Sample records for high latitude regions

  1. Birkeland currents and charged particles in the high-latitude prenoon region: A new interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bythrow, P.F.; Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, conjugate measurements of magnetic fields and charged particles at low altitude in the high-latitude prenoon sector and the magnetosheath were made with the DMSP F7, HILAT, and Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE satellites on November 1, 1984. These data show that the low-latitude portion of the traditional ''cusp'' particle signature is coincident with the prenoon region 1 current system in both hemispheres and for both northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland currents are associated with the dispersion region of cusp ions when the IMF is directed southward and with electron fluxes that are slightly enhanced over polar rain intensities. Finally, electron spectra measured by AMPTE CCE in the magnetosheath near 1000 MLT are similar in shape and energy to those acquired at low altitude by both DMSP F7 and HILAT. These observations indicate that for both northward and southward IMF, the traditional ''cusp particle'' signature is coincident with the region 1 Birkeland current system and maps to low altitude along field lines that thread the dayside boundary layer. The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland current system flows along field lines that lie poleward of the region of cusp particles and the region 1 current system. These field lines thread the plasma mantle. Thus, we suggest that the traditional ''cusp'' current system might be appropriately renamed the ''mantle'' Birkeland current system. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Guo, Q. L., E-mail: kdf@ynao.ac.cn [College of Mathematics Physics and Information Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  3. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David, E-mail: jegpeek@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  4. A new southern high-latitude index P. Ballatore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -aligned currents at the poleward auroral rim both in¯uence geomagnetic perturbations at polar latitudes and feed a new regional geomagnetic index AES-80, de®ned similarly to the classical auroral electrojet AE index, using data from ®ve Antarctic stations located at corrected geomagnetic latitudes about 80 °S. Because

  5. Temporal variations of solar rotation rate at high latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency splitting coefficients from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations covering the period 1995--2001 are used to study temporal variations in the solar rotation rate at high latitudes. The torsional oscillation pattern in the Sun is known to penetrate to a depth of about $0.1R_\\odot$ with alternate bands of faster and slower rotating plasma. At lower latitudes the bands move towards equator with time. At higher latitudes, however, the bands appear to move towards the poles. This is similar to the observed pole-ward movement of large scale magnetic fields at high latitudes. This also supports theoretical results of pole-ward moving bands at high latitudes in some mean field dynamo models. The polar rotation rate is found to decrease between 1995 and 1999 after which it has started increasing.

  6. Conjugate High Latitude Measurements along the 40 Magnetic Meridian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    ­ 12 Volt system · Six 40 Wae Solar Panels · Sixteen 100 Ah AGM sealed leadConjugate High Latitude Measurements along the 40º Magnetic Meridian: Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power the 2014 season marked as red squares. #12;Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF THE SUN'S HIGH-LATITUDE MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rightmire-Upton, Lisa [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Hathaway, David H. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kosak, Katie, E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu, E-mail: david.hathaway@nasa.gov, E-mail: mkosak2011@my.fit.edu [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The meridional circulation at high latitudes is crucial to the buildup and reversal of the Sun's polar magnetic fields. Here, we characterize the axisymmetric flows by applying a magnetic feature cross-correlation procedure to high-resolution magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We focus on Carrington rotations 2096-2107 (2010 April to 2011 March)-the overlap interval between HMI and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). HMI magnetograms averaged over 720 s are first mapped into heliographic coordinates. Strips from these maps are then cross-correlated to determine the distances in latitude and longitude that the magnetic element pattern has moved, thus providing meridional flow and differential rotation velocities for each rotation of the Sun. Flow velocities were averaged for the overlap interval and compared to results obtained from MDI data. This comparison indicates that these HMI images are rotated counterclockwise by 0.{sup 0}075 with respect to the Sun's rotation axis. The profiles indicate that HMI data can be used to reliably measure these axisymmetric flow velocities to at least within 5 Degree-Sign of the poles. Unlike the noisier MDI measurements, no evidence of a meridional flow counter-cell is seen in either hemisphere with the HMI measurements: poleward flow continues all the way to the poles. Slight north-south asymmetries are observed in the meridional flow. These asymmetries should contribute to the observed asymmetries in the polar fields and the timing of their reversals.

  8. A high galactic latitude survey of far ultraviolet excess objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, J.V.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two closely related efforts in astrophysical instrumentation and observation are described with the objective of performing a high galactic latitude survey of faint objects in the far ultraviolet. The avenues of research possible with data obtained from space based ultraviolet surveys are discussed and a summary of past, present and planned instruments capable of such survey work presented. The Faust telescope, an eight degree field of view imaging instrument with peak sensitivity at 1700A, designed for survey work is described. An imaging, active readout detector and associated ground support equipment were designed, constructed, and calibrated to replace the original photographic detector. The present state of observational data relevant to determining the atmospheric parameters of subdwarf B and O stars, and their mid-Galactic plane density and scale height was reviewed. Theoretical explanations of their evolutionary status were proposed. The optical observations and spectral reductions performed on objects included in a catalog of far ultraviolet bright, high galactic latitude objects are described. These observations provide a sample of subdwarf O and B stars free of brightness and temperature selection effects. A model atmospheres analysis was performed on the subdwarf sample to determine the temperature, gravity and helium to hydrogen ratio of the individual objects. The results show a smooth distribution of objects on the gravity versus temperature diagram near the theoretical location of the extended horizontal branch.

  9. A LARGE-AREA SURVEY FOR RADIO PULSARS AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacoby, B. A.; Kulkarni, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bailes, M.; Ord, S. M. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 31122 (Australia); Edwards, R. T. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)], E-mail: baj@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: srk@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: mbailes@swin.edu.au, E-mail: ord@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: Russell.Edwards@csiro.au

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed a survey for pulsars at high Galactic latitudes with the 64 m Parkes radio telescope. Observing with the 13 beam multibeam receiver at a frequency of 1374 MHz, we covered {approx}4150 square degrees in the region -100 deg. {<=} l {<=} 50 deg., 15 deg. {<=} |b| {<=} 30 deg. with 7232 pointings of 265 s each, thus extending the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey a further 15 deg. on either side of the Galactic plane. The signal from each beam was processed by a 96 channel x 3 MHz x 2 polarization filterbank, with the detected power in the two polarizations of each frequency channel summed and digitized with 1 bit sampling every 125 {mu}s, giving good sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with low or moderate dispersion measure. The resulting 2.4 TB data set was processed using standard pulsar search techniques with the workstation cluster at the Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing. This survey resulted in the discovery of 26 new pulsars including seven binary and/or millisecond pulsars, and redetected 36 previously known pulsars. We describe the survey methodology and results, and present timing solutions for the 19 newly discovered slow pulsars, as well as for nine slow pulsars discovered the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey that had no previous timing solutions. Even with a small sampling interval, 1374 MHz center frequency, and a large mid-latitude survey volume we failed to detect any very rapidly spinning pulsars. Evidently, such 'submillisecond' pulsars are rare.

  10. Role of latitude of source region in Solar Energetic Particle events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    PR1 2HE, UK Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland Abstract. Solar up to near- relativistic energies. Some of these particles can escape the solar atmosphere and travelRole of latitude of source region in Solar Energetic Particle events S. Dalla and N. Agueda1

  11. Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Properties of localized, high latitude, dayside aurora H. U. Frey,1 T. J. Immel,1 G. Lu,2 J different type of high latitude aurora, which does not show any signature of precipitating protons. It also causes the aurora. We interpret this aurora as the optical signature of electron precipitation

  12. High-latitude dayside energetic precipitation and IMF BZ rotations N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Owing to the high latitudes it is unlikely that these electrons were energized on the nightside by the solar wind. The precipitation appears at $77­79° magnetic latitude and coincides with a northward Ionosphere: Auroral ionosphere (2704); 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions

  13. Diffuse Galactic Light in the Field of the Translucent High Galactic Latitude Cloud MBM32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ienaka, N; Matsuoka, Y; Sameshima, H; Oyabu, S; Tsujimoto, T; Peterson, B A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted B, g, V, and R-band imaging in a 45x40 arcmin^2 field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S_\

  14. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  15. High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system in southern Scotland, during a storm event, and exhibit significantly different amplitude characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic

  16. Seasonal dependence of localized, high-latitude dayside aurora H. U. Frey, N. stgaard, and T. J. Immel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Seasonal dependence of localized, high-latitude dayside aurora (HiLDA) H. U. Frey, N. Østgaard frequently observes intense ultraviolet (UV) emissions from a localized High Latitude Dayside Aurora (HiLDA) poleward of the general auroral oval location [Frey et al., 2003a]. It has been shown that this aurora

  17. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  18. Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yueyang

    This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

  19. THE HIGH-LATITUDE BRANCH OF THE SOLAR TORSIONAL OSCILLATION IN THE RISING PHASE OF CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Christensen-Dalsgaard, J. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hill, F.; Komm, R. [National Solar Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Larson, T. P.; Schou, J. [HEPL Solar Physics, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Rempel, M.; Thompson, M. J., E-mail: rhowe@nso.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use global heliseismic data from the Global Oscillation Network Group, the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, to examine the behavior, during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, of the migrating zonal flow pattern known as the torsional oscillation. Although the high-latitude part of the pattern appears to be absent in the new cycle when the flows are derived by subtracting a mean across a full solar cycle, it can be seen if we subtract the mean over a shorter period in the rising phase of each cycle, and these two mean rotation profiles differ significantly at high latitudes. This indicates that the underlying high-latitude rotation has changed; we speculate that this is in response to weaker polar fields, as suggested by a recent model.

  20. Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from the Quaternary of high northern latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from determination key taxonomy paleoecology Round brown spiny dinoflagellate cysts from high latitudes a synthesis of descriptions with remarks on the mor- phology, taxonomy, nomenclature and ecology of cysts from

  1. High Latitude, Translucent Molecular Clouds as Probes of Local Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, R D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the gamma-ray emission from 9 high latitude, translucent molecular clouds taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) between 250 MeV and 10 GeV. Observations of gamma-rays allow us to probe the density and spectrum of cosmic rays in the solar neighborhood. The clouds studied lie within $\\sim\\!$270 pc from the Sun and are selected from the Planck all-sky CO map. Gamma-rays in this energy range mostly result from cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium, which is traced with three components: HI, CO, and dark gas. Every cloud is detected and shows significant, extended gamma-ray emission from molecular gas. The gamma-ray emission is dominated by the CO-emitting gas in some clouds, but by the CO-dark gas in others. The average emissivity and gamma-ray power law index from HI above 1 GeV shows no evidence of a systematic variation. The CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor shows no variation between clouds over this small spatial range, but shows significant variations within each cloud. The a...

  2. Realistic analytic model for the prompt and high latitude emission in GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Genet; J. Granot

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite show an early rapid decay phase (RDP) in their X-ray lightcurve, which is usually a smooth continuation of the prompt gamma-ray emission, strongly suggesting that it is its tail. However, the mechanism behind it is still not clear. The most popular model for this RDP is High Latitude Emission (HLE). While HLE is expected in many models for the prompt GRB emission, such as the popular internal shocks model, there are models in which it is not expected, such as sporadic magnetic reconnection events. Therefore, testing whether the RDP is consistent with HLE can help distinguish between different prompt emission models. We address this question by modeling the prompt emission as the sum of its individual pulses with their HLE tails. Analytic expressions for the observed flux density are obtained for power-law and Band function emission spectra. For internal shocks the observed instantaneous spectrum is very close to the emitted one, and should be well described by a Band function also during the RDP. Our model naturally produces, the observed spectral softening and steepening of the flux decay. The observed flux during the RDP is initially dominated by the tail of the last pulse, but the tails of one or more earlier pulses can become dominant later on. Moreover, modeling several overlapping pulses as a single wider pulse would over-predict the emission tail. Thus, one should be very careful when testing the predictions of HLE and do a combined temporal and spectral fit of the prompt GRB emission and the RDP.

  3. Infrared Excess and Molecular Clouds: A comparison of new suerveys of far-infrared and H I 21-cm emission at high galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. Reach; William F. Wall; Nils Odegard

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have created a map of the large-scale infrared surface brightness in excess of that associated with the atomic interstellar medium, using region-by-region correlations between the far-infrared and 21-cm line surface brightness. Our study updates and extends a previous attempt with IRAS and Berkeley/Parkes H I surveys. The far-infrared observations used here are from DIRBE, which extends far-infrared wavelength coverage to 240 um, so that we are reliably sampling the emission of large, thermal-equilibrium grains that dominate the dust mass. The H I data are from the combined Leiden-Dwingeloo and Parkes 21-cm line surveys. Using the maps of excess infrared emission at 100, 140, and 240 um, we created an atlas and identified the coherent structures. These infrared excess clouds can be caused both by dust that is warmer than average, or by dust associated with gas other than the atomic interstellar medium. We find very few warm clouds, such as the H II region around Spica. The majority of the infrared excess clouds are colder than the average atomic interstellar medium. These clouds are peaks of column density, and their excess infrared emission is due to dust associated with molecular gas. We identify essentially all known high-latitude molecular clouds in the infrared excess maps, and further identify a sample of new clouds with similar infrared properties. The infrared excess was correlated with CO line brightness, allowing us to measure the ratio of N(H2)/W(CO) for high-latitude clouds. The atlas of infrared excess may be a useful guide to regions of relatively high column density, which might cause high extinction toward extragalactic objects at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths and confusion for cosmic infrared and microwave backgrounds.

  4. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sameshima, H. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8501 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8501 (Japan); Tsujimoto, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Peterson, B. A., E-mail: ienaka@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  5. Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

  6. The effects of coronal mass ejection on galactic cosmic rays in the high latitude heliosphere: Observations from Ulysses` first orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bothmer, V.; Heber, B.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Wibberenz, G. [Univ. of Kiel (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik; Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Balogh, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Raviart, A. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d`Astrophysique; Paizis, C. [Univ. di Milano (Italy). Istituto di Fisica Cosmica CNR

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During its first solar orbit the Ulysses spacecraft detected several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at high heliographic latitudes. The authors present first observations on the effects of these high latitude CMEs on galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using measurements from the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) which is part of the Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Investigation (COSPIN) experiment, the Los Alamos SWOOPS (Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun) experiment and the magnetic field experiments. They find the passage of these CMEs over the spacecraft to be associated with short term decreases of GCR intensities The relatively weak shocks in these events, driven by the CMEs` over-expansion, had no strong influence on the GCRs. The intensity minimums of GCRs occurred on closed magnetic field lines inside the CMEs themselves as indicated by bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons. Short episodes of intensity increases of GCRs inside CMEs at times when the bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons disappeared, can be interpreted as evidence that GCRs can easily access the interior of those CMEs in which open magnetic field lines are embedded.

  7. amplify high-latitude warming: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    discharge and Bering Strait inflow are studied in a regional model of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. It is suggested that a gradual increase in the flux of Pacific...

  8. Landscape influences on climate-related lake shrinkage at high latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    reservoirs of carbon. Here, using a population of ca. 2300 lakes with statistically significant increasing-related declines in lake area have been identified across circumpolar regions and have been characterized-reaching ecosystem services along migratory routes. Net declining trends have also been characterized by spatial

  9. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Arain, 2007: Impacts of peat and vegetation on permafrostdecomposition, water balance, and peat accumulation. Earth2008: High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate

  10. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  11. Final Report for High Latitude Climate Modeling: ARM Takes Us Beyond Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Lynn M [Scripps/UCSD; Lubin, Dan [Scripps/UCSD

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The main thrust of this project was to devise a method by which the majority of North Slope of Alaska (NSA) meteorological and radiometric data, collected on a daily basis, could be used to evaluate and improve global climate model (GCM) simulations and their parameterizations, particularly for cloud microphysics. Although the standard ARM Program sensors for a less complete suite of instruments for cloud and aerosol studies than the instruments on an intensive field program such as the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), the advantage they offer lies in the long time base and large volume of data that covers a wide range of meteorological and climatological conditions. The challenge has been devising a method to interpret the NSA data in a practical way, so that a wide variety of meteorological conditions in all seasons can be examined with climate models. If successful, climate modelers would have a robust alternative to the usual “case study” approach (i.e., from intensive field programs only) for testing and evaluating their parameterizations’ performance. Understanding climate change on regional scales requires a broad scientific consideration of anthropogenic influences that goes beyond greenhouse gas emissions to also include aerosol-induced changes in cloud properties. For instance, it is now clear that on small scales, human-induced aerosol plumes can exert microclimatic radiative and hydrologic forcing that rivals that of greenhouse gas–forced warming. This project has made significant scientific progress by investigating what causes successive versions of climate models continue to exhibit errors in cloud amount, cloud microphysical and radiative properties, precipitation, and radiation balance, as compared with observations and, in particular, in Arctic regions. To find out what is going wrong, we have tested the models' cloud representation over the full range of meteorological conditions found in the Arctic using the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) data.

