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1

High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

Sprangle, Phillip [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Hafizi, Bahman [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

The investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, access to high temperature states of mat- ter capable of thermonuclear fusion and/or the effi- cientThe investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources for fusion materials. The application of fast pulse, high intensity lasers to drive low cost DT point neutron sources for fusion

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

3

Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315?nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 10{sup 16}?W/cm{sup 2} by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4?MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50?MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica e S.d.T. Università di Messina, V.S. d'Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata (Italy)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transverse spreading of electrons in high-intensity laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that for collisions of electrons with a high-intensity laser, discrete photon emissions introduce a transverse beam spread which is distinct from that due to classical (or beam shape) effects. Via numerical simulations, we show that this quantum induced transverse momentum gain of the electron is manifest in collisions with a realistic laser pulse of intensity within reach of current technology, and we propose it as a measurable signature of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

D. G. Green; C. N. Harvey

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Laser-Energy Transfer and Enhancement of Plasma Waves and Electron Beams by Interfering High-Intensity Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-Energy Transfer and Enhancement of Plasma Waves and Electron Beams by Interfering High-Intensity) The effects of interference due to crossed laser beams were studied experimentally in the high- intensity regime. Two ultrashort (400 fs), high-intensity (4 1017 and 1:6 1018 W=cm2) and 1 m wavelength laser

Umstadter, Donald

6

High-Intensity Coherent Vacuum Ultraviolet Source Using Unfocussed Commercial Dye Lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 High-Intensity Coherent Vacuum Ultraviolet Source Using Unfocussed Commercial Dye Lasers Daniel R Intruments Using two or three commercial pulsed nanosecond dye lasers pumped by a single 30 Hz Nd:YAG laser

Davis, H. Floyd

7

Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Title of dissertation: NOVEL APPLICATIONS OF HIGH INTENSITY FEMTOSECOND LASERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cycle seed pulse of terahertz radiation: a short, intense optical pulse (or sequence of pulses) aligns for amplification of few-cycle, high energy pulses of terahertz radiation. We report the development of corrugated the limitations of diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds and promise to allow high

Anlage, Steven

9

Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

Britten, J

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser18, deliver an intense uranium beam that deposit about 1 kJ0g specific energy in solid matter. Using 2004! Abstract Intense heavy ion beams from the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung ~GSI, Darmstadt

11

High intensity picosecond Fourier limited pulses : design of a synchronously pumped dye laser system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

527 High intensity picosecond Fourier limited pulses : design of a synchronously pumped dye laser picosecond pulses. A Nd : Yag picosecond laser is used to synchronously pump a dye oscillator/amplifier system. The dye oscillator is of the Littman type. Up to 1.5 mJ of energy is obtained in a 20 ps pulse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Fiber Bragg grating inscription by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser light: comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiber Bragg grating inscription by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser light: comparison with other 264-nm laser light and a phase mask technique, Bragg grating inscription in a range of different, that result in a significant photosensitivity enhancement of the in- vestigated fibers in comparison

Nikogosyan, David N.

13

Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation ...

Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dynamical Schwinger effect and high-intensity lasers. Realising nonperturbative QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility of experimental verification of vacuum e^+e^- pair creation at the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with intensities 10^{20}-10^{22} W/cm^2, achievable with present-day petawatt lasers, and approaching the Schwinger limit: 10^{29} W/cm^2 to be reached at ELI. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the evolution of the e^+ and e^- distribution functions governed by a non-Markovian source term for pair production. As possible experimental signals of vacuum pair production we consider e^+e^- annihilation into gamma-pairs and the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e^+e^- plasma. We discuss the dependence of the dynamical pair production process on laser wavelength, with special emphasis on applications in the X-ray domain (X-FEL), as well as the prospects for \\mu^+\\mu^- and \\pi^+\\pi^- pair creation at high-intensity lasers. We investigate perspectives for using high-intensity lasers as ``boosters'' of ion beams in the few-GeV per nucleon range, which is relevant, e.g., to the exploration of the QCD phase transition in laboratory experiments.

D. B. Blaschke; A. V. Prozorkevich; G. Roepke; C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. S. Shkirmanov; S. A. Smolyansky

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Saturation of Photoluminescence from Carbon Nanotubes at High Laser Intensities: Exciton-Exciton Annihilation near the Mott Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saturation of Photoluminescence from Carbon Nanotubes at High Laser Intensities: Exciton) spectroscopy of individualized carbon nanotube ensembles has been carried out using wavelength completely flat, where the PL intensity became independent of the excitation wavelength (Fig. 1). Through

Maruyama, Shigeo

16

High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup ?15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1?m) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Litzenberg, D. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filamented electron beams have been observed to be emitted from the rear of thin solid targets irradiated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser when there is low-density plasma present at the back of the target. These observations are consistent with a laser-generated beam of relativistic electrons propagating through the target, which is subsequently fragmented by a Weibel-like instability in the low-density plasma at the rear. These measurements are in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations and theory, since the filamentation instability is predicted to be dramatically enhanced when the electron beam density approaches that of the background plasma.

