infrared surface emissions. The causes for this [open quotes]super[close quotes] greenhouse effect are explored, and four processes are found to contribute. Water vapor continuum absorption and thermodynamically controlled increases in water vapor concentration at constant relative humidity with increasing atmospheric temperature make significant contributions, but do not explain the entire super greenhouse effect. To explain the observations of atmospheric greenhouse trapping, the upper and middle troposphere, must be increasingly moist over the warmest sea surface temperatures, while the atmospheric temperature profile becomes increasingly unstable. Regions with these high sea surface temperatures are also increasingly subject to deep convection, which suggests that convection moistens the upper and middle troposphere in regions of convective activity relative to nonconvective regions, resulting in the super greenhouse effect. Dynamic processes, along with local thermodynamic processes, are required to explain the observed super greenhouse effect. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Hallberg, R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Inamdar, A.K. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Regional Planning | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Regional Planning Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Alias (field_alias) Apply California, Oregon, Washington Regional Ocean Partnership West Coast Governors' Alliance Regional Data Portal In Development U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico Regional Ocean Partnership U.S. Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership-currently being formally established Regional Data Portal To be developed Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina Regional Ocean Partnership Governors' South Atlantic Alliance Regional Data Portal Currently in development American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Marshall Islands, Palau

418

Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office  

Regional Competitions. Six Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competitions are taking place across the countryľ representing all of the United ...

419

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

420

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Regional Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Regional Climate Research: Needs and Opportunities was held 2ľ4 April 2001 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was cosponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of ...

L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Filippo Giorgi; Robert L. Wilby

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a series of six region-specific adaptation tools for the coastal communities in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Papua New Guinea....

423

Sections / Geographical Regions Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Sections provide a local forum for fats and oils professionals. Building a Stronger Global Association Sections / Geographical Regions Information Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents

424

Variability in Springtime Thaw in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Monitoring a Major Control on the Biospheric Assimilation of Atmospheric CO2 with Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented from the satellite microwave remote sensing record that the timing of seasonal thawing and subsequent initiation of the growing season in early spring has advanced by approximately 8 days from 1988 to 2001 for the pan-Arctic ...

Kyle C. McDonald; John S. Kimball; Eni Njoku; Reiner Zimmermann; Maosheng Zhao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Establishing Regional Resource Centers  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Establishing Regional Resource Centers Establishing Regional Resource Centers July 25, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all participants are in a listen only mode. To ask a question later during the question and answer session please press star then 1 on your touchtone phone. Today's conference is being recorded. If you have any objections you may disconnect. And I would like to turn it over to Mr. Jonathan Bartlett. Sir, you may begin. Jonathan Bartlett: Thank you very much. This is Jonathan Bartlett from the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Today's WPA Webinar will be on the subject of establishing regional resource centers. I will be joined by Ian Baring-Gould at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the

426

Regional Retail Gasoline Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Retail gasoline prices, like those for distillate fuels, have hit record prices nationally and in several regions this year. The national average regular gasoline price peaked at $1.68 per gallon in mid-June, but quickly declined, and now stands at $1.45, 17 cents higher than a year ago. Two regions, in particular, experienced sharp gasoline price runups this year. California, which often has some of the highest prices in the nation, saw prices peak near $1.85 in mid-September, while the Midwest had average prices over $1.87 in mid-June. Local prices at some stations in both areas hit levels well over $2.00 per gallon. The reasons for the regional price runups differed significantly. In the Midwest, the introduction of Phase 2 RFG was hampered by low stocks,

427

regional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

regional regional Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption gas regional UK Data application/zip icon Guidance document for interpreting data (zip, 1.2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Excel file: 2005 MLSOA and IGZ gas and electricity (xls, 10 MiB)

428

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Missouri Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Missouri Regions Missouri Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle...

430

BPA Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oregon Regions BPA Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School...

431

DC Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Washington DC Regions DC Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

432

Chicago Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois Regions Chicago Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About NSB High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School...

433

New, efficient regional architecture  

SciTech Connect

Recent trends in the design of solar homes are discussed with particular emphasis on the particular climate in which the house will be located. Regional climatic conditions will effect design strategies including insulation, ventilation, shading, site planning, window area, etc. The important effects of local climate have been established over the past 5 years. Sources of information concerning solar architecture are cited.

Stains, L.R.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

California SouthWest Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School...

435

2020 Electric Car Exterior Design for Pearl River Delta Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the fastest economic development regions in China. The big cities in PRD attract a great many young high-educatedů (more)

Zhu, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

SUBSPACE TRUST-REGION METHODS FOR LARGE BOUND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region problem and high overhead of computing is avoided, see [ę ] and references ..... derive from forcing (2.8) and can be easily proved following the lines.

437

NETL: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Carbon Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded cooperative agreements to seven Regional Carbon Sequestration...

438

Regional Opportunities in New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Opportunities in New Mexico Regional Opportunities in New Mexico The Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (FCI) facilitates a number of programs designed to stimulate...