  12. 3, 10811107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 3, 1081­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page-dimensional model study of long-term mid-high latitude lower stratosphere ozone changes M. P. Chipperfield School­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page Abstract Introduction

  13. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  14. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  15. A Geochemical and Sedimentary Record of High Southern Latitude Holocene Climate Evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moy, C M; Dunbar, R B; Guilderson, T P; Waldmann, N; Mucciarone, D A; Recasens, C; Austin, J A; Anselmetti, F S

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55{sup o}S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8,000 years based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcan Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allow us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8,000 years. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C between 7,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano {delta}{sup 13}C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface temperature from the mid-latitude Chilean continental shelf and Antarctic air temperatures from the Taylor Dome ice core record in East Antarctica. Mid-Holocene warming occurred simultaneously across the Antarctic Frontal Zone, and in particular, in locations currently influenced by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  16. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  17. Impact of 15 Jan 2010 annular solar eclipse on the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Indian region from Magnetometer, Ionosonde and GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Rajaram, Girija; Sripathi, Samireddipalle; Bhaskar, Ankush

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annular eclipse of Jan 15, 2010 over southern India was studied with a network of multi-instrumental observations consisting magnetometer, ionosonde and GPS receivers. By selecting the day before and the normal EEJ days as the control days, it is intrinsically proved that the regular eastward electric field for the whole day at the equator was not just weakened but actually was flipped for several hours by the influence of tides related to the spectacular Sun-Moon-Earth alignment near the middle of the day. The effect of flipping the electric field was clearly seen in the equatorial ionosonde data and through the large array of GPS receivers that accomplished the TEC data. The main impact of the change in the electric field was the reduced EIA at all latitudes, with the anomaly crest that shifted towards the equator. The equatorial F-region density profile was also showing an enhanced F region peak in spite of a reduced VTEC. By comparison to the plasma density depletion associated with the temporary lack...

  18. LOW-FREQUENCY IMAGING OF FIELDS AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY 32 ELEMENT PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Christopher L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Levine, Alan M. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); De Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Hernquist, Lars L.; Bernardi, Gianni [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bowman, Judd D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Briggs, Frank H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaensler, B. M.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Sadler, Elaine M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia); Morales, Miguel F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sethi, Shiv K. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Arcus, Wayne; Crosse, Brian W. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Barnes, David G. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Bunton, John D. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping (Australia); Cappallo, Roger C.; Corey, Brian E., E-mail: clmw@mit.edu [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA (United States); and others

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency, wide-field-of-view radio interferometer under development at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. We have used a 32 element MWA prototype interferometer (MWA-32T) to observe two 50 Degree-Sign diameter fields in the southern sky, covering a total of {approx}2700 deg{sup 2}, in order to evaluate the performance of the MWA-32T, to develop techniques for epoch of reionization experiments, and to make measurements of astronomical foregrounds. We developed a calibration and imaging pipeline for the MWA-32T, and used it to produce {approx}15' angular resolution maps of the two fields in the 110-200 MHz band. We perform a blind source extraction using these confusion-limited images, and detect 655 sources at high significance with an additional 871 lower significance source candidates. We compare these sources with existing low-frequency radio surveys in order to assess the MWA-32T system performance, wide-field analysis algorithms, and catalog quality. Our source catalog is found to agree well with existing low-frequency surveys in these regions of the sky and with statistical distributions of point sources derived from Northern Hemisphere surveys; it represents one of the deepest surveys to date of this sky field in the 110-200 MHz band.

  19. Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl March 13, 2015 - 6:43pm...

  20. Alaska Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alaska Regions Alaska Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals...

  1. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Year 3 technical progress report, November 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The net radiative forcing of clouds varies strongly with latitude. Poleward of 30 degrees in both hemispheres, low-level clouds create a net cooling effect corresponding to radiative divergences of {minus}50 to {minus}100 W/m{sup 2}. It is likely that a combination of fogs, boundary-layer stratocumulus, and stratus clouds are the main contributors to this forcing. Models of the response of the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds to changes in aerosol abundance, for a variety of large-scale meteorological forcings, are important additions to GCMs used for the study of the role of Arctic systems in global climate. The overall objective of this research is the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The parameterization is to be designed for ultimate use in GCM simulations as a tool in understanding the role of CCN, IN, and Arctic clouds in radiation budgets. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) will be used during the course of this work. The parameterizations developed in this research are intended for application in a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  2. Crossing the Transition Region High Altitude Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : enhanced emission at TR temperatures Much lower density in umbra and plume: (log(Ne/cm 3)=10 Lyman line profiles not reversed in umbra and plume TR above sunspots is higher and probably more extended than in the surrounding plage region ------plage -.-.-.penumbra ......umbra ____plume #12;Outline Recent observations

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME September 1st 2006 to November 30th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South wins regional Science Bowl at PPPL A dramatic ending to High School Bowl sends local team to nationals By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February...

  9. Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Feb. 10 January 30, 2007 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of...

  10. Improving magnet designs with high and low field regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørk, R; Smith, A; Pryds, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays has to deliver high field regions in close proximity to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material used by 42% while increasing the difference in flux density between a high and a low field region by 45%.

  11. Eastward propagation of transient field-aligned currents and Pi 2 pulsations at auroral latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, D.J.; Samson, J.C.; Rostoker, G. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient field-aligned currents associated with the substorm expansive phase produce the damped, quasisinusoidal, geomagnetic pulsations called Pi 2's. Mid-latitude and auroral latitude measurements of the fields of these pulsations have indicated that they are produced, for the most part, by westward propagating field-aligned currents at auroral latitudes, although some studies have shown hints of eastward propagation, particularly far to the east of the longitude of the onset of the expansive phase. This study uses data from the University of Alberta magnetometer array to identify the characteristics of the eastward propagating mode at high latitudes by measuring polarizations and apparent group and phase velocities in regions far to the east of the expansive phase. The results show that eastward propagating Pi 2's have very high phase velocities (typically 40 km/s) which are comparable with those of the westward propagating mode. The polarizations and field configurations are compatible with a field-aligned and ionospheric current model which is very similar to that for the westward propagating component. These current models suggest that Pi 2's may be caused by shear Alfven waves produced by an azimuthally expanding, fast mode wave. The shear Alfven waves are reflected from the auroral ionosphere to produce the latitudinally localized field-aligned and ionospheric currents in the eastward (and westward) propagating modes.

  12. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  13. High temperature superconductivity in metallic region near Mott transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin-singlet superconductivity without phonons is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the superconductivity requires not only the total correlation should be strong enough but also the density of state around Fermi energy should be large enough, which shows that the high temperature superconductivity could only be found in the metallic region near the Mott metal insulator transition (MIT). Other properties of superconductors are also discussed on these conclusions.

  14. An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

  15. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Final technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The long-term objective of this research was the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The work plan was to perform simulations of these cloud systems to gain understanding of their dynamics and microphysics, especially how aerosols affect cloud development and properties, that cold then be used to guide parameterizations. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System), modified to treat Arctic clouds, have been used during the course of this work. The authors also developed a new modeling system, the Trajectory Ensemble Model, to perform detailed chemical and microphysical simulations off-line from the host LES model. The increased understanding of the cloud systems investigated in this research can be applied to a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  16. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  17. Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude Darin by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new

  18. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  19. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  20. The Chimalapas Region, Oaxaca, Mexico: a high-priority region for bird conservation in Mesoamerica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Herná ndez-Bañ os, Blanca E.; Escalona-Segura, Griselda; Rebó n-Gallardo, Fanny; Rodrí guez-Ayala, Emir; Figueroa-Esquivel, Elsa M.; Cabrera-Garcí a, Leonardo

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chimalapas lie in the easternmost corner of Oaxaca (Figure 1), at the shared border of Oaxaca, Veracruz and Chiapas. With Chajul (Chiapas) and Calakmul (Campeche) they rank among the largest pristine tropical regions of Mexico, holding an impressive number... of vegetation types, including cloud forest, trop- ical rainforest, semi-deciduous tropical forest, humid pine-oak forest, and deciduous tropical forest (Binford 1989, Wendt 1989, 1993; Figure 2). The region had its geological origins in the Upper Cretaceous...

  1. Thomas Jefferson High School takes regional Science Bowl competition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl Results: Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Science Bowl 2005 team includes (front...

  2. Planning for a regional rail system : analysis of high speed and high quality rail in the Basque region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Paul R. S. (Paul Robinson S.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to provide guidance for regional rail network planning to achieve the maximum benefits in terms of economic growth, passenger satisfaction, and environmental sustainability. The hypothesis is ...

  3. We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    We Have a Winner - DC High School Regional Science Bowl Competition Held Last Saturday Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Education and Community...

  4. Radiative Feedback in Relic HII Regions at High-Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Mesinger; Greg L. Bryan; Zoltan Haiman

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    UV radiation from early astrophysical sources could have a large impact on subsequent star formation in nearby protogalaxies. Here we study the radiative feedback from the first, short-lived stars using hydrodynamical simulations with transient UV backgrounds (UVBs) and persistent Lyman-Werner backgrounds (LWBs) of varying intensity. We extend our prior work in Mesinger et al. (2006), by studying a more typical region whose proto-galaxies form at lower redshifts, z~13-20, in the epoch likely preceding the bulk of reionization. We confirm our previous results that feedback in the relic HII regions resulting from such transient radiation, is itself transient. Feedback effects dwindle away after ~30% of the Hubble time, and the same critical specific intensity of J_UV~0.1 x 10^{-21} ergs/s/cm^2/Hz/sr separates positive and negative feedback regimes. Additionally, we discover a second episode of eventual positive feedback in halos which have not yet collapsed when their progenitor regions were exposed to the transient UVB. This eventual positive feedback appears in all runs, regardless of the strength of the UVB. However, this feedback regime is very sensitive to the presence of Lyman-Werner radiation, and notable effects disappear under fairly modest background intensities of J_LW>10^{-3} x 10^{-21} ergs/s/cm^2/Hz/sr. We conclude that UV radiative feedback in relic HII regions, although a complicated process, seems unlikely to have a major impact on the progress of cosmological reionization, provided that present estimates of the lifetime and luminosity of a PopIII star are accurate. More likely is that the build-up of the LWB ultimately governs the feedback strength until a persistent UV background can be established. [abridged

  5. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Matsumura, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Nagai, Makoto [Division of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-noudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kamegai, Kazuhisa, E-mail: ktanaka@phys.keio.ac.jp [Department of Industrial Administration, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, and H{sup 13}CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s{sup –1} velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and (1-4) × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 10{sup 51} erg and 0.7 × 10{sup 51} erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 10{sup 5} yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  6. Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Sally A.

    Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy University Tallahassee, FL 32306-4530 tyson@cs.fsu.edu Abstract. Increasingly tight energy design goals with a set of smaller region caches that significantly reduces energy consumption with little performance

  7. High-Speed Region Detection and Labeling using an FPGA-based Custom Computing Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Speed Region Detection and Labeling using an FPGA-based Custom Computing Platform Ramana V-0111 Abstract. General purpose custom computing platforms, such as Splash-2, have demonstrated the ability demonstrates the effectiveness of such platforms. The design and implementation of a region labeling task

  8. Microsoft Word - PR 04-14 BPA Regional Science Bowl High School...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140971-207-8390 or 503-230-5131 Westview High School Team 1 of Beaverton, Ore., wins competition at BPA Regional Science Bowl in Portland...

  9. LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    819 LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE M Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London El 4 successfully in determining the basic characteristics of the base of the solar convec- tive region (e

  10. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  11. Mats Lindroos, Cristina Oyon and Stevey OECD "A High Power Spallation Source in each Global Region"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ESS Mats Lindroos, Cristina Oyon and Stevey Peggs #12;ESS 2 #12;OECD "A High Power Spallation Source in each Global Region" SNS Oak Ridge J-PARC Tokai ESS in Lund #12;ESS: Site selection process · ESS high up on the ESFRI list Th ti biddi f th it (Bilb L d d· Three consortia bidding for the site

  12. Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 467342 $7D425BE27B725CE9393BE647 #12;Summertime total ozone variations over middle and polar latitudes and summertime ozone over middle and polar latitudes is analyzed using zonally averaged total ozone data. Short

  13. Satellite Microwave remote sensing of contrasting surface water inundation changes within the ArcticBoreal Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    -atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2, CH4) fluxes, and potential feedbacks to climate change. Here we report fractional open water (Fw) cover from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E). The AMSR ) of regions above 49°N (Brown et al., 1998). Although permafrost is widespread at high latitudes due to low

  14. Highlighting High Performance: Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School; Upton, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Blackstone Valley High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, and water conservation. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  15. Interpreting discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (2632S)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabatel, Antoine

    's Norte Chico region (26­32°S) Vincent Favier,1,2 Mark Falvey,3 Antoine Rabatel,1 Estelle Praderio,1 February 2009. [1] The water resources of high-altitude areas of Chile's semiarid Norte Chico region (26 discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (26­32°S

  16. Control of high power IGBT modules in the active region for fast pulsed power converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cravero, JM; Garcia Retegui, R; Maestri, S; Uicich, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At CERN, fast pulsed power converters are used to supply trapezoidal current in different magnet loads. These converters perform output current regulation by using a high power IGBT module in its ohmic region. This paper presents a new strategy for pulsed current control applications using a specifically designed IGBT driver.

  17. Controls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0053, USA b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of TexasControls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA Sunil Mehtaa, *, Alan E. Fryara , Jay L. Bannerb a Department of Geological Sciences, University

  18. WRF Test on IBM BG/L:Toward High Performance Application to Regional Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of climate change will mostly be felt on local to regional scales (Solomon et al., 2007). To develop better forecast skill in regional climate change, an integrated multi-scale modeling capability (i.e., a pair of global and regional climate models) becomes crucially important in understanding and preparing for the impacts of climate change on the temporal and spatial scales that are critical to California's and nation's future environmental quality and economical prosperity. Accurate knowledge of detailed local impact on the water management system from climate change requires a resolution of 1km or so. To this end, a high performance computing platform at the petascale appears to be an essential tool in providing such local scale information to formulate high quality adaptation strategies for local and regional climate change. As a key component of this modeling system at LLNL, the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is implemented and tested on the IBM BG/L machine. The objective of this study is to examine the scaling feature of WRF on BG/L for the optimal performance, and to assess the numerical accuracy of WRF solution on BG/L.

  19. LOCATION AND MAGNETOSPHERIC MAPPING OF SATURN'S MID-LATITUDE INFRARED AURORAL OVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallard, Tom; Melin, Henrik; Cowley, Stanley W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Miller, Steve [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lystrup, Makenzie B., E-mail: tss@ion.le.ac.u [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, CO 80303-7814 (United States)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous observations of Saturn's infrared aurorae have shown that a mid-latitude aurora exists significantly equatorward of the main auroral oval. Here, we present new results using data from four separate observing runs in 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2010. When combined, these provide a view of the mid-latitude aurora under a considerable range of viewing conditions, allowing the first calculation of the latitudinal position of this aurora to be made. This has shown that the mid-latitude aurora is located at the magnetic footprint of the region within the magnetosphere where the initial breakdown in corotation occurs, between 3 R {sub S} and the orbit of Enceladus ({approx}3.95 R {sub S}). We also confirm that this aurora is a continuous stable feature over a period of more than a decade and that an oval morphology is likely. When combined, these results indicate that the mid-latitude auroral oval is formed by currents driven by the breakdown process within the magnetosphere, in turn caused by mass loading from the torus of Enceladus, analogous with the volcanic moon Io's dominant role in the formation of Jupiter's main auroral oval.

  20. Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Galactic Centre Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher van Eldik

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in pushing the sensitivity of the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique into the 10 mCrab regime has enabled first sensitive observations of the innermost few 100 pc of the Milky Way in Very High Energy (VHE; >100 GeV) gamma rays. These observations are a valuable tool to understand the acceleration and propagation of energetic particles near the Galactic Centre. Remarkably, besides two compact gamma-ray sources, faint diffuse gamma-ray emission has been discovered with high significance. The current VHE gamma-ray view of the Galactic Centre region is reviewed, and possible counterparts of the gamma-ray sources and the origin of the diffuse emission are discussed. The future prospects for VHE Galactic Centre observations are discussed based on order-of-magnitude estimates for a CTA type array of telescopes.

  1. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Regions of Low and High Gastric Cancer Risk in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    The draft genome sequences of six Colombian Helicobacter pylori strains are presented. These strains were isolated from patients from regions of high and low gastric cancer risk in Colombia and were characterized by ...

  3. High-resolution observations of active region moss and its dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, R J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The \\textit{High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C)} has provided the sharpest view of the EUV corona to date. In this paper we exploit its impressive resolving power to provide the first analysis of the fine-scale structure of moss in an active region. The data reveal that the moss is made up of a collection of fine threads, that have widths with a mean and standard deviation of $440\\pm190$~km (Full Width Half Maximum). {The brightest moss emission is located at the visible head of the fine-scale structure and the fine structure appears to extend into the lower solar atmosphere.} The emission decreases along the features implying the lower sections are most likely dominated by cooler transition region plasma. These threads appear to be the cool, lower legs of the hot loops. In addition, the increased resolution allows for the first direct observation {of physical displacements of the moss fine-structure in a direction transverse to its central axis. Some of these transverse displacements demonstrate periodic b...

  4. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 AMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Landsman, Wayne B. [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, Peter W. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: gmarion@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 1,00084 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s{sup –1}) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between –14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II, and Fe II that produce both HVF and photospheric-velocity (PVF) absorption features. SN 2009ig is unusual for the large number of lines with detectable HVF in the spectra, but the light-curve parameters correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia (M{sub B} = –19.46 mag and ?m{sub 15}(B) = 0.90 mag). Similarly, the Si II ?6355 velocity at the time of B-max is greater than 'normal' for an SN Ia, but it is not extreme (v{sub Si} = 13,400 km s{sup –1}). The –14 days and –13 days spectra clearly resolve HVF from Si II ?6355 as separate absorptions from a detached line forming region. At these very early phases, detached HVF are prevalent in all lines. From –12 days to –6 days, HVF and PVF are detected simultaneously, and the two line forming regions maintain a constant separation of about 8000 km s{sup –1}. After –6 days all absorption features are PVF. The observations of SN 2009ig provide a complete picture of the transition from HVF to PVF. Most SNe Ia show evidence for HVF from multiple lines in spectra obtained before –10 days, and we compare the spectra of SN 2009ig to observations of other SNe. We show that each of the unusual line profiles for Si II ?6355 found in early-time spectra of SNe Ia correlate to a specific phase in a common development sequence from HVF to PVF.