Wei, M.S.; Beg, F.N.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clark, E.L.; Evans, R.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ledingham, K.W.D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Norreys, P.A. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Department of Physics, The Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double laser-produced plasmas are bright ultrafast line x-ray sources potentially suitable for different onto a solid target into the x-ray emission is significantly enhanced when a laser prepulse precedes

Limpouch, Jiri

19

Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses J; the scaling rules for the conversion efficiency of the laser radiation into the line X-ray emission are discussed. Keywords: Laser-produced plasma; Line X-ray emission; X-ray sources; X-ray spectroscopy 1

Limpouch, Jiri

20

Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A focusable, convergent fast-electron beam from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel scheme for the creation of a convergent, or focussing, fast-electron beam generated from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions is described. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of this scheme in two dimensions. It is shown that a beam of fast-electrons of energy 500 keV - 3 MeV propagates within a solid-density plasma, focussing at depth. The depth of focus of the fast-electron beam is controlled via the target dimensions and focussing optics.

Scott, R H H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short laser pulse with a He jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short of interaction of a relativistically intense 4-TW, 400-fs laser pulse with a He gas jet. We observe a stable data, we reconstructed the axial profile of laser channel and on-axis laser intensity. The estimated

Umstadter, Donald

23

Monte Carlo calculations of pair production in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray and electron-positron pair production will figure prominently in laser-plasma experiments with next generation lasers. Using a Monte Carlo approach we show that straggling effects arising from the finite recoil an electron experiences when it emits a high energy photon, increase the number of pairs produced on further interaction with the laser fields.

Roland Duclous; John Kirk; Anthony Bell

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Observation of a Long-Wavelength Hosing Modulation of a High-Intensity Laser Pulse in Underdense Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first experimental observation of a long-wavelength hosing modulation of a high-intensity laser pulse. Side-view images of the scattered optical radiation at the fundamental wave-length of the laser reveal a transverse oscillation of the laser pulse during its propagation through underdense plasma. The wavelength of the oscillation \\lambda_hosing depends on the background plasma density n_e and scales as \\lambda_hosing~n_e^-3/2. Comparisons with an analytical model and 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that this laser hosing can be induced by a spatio-temporal asymmetry of the intensity distribution in the laser focus which can be caused by a misalignment of the parabolic focussing mirror or of the diffraction gratings in the pulse compressor.

Kaluza, M C; Thomas, A G R; Najmudin, Z; Dangor, A E; Murphy, C D; Collier, J L; Divall, E J; Foster, P S; Hooker, C J; Langley, A J; Smith, J; Krushelnick, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Probing the spectral and temporal structures of high-order harmonic generation in intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the origin of the har- monics with energies much in excess of the ionization po- tential Ip of the electronic wave packet with the parent ionic core. Based on this model, the cutoff energy is predicted in intense pulsed laser fields. Accurate time-dependent wave functions are obtained by means of the time

Chu, Shih-I

26

Sensitivity to Dark Energy candidates by searching for four-wave mixing of high-intensity lasers in the vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical challenges to understand Dark Matter and Dark Energy suggest the existence of low-mass and weakly coupling fields in the universe. The quasi-parallel photon-photon collision system (QPS) can provide chances to probe the resonant production of these light dark fields and the induced decay by the coherent nature of laser fields simultaneously. By focusing high-intensity lasers with different colors in the vacuum, new colors emerge as the signature of the interaction. Because four photons in the initial and final states interplay via the dark field exchange, this process is analogous to four-wave mixing in quantum optics, where the frequency sum and difference among the incident three waves generate the fourth wave with a new frequency via the nonlinear property of crystals. The interaction rate of the four-wave mixing process has the cubic dependence on the intensity of each wave. Therefore, if high-intensity laser fields are given, the sensitivity to the weakly coupling of dark fields to photons rapidly increases over the wide mass range below sub-eV. Based on the experimentally measurable photon energies and the linear polarization states, we formulate the relation between the accessible mass-coupling domains and the high-intensity laser parameters, where the effects of the finite spectrum width of pulse lasers are taken into account. The expected sensitivity suggests that we have a potential to explore interactions at the Super-Planckian coupling strength in the sub-eV mass range, if the cutting-edge laser technologies are properly combined.