439

Regional Reserve Margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the status of reserve margins across the country. Reserve margins represent the margin of excess capacity compared to demand. It is commonly calculated as the fraction of unused capacity during the summer peak. Simple in concept, the numbers can be difficult to calculate because of changes in geographic boundaries between regions, different views of what capacity qualifies to be counted, and changes in estimates of demand. This report provides a comprehensive and consistently calcula...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

EPRI Regional Haze Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last decade, EPRI has investigated ways to improve the scientific basis for various steps required under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) 1999 Regional Haze Regulations (RHR). Those regulations require mitigating visibility impairment in mandatory Class I areaslarger national parks and wilderness areasattributable to manmade air pollution by 2064. Several technical issues have arisen while interpreting the implementation process of the RHR. This report describes EPRI and o...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management Context The Gulf of Mexico Region includes by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC) and NOAA Fisheries (NMFS) under eight fishery in conjunction with the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (SAFMC). Gulf of Mexico Region FMPs 1. Red Drum

442

Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regions Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Regions RegionsMap2012.jpg Geothermal regions were outlined for the western United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) to identify geothermal areas, projects, and exploration trends for each region. These regions were developed based on the USGS physiographic regions (U.S. Geological Survey), and then adjusted to fit geothermal exploration parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects (weather, vegetation patterns, groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.[1] Add a new Geothermal Region List of Regions Area (km2) Mean MW

443

Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CTC Team CTC Team 1 Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by: The Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Team January 6, 2004 The CTC Team 2 Presentation Outline Introduction of CTC Team CTC Background Technical Approach - CTC Team Member Presentations Conclusions The CTC Team 3 The CTC Project Team Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Resource Dynamics Corp. Tradeoff Analyses of Hydrogen

444

Statistics of GPS ionospheric scintillation and irregularities over polar regions at solar minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical study of the occurrence characteristic of GPS ionospheric scintillation and irregularity in the polar latitude is presented. These measurements were made at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard [78.9░N, 11.9░E; 75.8░N corrected geomagnetic latitude (CGMLat)] ... Keywords: GPS, IMF, Ionospheric scintillation, Polar latitude irregularity

Guozhu Li; Baiqi Ning; Zhipeng Ren; Lianhuan Hu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Sierra Nevada Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sierra Nevada Region Sierra Nevada Region Power Revenue Requirement Forecast FY 2014 - FY 2017 Expenses Revenues Expenses Revenues Expenses Revenues Expenses Revenues Expenses Revenues O&M Expense: /1 Reclamation $41,172,013 $43,590,771 $45,797,325 $47,108,786 $49,408,075 Western $56,601,261 $58,299,299 $60,048,278 $61,849,726 $63,705,218 Total O&M Expense $97,773,274 $101,890,070 $105,845,603 $108,958,512 $113,113,292 Purchase Power Expense: Custom Product & Suppl. Power /2 $211,016,136 $211,016,136 $215,236,459 $215,236,459 $219,541,188 $219,541,188 $223,932,012 $223,932,012 $228,410,652 $228,410,652 HBA Costs /3 $2,310,408 $2,379,720 $2,451,112 $2,524,645 $2,600,385 Purchases for Project Use /4 $1,025,800 $0 $0 $0 $0 Washoe Cost for BR $471,500 $471,500 $471,500 $194,000 $194,000 Total Purchase Power

446

Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascades Geothermal Region Cascades Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (3) Techniques (5) Map: {{{Name}}} The Cascade Range is part of a vast mountain chain that extends from British Columbia to northern California and has been volcanically active for ~ 40 million years as a result of the convergence of the of the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. Two physiographic sub-provinces make up the Cascade Range; the Western Cascades and the High Cascades on the east. Middle Eocene to early Pliocene (40 - 5 million years) thick mafic lava flows, primarily of andesitic composition are associated with ash flows, tuffs, and silicic intrusive bodies and stocks that decrease in age eastward to the High Cascades. Miocene to Holocene volcanic rocks make up

447

Appendix K: Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2008 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

448

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Carbon Capture and Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration...

449

Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ÔćĹ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Colorado, New Mexico Area 128,454 km┬▓128,454,000,000 m┬▓ 49,583.244 mi┬▓ 1,382,666,010,600 ft┬▓ 153,630,984,000 yd┬▓ 31,741,625.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 1,010 MW1,010,000 kW 1,010,000,000 W 1,010,000,000,000 mW 1.01 GW 0.00101 TW Planned Capacity

451

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Regional air quality in the Four Corners study region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The body of information presented in this paper is directed to policy makers, regulators, and energy planners concerned with the effect of energy development and alternative regulatory policies on regional air quality in the Four Corners Study Region. This study was one of 5 regional studies conducted for the National Commission on Air Quality (NCAQ). Potential regional air quality impacts were evaluated out to the year 1995 for alternative energy scenarios under current and alternative regulatory policies. Highlights of the results from the regional air quality analysis are discussed in this paper.