  5. Deconstructing the High-Mass Star-Forming Region IRAS 23033+5951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Reid; Brenda C. Matthews

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming object IRAS 23033+5951. Our observations reveal two massive molecular cloud cores, designated IRAS 23033+5951-MMS1 and IRAS 23033+5951-MMS2. MMS1 has already formed a massive protostar and MMS2 appears to be on the verge of doing so. The latter core may be an example of a massive analogue to a "Class 0" star-forming object. The more evolved core shows some evidence of N2H+ destruction near the protostar, consistent with similar findings in low-mass star-forming objects. In addition to the already-known prominent HCO+ outflow, our SiO 2--1, and CH3OH 2--1 maps show evidence for two more candidate outflows, both presumably less powerful than the main one. Both cores are embedded in an elongated feature whose major axis is oriented almost exactly perpendicular to the axis of the most prominent outflow in the region. Although it has many of the characteristics of a disk, the 87,000 AU (0.42 pc) diameter of this structure suggests that it is more likely to be the flattened, rotating remnant of the natal molecular cloud fragment from which the star-forming cores condensed. We conclude that IRAS 23033+5951 is an excellent example of massive star formation proceeding in relative isolation, perhaps by the method of monolithic collapse and disk accretion.

  6. african high-level regional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 6 FREEDOM TO INNOVATE BIOTECHNOLOGY IN AFRICAS...

  7. Arkansas Regional High Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    that you can bring to the competition. Competition Location University of Arkansas-Fort Smith Math-Science (MS) Building 5210 Grand Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72913 Regional...

  8. An analysis of modified convective available potential energy and Richardson number in mid-latitude squall line environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stricherz, James Nicholas

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modified convective available potential energy (MCAPE) and Richardson number (MRI) were computed for each upper air sounding in a synoptic ? scale data network. The resulting fields were contoured and compared to the development, growth and decay of mid... ? latitude squall lines in several cases studies. The results indicate that, though the squall lines remained in the vicinity of MCAPE maxima and MRI minima there was no quantitative association. The squall lines also appeared to avoid these regions...

  9. Reliable performance Do not compromise on performance. The Latitude 3000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    (Emerging Market), all 64 Bit Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Home Basic (Emerging, the Latitude 3000 Series offers a smart choice for an easy to manage environment. · Dell Data Protection l Market), 32 & 64 Bit Ubuntu 12.04 Long Term Support (LTS

  10. On the relation between electron temperatures in the O+ and O++ zones in high-metallicity HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; J. M. Vilchez; T. X. Thuan

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a new way to establish the relation between the electron temperature t3 within the [OIII] zone and the electron temperature t2 within the [OII] zone in high-metallicity (12+log(O/H) > 8.25) HII regions. The t2 - t3 diagram is constructed by applying our method to a sample of 372 HII regions. We find that the correlation between t2 and t3 is tight and can be approximated by a linear expression. The new t2 - t3 relation can be used to determine t2 and accurate abundances in high-metallicity HII regions with a measured t3. It can also be used in conjunction with the ff relation for the determination of t3 and t2 and oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions where the [OIII]4363 auroral line is not detected. The derived t2 - t3 relation is independent of photoionization models of HII regions.

  11. MID LATITUDE CYCLONE A CASE STUDY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3,OfficeWITH AT65-OCT. 5, Small

  12. Guaranteed stability regions of linear systems with actuator saturation using the low-and-high gain technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Matthew C.

    constraints. Although its introduction in (Lin & Saberi1993) was fairly modest, it has since been used on predictive control. The low-and-high gain technique was introduced in Lin & Saberi (1995) as a method ensuring that the region in which stability was guaranteed did not shrink. With the work in Lin & Saberi

  13. Regional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources that cause frequent and hazardousRegional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport

  14. Regional transport and dilution during high pollution episodes in southeastern France: Summary of findings from the ESCOMPTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources which cause frequent1 Regional transport and dilution during high pollution episodes in southeastern France: Summary and hazardous pollution episodes especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON THE HEATING OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ACTIVE REGION LOOPS: OBSERVATIONS FROM HINODE AND THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of high-temperature emission in the core of a solar active region using instruments on Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). These multi-instrument observations allow us to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures and follow the evolution of emission at different temperatures. We find that at the apex of the high-temperature loops the emission measure distribution is strongly peaked near 4 MK and falls off sharply at both higher and lower temperatures. Perhaps most significantly, the emission measure at 0.5 MK is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude from the peak at 4 MK. We also find that the temporal evolution in broadband soft X-ray images is relatively constant over about 6 hr of observing. Observations in the cooler SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) bandpasses generally do not show cooling loops in the core of the active region, consistent with the steady emission observed at high temperatures. These observations suggest that the high-temperature loops observed in the core of an active region are close to equilibrium. We find that it is possible to reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines with a simple, high-frequency heating scenario where heating events occur on timescales much less than a characteristic cooling time. In contrast, low-frequency heating scenarios, which are commonly invoked to describe nanoflare models of coronal heating, do not reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines and predict low-temperature emission that is approximately an order of magnitude too large. We also present an initial look at images from the SDO/AIA 94 A channel, which is sensitive to Fe XVIII.

  16. Inspired Design The slim, light Latitude 6430u is simply beautiful from every

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    laptops ever. All systems are BFR/PVC- free2 , EPEAT registered3 , ENERGY STAR 5.2 qualified and offer of Latitude E-family laptops, the Latitude 6430u is amongst the most environmentally- responsible Latitude. Available with a 14.0" HD or 14.0" HD+ display4 and HDMI and VGA ports, it enables versatile usage

  17. WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near...

  18. High School Regionals | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L80's »Regionals National Science

  19. Groundwater Nitrogen Source Identification and Remediation in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaune, P.; Scanlon, B.; Reedy, R.; Schwartz, R.; Baumhardt, L.; Gregory, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data on potential management strategies that can remediate groundwater nitrate levels, this project was developed. The primary objective was to identify sources of groundwater nitrate in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains and the secondary...

  20. H2 formation on PAHs in photodissociation regions: a high-temperature pathway to molecular hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschman, Leon; Spaans, Marco; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. It is thought that a large portion of H2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We model the influence of PAHs on total H2 formation rates in photodissociation regions (PDRs) and assess the effect of these formation rates on the total cloud structure. We set up a chemical kinetic model at steady state in a PDR environment and included adiative transfer to calculate the chemistry at different depths in the PDR. This model includes known dust grain chemistry for the formation of H2 and a H2 formation mechanism on PAHs. Since H2 formation on PAHs is impeded by thermal barriers, this pathway is only efficient at higher temperatures (T > 200 K). At these temperatures the conventional route of H2 formation via H atoms physisorbed on dust grains is no longer feasible, so the PAH mechanism enlarges the region where H2 formation is possible. We find that PAHs have a significant influence on the structure of PD...

  1. Disposal of high-level nuclear waste above the water table in arid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roseboom, E.H. Jr.

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Locating a repository in the unsaturated zone of arid regions eliminates or simplifies many of the technological problems involved in designing a repository for operation below the water table and predicting its performance. It also offers possible accessibility and ease of monitoring throughout the operational period and possible retrieval of waste long after. The risks inherent in such a repository appear to be no greater than in one located in the saturated zone; in fact, many aspects of such a repository`s performance will be much easier to predict and the uncertainties will be reduced correspondingly. A major new concern would be whether future climatic changes could produce significant consequences due to possible rise of the water table or increased flux of water through the repository. If spent fuel were used as a waste form, a second new concern would be the rates of escape of gaseous {sup 129}I and {sup 14}C to the atmosphere.

  2. High time resolution observations of the solar wind and backstreaming ions in the earth's foreshock region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Formisano, V.; Orsini, S.; Bonifazi, C.; Egidi, A.; Moreno, G.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of the solar wind with ions backstreaming from the earth's bow shock is studied at high time resolution. It turns out that the bulk velocity of the solar wind oscillates, both in magnitude and direction, with typical periods of approx.1 minute in presence of the 'diffuse' ion population. Oscillations of comparable periods are also observed in the angular distribution and energy spectrum of the diffuse ions.

  3. Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, A. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhao, K. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

  4. Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beam charges upJefferson Lab holds

  5. Hydrodynamical simulations of the decay of high-speed molecular turbulence. I. Dense molecular regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgi Pavlovski; Michael D. Smith; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Alexander Rosen

    2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results from three dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of decaying high-speed turbulence in dense molecular clouds. We compare our results, which include a detailed cooling function, molecular hydrogen chemistry and a limited C and O chemistry, to those previously obtained for decaying isothermal turbulence. After an initial phase of shock formation, power-law decay regimes are uncovered, as in the isothermal case. We find that the turbulence decays faster than in the isothermal case because the average Mach number remains higher, due to the radiative cooling. The total thermal energy, initially raised by the introduction of turbulence, decays only a little slower than the kinetic energy. We discover that molecule reformation, as the fast turbulence decays, is several times faster than that predicted for a non-turbulent medium. This is caused by moderate speed shocks which sweep through a large fraction of the volume, compressing the gas and dust. Through reformation, the molecular density and molecular column appear as complex patterns of filaments, clumps and some diffuse structure. In contrast, the molecular fraction has a wider distribution of highly distorted clumps and copious diffuse structure, so that density and molecular density are almost identically distributed during the reformation phase. We conclude that molecules form in swept-up clumps but effectively mix throughout via subsequent expansions and compressions.

  6. Highly polarized structures in the near-nuclear regions of Cygnus A: intrinsic anisotropy within the cones?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Tadhunter; W. Sparks; D. J. Axon; L. Bergeron; N. J. Jackson; C. Packham; J. H. Hough; A. Robinson; S. Young

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR imaging polarimetry observations of the nucleus of Cygnus A, taken with the NICMOS camera of the HST at a wavelength of 2.0 microns.These maps reveal a highly collimated region of polarized emission straddling the nucleus and extending to a radius of 1.2 arcseconds. Remarkably, this feature coincides with one, but only one, limb of the edge-brightened bicone structure seen in the total intensity image. The high degree (P_k ~ 25%) and orientation of the extended polarization feature are consistent with a scattering origin. Most plausibly, the detection of polarization along only one limb of the bicone is a consequence of intrinsic anisotropy of the near-IR continuum within the radiation cones, with the direction of maximum intensity of the near-IR radiation field significantly displaced from the direction of the radio axis. The unresolved nuclear core source is also highly polarized (P_k > 28%), with a position angle close to the perpendicular to the radio axis. Given that this high degree of nuclear polarization can only be explained in terms of dichroic extinction if the dichroic mechanism is unusually efficient in Cygnus A, it is more likely that the nuclear polarization is due to the scattering of nuclear light in an unresolved scattering region close to the AGN. In this case, the flux of the core source in the K-band is dominated by scattered rather than transmitted quasar light, and previous extinction estimates based on K-band photometry of the core substantially underestimate the true nuclear extinction.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  8. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M., E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  9. Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

  10. Magnetic Landscape of Sun's Polar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; K. Matsuzaki; S. Nagata; D. Orozco Suarez; T. Shimizu; M. Shimojo; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. K. Suzuki; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the magnetic landscape of the polar region of the Sun that is unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard \\emph{Hinode}. Using a Milne-Eddington inversion, we found many vertically-oriented magnetic flux tubes with field strength as strong as 1 kG that are scattered in latitude between 70-90 degree. They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polarity of the polar region. The field vectors were observed to diverge from the center of the flux elements, consistent with a view of magnetic fields that expand and fan out with height. The polar region is also covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal magnetic fields whose photospheric source is evidently rooted in the strong field, vertical patches of flux. We conjecture that vertical flux tubes with large expansion around the photosphere-corona boundary serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves that accelerate the solar wind.

  11. GHIGLS: HI mapping at intermediate Galactic latitude using the Green Bank Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, P G; Goncalves, D Pinheiro; Lockman, Felix J; Boothroyd, A I; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Joncas, G; Stephan, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the data cubes from GHIGLS, our deep Green Bank Telescope surveys of the 21-cm line emission of HI in targeted fields at intermediate Galactic latitude. The GHIGLS fields together cover over 800 square degrees at 9.55' spatial resolution. The HI spectra have an effective velocity resolution about 1.0 km/s and cover at least -450 power spectra of maps of the column density, NHI. For our featured representative field, centered on the North Ecliptic Pole, the scaling exponents in power-law representations of the power spectra of NHI maps for low, intermediate, and high velocity gas components (LVC, IVC, and HVC) are -2.90 +/- 0.03, -2.55 +/- 0.04, and -2.66 +/- 0.06, respectively. After Gaussian decomposition of the line profiles, NHI maps were also made corresponding to the broad and narrow line components in the LVC...

  12. Background and Introduction The Rainwater Basin Region (RWB) provides critical mid-latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    systems many gravity irrigated fields have been converted. As a result the irrigation reuse pits a Geographical Information System (GIS) dataset that inventoried all irrigation reuse pits throughout the entire irrigation from leaving their property. This resulted in thousands of irrigation reuse pits being excavated

  13. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Schweiner; Jörg Main; Holger Cartarius; Günter Wunner

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom a saddle point appears, which is called the Stark saddle point. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy one can find classical orbits, which are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation another orbit of similar shape is found, which becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum-mechanically exact calculations we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincar\\'e sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  14. High Spatial Resolution KAO Far-Infrared Observations of the Central Regions of Infrared-Bright Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith; P. M. Harvey

    1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new high spatial resolution Kuiper Airborne Observatory 50 micron and/or 100 micron data for 11 infrared-bright galaxies. We also tabulate previously published KAO data for 11 other galaxies, along with the IRAS data for the bulges of M 31 and M 81. We find that L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) correlate with CO (1 - 0) intensity and tau(100). Galaxies with optical or near-infrared signatures of OB stars in their central regions have higher values of I(CO) and tau(100), as well as higher far-infrared surface brightnesses and L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) ratios. L(FIR)/L(H(alpha)) does not correlate strongly with CO and tau(100). These results support a scenario in which OB stars dominate dust heating in the more active galaxies and older stars are important in quiescent bulges.

  15. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these two conditions provide ideal conditions for the formation of highly supercooled drizzle and rain. These results help explain the anomalously high incidences of aircraft icing at cold temperatures in U.S. west coast clouds (Bernstein et al., 2004) and highlight the need to include aerosol effects when simulating aircraft icing with cloud models. These case studies can also serve as benchmarks for explicit cloud microphysics models attempting to simulate the formation of precipitation in these types of pristine conditions.

  16. Very low latitude (L = 1.08) whistlers Rajesh Singh,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    currents of whistler-producing lightning, which demonstrate a cutoff at 30 kA. Citation: Singh, R., M. B is much larger in a duct propagation than in non-ducted. At low latitudes (geomagnetic latitude the transmission cone. On the other hand, earlier studies utilized direction finding measurements to investigate

  17. Seasonal persistence of northern low-and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases #12;Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases 10 July 2008; accepted 23 July 2008; published 11 November 2008. [1] Analysis of observed ozone

  18. Beta diversity and latitude in North American mammals: testing the hypothesis of covariation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

    Beta diversity and latitude in North American mammals: testing the hypothesis of covariation Pilar Rodri´guez and He´ctor T. Arita Rodri´guez, P. and Arita, H. T. 2004. Beta diversity and latitude of the pattern remain insufficiently explored, including the effect of scales and the role of beta diversity

  19. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  20. Tracing Quasar Narrow-Line Regions Across Redshift: A Library of High S/N Optical Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tammour, A; Richards, G T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single optical spectrum, the quasar narrow-line region (NLR) reveals low density, photoionized gas in the host galaxy interstellar medium, while the immediate vicinity of the central engine generates the accretion disk continuum and broad emission lines. To isolate these two components, we construct a library of high S/N optical composite spectra created from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7). We divide the sample into bins of continuum luminosity and Hbeta FWHM that are used to construct median composites at different redshift steps up to 0.75. We measure the luminosities of the narrow-emission lines [NeV]3427, [NeIII]3870, [OIII]5007, and [OII]3728 with ionization potentials (IPs) of 97, 40, 35, and 13.6 eV respectively. The high IP lines' luminosities show no evidence of increase with redshift consistent with no evolution in the AGN SED or the host galaxy ISM illuminated by the continuum. In contrast, we find that the [OII] line becomes stronger at higher redshifts, and we interpret this as a co...

  1. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  2. First VUV full-Sun spectrum of the transition region with high spectral resolution compared to cool stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardi Peter

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the first full-Sun vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission line profile originating from the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona. It is based on a raster scan of the whole solar disk using SUMER/SOHO. The full-Sun spectrum has a spectral resolution which allows an investigation of details in the line profile as well as a thorough comparison to stellar spectra as obtained, e.g. with FUSE or STIS/HST. The full-Sun spectrum shows enhanced emission in the wings, and is well described by a double Gaussian fit with a narrow and a broad component. It is shown that the broad component is due to structures on the solar surface, especially those related to the magnetic chromospheric network. Thus it is proposed that the broad components of other solar-like stars are also a consequence of the mixture of surface structures, and not necessarily a signature of small-scale heating processes like explosive events, as it is commonly argued. A comparison to spectra of luminous cool stars shows that the line asymmetries of these stars might also be a surface structure effect and not or only partly due to opacity effects in their cool dense winds. These comparisons show the potential of high quality full-Sun VUV spectra and their value for the study of solar-stellar connections. As an example, this study proposes that alpha Cen A has a considerably higher amount of magnetic flux concentrated in the chromospheric magnetic network than the Sun.