Kensuke Homma

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Two-color phase control of high-order harmonic generation in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a time-independent generalized Floquet approach for nonperturbative treatment of high-order harmonic generation (HG) in intense onea (i) determination of the complex quasienergy eigenvalue and eigenfunction by means of the non...

Telnov, Dmitry A.; Wang, Jingyan; Chu, Shih-I

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analysis of two-dimensional high-energy photoelectron momentum distributions in the single ionization of atoms by intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, using longer pulses at lower intensities. The energy spectra above 4Up, where Up is the ponderomotive energy, have been found to vary rapidly with small changes in laser intensities 10,11 when laser pulseAnalysis of two-dimensional high-energy photoelectron momentum distributions in the single

Lin, Chii-Dong

29

Generation of high-quality mega-electron volt proton beams with intense-laser-driven nanotube accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion acceleration scheme using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed, in which embedded fragments of low-Z materials are irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser to eject substantial numbers of electrons. Due to the resultant characteristic electrostatic field, the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of the barrel and bullets of a gun, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic ion beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic MeV-order proton beams using nanometer-size CNT under a super-intense electrostatic field {approx}10{sup 14} V m{sup -1}.

Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [Department of Engineering, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Engineering, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effect of Nuclear Motion on Molecular High-Order Harmonics and on Generation of Attosecond Pulses in Intense Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate harmonic spectra and shapes of attosecond-pulse trains using numerical solutions of Non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Shroedinger equation for 1D H{sub 2} molecules in an intense laser pulse. A very strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the time profiles of high-order harmonics. In general the nuclear motion shortens the part of the attosecond-pulse train originating from the first electron contribution, but it may enhance the second electron contribution for longer pulses. The shape of time profiles of harmonics can thus be used for monitoring the nuclear motion.

Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Lu, Huizhong [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Laser enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound thrombolysis: An in vitro study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation, and ultrasound and laser parameters were optimized to achieve better thrombolysis efficiency. The results indicated that the thrombolysis efficiency increased when pulse length of HIFU wave, HIFU pressure, or laser fluence increases. Also...

Cui, Huizhong; Yang, Xinmai

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup ?2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

Ridgers, C.P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kirk, J.G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Duclous, R. [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Blackburn, T.G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bell, A.R. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of long-period fiber gratings induced by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,5]. Such UV laser irradiation led to a refractive index change in the Ge-doped fiber core via a single for fiber irradiation [6,7], focused ion- beam radiation [8], and electric arc [9,10]. It was also shown@phys.ucc.ie (D.N. Nikogosyan). Optics Communications 246 (2005) 107­115 www.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;most

Nikogosyan, David N.

35

HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or Omega may offer additional advantages and we would expect these to be explored and evaluated during the CD process. Question 3 - A laser/optics experts group should review this proposal to ensure the level of R&D is reasonable to provide a sufficient chance of success (>50%). In the preparation of the HILL proposal, we sent our proposal and cost estimates to laser designers/scientists across the complex. Though risks were identified with our design, the prevailing view of those we engaged was that the risks were appropriately represented by the TRL levels assigned and that the enabling R&D planned in our proposal was adequate for risk mitigation. Question 4 - More data and peer review is needed from its sister facilities around the world. It is our specific intent to conduct both scientific and technical workshops with the user community if the High Intensity Science field is further encouraged as part of the NNSA Roadmap. Question 5 - Does HILL have to be co-located with MARIE 1.0? Is that feasible from the point of view of TA-53 real estate? Multiple siting options were considered for HILL, including co-location with MaRIE 1.0 (the most cost-effective and flexible option), as well as in a separate, stand-alone building and in a retro-fitted existing building. The cost estimate included these contingencies and candidate locations for HILL in TA-53 were identified. There is actually significant space at TA-53 on the hill in the northeast end of the mesa. Question 6 - What would be the impact on the weapons program if this facility were NOT built? An inability to elucidate aspects of weapons science in the dense plasma regime and validate computer models for same. This will lead to reduced confidence in the computer tools used for certification. Question 7 - Will HILL allow some of the x-ray vulnerability studies proposed by SPARC? If so what does Sandia's vulnerability group think of this method versus SPARC. It is possible that some of the scope envisioned for SPARC could be achieved on HILL, although likely that the energy produced at HILL not bei

Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Extension of high-order harmonic generation cutoff via coherent control of intense few-cycle chirped laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for larger dis- tances. #1;b#2; A second-order split-operator technique in the en- ergy representation, which allows the explicit elimination of undesirable fast-oscillating high-energy components, is used for the efficient time propagation of the wave... potential and the laser field. It then oscil- lates quasifreely driven by the Lorenz force and acquires kinetic energy from the laser field. Lastly, after the laser reverses its direction, the returning electron will emit har- monic photons by radiative...