Nochumson, D.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays an important role in the formation of the dense low-speed wind. On the other hand, the fast waves can carry a sizable energy to the upper level to heat the outer corona and accelerate the high-speed wind effectively. We also study dependency on field strength, $B_0$, at the bottom of the TR and non-radial expansion of a flow tube, $f_{\\rm max}$, to find that large $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\gtrsim 2$ but small $B_0\\simeq 2$G are favorable for the high-speed wind and that small $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\simeq 1$ is required for the low-speed wind.

Takeru K. Suzuki

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Stations in Special Wind Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stations in Special Wind Regions. ... station_matrix_912850.xlsx (Excel file). [ SED Home | Extreme Winds Home | Previous | Next ] ...

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Regional business cycles in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is clear evidence for differences in the structure of the Italian regional business cycle in the period 1951-2004: the relationship with the national business cycle is closer in the North than in the South. The interaction between regional cycles ... Keywords: Regional business cycles, Spectral analysis, Stylized facts

Camilla Mastromarco; Ulrich Woitek

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Regional Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage. We launched this initiative in 2003. It's being completed in phases (I, II, and III) and forms the centerpiece of national efforts to develop the

458

Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robyn Rock Robyn Rock Robyn Rock Manager, BNL Proposal Center rrock@bnl.gov, (631)-344-5468 Photo of Robyn Rock Responsibilities Robyn is responsible for establishing a new Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Proposal Center to support the Laboratory's development of high-quality, competitive proposals to sponsor organizations; for providing oversight for BNL proposal process, organizational performance and optimization in proposal execution; supporting the Laboratory's growth initiative through collaborations with BNL's research organizations and with external funding organizations and partners. She is also responsible for providing leadership in advising BNL's research organizations on funding opportunity requirements. Experience Robyn's strengths include 15 years of experience in Government

459

Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascades Geothermal Region Cascades Geothermal Region (Redirected from Cascades) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (3) Techniques (5) Map: {{{Name}}} The Cascade Range is part of a vast mountain chain that extends from British Columbia to northern California and has been volcanically active for ~ 40 million years as a result of the convergence of the of the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. Two physiographic sub-provinces make up the Cascade Range; the Western Cascades and the High Cascades on the east. Middle Eocene to early Pliocene (40 - 5 million years) thick mafic lava flows, primarily of andesitic composition are associated with ash flows, tuffs, and silicic intrusive bodies and stocks that decrease in age

460

New Mexico Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mexico Regions » New Mexico Regional Mexico Regions » New Mexico Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New Mexico Regions New Mexico Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Cheryl Garcia Email: cagarci@Sandia.gov Regional Event Information Date: January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 40 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high latitude regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Wyoming Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Science Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Anne Theriault Email: anne@wyrsb.org Regional Event Information Date: February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 16 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

462

Louisiana Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Louisiana Regions » Louisiana Regional Science Louisiana Regions » Louisiana Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Louisiana Regions Louisiana Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Tammy James Email: Tammy.James@SPR.DOE.GOV Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, February 15, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 30 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 2

463

CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2010 Country Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

464

Appendix B Sierra Nevada Region Customer Groups and Economic Regions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A- Not available electronically. A- Not available electronically. Appendix B Sierra Nevada Region Customer Groups and Economic Regions The list included in this appendix shows the Sierra Nevada Region customers with contracts expiring in the year 2004. The list indicates which customer group each customer is considered a part of for purposes of analysis. The list also shows which economic region each customer is located in. Some customers are not included in a subregion of the central and northern California region. Further discussion of the economic regions is included in Section 4.9.4 and in Appendix L. Appendix C Renewable Technology Cost Information Matrix The development of the renewable technology matrix (RTM) was undertaken to determine the primary cost and performance characteristics of renewable technologies in

465

Regional Variations of Moist Static Energy Flux into the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the climmological heating of the Arctic by the atmospheric moist static energy (MSE) flux from lower latitudes based on 25 years (November 1964ľ1989) of the GFDL dataset. During the five month winter period (NDJFM) the ...

James E. Overland; Philip Turet; Abraham H. Oort

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Arizona Regions Arizona Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Arizona Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Arizona Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

467

Oregon Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oregon Regions Oregon Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Oregon Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Oregon Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

468

Iowa Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Iowa Regions Iowa Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Iowa Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Iowa Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

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Georgia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Georgia Regions Georgia Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Georgia Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Georgia Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

470

Florida Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Florida Regions Florida Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Florida Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Florida Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

471

Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Wyoming Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wyoming Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

472

Alaska Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Alaska Regions Alaska Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Alaska Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Alaska Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

473

Minnesota Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Minnesota Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Minnesota Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

474

Idaho Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Idaho Regions Idaho Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Idaho Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Idaho Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

475

Michigan Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Michigan Regions Michigan Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Michigan Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Michigan Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

476

Texas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Texas Regions Texas Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Texas Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Texas Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

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Missouri Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Missouri Regions Missouri Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Missouri Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Missouri Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your