  3. Alfven field line resonances at low latitudes (L = 1.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, A.W.; Worthington, E.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Baransky, L.N.; Fedorov, E.N.; Kurneva, N.A.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Shvetzov, D.N. [Institute of the Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bektemirov, A.A.; Philipov, G.V. [Institute of Seismology of Kyrgyzian Academy of Science, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here the authors present preliminary analysis of measurements of the spatial structure of ULF waves in the low latitude ionosphere. They used a gradient analysis method to demonstrate that Pc3 Alfven field line resonances do exist at L=1.5. The authors recorded resonance frequencies, resonance widths, and radial gradients of Alfven frequencies. The widths are found to increase with decreasing latitude, which is attributed to increased ionospheric damping.

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  5. High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti1 M7.0 earthquake and comparisons with finite source studies2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti1 M7.0 earthquake ruptured on January 12th 2010 on a complex fault10 system near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Offshore rupture earthquake that hit Haiti in January 2010 was one of the most devastating37 natural disasters of the last

  6. High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti1 M7.0 earthquake and comparisons with finite source studies2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti1 M7.0 earthquake ruptured on January 12th 2010 on a complex fault10 system near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Offshore rupture that hit Haiti in January 2010 was one of the most devastating34 natural disasters of the last decades

  7. Paleoclimatic significance of Middle Pleistocene glacial deposits in the Kotzebue Sound region, northwest coastal Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roof, S.R.; Brigham-Grette, J. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Middle Pleistocene time, glaciers extended from the western Brooks Range in NW Alaska to the coast at Kotzebue Sound, forming Baldwin Peninsula, a 120 km-long terminal moraine. Marine, glacigenic, and fluvial facies exposed along coastal bluffs surrounding Kotzebue Sound and Hotham Inlet indicate that at least the initial stages of the glacial advance occurred while sea level was high enough to cover the shallow Bering Shelf. Although it is presently uncertain if the ice actually reached tidewater before extensive middle-latitude ice-sheet formation, the marine and glacigenic facies clearly indicate that this advance must have occurred significantly out-of-phase with lower latitude glaciation. The authors believe an ice-free Bering Sea provided the moisture for glacier growth during the waning phases of a global interglacial climate. Although the magnitude of the Baldwin Peninsula advance was large compared to late Pleistocene advances, the timing with respect to sea level is consistent with observations by Miller and de Vernal that late Pleistocene polar glaciations also occurred near the end of interglacial periods, when global sea level was high, high-latitude oceans were relatively warm, and summer insolation was decreasing. An important implication of this out-of-phase glaciation hypothesis is that the critical transition point between climate states may be earlier in the interglacial-glacial cycle than previously thought. Because it appears that climate change is initiated in polar regions while the rest of Earth is experiencing an interglacial climate, many of their climate models must be revised. The glacial record at Baldwin Peninsula provides an opportunity to test, revise, and perhaps extend this out-of-phase glaciation hypothesis to the middle Pleistocene interval.

  8. High-resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot oscillations with the interface region imaging spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, H.; DeLuca, E.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Golub, L.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Weber, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, B.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Kleint, L.; Cheung, M.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Tarbell, T. D.; Wuelser, J. P. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V., E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); and others

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results of sunspot oscillations from observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. The strongly nonlinear oscillation is identified in both the slit-jaw images and the spectra of several emission lines formed in the transition region and chromosphere. We first apply a single Gaussian fit to the profiles of the Mg II 2796.35 Å, C II 1335.71 Å, and Si IV 1393.76 Å lines in the sunspot. The intensity change is ?30%. The Doppler shift oscillation reveals a sawtooth pattern with an amplitude of ?10 km s{sup –1} in Si IV. The Si IV oscillation lags those of C II and Mg II by ?6 and ?25 s, respectively. The line width suddenly increases as the Doppler shift changes from redshift to blueshift. However, we demonstrate that this increase is caused by the superposition of two emission components. We then perform detailed analysis of the line profiles at a few selected locations on the slit. The temporal evolution of the line core is dominated by the following behavior: a rapid excursion to the blue side, accompanied by an intensity increase, followed by a linear decrease of the velocity to the red side. The maximum intensity slightly lags the maximum blueshift in Si IV, whereas the intensity enhancement slightly precedes the maximum blueshift in Mg II. We find a positive correlation between the maximum velocity and deceleration, a result that is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating magnetoacoustic shock waves.

  9. On the Identification of High Mass Star Forming Regions using IRAS: Contamination by Low-Mass Protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler L. Bourke; A. R. Hyland; Garry Robinson

    2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a survey of a small sample (14) of low-mass protostars (L_IR < 10^3 Lsun) for 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission performed using the ATNF Parkes radio telescope. No new masers were discovered. We find that the lower luminosity limit for maser emission is near 10^3 Lsun, by comparison of the sources in our sample with previously detected methanol maser sources. We examine the IRAS properties of our sample and compare them with sources previously observed for methanol maser emission, almost all of which satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for selecting candidate UCHII regions. We find that about half of our sample satisfy this criterion, and in addition almost all of this subgroup have integrated fluxes between 25 and 60 microns that are similar to sources with detectable methanol maser emission. By identifying a number of low-mass protostars in this work and from the literature that satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for candidate UCHII regions, we show conclusively for the first time that the fainter flux end of their sample is contaminated by lower-mass non-ionizing sources, confirming the suggestion by van der Walt and Ramesh & Sridharan.

  10. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  11. The Impact of Energy Shortage and Cost on Irrigation for the High Plains and Trans Pecos Regions of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Zavaleta, L.; Petty, J. A.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was utilized in pumping water, compared to 18 percent used in machinery operations. Of this irrigation fuel, 76 percent was natural gas, the majority of which was consumed in the High Plains (Coble and LePori). Current supplies and reserves of natural gas have...

  12. SPITZER IRAC AND MIPS IMAGING OF CLUSTERS AND OUTFLOWS IN NINE HIGH-MASS STAR FORMING REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beuther, Henrik

    - to high-mass stars has advanced significantly via near-infrared surveys (e.g., Testi et al. 1999 interferometric observations. We detect infrared coun- terparts of these dusty cores in the IRAC or MIPS 24 m bands. Reflection nebulae dominated by the emission from UV-heated hydrocarbons in the 8 m band can

  13. Recent changes in freezing level heights in the Tropics with implications for the deglacierization of high mountain regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    are likely to be affecting other high elevation ice caps and glaciers in Ecuador, Peru´ and Bolivia/decade over the last 50 years. Meteorological observations at 5680 m on the summit of the Quelccaya Ice Cap­May, and rise well above freezing for much of the year around the ice cap margin at 5200 m. This is consistent

  14. Friction in Mid-latitude Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Friction in Mid-latitude Cyclones Ian Boutle Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown #12;Motivation · Many studies have shown the significance of friction in formation and dissipation of cyclones Dt = + × . F . Diabatic Term: · Surface heat fluxes · Latent heat fluxes Frictional Term

  15. On the paucity of Fast Radio Bursts at low Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the effect of Galactic diffractive interstellar scintillation as a means of explaining the reported deficit of Fast Radio Burst (FRB) detections at low Galactic latitude. We model the unknown underlying FRB flux density distribution as a power law with a rate scaling as $S_\

  16. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L., E-mail: shixiangjun@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  17. Discovery of Eight Recycled Pulsars - The Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Edwards

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a pulsar survey of intermediate Galactic latitudes (15deg 0.57 Mo and > 1.2 Mo), while anotherhas a low mass (~0.2 Mo) companion in a 23.3-d orbit, residing the well-known orbital period ``gap''.

  18. High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jolley, Casey

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, Michael C. Pope Committee Members, Ethan L. Grossman Debbie J. Thomas Head of Department, Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon..., and my committee members, Dr. Ethan Grossman and Dr. Debbie Thomas, for their time and guidance. Special thanks goes to my primary advisor, Dr. Pope, for his extra guidance and time away from family collecting samples. Additionally, I?d like to thank...

  19. A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

  20. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Inclusion of Inland Water Surfaces. J. Clim. , 8, 2691-Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. J.H. , 1955: Wind Stress Over a Water Surface. Quart. J. Roy.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration On clear, dark nights at high northern latitudes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    scientists want to learn when, where, and why solar wind energy stored within the Earth's magneto- sphere, and energized particles that accompany the release of energy that occurs during substorms. In particular protecting us from the fatal effects of the Solar wind." When the five identical probes align over the North

  2. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and validation of ocean–atmosphere energy flux fields. WCRP-exchange of energy and material between the ocean and lowerexplained by a mean energy flux into the ocean of just 0.86

  3. Desertification of high latitude ecosystems: conceptual models, time-series analyses and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsson, Johann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , representing state 5 where land degradation and erosion has resulted in loss of much of the mineral soil and nutrients, leaving a frost-heaved, gravely, oligotrophic substrate behind... exhibiting signs of frost damage on three dates............................................... 83 4.10 Percentage of birch seedling in control and 25% and 75% defoliation treatments exhibiting signs of frost damage in June of 2001, 2002 and 2003...

  4. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  5. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Com- munity Earth System Model 1 (CESM1), Tellus A,CESM climate model. Other Earth system models with differentPrediction using Earth System Models (EaSM) grants to

  6. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1, http://and the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) (http://quantify these feedbacks, Earth System Models (ESMs) need to

  7. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

  8. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the heat capacity of the ice mass and liquid water mass.all the ice (liquid) is melted (frozen). Heat capacities are

  9. Climatic response to high-latitude volcanic eruptions Luke Oman, Alan Robock, and Georgiy Stenchikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    a decrease in the Asian monsoon circulation with significant decreases of up to 10% in cloud cover of El Chicho´n. Graf and Timmreck [2001] simu- lated the aerosol radiative effects of the Laacher See injected. This causes their largest radiative forcing to be extratropical, and the climate response should

  10. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  11. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil temperatures. Wetland treatments in GCMs (Ringeval etA more mechanistic treatment of wetland hydrology in an ESM

  12. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Louisiana Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Louisiana Regions Louisiana Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

  14. Wyoming Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School...

  15. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  16. A GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parmaterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2you aA Deep Divein

  17. A study of mid-latitude tropopause characteristics over eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Ben Howard

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    50 40 30 20 10 MO BUP PLT GSO 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 Latitude (degrees north) Figure l. Occurrence of multiple tropopauses during summer 120 IJ III 0 0 0 E 0 0 '0 N 4J 0 A N 0 100 80 60 40 20 E I CI CI -20 60 55 50 45... 40 35 30 25 Latitude (degrees north) Figure 2. Profile of mean zonal wind during summer 21 70 C 4I 0 o e e o, o o IU O N lJ o e W m 0 o 4J 4J C m Ol v 6 u Ol CI 60 50 40 30 20 10 PH NO BUF 0 SO P T 60 55 50 45 40 35...

  18. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  19. THE ABUNDANCE, ORTHO/PARA RATIO, AND DEUTERATION OF WATER IN THE HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 6334 I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Lis, D. C.; Monje, R. R. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rolffs, R.; Schilke, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Comito, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ceccarelli, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France)] [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S., E-mail: dcl@caltech.edu [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 30 transitions of water isotopologues toward the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334 I. The line profiles of H{sup 16} {sub 2}O, H{sup 17} {sub 2}O, H{sup 18} {sub 2}O, and HDO show a complex pattern of emission and absorption components associated with the embedded hot cores, a lower-density envelope, two outflow components, and several foreground clouds, some associated with the NGC 6334 complex, others seen in projection against the strong continuum background of the source. Our analysis reveals an H{sub 2}O ortho/para ratio of 3 {+-} 0.5 in the foreground clouds, as well as the outflow. The water abundance varies from {approx}10{sup -8} in the foreground clouds and the outer envelope to {approx}10{sup -6} in the hot core. The hot core abundance is two orders of magnitude below the chemical model predictions for dense, warm gas, but within the range of values found in other Herschel/HIFI studies of hot cores and hot corinos. This may be related to the relatively low gas and dust temperature ({approx}100 K), or time-dependent effects, resulting in a significant fraction of water molecules still locked up in dust grain mantles. The HDO/H{sub 2}O ratio in NGC 6334 I, {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, is also relatively low, but within the range found in other high-mass star-forming regions.

  20. Low-latitude Western North Atlantic climate variability during the past millennium : insights from proxies and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenger, Casey Pearce

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of natural climate variability during the past millennium provide a frame of reference in which to assess the significance of recent changes. This thesis investigates new methods of reconstructing low-latitude ...

  1. Discovery of Eight z ~ 6 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Overlap Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; Cai, Zheng; Clement, Benjamin; Wang, Ran; Fan, Zhou

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of eight quasars at z~6 identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) overlap regions. Individual SDSS imaging runs have some overlap with each other, leading to repeat observations over an area spanning >4000 deg^2 (more than 1/4 of the total footprint). These overlap regions provide a unique dataset that allows us to select high-redshift quasars more than 0.5 mag fainter in the z band than those found with the SDSS single-epoch data. Our quasar candidates were first selected as i-band dropout objects in the SDSS imaging database. We then carried out a series of follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR to improve photometry, remove contaminants, and identify quasars. The eight quasars reported here were discovered in a pilot study utilizing the overlap regions at high galactic latitude (|b|>30 deg). These quasars span a redshift range of 5.86

  2. ZnS and ZnSe immersion gratings for astronomical high-resolution spectroscopy - evaluation of internal attenuation of bulk materials in the short NIR region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kondo, S; Yasui, C; Kuzmenko, P J; Tokoro, H; Terada, H

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the internal attenuation of bulk crystals of CVD-ZnS, CVD-ZnSe, Si, and GaAs, in the short near-infrared (sNIR) region to evaluate the possibility of astronomical immersion gratings with those high refractive index materials. We confirm that multispectral grade CVD-ZnS and CVD-ZnSe are best suited for the immersion gratings, with the smallest internal attenuation of {alpha}{sub att} = 0.01-0.03 cm{sup -1} among the major candidates. The measured attenuation is roughly in proportion to {lambda}{sup -2}, suggesting it is dominated by bulk scattering due to the polycrystalline grains rather than by absorption. The total transmittance in the immersion grating is estimated to be at least > 80 %, even for the spectral resolution of R = 300,000. Two potential problems, the scattered light by the bulk material and the degradation of the spectral resolution due to the gradient illumination in the diffracted beam, are investigated and found to be negligible for usual astronomical applications. Since the remaining problem, the difficulty of cutting grooves on CVD-ZnS and CVD-ZnSe, has recently been overcome by the nanoprecision fly-cutting technique, ZnS and ZnSe immersion gratings for astronomy can be technically realized.

  3. Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

  4. PACIFIC HIGHLY MIGR ATORY PEL AGIC FISHERIES pacific highly migratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Pacific Ocean, from the tropics to temperate latitudes. Many of these fishes routinely travel great highly migratory species throughout the Pacific Ocean. Some of the fleets are capable of operating across the Pacific as well as in other oceans during a single fishing season. These fleets use larger purse

  5. Petrology of a dredged cumulate-textured gabboric complex from the mid-Atlantic ridge, latitude 26?N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiezzi, Lawrence James

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- '"EXTURED GABI3ROIC COMPLEX FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N 0 A Thesis LAWRENCE JAMES Ti'ZZI Submitted to the Graduate Ccilec;e of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Majo- Subject: Geology PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- TEXTURED GABBROIC CONPLEX FROM o THE NID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N A Thesis by LAWRENCE JAMES TIEZZI Approved as to style and content by...

  6. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill University; Giangrande, Scott

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  7. The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

  8. What is this MCMS? MCMS stands for the MAP Climatology of Mid-latitude Storminess dataset (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arguments. Cyclone tracking is treated as a separate process and product (not shown here for brevity) depression around a mid-latitude baroclinic cyclone (or just cyclone). MCMS rests on two operations: 1) finding and tracking cyclones and 2) objectively delineating the area under each cyclones influence

  9. Latitude, seed predation and seed mass A. T. Moles* and M. Westoby Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moles, Angela

    of species from around the world. We also aimed to quantify the slope and predictive power expected that herbivory and predation might be more sustained threats there. Considerable evidence supports winter browsing intensity and latitude across six species of woody plants (Swihart & Bryant, 2001

  10. SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind theoretical work in which enhancements of coronal helium lead to stagnation of the escaping proton flux

  11. Putting plant resistance traits on the map: a test of the idea that plants are better defended at lower latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at lower latitudes Angela T. Moles1,2,3,4 , Ian R. Wallis3 , William J. Foley3 , David I. Warton5 , James C Biology, James Cook University, PO Box 6811,Cairns, Australia; 12 NationalEnvironmental Research InstituteSciences, University of Zambia, PO Box 32379, Lusaka 10101, Zambia;18 School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook

  12. A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Sharon E.

    A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa 2007 #12;2 Abstract In the Southern Hemisphere over Africa a mid-tropospheric easterly jet stream exists during some months that is analogous to the African Easterly Jet over West Africa. In this note

  13. Determination of the optimum inclination of a flat solar collector in function of latitude and local climatic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    569 Determination of the optimum inclination of a flat solar collector in function of latitude of a solar collector, it is necessary to reduce its size to a minimum for a given collected energy of equations described in this work were developed to determine the inclination angle of a . flat solar

  14. Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

  15. DISCOVER-AQ Outlook for Friday, July 21, 2011 High surface temperatures of near 100 F today in the study region have led to substantial ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orange for PM2.5 today, which is the first time that has occurred during DISCOVER-AQ. South and SW winds expected. Southerly winds continue to bring moisture into our region. 500 mb NAM at 2 PM. #12;Tomorrow Saturday: Heat and humidity sticks around. Sunday: Hot, sticky, and cloud coverage > 50%. Light Winds Juicy

  16. An alternative model for ultra-high pressure in the Svartberget Fe-Ti garnet-peridotite, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Gneiss Region, Norway JOHANNES C. VRIJMOED1,*, YURI Y. PODLADCHIKOV1 , TORGEIR B. ANDERSEN1 and EBBE H, Norway *Corresponding author, e-mail: j.c.vrijmoed@fys.uio.no 2 Aker Exploration AS, PO Box 580, Sentrum, 4003 Stavanger, Norway Abstract: The previously reported ``Fe-Ti type'' garnet-peridotite is located

  17. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  18. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Multilayer Laminar-Type Holographic Grating and Its Application to a High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Monochromator for the 1-8 keV Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Masato; Ishino, Masahiko; Imazono, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Heimann, Phil A.; Gullikson, Eric H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Takenaka, Hisataka; Hatayama, Masatoshi [NTT Advanced Technology Corp., 2-1-1, Nishi-shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 163-0431 (Japan); Sasai, Hiroyuki [Shimadzu Corp., 1 Nishinokyo-Kuwabaramachi, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, 614-0051 (Japan); Sano, Kazuo [Shimadzu Emit Co., Ltd., 2-5-23, Kitahama, Chuo-ku, Osaka 541-0041 (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A W/C multilayer laminar-type holographic grating was fabricated and its diffraction efficiency was evaluated in the 1-8 keV region. Taking advantage of its high diffraction efficiency a monochromator equipped with a multilayer varied-line-spacing plane grating was designed. The throughput of the monochromator based on the experimental diffraction efficiency of the multilayer grating and resolving power were calculated in comparison with those of a monochromator equipped with a Au coated grating.