Carrera, Juan J.; Chu, Shih-I

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of 1–8 keV K-? x-ray emission from high intensity femtosecond laser produced plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an experimental study on the optimization of a laser plasma based x-ray source of ultra-short duration K-? line radiation. The interaction of pulses from a CPA based Ti:sapphire laser (10 TW, 45 fs, 10 Hz) system with magnesium, titanium, iron and copper solid target generates bright 1-8 keV K-? x-ray radiation. The x-ray yield was optimized with the laser pulse duration (at fixed fluence) which is varied in the range of 45 fs to 1.4 ps. It showed a maximum at laser pulse duration of ?740 fs, 420 fs, 350 and 250 fs for Mg (1.3 keV), Ti (4.5 keV), Fe (6.4 keV) and Cu (8.05 keV) respectively. The x-ray yield is observed to be independent of the sign of the chirp. The scaling of the K-? yield (I{sub x} ? I{sub L}{sup ?}) for 45 fs and optimized pulse duration were measured for laser intensities in the region of 3 × 10{sup 14} – 8 × 10{sup 17}. The x-ray yield shows a much faster scaling exponent ? = 1.5, 2.1, 2.4 and 2.6 for Mg, Ti, Fe and Cu respectively at optimized pulse duration compared to scaling exponent of 0.65, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 obtained for 45 fs duration laser pulses. The laser to x-ray energy conversion efficiencies obtained for different target materials are ?{sub Mg} = 1.2 × 10{sup ?5}, ?{sub Ti} = 3.1 × 10{sup ?5}, ?{sub Fe} = 2.7 × 10{sup ?5}, ?{sub Cu} = 1.9 × 10{sup ?5}. The results have been explained from the efficient generation of optimal energy hot electrons at longer laser pulse duration. The faster scaling observed at optimal pulse duration indicates that the x-ray source is generated at the target surface and saturation of x-ray emission would appear at larger laser fluence. An example of utilization of the source for measurement of shock-wave profiles in a silicon crystal by time resolved x-ray diffraction is also presented.

Arora, V., E-mail: arora@rrcat.gov.in; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Bagchi, S.; Tayyab, M.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)] [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Molecular-bond hardening and dynamics of molecular stabilization and trapping in intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stabilization and population trapping of high-lying vibrational states and chemical bond hardening are predicted for both continuous-wave (cw) lasers and short laser pulses. While the intensity dependences of the laser-induced stabilization are essentially...

Yao, Guanhua; Chu, Shih-I

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Propagation In Matter Of Currents Of Relativistic Electrons Beyond The Alfven Limit, Produced In Ultra-High-Intensity Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of several experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic currents in matter from ultra-high-intensity laser pulse interaction with target. We present our results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: 1) K{alpha} emission and K{alpha} imaging, 2) study of target rear side emission in the visible region, 3) time resolved optical shadowgraphy.

Batani, D.; Manclossi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G.Occhialini', Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); INFM, Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Baton, S.D.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Gremillet, L.; Popescu, H. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-X-Paris VI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Santos, J.J. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-X-Paris VI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Martinolli, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G.Occhialini', Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); INFM, Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-X-Paris VI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Antonicci, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G.Occhialini', Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); INFM, Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Rousseaux, C.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Hall, T. [University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex, CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Cowan, T.E.; Stephens, R. [Inertial Fusion Technology Division, Fusion Group, General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Key, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA (United States); King, J.; Freeman, R. [Department of Applied Sciences, University of California Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few ?m is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The ?m-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

Chatterjee, Gourab, E-mail: gourab@tifr.res.in; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra, E-mail: grk@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 ?m (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

High intensity femtosecond enhancement cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To produce extreme ultraviolet radiation via high harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases, light intensities in excess of 1014 W/cm 2 are required. Usually such high intensity are obtained by parametric amplification of ...

Abram, Gilberto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Laser intensity effects in noncommutative QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a two-fold extension of QED assuming the presence of strong external fields provided by an ultra-intense laser and noncommutativity of spacetime. While noncommutative effects leave the electron's intensity induced mass shift unchanged, the photons change significantly in character: they acquire a quasi-momentum that is no longer light-like. We study the consequences of this combined noncommutative strong-field effect for basic lepton-photon interactions.

Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Mattias Marklund

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

Habibi, M., E-mail: habibi.physics@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the grant entitled, ���¢��������Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.���¢������� The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

Mori, Warren, B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

Coverdale, C.A.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

X-ray spectroscopy of buried layer foils irradiated with an ultra high intensity short pulse laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Pulse Laser by Sophia Nan Chen Doctor of Philosophy inEngineering Physics) by Sophia Nan Chen Committee in charge:Tynan The dissertation of Sophia Nan Chen is approved, and

Chen, Sophia Nan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiation Reaction in High-Intense Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the development of the radiating electron model by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938, many authors have tried to reformulate this model so-called radiation reaction. Recently, this effects has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a method for the stabilization of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [PTEP 2014, 043A01 (2014), PTEP 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. In the other hand, the field modification by high-intense fields should be required under 10PW lasers, like ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose the combined method how to adopt the high-intense field correction with the stabilization by quantum vacuum as the extension from the model by Dirac.

Seto, Keita

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Coherent control and giant enhancement of multiphoton ionization and high-order-harmonic generation driven by intense frequency-comb laser fields: An ab initio theoretical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the intensity of the driving frequency-comb laser fields. However, the two-level model does not take into account the effects of multilevel structure and ionization, which are inherent in real atomic and/or molecular systems driven by intense laser fields... function. In general, the carrier frequency ?c is not necessarily one of the comb frequencies nor does it equal ?0. Due to the incommensuration between the time period (=2?/?c) of the carrier wave and the time interval ? of the pulse envelope, there is a...

Chu, Shih-I; Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-li

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khodakovskii, N G [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mikheev, P M

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Short, Robert W. (Rochester, NY); Craxton, Stephen (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intense terahertz emission from relativistic circularly polarized laser pulses interaction with overdense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the interaction of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse with an overdense plasma target, the longitudinal motion of bunches of electrons under the action of light pressure and electrostatic restore force can emit intense terahertz (THz) pulses. This mechanism allows high pump laser intensity and large electron number participating in the emission. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to investigate the THz emission. The results suggest that such a source can produce remarkably intense THz pulses with energy of several mJ/sr and power of tens of gigawatts, which could find applications in nonlinear studies and relativistic laser-plasma interaction diagnostics.

Chen, Zi-Yu; Li, Xiao-Ya [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Vacuum self-focussing of very intense laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that long-range photon-photon attraction induced by the dipole interaction of two electron-positron loops can lead to "vacuum self-focussing" of very intense laser beams. The focussing angle theta(F) is found to increase with the beam intensity I as theta(F) I^(4/3); for the laser beams available at present or in the near future, theta(F) 10^(-10)--10^(-7).

Dmitri Kharzeev; Kirill Tuchin

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

Todd Ditmire

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nonlinear dynamics of ionization stabilization of atoms in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the stabilization of ionization of atoms subjected to a superintense laser pulse using nonlinear dynamics. We provide an explanation for the lack of complete ionization at high intensity and for the decrease of the ionization probability as intensity is increased. We investigate the role of each part of the laser pulse (ramp-up, plateau, ramp-down) in this process. We emphasize the role of the choice for the ionization criterion, energy versus distance criterion.

Michael Norman; C. Chandre; T. Uzer; Peijie Wang

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Response of GaAs to fast intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent experiments, we have performed simulations which show in detail how the electrons and ions in GaAs respond to fast intense laser pulses (with durations of order 100 fs and intensities of order 1-10 TW/cm(2)). The method of tight...

Graves, JS; Allen, Roland E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Molecules in intense laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for a Born-Oppenheimer (static nuclei) three-dimensional H{sub 2}{sup +} in super intense laser fields (I=4x10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19}, and 4x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) at wavelength {lambda}{sub L}=45 nm and 25 nm to assess the influence of nondipolar (magnetic) effects on high order harmonic generation spectra in molecules. It is found that even harmonics appear due to the magnetic field component direction perpendicular to the electric field polarization with intensities about two orders of magnitude less than the odd harmonics emitted along the electric field polarization. The even harmonics exhibit plateaus with cutoffs which exceed in intensity the odd harmonic plateaus and maximum energies predicted by semiclassical electron recollision models. Although the spectra are weak, the wavelength of the recollision electron in the maximum energy regions correspond to subatomic dimensions and the corresponding emitted photons have subnanometer wavelengths.

Bandrauk, A. D.; Lu, H. Z. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sideband Mixing in Intense Laser Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electron propagator in a laser background has been shown to be made up of a series of sideband poles. In this paper we study this decomposition by analysing the impact of the residual gauge freedom in the Volkov solution on the sidebands. We show that the gauge transformations do not alter the location of the poles. The identification of the propagator from the two-point function is maintained but we show that the sideband structures mix under residual gauge transformations.

Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fundamental physics on natures of the macroscopic vacuum under high intense electromagnetic fields with accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High intense electromagnetic fields can be unique probes to study natures of macroscopic vacua by themselves. Combining accelerators with the intense field can provide more fruitful probes which can neither be achieved by only intense fields nor only high energy accelerators. We will overview the natures of vacua which can be accessible via intense laser-laser and intense laser-electron interactions. In the case of the laser-laser interaction, we propose how to observe nonlinear QED effects and effects of new fields like light scalar and pseudo scalar fields which may contribute to a macroscopic nature of our universe such as dark energy. In the case of the laser-electron interaction, in addition to nonlinear QED effects, we can further discuss the nature of accelerating field in the vacuum where we can access physics related with event horizons such as Hawking-Unruh radiations. We will introduce a recent experimental trial to search for this kind of odd radiations.

Kensuke Homma

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

High-performance laser processing using manipulated ultrafast laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We employ manipulated ultrafast laser pulses to realize microprocessing with high-performance. Efficient microwelding of glass substrates by irradiation by a double-pulse train of ultrafast laser pulses is demonstrated. The bonding strength of two photostructurable glass substrates welded by double-pulse irradiation was evaluated to be 22.9 MPa, which is approximately 22% greater than that of a sample prepared by conventional irradiation by a single pulse train. Additionally, the fabrication of hollow microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional shape embedded in fused silica is realized by spatiotemporally focusing the ultrafast laser beam. We show both theoretically and experimentally that the spatiotemporal focusing of ultrafast laser beam allows for the creation of a three-dimensionally symmetric spherical peak intensity distribution at the focal spot.

Sugioka, Koji; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Capelli, D.; Antici, P. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Levy, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S. [Department of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

High intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience and results from recent high intensity proton running periods of the Brookhaven AGS, during which a record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse was reached, is presented. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of three high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the 1.5 GeV Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. Recently even higher intensity proton synchrotrons are studied for neutron spallation sources or proton driver for a muon collider. Implications of the experiences from the AGS to these proposals and also possible future upgrades for the AGS are discussed.

Brennan, J.M.; Roser, T.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Device Architecture Simplification of Laser Pattering in High-Volume Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication using Intensive Computation for Design and Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prices of Si based solar modules have been continuously declining in recent years. Goodrich is pointing out that a significant portion of these cost reductions have come about due to ?economies of scale? benefits, but there is a point of diminishing returns when trying to lower cost by simply expanding production capacity [1]. Developing innovative high volume production technologies resulting in an increase of conversion efficiency without adding significant production cost will be necessary to continue the projected cost reductions. The Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) is seeking to achieve this by closing the PV efficiency gap between theoretical achievable maximum conversion efficiency - 29% for c-Si - and the current typical production - 18.5% for a typical full area back contact c-Si Solar cell ? while targeting a module cost of $0.50/Watt . The research conducted by SolarWorldUSA and it?s partners within the FPACE framework focused on the development of a Hybrid metal-wrap-through (MWT) and laser-ablated PERC solar cell design employing a extrusion metallization scheme to achieve >20% efficient devices. The project team was able to simulate, develop and demonstrate the technologies necessary to build p-type MWT PERC cells with extruded front contacts. Conversion efficiencies approaching 20% were demonstrated and a path for further efficiency improvements identified. A detailed cost of ownership calculation for such a device was based on a NREL cost model and is predicting a $/Watt cost below 85 cents on a 180 micron substrate. Several completed or planned publications by SolarWorldUSA and our partners are based on the research conducted within this project and are adding to a better understanding of the involved technologies and materials. Several aspects and technologies of the proposed device have been assessed in regards to technical effectiveness and economic feasibility. It has been shown in a pilot demonstration with wafer thicknesses down to 120 micron that further wafer thickness reduction is only economically viable if handling and contact formation limitations are addressed simultaneously. Furthermore the project partners assessed and demonstrated the feasibility of processing wafers with vias connecting front and back sides through a PERC cell process and aligning and connecting those vias with a non-contact metallization. A close cooperation between industry and institutes of higher education in the Pacific Northwest as shown in this project is of direct benefit to the public and is contributing to the education of the next generation of PV engineers and scientist.

Grupp Mueller, Guenther [SolarWorld; Herfurth, Hans [Fraunhofer CLT; Dunham, Scott [University of Washington; Xu, Baomin [PARC

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

High repetition rate fiber lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Future High-Intensity Proton Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an overview of currently planned high-intensity proton accelerators. While for high energies (>10GeV) synchrotrons remain the preferred tools to produce high-intensity beams, recent years have seen an impressive development of linac-based lower-energy (intensity proton drivers for spallation sources, accelerator driven systems (ADS), production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) and various neutrino applications (beta-beam, superbeam, neutrino factory). This paper discusses the optimum machine types for the various beam requirements and uses a range of projects, which are likely to be realised within the coming decade, to illustrate the different approaches to reach high average beam power with the application-specific time structure. Only machines with a beam power above 100kW are considered.