  19. Thermal constraints on the productivity of the olive (Olea europaea L.) in the climates of olive-producing regions and of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denney, James Osborne

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in olive-producing regions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 8 Number of chilling days & 7. 2'C in Texas 72 9 Days of "effective chilling" in olive-producing regions (Min 1. 7-7, 2'C, Max 1Z. B-Z3. 9'C). 73 10 Days of "effective chilling... in the ma1n areas above 30' latitude north and below 30' latitude south and that ol ive trees grown in warmer cl imates grow vegetatively but do not fru1t. He notes that many olive-producing sites have mean January temperatures of from 7. 2' to 9. 8...

  20. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meteorological phenomenon of particular interest to forecasters is the mesoscale convective system (MCS). Chappell (1986) defines an MCS as "any multicellular storm or group of interacting storms that suggests some organization in its forcing". An MCS...VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  1. High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Iman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

  2. High-differential-quantum-efficiency, long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers using five-stage bipolar-cascade active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koda, R.; Wang, C.S.; Lofgreen, D.D.; Coldren, L.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Raytheon Vision Systems, Goleta, California 93117 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present five-stage bipolar-cascade vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1.54 {mu}m grown monolithically on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A differential quantum efficiency of 120%, was measured with a threshold current density of 767 A/cm{sup 2} and voltage of 4.49 V, only 0.5 V larger than 5x0.8 V, the aggregate photon energy. Diffraction loss study on deeply etched pillars indicates that diffraction loss is a major loss mechanism for such multiple-active region devices larger than 20 {mu}m. We also report a model on the relationship of diffraction loss to the number of active stages.

  3. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  4. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  5. Statistical characteristics of small-scale spatial and temporal electric field variability in the high-latitude ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    to the total energy deposited in the atmosphere through Joule heating and mechanical energy transfer's ionosphere are investigated using 48 months of data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (Super. The amount of energy contributed by small-scale electric field variability has been estimated in previous

  6. Estimating wetland methane emissions from the northern high latitudes from 1990 to 2009 using artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    artificial neural networks Xudong Zhu,1 Qianlai Zhuang,1 Zhangcai Qin,1 Mikhail Glagolev,2 and Lulu Song1 develop a statistical model of CH4 emissions using an artificial neural network (ANN) approach and field to 2009 using artificial neural networks, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 27, doi:10.1002/gbc.20052. 1

  7. Simulation of high-latitude hydrological processes in the TorneKalix basin: PILPS Phase 2(e)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    (1979­1998) were provided to the 21 participating modeling groups for 218 1/4j grid cells, underestimation of true precipitation and the necessity to estimate incoming solar radiation were the primary data of a three-part paper: (1) calibration­validation runs--calibration of model parameters using observed

  8. The Freshening of Surface Waters in High Latitudes: Effects on the Thermohaline and Wind-Driven Circulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to freshen over the next few decades should polar ice caps melt or should precipitation increase in those re involves meridional overturning, but its variations and critical transitions affect mainly the Tropics of the critical parameters that affect the relative strength of the two circulation components and hence

  9. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  10. MATTER MIXING IN ASPHERICAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CONDITIONS FOR CONVEYING {sup 56}Ni INTO HIGH VELOCITY REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masaomi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Tolstov, Alexey [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, Masa-aki, E-mail: masaomi.ono@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 M{sub Sun} star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that {sup 56}Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter ({approx}>3500 km s{sup -1}) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of {sup 56}Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We find that no high velocity {sup 56}Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to some unknown mechanism in a later phase just before the shock wave reaches the hydrogen envelope, {sup 56}Ni with a velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} can be obtained. Aspherical explosions that are asymmetric across the equatorial plane with clumpy structures in the initial shock waves are investigated. We find that the clump sizes affect the penetration of {sup 56}Ni. Finally, we report that an aspherical explosion model that is asymmetric across the equatorial plane with multiple perturbations of pre-supernova origins can cause the penetration of {sup 56}Ni clumps into fast moving matter of 3000 km s{sup -1}. We show that both aspherical explosions with clumpy structures and perturbations of pre-supernova origins may be necessary to reproduce the observed high velocity of {sup 56}Ni. To confirm this, more robust three-dimensional simulations are required.

  11. Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

  12. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  13. Washington Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Regions National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and...

  14. Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle...

  15. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  16. Alabama High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

  17. Table A1. Geographic information (latitude, longitude, elevation above sea level) for CASTNet sites used in our analysis. Sites determined to be regionally-representative are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , SUM. Note the range of magnitudes on the y-axes. MDA8O3(ppbv) MDA8O3(ppbv) 25 35 45 55 65 J F M A M J 35 40 45 50 55 J F M A M J J A S O N D ASH HOW ACA WST Reg. Mean Reg. Repr. Far Northeast(f) MDA8O3 MDA8O3(ppbv) MDA8O3(ppbv) MDA8O3(ppbv) MDA8O3(ppbv) 25 35 45 55 65 J F M A M J J A S O N D LAV YOS PIN

  18. A COMPANION AS THE CAUSE OF LATITUDE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN THE WIND OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groh, J. H. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Madura, T. I.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kruip, C. J. H., E-mail: jose.groh@unige.ch [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae binary system obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS. Eta Car is enshrouded by the dusty Homunculus nebula, which scatters light emitted by the central binary and provides a unique opportunity to study a massive binary system from different vantage points. We investigate the latitudinal and azimuthal dependence of H{alpha} line profiles caused by the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity created by the companion star. Using two-dimensional radiative transfer models, we find that the wind cavity can qualitatively explain the observed line profiles around apastron. Regions of the Homunculus which scatter light that propagated through the WWC cavity show weaker or no H{alpha} absorption. Regions scattering light that propagated through a significant portion of the primary wind show stronger P Cygni absorption. Our models overestimate the H{alpha} absorption formed in the primary wind, which we attribute to photoionization by the companion, not presently included in the models. We can qualitatively explain the latitudinal changes that occur during periastron, shedding light on the nature of Eta Car's spectroscopic events. Our models support the idea that during the brief period of time around periastron when the primary wind flows unimpeded toward the observer, H{alpha} absorption occurs in directions toward the central object and Homunculus SE pole, but not toward equatorial regions close to the Weigelt blobs. We suggest that observed latitudinal and azimuthal variations are dominated by the companion star via the WWC cavity, rather than by rapid rotation of the primary star.

  19. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K... carbonate primary production at the onset of global cooling, and (3) a significant increase in nutrient availability in the low-latitude surface ocean through the EOT. Citation: Dunkley Jones, T., P. R. Bown, P. N. Pearson, B. S. Wade, H. K. Coxall, and C. H...

  20. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  1. Spread-F during the magnetic storm of 22 January 2004 at low latitudes: Effect of IMF-Bz in relation to local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Janardhan

    measurements at an electrojet station Thumba. This phenomenon is found to occur during geomagnetic quiet of the orthogonal horizontal electric field and the geomagnetic field gives rise to several distinct features Electrojet (EEJ), a band of intense daytime eastward current in the ionosphere (100 km) within ± 3 latitudes

  2. Neogene Low-latitude Seasonal Environmental Variations: Stable Isotopic and Trace Elemental Records in Mollusks from the Florida Platform and the Central American Isthmus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Kai

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Ph.D. dissertation integrates stable isotope and trace element geochemistry in modern and fossil gastropod shells to study low-latitude marine paleoenvironments. First, stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) and Sr/Ca ratios are used...

  3. Northern mid-latitude glaciation in the Late Amazonian period of Mars: Criteria for the recognition of debris-covered glacier and valley glacier landsystem deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    in talus pile pore space caused lubrication and flow during an earlier climatic regime. A number of factors have remained uncertain, however, including the detailed structure and texture of LDA analogs, to assess the characteristics of LDA/LVF in the northern mid-latitudes of Mars. We find evidence

  4. Testing three 90Whr Dell Batteries for Latitude E6410 I have been able, for complicated reasons, to test three batteries sold as 9cell 90Whr batteries for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloman, Aaron

    Testing three 90Whr Dell Batteries for Latitude E6410 I have been able, for complicated reasons, to test three batteries sold as 9cell 90Whr batteries for the Dell Latitude E6410 computer, one made battery was fully charged then allowed to discharge while the laptop was on, and not doing very much

  5. Analysis of the effects of ionospheric sampling of reflection points near-path, for high-frequency single-site-location direction finding systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filho, C.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis suggests a method to estimate the current value of an ionospheric parameter. The proposed method is based on the known variability of the observed current values near path and utilizes data derived from ionospheric sampling measurements. Analysis of errors is provided in Single-Site-Location High-Frequency Direction Finding (SSL-HFDF), arising from ionospheric irregularities such as Es (sporadic E), ionospheric tilts, and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). The characteristics of Es, tilts and TIDs for mid-latitudes are summarized in tables. The spatial and temporal coherence of ionospheric variabilities and irregularities is analyzed over the electron density. Practical results, measurements, and studies are presented on SSL-HFDF. A survey of characteristics of the ionosphere in the equatorial region is also provided. Finally, some recommendations are given to maximize the applicability of the proposed method.

  6. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  7. Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

  8. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  9. Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

  10. Evidence for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from a Region of the Galactic Plane R. Atkins,1,* W. Benbow,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    longitude l 2 40; 100 and latitude jbj power law spectrum Gamma rays are the best direct probe of cosmic rays outside the solar neighborhood. The interstellar medium, with its relatively high density in the galactic plane, is a passive target for gamma

  11. Evaluation of trends in high temperature extremes in north-western Europe in regional climate This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    . There is also no significant correlation between the RCM Tann.max trends and trends in radiation or Bowen ratio of the work, journal citation and DOI. number of regions in the world (Clark et al 2006, Fischer and Sch

  12. Periodic auroral forms and geomagnetic field oscillations in the 1400 MLT region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potemra, T.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)); Vo, H.; Venkatesan, D.; Cogger, L.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Bythrow, P.F.; Anderson, B.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UV images obtained with the Viking satellite often show bright features which resemble beads or pearls aligned in the east-west direction between noon and 1800 MLT. Viking acquired a series of 25 UV images during a 28-min period on July 29, 1986, which showed a distinct series of periodic bright features in this region. Magnetic field and hot plasma measurements obtained by Viking confirm that the UV emissions are colocated with the field line projection of an upward-flowing region 1 Birkeland current and precipitating energetic ({approximately}200 eV) electrons. The magnetic field and electric field measurements show transverse oscillations with a nearly constant period of about 3.5 min from 67{degree} invariant latitude equatorward up to the location of the large-scale Birkeland current system near 76{degree} invariant latitude. The electric field oscillations lead the magnetic field oscillations by about a quarter-period. The authors interpret the observed oscillations as standing Alfven waves driven at a frequency near the local resonance frequency by a large-scale wave in the boundary layer. They propose that the energy flux of the precipitating low-energy electrons in this afternoon region is modulated by this boundary wave and produces the periodic UV emission features. The results of this study support the view that large-scale oscillations of magnetospheric boundaries, possibly associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, can modulate currents, particles, and auroral forms.

  13. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; M. Tsujimoto; A. Paizis; K. Hamaguchi; A. Bamba; R. Cutri; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; A. Senda; M. Ueno; S. Yamauchi; V. Beckmann; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; P. Dubath; E. Nishihara

    2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray source had been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partially overlapping ACIS-I fields (~250 arcmin^2in total). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes accounts for only ~ 10 % of the total X-ray flux in the field of view. Even hypothesizing a new population of much dimmer and numerous Galactic point sources, the total observed X-ray flux cannot be explained. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than that measured at the high Galactic latitude regions, indicating that majority of the hard sources are background AGNs. Following up the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT. Almost all the soft X-ray sources have been identified in NIR and their spectral types are consistent with main-sequence stars, suggesting most of them are nearby X-ray active stars. On the other hand, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts, which are presumably Galactic. From X-ray and NIR spectral study, they are most likely to be quiescent cataclysmic variables. We have also carried out a precise spectral study of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission excluding the point sources.

  14. CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for...

  15. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  16. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  17. Washington DC Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Washington DC Regions National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School...

  18. SWPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Pennsylvania Regions SWPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  19. Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  20. Oklahoma Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Oklahoma Regions Oklahoma Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  1. West Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    West Virginia Regions West Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle...

  2. Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Virginia Regions Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  3. UTPA Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    UTPA Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School...

  4. Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved Energy Regions R.M. Bahran, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, E.J. Blain and Y. Danon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved providing an evacuated pathway for the neutrons to travel. Isotopically-enriche advanced fuel [1,2]. High resolution neutron time-of-flight transmission measurements on highly enriched

  5. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  6. New York State Capital District Regional Middle School Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    New York State Capital District Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School...

  7. Regional Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

  8. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  9. A Near-Infrared Photometric Study of the Low Latitude Globular Clusters Liller 1, Djorgovski 1, HP 1, and NGC 6528

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Images recorded through J, H, Ks, 2.2 micron continuum, and 2.3 micron CO filters are used to investigate the stellar contents of the low Galactic latitude globular clusters NGC 6528, Liller 1, Djorgovski 1, and HP 1, as well as surrounding bulge fields. Metallicities are estimated for the latter three clusters by comparing the colors and CO indices of giant branch stars with those in other clusters and the bulge, while reddenings are estimated from the colors of bright bulge stars in the surrounding fields. In some cases the metallicities and reddenings are significantly different from previous estimates.

  10. ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 29, NO. 2, 2012, 407421 Modulation of Low-Latitude West Wind on Abnormal Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    ) intensification. Condensation of water vapor increased the energy supply, which eventuated the intensification by tropical cyclones (TCs), al- though TCs in this region account for 7% of the total number of global TCs in the Bay of Bengal (BOB) have two sea- sons. The primary season is the post-monsoon period and the second

  11. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  12. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Report Introduction The economy of the United States is more than three and one-half years accounting for both increasing shares of the economy and of recessionary employment losses. Manufacturing, driven by globalization and advancing information technology. Recoveries now produce jobs new

  13. LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES JOHNS HOPKINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION & THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS #12;Leadership Handbook for Regional Chapters 2 CONTENTS Contents .......................................................................................................................9 Chapter Leadership

  14. Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runner-up Teams The Six Regional Competitions The Massachusetts Institute of Technology logo. Northeast Region Lead: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA) This...

  15. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  16. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey XII : Galactic plane acceleration search and the discovery of 60 pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, C; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Flynn, C M L; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Tiburzi, C; Eatough, R P; Lyne, A G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present initial results from the low-latitude Galactic plane region of the High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey conducted at the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the terabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a constant acceleration approximation, a ratio of data length over orbital period of ~0.1 results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. From the 50 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 435 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 60 pulsars, two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar whose heavy white dwarf (WD)...

  17. Future work The lack of snowfall at southern latitudes is an obvious error and it should be easy to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effect upon the energy balance of the land surface and its influence on atmospheric circulation (Cotton with the AMSR-E passive microwave radiometer (Kelly et al. 2004) and the ESA Globsnow product (Solberg et al of Geophysical Research, v114, pD06111. Sheffield J, Goteti G, Wood, EF, 2006. Development of a 50-year high

  18. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  19. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  20. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  1. Regional Energy Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  2. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companies eye

  3. THE DYNAMICS AND HEATING OF ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A., E-mail: george.doschek@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine the dynamics of active regions using spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. I show the relationship between non-thermal velocities, Doppler outflows and downflows, intensities, and electron density for two representative active regions out of a group of 18 active regions examined. Results from the other active regions are summarized. Imaging spectra of these active regions were obtained from a number of different EIS raster observations. In the case of the outflows for the two representative regions, two-Gaussian fits were made to line profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIII to obtain quantitative information on high-speed components of the outflows. A three-Gaussian fit was made for the Fe XII line at {lambda}195.119. The highest speed outflows occur in weak regions adjacent to the bright loops in active regions. They are weak (less than 5% of the intensity of the main spectral component in the brightest parts of active regions) and even in the extensive flow regions they are generally less than 25% of the intensity of the main component. The outflow regions are characterized by long or open magnetic field lines and I suggest that the apparent absence of these higher speed outflows in bright regions is due to abundant stationary plasma in the closed bright loop regions that mask or overwhelm the outflow signal.