Gerigk, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang emission from the interaction of an ultrafast ( 29 fs), intense ( 1018 W/cm2 ) laser pulse with underdense of such an ultrafast laser pulse with matter and possible new approaches to MeV electron generation. In this paper we

Umstadter, Donald

76

Numerical simulation study of positron production by intense laser-accelerated electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Positron production by ultra-intense laser-accelerated electrons has been studied with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. The dependence of the positron yield on plasma density, plasma length, and converter thickness was investigated in detail with fixed parameters of a typical 100 TW laser system. The results show that with the optimal plasma and converter parameters a positron beam containing up to 1.9 × 10{sup 10} positrons can be generated, which has a small divergence angle (10°), a high temperature (67.2 MeV), and a short pulse duration (1.7 ps)

Yan, Yonghong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dong, Kegong; Wu, Yuchi; Zhang, Bo; Gu, Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Zeen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

Bliss, David Emery; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hole boring in a DT pellet and fast ion ignition with ultra-intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently achieved high intensities of short laser pulses open new prospects in their application to hole boring in inhomogeneous overdense plasmas and for ignition in precompressed DT fusion targets. A simple analytical model and numerical simulations demonstrate that pulses with intensities exceeding 1022 W/cm2 may penetrate deeply into the plasma as a result of efficient ponderomotive acceleration of ions in the forward direction. The penetration depth as big as hundreds of microns depends on the laser fluence, which has to exceed a few tens of GJ/cm2. The fast ions, accelerated at the bottom of the channel with an efficiency of more than 20%, show a high directionality and may heat the precompressed target core to fusion conditions.

Naumova, N; Tikhonchuk, V T; Labaune, C; Sokolov, I V; Mourou, G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.025002

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Efficient plasma production by intense laser irradiation of low density foam targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental investigations conducted on low density structured materials, such as foams have been presented in this paper. These low density foam targets having a density greater than the critical density of the laser produced plasma ({rho}{sub cr{approx_equal}}3 mg{center_dot}cm{sup -3} at laser wavelength 1.06 {mu}m) have been envisaged to have enhanced laser absorption. Experiments were done with an indigenously developed, focused 15 Joule/500 ps Nd: Glass laser at {lambda} = 1064 nm. The focused laser intensity on the target was in the range of I{approx_equal}10{sup 13}-2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser absorption was determined by energy balance experiments. Laser energy absorption was observed to be higher than 85%. In another set of experiments, low density carbon foam targets of density 150 mg/cc were compared with the solid carbon targets. The x-ray emission in the soft x-ray region was observed to increase in foam target by about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt doped foam as compared to solid carbon. Further, investigations were also carried out to measure the energy transmitted through the sub-critical density TAC foam targets having a density less than 3 mg/cc. Such targets have been proposed to be used for smoothening of intensity ripples in a high power laser beam profile. Transmission exceeding 1.87% has been observed and consistent with results from other laboratories.

Tripathi, S.; Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J. [Laser and Neutron Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Nataliya, B. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ultraviolet to X-ray region. Recently, injection of a single-pass FEL by the third laser harmonic of a TiLETTERS Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense-electron lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers

Loss, Daniel

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81

Ultrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVEGUIDE Ultraintense laser­plasma interaction applications in- cluding x-ray lasers, coherentUltrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration Andrew G of corrugated slow-wave plasma guiding structures with application to quasi- phase-matched direct laser

Milchberg, Howard

82

Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields:? High-order harmonic generation of H2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.29 215.30 25 210.20 210.19 49 216.48 216.50 FIG. 2. The induced dipole moment ^ z(t) & and dipole accelera- tion ^ (d2z(t)/dt2)/v02& of H2 at R51.4a0 as a function of time ~in optical cycles!. The laser intensity is 1014 W/cm2 and wavelength 1064 nm...

Chu, Shih-I; Chu, Xi

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

85

Multiple hot images from an obscuration in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical investigation on the formation of hot images in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks, to disclose the distribution and intensity of hot images in high-power disk amplifiers. It is shown that multiple hot images from an obscuration may be formed, instead of one hot image as reported previously in the literature. This gives a clear explanation for the curious damage pattern of hot images, namely, damage sites appearing on alternating optics in periodic trains. Further analysis demonstrates that the distribution and intensity of hot images depend closely on the number of Kerr medium disks, the distance from the obscuration to the front of the first disk downstream, the space between two neighboring disks, and the thickness and B integral of each disk. Moreover, we take two cascaded Kerr medium disks for example to detail multiple hot images from an obscuration and confirm the theoretical results by numerical simulations.