  4. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  5. Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

  6. Methane depletion in both polar regions of Uranus inferred from HST/STIS and Keck/NIRC2 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi; de Pater, Imke; Rages, Kathy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From STIS observations of Uranus in 2012, we found that the methane volume mixing ratio declined from about 4% at low latitudes to about 2% at 60 deg N and beyond. This is similar to that found in the south polar regions in 2002, in spite of what appears to be strikingly different convective activity in the two regions. Keck and HST imaging observations close to equinox imply that the depletions were simultaneously present in 2007, suggesting they are persistent features. The depletions appear to be mainly restricted to the upper troposphere, with depth increasing poleward from about 30 deg N, reaching ~4 bars at 45 deg N and perhaps much deeper at 70 deg N. The latitudinal variations in degree and depth of the depletions are important constraints on models of meridional circulation. Our observations are qualitatively consistent with previously suggested circulation cells in which rising methane-rich gas at low latitudes is dried out by condensation and sedimentation of methane ice particles as the gas ascend...

  7. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  8. The Corona Australis Star Forming Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Neuhäuser; Jan Forbrich

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    At a distance of about 130 pc, the Corona Australis molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest regions with ongoing and/or recent star formation. It is a region with highly variable extinction of up to AV~45 mag, containing, at its core, the Coronet protostar cluster. There are now 55 known optically detected members, starting at late B spectral types. At the opposite end of the mass spectrum, there are two confirmed brown dwarf members and seven more candidate brown dwarfs. The CrA region has been most widely surveyed at infrared wavelengths, in X-rays, and in the millimeter continuum, while follow-up observations from centimeter radio to X-rays have focused on the Coronet cluster.

  9. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  10. 6, 1332313366, 2006 Regional pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials of major population centers M. G. Lawrence a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Regional pollution potentials. Lawrence (lawrence@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 13323 #12;ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials

  11. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

  12. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

  13. Quasar H II Regions During Cosmic Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo A. Alvarez; Tom Abel

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic reionization progresses as HII regions form around sources of ionizing radiation. Their average size grows continuously until they percolate and complete reionization. We demonstrate how this typical growth can be calculated around the largest, biased sources of UV emission, such as quasars, by further developing an analytical model based on the excursion set formalism. This approach allows us to calculate the sizes and growth of the HII regions created by the progenitors of any dark matter halo of given mass and redshift with a minimum of free parameters. Statistical variations in the size of these pre-existing HII regions are an additional source of uncertainty in the determination of very high redshift quasar properties from their observed HII region sizes. We use this model to demonstrate that the transmission gaps seen in very high redshift quasars can be understood from the radiation of only their progenitors and associated clustered small galaxies. The fit sets a lower limit on the redshift of overlap at z = 5.8 +/- 0.1. This interpretation makes the transmission gaps independent of the age of the quasars observed. If this interpretation were correct it would raise the prospects of using radio interferometers currently under construction to detect the epoch of reionization.

  14. Multilateral, regional and bilateral energy trade governance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal-Arcas, Rafael; Grasso, Costantino; Rios, Juan Alemany (Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom))

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current international energy trade governance system is fragmented and multi-layered. Streamlining it for greater legal cohesiveness and international political and economic cooperation would promote global energy security. The current article explores three levels of energy trade governance: multilateral, regional and bilateral. Most energy-rich countries are part of the multilateral trading system, which is institutionalized by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The article analyzes the multilateral energy trade governance system by focusing on the WTO and energy transportation issues. Regionally, the article focuses on five major regional agreements and their energy-related aspects and examines the various causes that explain the proliferation of regional trade agreements, their compatibility with WTO law, and then provides several examples of regional energy trade governance throughout the world. When it comes to bilateral energy trade governance, this article only addresses the European Union’s (EU) bilateral energy trade relations. The article explores ways in which gaps could be filled and overlaps eliminated whilst remaining true to the high-level normative framework, concentrating on those measures that would enhance EU energy security.

  15. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

  16. amhara regional states: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    driven by a decline in the frequency of mid-latitude cyclones tracking across southern Canada. The cold fronts associated with these cyclones are known to provide the main...

  17. Divecha Centre for Climate Change Indian Institute of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    widespread melting of high- elevation glaciers and ice caps, particularly in low to middle latitudes and environmental histories from ice core records from both Polar Regions and from low to mid-latitude, high-elevation ice fields. These records demostrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to lower

  18. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  19. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  20. The tropics may be defined as the region between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of1 Capricorn (i.e., within 23.5E N and S latitude), or according to ecozone, based on temperature,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Herzegovina, Cambodia, Cuba, Iraq, Lebanon, and Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro). 1 Prof. Jeffrey D. Sachs income levels to natural resources, energy in the cases of Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan, and diamonds

  1. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  2. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan Heart of Texas Region Bosque, Falls, Freestone, Hill, Limestone & McLennan Counties December 1, 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements... of Texas Council of Governments (HOTCOG) and the McLennan County Youth Collaboration (MCYC) ---21 Central Texas Senior Ministries (CTSM), Hill County Transit (HCT) and Scott and White (S&W) Medical Facilities...

  3. Southeast Regional Summit to Convene High-Profile Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leaders on July 9 June 25, 2015 - 2:38pm Addthis Suniva, Inc. solar panels on the roof of the Carbon-Neutral Energy Solutions Laboratory at the Georgia Institute of...

  4. Southeast Regional Summit to Convene High-Profile Clean Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |Solar EnergySouth Carolina Energy Office

  5. Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAFofEmail Mr.Virginia Arreguin AboutWhat:

  6. Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical High School | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp Jumpsource HistoryCommunity

  7. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1,MechanicalJeffersonat

  8. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1,MechanicalJeffersonat5, 2011.

  9. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1,MechanicalJeffersonat5,

  10. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1,MechanicalJeffersonat5,7, 2009.

  11. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1,MechanicalJeffersonat5,7,

  12. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest. Regional Energy...

  13. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    AND COMMUNITIES PITTSBURGH, PA. | AUGUST 2013 #12;PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 32 PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (HAPs)/AIR TOXICS PREPARED BY AUTHORSPITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS (PRETA) REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR

  14. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  15. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  16. Presentation of Regional SDSN Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    ;Conference topics: Pollution in the Mediterranean sea Climate change Improving the management Energy#12;Presentation of UN SDSN and MED SDSN Regional SDSN Center for the Mediterranean Region #12;UN for the Mediterranean Basin Why a Mediterranean Network? Shared history Shared environment Shared future MED

  17. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  18. Water Masers Toward Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kurtz; P. Hofner

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey in the 6_{16}-5_{23} rotational water transition toward 33 galactic ultracompact HII regions. Maser emission is detected toward 18 of these sources; two are new detections. High quality spectra are provided for all 18 sources. We discuss the detection rate of this survey and the correlation of various maser properties with other physical parameters. In addition, we report wide-bandwidth (316 km/s), moderate-resolution (~ 3'') water maser observations of the HH80-81 region. We report the first detection of water maser emission at the approximate velocity of the molecular core. This emission is coincident with the extreme tip of the thermal jet, and well-removed from the much stronger and well-known maser emission at the position of VLA-3.

  19. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention to the research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System

  20. Polar Precipitation Measurement Mission A Mission Concept for Earth Explorer 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regional and global energy-water cycle budgets. Measurement of precipitation at the high latitudes the middle to high latitudes. To improve global precipitation estimates through the synergistic use of space borne radar and radiometer measurements. Orbital characteristics To achieve full sensitivity an orbit

  1. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  2. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in conjunction with TxDOT to increase public awareness of the project. As an integral part of this project, each of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public... Sherman TAPS TAPS TAPS operates in seven (7) counties, with three (3) of the counties in the Texoma Region. TAPS services include demand response, commuter bus services and special services. Square Miles Population ?00 Rider Trips ?05 Clay 1...

  3. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

  4. SHPE-Fresno Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    SHPE-Fresno Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School...

  5. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

  6. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

  7. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  8. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  9. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  10. Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio.

  11. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  12. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  13. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 IdleRegardingIndustrial Technologies|3

  14. Southeast Texas Region Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission

    Providers Public transportation in the southeast Texas region includes primarily demand- response service, with two localities managing fixed-route systems. Table 2 identifies the transportation providers within the region. The major transportation... citywide bus services with eleven local routes. PAT operates from 6:15am to 6:15pm five days a week. Annual ridership for BMT totaled 671,420 fixed route and 22,155 demand response trips in 2005, while PAT ridership reached 116,632 fixed route and 20...

  15. High SEER Residential AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the new offerings of residential air conditioning systems with very high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) ratings, the two regional areas dictating operations standards ("hot, humid" and "hot, dry"), and the potential energy savings these new systems can provide. The article concludes with a brief review of current market potential.

  16. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify promising locations for both demonstration and pilot-scale algal cultivation projects, including the production potential of using wastewater, and potential land use considerations.

  17. Regional Oxidant Model (ROM), Source code and test data (Version 2. 1). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) is a three-dimensional photochemical Eulerian grid model designed to simulate ambient concentrations of ozone and related species. ROM is a 3-layer model with a horizontal resolution of approximately 19 km; each grid cell has dimensions of 1/6 degree latitude by 1/4 degree longitude. The typical horizontal extent of the modeling domain is 1000 km. The model is designed to simulate hourly regional concentrations of ozone during largely stagnant summertime conditions that are associated with elevated smog episodes. The model is designed so that its preprocessors run on a VAX and the core model runs on an IBM mainframe. A typical 3-day simulation of the core model for the northeastern U.S. uses 9.5 hours of CPU on an IBM 3090. A total of 19 computer tapes comprise the release of the ROM (Version 2.1). Six of the tapes were generated on an IBM, and 13 tapes were generated on a VAX. The tapes contain source code, sample runstreams, and test data for a 3-day simulation. Potential users of the ROM should be aware that the modeling system is complex and requires extensive computer resources. The services of engineers, meteorologists, or computer scientists experienced in photochemical grid modeling are required.

  18. Regional Oxidant Model (ROM), (Source code only) (Version 2. 1). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) is a three-dimensional photochemical Eulerian grid model designed to simulate ambient concentrations of ozone and related species. ROM is a 3-layer model with a horizontal resolution of approximately 19 km; each grid cell has dimensions of 1/6 degree latitude by 1/4 degree longitude. The typical horizontal extent of the modeling domain is 1000 km. The model is designed to simulate hourly regional concentrations of ozone during largely stagnant summertime conditions that are associated with elevated smog episodes. The model is designed so that its preprocessors run on a VAX and the core model runs on an IBM mainframe. A typical 3-day simulation of the core model for the northeastern U.S. uses 9.5 hours of CPU on an IBM 3090. A total of 19 computer tapes comprise this release of the ROM (Version 2.1). Six of the tapes were generated on an IBM, and 13 tapes were generated on a VAX. The tapes contain source code, sample runstreams, and test data for a 3-day simulation. Potential users of the ROM should be aware that the modeling system is complex and requires extensive computer resources. The services of engineers, meteorologists, or computer scientists experienced in photochemical grid modeling are required.

  19. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companiesRegions

  20. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  1. Panhandle Region Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panhandle Regional Transportation Advisory Group

    drivers; shared office staff with PCS Schedule for out of county trips Amarillo MWF Notes on Service Provided Medicaid to Amarillo M-F; school trips M-F; Hereford Satellite Center; some trips to Hereford Senior Center and nursing homes Table 2............................................................................................................................ 2-5 Health and Human Services Organizations ................................................................................. 2-9 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation .................................................... 2...

  2. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

  3. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  4. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public transportation. This Coordination Committee addressed this issue with enthusiasm, generating significant topics...DOT requirement that all vehicles be ADA compliant, Medicaid restrictions and Insurance as significant barriers to public transportation. Best practices included sharing of information regarding this project through publication in rural newspapers, inter...

  5. Cicrumnuclear Supernova Remnants and HII Regions in NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Ulvestad

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Archival VLA data has been used to produce arcsecond-resolution 6- and 20-cm images of the region surrounding the nuclear 200-pc (~15") starburst in NGC 253. Twenty-two discrete sources stronger than 0.4 mJy have been detected within ~2 kpc (~3') of the galaxy nucleus; almost all these sources must be associated with the galaxy. None of the radio sources coincides with a detected X-ray binary, so they appear to be due to supernova remnants and H II regions. The region outside the central starburst has a derived radio supernova rate of <~0.1/yr, and may account for at least 20% of the recent star formation in NGC 253. Most of the newly identified sources have steep, nonthermal radio spectra, but several relatively strong thermal sources also exist, containing the equivalent of tens of O5 stars. These stars are spread over tens of parsecs, and are embedded in regions having average ionized gas densities of 20-200/cm^3, much lower than in the most active nuclear star-forming regions in NGC 253 or in the super star clusters seen in other galaxies. The strongest region of thermal emission coincides with a highly reddened area seen at near-infrared wavelengths, possibly containing optically obscured H II regions.

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  7. HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION IN THE NEAR AND FAR 3 kpc ARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ellingsen, S. P. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the presence of 6.7 GHz methanol masers, known tracers of high-mass star formation, in the 3 kpc arms of the inner Galaxy. We present 49 detections from the Methanol Multibeam Survey, the largest Galactic plane survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers, which coincide in longitude, latitude, and velocity with the recently discovered far-side 3 kpc arm and the well-known near-side 3 kpc arm. The presence of these masers is significant evidence for high-mass star formation actively occurring in both 3 kpc arms.

  8. The high cost of low quality in R D (research and development)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.V.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of quality assurance and quality control yield high payoffs when applied to research activities. Researchers are usually highly motivated individuals who earnestly desire to produce excellent results. The nature of research and the temperament of researchers are such that considerable freedom and latitude are usually required so that the creative processes are not impeded. These are approaches that can be used in applying quality assurance and control that researchers will accept and use when they see the payoff. Some examples are given, with particular emphasis on quality cost systems applied to measurement processes in R D. 14 refs.

  9. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  10. Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ready for detailed review of the contract language. * The sections that pertain to the "heart of the deal" (Products, rate-related provisions, net requirements, High Water Marks,...

  11. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  12. Ionospheric storms on Mars: Impact of the corotating interaction region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    of intermittent cold/low energy and energized plasmas. The scavenging effect caused by the intrusions of solar effects related to the impact of a dense and high pressure solar wind (corotating interaction region for the incoming solar wind. Large blobs of solar wind plasma penetrate to the magnetosphere and sweep out dense

  13. Optic Ataxia: From Balint's Syndrome to the Parietal Reach Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard

    Neuron Review Optic Ataxia: From Balint's Syndrome to the Parietal Reach Region Richard A. Andersen@vis.caltech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.02.025 Optic ataxia is a high-order deficit in reaching's syndrome that also includes attentional and gaze disorders. Aspects of optic ataxia are misreaching

  14. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WEST CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FINAL REPORT NOVEMBER 2006 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman... Workshops 177 Appendix C - Public Meetings 183 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman Corporation November 2006 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

  15. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  16. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5192 (United States); Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  17. Arctic Transitions in the LandAtmosphere System (ATLAS): Background, objectives, results, and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    , commercial fisheries resources, infrastructure, and industrial activity (e.g., oil and gas development for human live- lihoods in high-latitude regions and elsewhere through effects on subsistence resources

  18. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  19. Fueling Gas to the Central Region of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiichi Wada

    2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplying gas to the galactic central regions is one of key ingredients for AGN activity. I will review various fueling mechanisms for a R ~ 1 kpc region, determined mainly by numerical simulations over the last decade. I will also comment on the bars-within-bars mechanism. Observations suggest that the stellar bar is not a sufficient condition for gas fueling. Moreover, considering the various factors for the onset of gas accretion, stellar bars would not even be a necessary condition. I introduce recent progress obtained through our two- and three-dimensional, high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the ISM in the central 0.1--1 kpc region of galaxies. Possible structure of the obscuring molecular tori around AGNs is also shown. The nuclear starburst is an important factor in determining the structure of the molecular tori and the mass accretion rate to the nucleus. It is natural that the ISM in the central 100 pc region is a highly inhomogeneous and turbulent structure. As a result, gas accretion to the central parsec region should be time dependent and stochastic. The conventional picture of gas fueling and the AGN unified model may be modified in many respects.

  20. Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to libraryOpen EnergyInformation|Regions

  1. Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

  2. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  3. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  4. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nonproliferation and Arms Control Analysis Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  5. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold climate zone) buildings use least energy compared to other cold regions, mainly because of its high altitude and ample solar

  6. High Pt Jet Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Martinez

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, a comprehensive review of the main aspects of high $\\pt$ jet physics in Run II at the Tevatron is presented. Recent measurements on inclusive jet production are discussed using different jet algorithms and covering a wide region of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. Several measurements, sensitive to a proper description of soft gluon radiation and the underlying event in hadron collisions, are shown. Finally, high $\\pt$ prompt photon measurements and studies on the production of electroweak bosons in association with jets in the final state are discussed.

  7. Alaska Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstracts ChemicalAlaska Regions National

  8. Arkansas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstractsAprilArgonneArkansas Regions

  9. Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

  10. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  11. Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation...

  13. Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groom, D.E. [ed.

    1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

  14. Enhanced ULF electromagnetic activity detected by DEMETER above seismogenic regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasiou, M; David, C; Anagnostopoulos, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of a comparison between ultra low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation, recorded by an electric field instrument (ICE) onboard the satellite DEMETER in the topside ionosphere, and the seismicity of regions with high and lower seiismic activity. In particular we evaluated the energy variations of the ULF Ez-electric field component during a period of four years (2006-2009), in order to examine check the possible relation of ULF EM radiation with seismogenic regions located in central America, Indonesia, Eastern Mediterranean Basin and Greece. As a tool of evaluating the ULF Ez energy variations we used Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) techniques. The results of our analysis clearly show a significant increase of the ULF EM energy emmited from regions of highest seismic activity at the tectonic plates boundaries. We interpret these results as suggesting that the highest ULF EM energy detected in the topside ionosphere is originated from seismic processes within Earth's...

  15. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  16. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  17. 6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

  18. Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

  19. Segmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp-Foliguet, Sylvie

    recognition from fuzzy regions. Keywords: Segmentation, Fuzzy region, Watershed, Color image, TopographicSegmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance SYLVIE PHILIPP­FOLIGUET 1 MARCELO@dcc.ufmg.br, arnaldo@dcc.ufmg.br 3 Supported by CAPES. Abstract. This paper exposes an algorithm that leads to a fuzzy

  20. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities: (1) the demilitarization of the Sinai region between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s; (2) the 1991 quadripartite agreement for monitoring nuclear facilities among Brazil, Argentina, The Argentine-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency; and (3) a bilateral Open Skies agreement between Hungary and Romania in 1991. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations.Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  1. The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    266 The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak was conducted in the Houston area to assess the secondary regional pollution peak that occurs at that time pollution episodes, which correlated with stagnant weather patterns and high temperatures. During spring

  2. MIRCO-STRUCTURES OF RF SURFACES IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-WELD REGIONS OF NIOBIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    MIRCO-STRUCTURES OF RF SURFACES IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-WELD REGIONS OF NIOBIUM R.L. Gengyz , J-structures of RF surfaces in the electron-beam-weld (EBW) regions of niobium samples were studied. These surfaces.These observations have important impli- cations in explanations of the high-field-Q-drop of niobium superconducting

  3. Vibration Suppression and Optimal Repetitive Disturbance Rejection Control in Semi-Nyquist Frequency Region using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    suppression and disturbance rejec- tion even in the semi-Nyquist frequency region. First, the continuous and to reject disturbance in high frequency re- gion because the Nyquist frequency is relatively low-sample performance to reject disturbance in the semi-Nyquist frequency region [6]. On the other hand, authors

  4. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  5. Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikkawa, Izumi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

  6. The role of rooting strategies on the eco-hydrology of semi-arid regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivandran, Gajan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arid regions are characterized by high variability in the arrival of rainfall, and species found in these areas have adapted mechanisms to ensure the capture of this scarce resource. In particular, the rooting strategies ...

  7. South Central Ohio’s brightest to square off Friday at DOE Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PIKETON, Ohio — A record number of teams (32) from 18 southern Ohio high schools will compete in the third annual South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl on Friday, March 13, 2015 at Shawnee State...

  8. High pressure melt ejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent probabilistic risk assessments have identified the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure while the reactor coolant system is at elevated pressure. The analyses postulate that the blowdown of steam and hydrogen into the reactor cavity will cause the core material to be swept from the cavity region into the containment building. The High Pressure Melt Streaming (HIPS) program is an experimental study of the high pressure ejection of molten material and subsequent interactions within a concrete cavity. The program focuses on using prototypic system conditions and scaled models of reactor geometries to accurately simulate the ex-vessel processes during high-pressure accident sequences. Scaling analyses of the experiment show that the criteria established for core debris removal from the cavity are met or exceeded. Tests are performed at two scales, representing 1/10th and 1/20th linear reproductions of the Zion reactor plant. Results of the 1/20th scale tests are presented.

  9. 2009 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Bowers Michelle Diane Highly Distinguished Bowling Joseph David Highly Distinguished Ashley Highly Distinguished Bryant Catherine Clancy Highly Distinguished Buckheister Elaine A Highly

  10. Northwest Regional Technology Center, March 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to homeland security in the region, and this issue highlights Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Initiative The Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking (BFTS the Puget Sound Area Maritime Security Committee Area of Responsibility. As part of the Initiative

  11. Emitting gas regions in Mrk 493: An extensive Fe II line emission region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Popovic; A. Smirnova; D. Ilic; A. Moiseev; J. Kovacevic; V. Afanasiev

    2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed 3D spectroscopic observations of Mrk 493 in order to investigate the Fe II emitting region and their possible connection with the Hydrogen emitting region. We found that there is a strong Fe II emission in an extensive region ~ 4" x 4" around Sy 1 nucleus. The Fe II line width indicates that these lines are originated in an intermediate line region.

  12. Density structure of an active region and associated moss using Hinode/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Tripathi; H. E. Mason; P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: Studying the problem of active region heating requires precise measurements of physical plasma parameters such as electron density, temperature etc. It is also important to understand the relationship of coronal structures with the magnetic field. The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode provides a rare opportunity to derive electron density simultaneously at different temperatures. Aims: MethodsWe study the density structure and characterise plasma in active regions and associated moss regions. In addition we study its relationship to the photospheric magnetic field. Methods: We used data recorded by the EIS, together with magnetic field measurements from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard SoHO and images recorded with the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT/Hinode). Results: We find that the hot core of the active region is densest with values as high as 10^10.5 cm^-3. The electron density estimated in specific regions in the active region moss decreases with increasing temperature. The moss areas were located primarily on one side of the active region, and they map the positive polarity regions almost exactly. The density within the moss region was highest at log T=5.8-6.1, with a value around 10^(10.0-10.5) cm^-3. The moss densities were highest in the strong positive magnetic field region. However, there was no such correlation for the negative polarity areas, where there was a large sunspot.

  13. Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign In AbouttoTwo Sign

  14. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  15. Niger delta deepwater region petroleum potential assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. [Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    On behalf of the Nigerian Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources some 23,000 km of high quality 192 channel, 96 fold seismic, and associated gravity and magnetic data were acquired by TGSI-Mabon Geophysical Co. and made available to the industry in 1991. These data were collected over all deepwater blocks in conjunction with the planned 1993 license round. Later, during 1993 and 1994 TGSI with Mabon Ltd. and Stratum Petroleum Services extended the program onto the shelf (7,000 km) and into the ultra deepwater areas (6,400 km), making possible modern studies of the entire offshore delta complex. In assessing the petroleum potential of an undrilled region, it is useful to refer to analogous basins or provinces already with histories of hydrocarbon exploration and discovery. With this in mind, and using limited data from the already drilled areas of Nigeria offshore, the adjacent West Africa salt basin and Brazil in particular, an attempt is made to discuss the hydrocarbon habitat of the undrilled Niger delta deepwater offshore sedimentary sequences.

  16. The obscured circumnuclear region of NGC 3079

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. P. Israel; P. P. van der Werf; T. G. Hawarden; C. Aspin

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Images in the J, H and K bands and in the the v=1-0 S(1) line of H2 of the central region of the almost edge-on galaxy NGC 3079 reveal contributions from direct and scattered starlight, emission from hot dust and molecular gas, and extinction gradients. The central 100 pc suffers an extinction of 6 mag. Extremely red near-infrared colours require the presence of hot dust at about 1000 K. Less reddened parts of the bulge require either a 20% J-band contribution from young stars in a stellar bar, or a 20-30% contribution from scattered stellar light. The nucleus is surrounded by a dense molecular disk of radius 300 pc. Emission from H2 and hot dust traces a cavity of radius 120 pc. In the central few hundred pc, HI spin temperatures must be less than 275 K and the CO-to_H2 conversion factor is at most 5% of the standard Galactic value. This is consistent with theoretical predictions for environments subjected to dissociative shocks, where reformation of H2 is impeded by high dust grain temperatures. The overall molecular gas content of NGC 3079 is normal for a late-type galaxy.

  17. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

    1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  18. 2011 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Elizabeth Campbell Highly Distinguished Bowker Ripley Eden Highly Distinguished Brandfass Lara Rose Highly Distinguished Brotherton Cara Price Highly Distinguished Brown Anna Laughlin Highly Distinguished Brown Chloe Alix Highly Distinguished Brown Kelsey Michelle Highly Distinguished Brown Kyle Truman Highly

  19. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    42 U.S.C. 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States....

  20. BPA Regional Science Bowl Begins Jan. 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional-Science-Bowl-Begins-Jan-31 Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  1. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  2. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase Core Storage R&D Storage Infrastructure Strategic Program Support NATCARBAtlas Program Plan Project Portfolio...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Vermont Photovoltaic Regional Test...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The...

  4. Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a number of regional districts, commissions, and authorities with the power to implement regulations and development plans for protected park and recreational areas.

  5. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  7. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  8. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  9. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  10. Regional Resource Centers for Innovation Brochure (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes OIT's Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RCIs), which provide the Innovation and Invention program grantees and other small business energy innovators commercialization assistance.

  11. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  12. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; E. Terlevich; M. Castellanos; G. F. Hagele

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  13. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Díaz, A I; Castellanos, M; Hägele, G F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  14. Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel A; Fernandez, Jorge

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium DanielFernandez, MD Keck School of Medicine of the University ofDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Los Angles, CA The Western

  15. anemia mga1 region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Plants Websites Summary: 652013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions - Outlook June 4, 2013...

  16. 2012 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Beck Misty Nicole Highly Distinguished Beckett Ethan Patrick Highly Distinguished Sara Nicole Highly Distinguished Borland Kelly Nicole Highly Distinguished Bosshardt Zachary Michael

  17. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  18. Microsoft Word - 2014 DOE Science Bowl-high schools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 21, 2014 Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Calloway County High School Wins DOE Regional Science Bowl PADUCAH, KY - Calloway County High School won the U.S. Department of Energy's West...

  19. Valley wins High School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valley wins High School Science Bowl West Des Moines Valley defeated Bettendorf 72-32 in the championship match to win the 25th Ames LaboratoryIowa State University Regional High...

  20. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology wins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bowl February 15, 2006 TJHSST Finishing in first place at the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl was the team from the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and...

  1. Predicting Functional Regions of Objects Chaitanya Desai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanan, Deva

    regions. We compare "blind" approaches that ig- nore image data, bottom-up approaches that reason about). We benchmark a wide variety of algo- rithms for producing such outputs, including blind baselines- fords little use to an observer. The central thesis of this work is that functional regions

  2. THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION DIETER HESSE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS DIVISION UNECE #12;Major trends in the global economy so far in 2003 Global economic activity picked up ­ but uneven regional growth forces United States remains main engine of global economic growth Japan and Asian emerging

  3. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs, Nirupam Bajpai and Ananthi Ramiah Papers #12;Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs Center for International Development (CID) Harvard University Ananthi_Ramiah@harvard.edu This paper was prepared for the Asian Economic

  4. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year

  5. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2 | Last

  6. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2

  7. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog

  8. Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning Undergraduate Degree Programmes www School of City and Regional Planning 11 BSc Geography (Human) 13 BSc Geography (Human) and Planning 15 to Find Us #12;Welcome 1www.cardiff.ac.uk/cplan Thank you for your interest in the Cardiff School of City

  9. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  10. 2012 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Distinguished Andersen Meredith Esther Highly Distinguished Anderson Anna Kathleen Highly Distinguished Anderson Leah Ellen Highly Distinguished Anderson Lucy Paige Highly Distinguished Andrews James Matheson Highly Distinguished Aquino Jeri-Lynn Highly Distinguished Armistead Mary Chandler Highly Distinguished Armstrong Jessa

  11. Interaction Region Design and Detector Integration at JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fanglei [JLAB; Brindza, Paul D. [JLAB; Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A. [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB; Hyde, Charles E. [ODU; Sullivan, Michael [SLAC

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) will be a next-generation facility for the study of the strong interaction (QCD). JLab?s MEIC is designed for high luminosities of up to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. This is achieved in part due to an aggressively small beta-star, which imposes stringent requirements on the collider rings? dynamical properties. Additionally, one of the unique features of MEIC is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. The detector design relies on a number of features, such as a 50 mrad beam crossing angle, large-aperture ion and electron final focusing quads and spectrometer dipoles as well as a large machine-element-free detection space downstream of the final focusing quads. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detector and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region?s modularity for easiness of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary non-linear dynamical properties.

  12. Chlorine-36 in Water, Snow, and Mid-Latitude Glacial Ice of North America: Meteoric and Weapons-Tests Production in the Vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. DeWayne; J. R. Green (USGS); S. Vogt, P. Sharma (Purdue University); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo); S. N. Davis (University of Arizona); G. L. Cottrell (USGS)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of chlorine-36 (36Cl) were made for 64 water, snow, and glacial-ice and -runoff samples to determine the meteoric and weapons-tests-produced concentrations and fluxes of this radionuclide at mid-latitudes in North America. The results will facilitate the use of 36Cl as a hydrogeologic tracer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This information was used to estimate meteoric and weapons-tests contributions of this nuclide to environmental inventories at and near the INEEL. The data presented in this report suggest a meteoric source 36Cl for environmental samples collected in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming if the concentration is less than 1 x 10 7 atoms/L. Additionally, concentrations in water, snow, or glacial ice between 1 x 10 7 and 1 x 10 8 atoms/L may be indicative of a weapons-tests component from peak 36Cl production in the late 1950s. Chlorine-36 concentrations between 1 x 10 8 and 1 x 10 9 atoms/L may be representative of re-suspension of weapons-tests fallout airborne disposal of 36Cl from the INTEC, or evapotranspiration. It was concluded from the water, snow, and glacial data presented here that concentrations of 36Cl measured in environmental samples at the INEEL larger than 1 x 10 9 atoms/L can be attributed to waste-disposal practices.

  13. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) survey of the FEMA Region X Federal Regional Center, Bothell, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crutcher, R.I.; Buchanan, M.E.; Jones, R.W.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop an engineering design package to protect the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Radio System (FNARS) facilities against the effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMPS). This report refers to the FEMA Federal Regional Center (FRC) in Bothell, Washington. It is highly probably that there will be a heavy dependence upon high-frequency (hf) radio communications for long-haul communications following a nuclear attack on the continental United States, should one occur. To maintain the viability of the FEMA hf radio network during such a situation, the FNARS facilities must take measures to protect against the effects of HEMP that are likely to be created in a nuclear confrontation. The equipment under stress has already been designed and built so that little opportunity exists for equipment design changes that could raise the threshold levels at which malfunctions occur. The solution must then be to reduce HEMP-induced stresses on the system by means of tailored retrofit hardening measures using commercial protection devices when available. If is the intent of this report to define the particular hardening measures that will minimize the susceptibility of the network components to HEMP effects. To the extent economically viable, protective actions have been recommended for implementation, along with necessary changes or additions, during the period of the FNARS upgrade program. This report addresses electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects only, and disregards any condition in which radiation effects may be a factor. This report identifies the systems in the facility considered critical for emergency option. To identify the critical systems in the facility and the EMP coupling paths into these systems, an EMP survey of the facility was conducted. Results of the survey are presented along with recommendations for tailored retrofit hardening measures to be implemented to protect the facility from EMP.

  14. Regional measurements of /sup 14/Cmisonidazole distribution and blood flow in subcutaneous RT-9 experimental tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasberg, R.; Horowitz, M.; Strong, J.; Molnar, P.; Patlak, C.; Owens, E.; Fenstermacher, J.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional (/sup 14/C)misonidazole-derived radioactivity (MISO*) was measured by quantitative autoradiography in s.c. RT-9 experimental tumors 0.5, 2, and 4 h after an i.v. bolus (25 mg) and constant infusion (10 mg/h) in rats. Misonidazole (MISO) concentration in plasma, tumor, and other tissues was also measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The distribution of MISO* in the tumors always resulted in a characteristic pattern with high peripheral and low central values. The high-activity regions in the tumor rim achieved tissue: plasma MISO* activity ratios of 0.97 and 2.2 by 0.5 and 4 h, respectively; for central tumor regions, this ratio was 0.20 and 0.32 for the same periods, respectively. The limited distribution of MISO* to central tumor regions could be correlated to low values of blood flow (measured with (/sup 131/I)iodoantipyrine) and to diffusion from peripheral tumor regions. Low blood flow in the central regions of these tumors will significantly limit the distribution of MISO and other drugs to viable-appearing cells in these areas and could account in part for the failures of chemotherapy in certain solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic modeling indicates that 1 to 9 h may be necessary for MISO concentrations in some tumor regions to reach 50% of that in plasma.

  15. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

  16. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  17. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , when attributed on a consumption basis, California's per capita emissions are over 25 percent higherThe CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions

  18. Control of Regional and Global Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary idea for regional and global weather control. He offers to cover cities, bad regions of country, full country or a continent by a thin closed film with control clarity located at a top limit of the Earth troposphere (4 - 6 km). The film is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric pressure and connected to ground by thin cables. It is known, the troposphere defines the Earth weather. Authors show this closed dome allows to do a full control of the weather in a given region (the day is always fine, the rain is only in night, no strong wind). The average Earth (white cloudy) reflectance equal 0.3 - 0.5. That means the Earth losses about 0.3 - 0.5 of a solar energy. The dome controls the clarity of film and converts the cold regions to subtropics and creates the hot deserts, desolate wildernesses to the prosperous regions with temperate climate. That is a realistic and the cheapest method of the weather control in the Earth at the current time. Key words: Global weather control, gigantic film dome, converting a cold region to subtropics, converting desolate wilderness to a prosperous region.

  19. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  20. Stellar Populations in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; M. Alvarez-Alvarez; M. Castellanos

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the stellar populations and gas physical conditions in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions (CNSFR) based on broad and narrow band photometry and spectrophotometric data, which have been analyzed with the use of evolutionary population synthesis and photoionization models. It is found that most CNSFR show composite stellar populations of slightly different ages. They seem to have the highest abundances in HII region-like objects, showing also N/O overabundances and S/O underabundances by a factor of about three. Also, CNSFR as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller $\\eta$' values, and thereforefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  1. 2013 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Anderson Chelsea Mariah Highly Distinguished Anderson Madison Olivia Highly Distinguished Andrews James Askew Mary Frances Highly Distinguished Augustine Andrew William Highly Distinguished Austin Adrian Bailes Mary Elizabeth Highly Distinguished Bailey Erika Leigh Highly Distinguished Bailey Margaret

  2. High density laser-driven target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindl, John D. (San Ramon, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  3. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compliance Period for Regional Standards Applicable to Central Air Conditioners April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal...

  4. Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sierra Nevada Region is one of five offices in the Western Area Power Administration. SN markets power in northern and central California, and portions of Nevada, to wholesale...

  5. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Fransisco, CA), Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA), Gray, Joe W. (San Fransisco, CA)

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  6. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  7. Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIRPC is a regional council of local governments serving the citizens of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Northwest Indiana. NIRPC provides a forum that enables the citizens of Northwest...

  8. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MIDWEST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS MIDWEST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself #12;3-i Contents Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 A. Description of the Midwest

  9. Public School Transportation National and Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Public School Transportation National and Regional Perspectives: An Update Presented to Education University #12;Table of Contents I. Current Transportation Funding Policies ..................................................................................................................................1 B. Transportation Funding Options Used by States

  10. Contact Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Regional Office Mailing Address: PO Box 35800 Billings, MT 59107-5800 406-255-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-358-3415 Fax: 406-255-2900 Organizational chart with phone numbers...

  11. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  12. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  13. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The Vermont RTC...

  15. What is the Broad Line Region?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the Broad Line Region (BLR) made of? What determines its location? Why is it sometimes missing? What controls its properties? Some recent results and new approaches which may shed light on these issues are briefly described.

  16. About Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7,800 miles of Federal power lines, which are connected with other regional transmission systems and groups. To keep power moving through the system, we rely on our operations in...

  17. AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

  18. High e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke ne rgy data s am

  19. Clusters of Extragalactic Ultra Compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsey E. Johnson; Chip Kobulnicky; Phil Massey; Peter Conti

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detection of optically thick free-free radio sources in the galaxies M33, NGC 253, and NGC 6946 using data in the literature. We interpret these sources as being young, embedded star birth regions, which are likely to be clusters of ultracompact HII regions. All 35 of the sources presented in this article have positive radio spectral indices alpha>0 suggesting an optically thick thermal bremsstrahlung emission arising in the HII region surrounding hot stars. Energy requirements indicate a range of a several to >500 O7V star equivalents powering each HII region. Assuming a Salpeter IMF, this corresponds to integrated stellar masses of 0.1--60,000 Msun. For roughly half of the sources in our sample, there is no obvious optical counterpart, giving further support for their deeply embedded nature. Their luminosities and radio spectral energy distributions are consistent with HII regions having electron densities from 1500 cm^-3 to 15000 cm^-3 and radii of 1 - 7 pc. We suggest that the less luminous of these sources are extragalactic ultracompact HII region complexes, those of intermediate luminosity are similar to W49 in the Galaxy, while the brightest will be counterparts to 30 Doradus. These objects constitute the lower mass range of extragalactic ``ultradense HII regions'' which we argue are the youngest stages of massive star cluster formation yet observed. This sample is beginning to fill in the continuum of objects between small associations of ultracompact HII regions and the massive extragalactic clusters that may evolve into globular clusters.

  20. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  1. Regions of influence for two iterative methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifeste, Arlee Ross

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject Mathematics REGIONS OF INFLUENCE FOR TWO ITERATIVE METHODS A Thesis By ARLEE ROSS LEIFESTE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (N b )' January 1966 ACKNOWLEDGMENT The author wishes... purpose of the present discussion is to initiate a study of the "regions of influence" of the various solutions of the simul- taneous equations involved. Let the simultaneous functions be denoted and let ( y , y , , y 1 be a point of n...

  2. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  3. On the relationship between auroral and nebular oxygen line intensities in spectra of HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate relationships between observed auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in spectra of HII regions. We find a relation that is metallicity-dependent at low metallicities, but becomes independent of metallicity (within the uncertainties of the available data) above 12+logO/H ~ 8.25, i.e. there is one-to-one correspondance (the ff - relation) between auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in spectra of high-metallicity HII regions. The ff - relation allows one to estimate the flux in the auroral line from strong oxygen line measurements. This solves the problem of the electron temperature (and, consequently, abundance) determination in high-metallicity HII regions. The ff - relation confirms the basic idea of the empirical method, proposed by Pagel et al. (1979) a qurter of a century ago, that the oxygen abundance in HII region can be estimated from the strong oxygen lines measurements only.

  4. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  5. Benzene formation in the inner regions of protostellar disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Woods; Karen Willacy

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene (c-C6H6) formation in the inner 3 AU of a protostellar disk can be efficient, resulting in high abundances of benzene in the midplane region. The formation mechanism is different to that found in interstellar clouds and in protoplanetary nebulae, and proceeds mainly through the reaction between allene (C3H4) and its ion. This has implications for PAH formation, in that some fraction of PAHs seen in the solar system could be native rather than inherited from the interstellar medium.

  6. Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstracts Chemical Sciences,DOE124Alabama

  7. Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstracts Chemical

  8. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstractsAprilArgonne NationalArizona

  9. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstractsAprilArgonne

  10. Arkansas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » HighAbstractsAprilArgonneArkansas

  11. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzales; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission with high confidence. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  12. Ring diagram analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Rajaguru; Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of intense magnetic fields in and around sunspots is expected to modify the solar structure and oscillation frequencies. Applying the ring diagram technique to data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we analyze the characteristics of high-degree f and p modes near active regions and compare them with the characteristics of the modes in quiet regions. As expected from earlier results, the f- and p-mode frequencies of high degree modes are found to be significantly larger in magnetically active regions. In addition, we find that the power in both f and p modes is lower in active regions, while the widths of the peaks are larger, indicating smaller lifetimes. We also find that the oscillation modes are more asymmetric in active regions than those in quiet regions, indicating that modes in active regions are excited closer to the surface. While the increase in mode frequency is monotonic in frequency, all other characteristics show more complex frequency dependences.

  13. Transient horizontal magnetic fields in solar plage regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ishikawa; S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; H. Isobe; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of isolated, small-scale emerging magnetic fields in a plage region with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. Spectro-polarimetric observations were carried out with a cadence of 34 seconds for the plage region located near disc center. The vector magnetic fields are inferred by Milne-Eddington inversion. The observations reveal widespread occurrence of transient, spatially isolated horizontal magnetic fields. The lateral extent of the horizontal magnetic fields is comparable to the size of photospheric granules. These horizontal magnetic fields seem to be tossed about by upflows and downflows of the granular convection. We also report an event that appears to be driven by the magnetic buoyancy instability. We refer to buoyancy-driven emergence as type1 and convection-driven emergence as type2. Although both events have magnetic field strengths of about 600 G, the filling factor of type1 is a factor of two larger than that of type2. Our finding suggests that the granular convection in the plage regions is characterized by a high rate of occurrence of granular-sized transient horizontal fields.

  14. Determining the Hubble constant using HII regions and HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez, Ricardo; Terlevich, Roberto; Plionis, Manolis; Bresolin, Fabio; Basilakos, Spyros; Melnick, Jorge

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of a long term program aiming to provide accurate independent estimates of the Hubble constant (H0) and the Dark Energy equation of state parameter (w) using the L(Hbeta)-velocity dispersion (sigma) distance estimator for Giant HII regions and HII galaxies. We have used VLT and Subaru high dispersion spectroscopic observations of a local sample of HII galaxies, identified in the SDSS DR7 catalogue in order to re-define and improve the L(Hbeta) - sigma distance indicator and to determine the Hubble constant. To this end we used as local calibration or 'anchor' of this correlation, giant HII regions in nearby galaxies which have accurate distance measurements determined via primary indicators. Using our best sample of 89 nearby HII galaxies and 23 Giant HII regions in 9 galaxies we obtain H0 = 73.9+- 2.7 (statistical)+- 2.9 (systematic) km s-1 Mpc-1, in excellent agreement with, and independently confirming, the most recent SNe Ia based results.

  15. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

  16. Primordial Star Forming Regions in a CDM Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Zhang; Michael L. Norman; Peter Anninos; Tom Abel

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a three-dimensional 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species non-equilibrium ionization and radiative cooling processes, and use it to investigate primordial star forming regions that originate from high-\\sigma perturbations in a standard CDM dominated cosmology. We find it is possible to produce gravitationally bound and cooled structures at very high redshift (z ~ 40) with baryonic masses as small as ~1000Ms. The molecular hydrogen formation in these small scale structures follows very well the analytical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1996). We also discuss the minimum mass that cosmological structures must have in order to be able to cool and collapse.

  17. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  18. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    snow accumulation (mm snow water equivalent) by region.Bell, J.L. , Jour. American Water Resources Assoc. , 591-CO, 1993. Department of Water Resources (DWR), California

  19. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  20. Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

    The region north of the Canadian River in Texas and including the three western counties of Oklahoma have been rapidly developing the groundwater resource since the mid 1960's. This region, hereafter referred to as the Northern High Plains...

  1. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  2. Power systems simulations of the western United States region.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

  3. Extended emission associated with young HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen; S. S. Shabala; S. E. Kurtz

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to make observations of a sample of eight young ultra-compact HII regions, selected on the basis that they have associated class II methanol maser emission. We have made observations sensitive to both compact and extended structures and find both to be present in most sources. The scale of the extended emission in our sample is in general less than that observed towards samples based on IRAS properties, or large single-dish flux densities. Our observations are consistent with a scenario where extended and compact radio continuum emission coexists within HII regions for a significant period of time. We suggest that these observations are consistent with a model where HII evolution takes place within hierarchically structured molecular clouds. This model is the subject of a companion paper (Shabala et al. 2005) and addresses both the association between compact and extended emission and UCHII region lifetime problem.

  4. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  5. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  6. Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis indicates the extent to which pooled regional dispatch for matching generation to load mitigates the costs and improves associated reliability, particularly in scenarios with high penetration of variable output resources, such as wind

  7. Engaging Regions in Globalization: The Rise of the Economic Relationship between the San Francisco Bay Area and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volberding, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vitality. Globalization and the Region The world economy,Bay Area economy has achieved a high level of globalizationglobalization, notes that the expansion and specialization of the global economy

  8. Convective Transport of Trace Species Observed During the Stratosphere–Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 Experiment (START08)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siu, Leong Wai

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 Experiment (START08) the NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft encountered high concentrations of NO and NOy in the upper troposphere downwind of a squall line in north Texas...

  9. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  10. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  11. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  12. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  13. 2030 Northwest Arkansas Regional Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    united front. B. Regional Transportation History An early road was established through Northwest Arkansas in the 1830s linking Fort Smith to points in southern Missouri and on to St. Louis. By the mid 1800s many roads crossed the growing region including... the historic Butterfield Overland Coach Road that linked St. Louis and San Francisco. The Civil War brought troop movements through the area with major battles being fought at Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove. The University of Arkansas was established in 1872...

  14. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  15. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  16. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  17. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  18. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  19. Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division Jimmy Rodríguez-Zamora Caribbean Area Division, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918 Department of Homeland Security also. This effort is being carried out at the Caribbean Area Division as New York and New Jersey

  20. Minutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste Management Topic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Southern Animal and Waste Management Quarterly 2. Format & length: Electronic, pdf and MSWord (by requestMinutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste with the Symposium on the State of the Science: Animal Manure and Waste Management Attended by: M. Risse (UGA), T

  1. african region summary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 12 Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management...

  2. Drive-access transit : a regional analytical framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, James B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for analyzing drive-access transit at a regional level is developed in this research. This framework is intended primarily for in-house use by regional transit agencies, yet has implications for the regional ...

  3. Interaction Region Issues at the NLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

  4. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  5. Finding Regions of Interest on Toroidal Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Sinha, Rishi R; Jones, Chad; Ethier, Stephane; Klasky, Scott; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Shoshani, Arie; Winslett, Marianne

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is underway to turn this aspiration intoreality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinementfusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large amount of data are produced,the careful study of ``interesting'' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach forfinding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce acompact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructingregions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with bothcomputational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is 100s of times faster than a recentlypublished method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  6. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  7. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  8. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  9. Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutgers Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy Growth Challenges James W. Hughes Dean Edward J July 2006 #12;advanced new-economy peers--New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts--have been experi- encing employment declines in the post­2000 period in a number of important "new economy" sectors

  10. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress

  11. Pennsylvania Institute of State and Regional Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    SDCPa Pennsylvania State Data Center Institute of State and Regional Affairs Penn State Harrisburg 777 W. Harrisburg Pike Middletown, PA 17057-4898 Phone: (717) 948-6336 Fax: (717) 948-6754 E-mail: Pa in Pennsylvania since it was established at Penn State Harrisburg in 1973. The Institute was created as a means

  12. Patentanwlte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH)

    Patentanwälte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer, Klaus Dr. Patentanwälte Potthast & Spengler Auf der Rur, 52459 Inden Tel.: (02465) 86 29 144, mail@kleinespatent.de Busse, Frank Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer Grüner Weg 1, 52070 Aachen Tel.: (0241

  13. VANCOUVER FOREST REGION 2100 LABIEUX ROAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Paul Kuster and Frank Ullmann, Operations Manager. Assistance in planning and fieldwork were provided days and work on weekends and nights. Funding for this project was provided by Her Majesty the Queen, through the Vancouver Regional Office Research budget and the Squamish Forest District operational budget

  14. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  15. Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment May 2014 #12;1 Today's agenda Itasca transit options Enables strategic, efficient investment in long-term infrastructure, e.g., energy grid are seeking cities with good transit Transit can be a cost-efficient way to add capacity in corridors

  16. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  17. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/19/2011 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry May 31, 2011 9 _____________________________________________________________ _____________The field of nanotechnology continues to be one of the leading forces behind our nation's ability to develop, commercialize, and produce advancements that are enabled by nanotechnology. Therefore, Drexel

  18. Discovery of Highly Obscured Galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. R. Marleau; A. Noriega-Crespo; R. Paladini; D. Clancy; S. Carey; S. Shenoy; K. E. Kraemer; T. Kuchar; D. R. Mizuno; S. Price

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of twenty-five previously unknown galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance. Our systematic search for extended extra-galactic sources in the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL mid-infrared surveys of the Galactic plane has revealed two overdensities of these sources, located around l ~ 47 and 55 degrees and |b| less than 1 degree in the Sagitta-Aquila region. These overdensities are consistent with the local large-scale structure found at similar Galactic longitude and extending from |b| ~ 4 to 40 degrees. We show that the infrared spectral energy distribution of these sources is indeed consistent with those of normal galaxies. Photometric estimates of their redshift indicate that the majority of these galaxies are found in the redshift range z = 0.01 - 0.05, with one source located at z = 0.07. Comparison with known sources in the local Universe reveals that these galaxies are located at similar overdensities in redshift space. These new galaxies are the first evidence of a bridge linking the large-scale structure between both sides of the Galactic plane at very low Galactic latitude and clearly demonstrate the feasibility of detecting galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance using mid-to-far infrared surveys.

  19. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is a diverse partnership covering eleven states involving the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) an interstate compact; regulatory agencies and/or geological surveys from member states; the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); academic institutions; a Native American enterprise; and multiple entities from the private sector. Figure 1 shows the team structure for the partnership. In addition to the Technical Team, the Technology Coalition, an alliance of auxiliary participants, in the project lends yet more strength and support to the project. The Technology Coalition, with its diverse representation of various sectors, is integral to the technical information transfer, outreach, and public perception activities of the partnership. The Technology Coalition members, shown in Figure 2, also provide a breadth of knowledge and capabilities in the multiplicity of technologies needed to assure a successful outcome to the project and serve as an extremely important asset to the partnership. The eleven states comprising the multi-state region are: Alabama; Arkansas; Florida; Georgia; Louisiana; Mississippi; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; and Virginia. The states making up the SECARB area are illustrated in Figure 3. The primary objectives of the SECARB project include: (1) Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program by promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. This requires the development of relevant data to reduce the uncertainties and risks that are barriers to sequestration, especially for geologic storage in the SECARB region. Information and knowledge are the keys to establishing a regional carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage industry with public acceptance. (2) Supporting the President's Global Climate Change Initiative with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by 2012. A corollary to the first objective, this objective requires the development of a broad awareness across government, industry, and the general public of sequestration issues and establishment of the technological and legal frameworks necessary to achieve the President's goal. The information developed by the SECARB team will play a vital role in achieving the President's goal for the southeastern region of the United States. (3) Evaluating options and potential opportunities for regional CO{sub 2} sequestration. This requires characterization of the region regarding the presence and location of sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily CO{sub 2}, the presence and location of potential carbon sinks and geological parameters, geographical features and environmental concerns, demographics, state and interstate regulations, and existing infrastructure.

  20. adaptive localization regions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Developing regional and local scenarios for climate change mitigation and adaptation Geosciences Websites Summary: Developing regional...

  1. american monsoon region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and circulation in October Xue, Yongkang 30 Vegetation response to Holocene climate change in monsoon-influenced region Yan Zhao a, Geosciences Websites Summary: forest region;...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  3. Wind energy resources atlas. Volume 1. Northwest region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concering regional wind energy resource assessment; regional features; and state features for Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

  4. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability...

  5. Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region July 17, 2012 - 1:59pm Addthis Lynn Meyer Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy...

  6. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency, call slides and...

  7. ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) (Redirected from West African Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE)) Jump...

  8. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  9. Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date...

  10. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  11. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States...

  12. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and...

  13. Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date...

  14. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  15. May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning Efforts May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning Efforts May...

  16. anabaena variabilis regions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 250 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  17. andean region salta: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 260 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  18. ashanti region ghana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 307 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  19. asc ascarylose region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 313 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  20. andes region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 274 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...