Wang Youwen; Wen Shuangchun; You Kaiming; Tang Zhixiang; Deng Jianqin; Zhang Lifu; Fan Dianyuan

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

Lapatovich, Walter P. (Hudson, MA); Keeffe, William M. (Rockport, MA); Liebermann, Richard W. (Danvers, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

High precision, rapid laser hole drilling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

Edgecock, T R; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Wildner, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Hansen, C; Benedetto, E; Jensen, E; Kosmicki, A; Martini, M; Osborne, J; Prior, G; Stora, T; Melo-Mendonca, T; Vlachoudis, V; Waaijer, C; Cupial, P; Chancé, A; Longhin, A; Payet, J; Zito, M; Baussan, E; Bobeth, C; Bouquerel, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Lepers, B; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V; Bielski, J; Kozien, M; Lacny, L; Skoczen, B; Szybinski, B; Ustrycka, A; Wroblewski, A; Marie-Jeanne, M; Balint, P; Fourel, C; Giraud, J; Jacob, J; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Mitrofanov, S; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, Th; Delbar, Th; Debray, F; Trophine, C; Veys, S; Daversin, C; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Collazuol, G; Laveder, M; Mazzocco, M; Mezzetto, M; Signorini, C; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Migliozzi, P; Moro, R; Palladino, V; Gelli, N; Berkovits, D; Hass, M; Hirsh, T Y; Schaumann, M; Stahl, A; Wehner, J; Bross, A; Kopp, J; Neuffer, D; Wands, R; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, P; Agarwalla, S K; Villanueva, A Cervera; Donini, A; Ghosh, T; Cadenas, J J Gómez; Hernández, P; Martín-Albo, J; Mena, O; Burguet-Castell, J; Agostino, L; Buizza-Avanzini, M; Marafini, M; Patzak, T; Tonazzo, A; Duchesneau, D; Mosca, L; Bogomilov, M; Karadzhov, Y; Matev, R; Tsenov, R; Akhmedov, E; Blennow, M; Lindner, M; Schwetz, T; Martinez, E Fernández; Maltoni, M; Menéndez, J; Giunti, C; García, M C González; Salvado, J; Coloma, P; Huber, P; Li, T; López-Pavón, J; Orme, C; Pascoli, S; Meloni, D; Tang, J; Winter, W; Ohlsson, T; Zhang, H; Scotto-Lavina, L; Terranova, F; Bonesini, M; Tortora, L; Alekou, A; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Kurup, A; Jenner, L J; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Pozimski, J; Back, J J; Harrison, P; Beard, K; Bogacz, A; Berg, J S; Stratakis, D; Witte, H; Snopok, P; Bliss, N; Cordwell, M; Moss, A; Pattalwar, S; Apollonio, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ion heating dynamics in solid buried layer targets irradiated by ultra-short intense laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate bulk ion heating in solid buried layer targets irradiated by ultra-short laser pulses of relativistic intensities using particle-in-cell simulations. Our study focuses on a CD{sub 2}-Al-CD{sub 2} sandwich target geometry. We find enhanced deuteron ion heating in a layer compressed by the expanding aluminium layer. A pressure gradient created at the Al-CD{sub 2} interface pushes this layer of deuteron ions towards the outer regions of the target. During its passage through the target, deuteron ions are constantly injected into this layer. Our simulations suggest that the directed collective outward motion of the layer is converted into thermal motion inside the layer, leading to deuteron temperatures higher than those found in the rest of the target. This enhanced heating can already be observed at laser pulse durations as low as 100 fs. Thus, detailed experimental surveys at repetition rates of several ten laser shots per minute are in reach at current high-power laser systems, which would allow for probing and optimizing the heating dynamics.

Huang, L. G. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 201800 Shanghai (China) [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 201800 Shanghai (China); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany) [Germany; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China); Bussmann, M.; Kluge, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Lei, A. L. [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, 201800 Shanghai (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, 201800 Shanghai (China); Yu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 201800 Shanghai (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 201800 Shanghai (China); Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Laser-matter interaction at intensities of 10 sup 12 W/cm sup 2 and below  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For single pulsed laser-matter interactions at sufficiently high intensity, the electron density in the ablated vapor is large enough to absorb the laser radiation before it can reach the dense target material. The resulting interaction can be described in terms of energy flows: laser energy is absorbed in the plasma in front of the target and reappears as thermal electron energy and secondary radiation, part of which impinges upon and heats the dense target material at the dense material-vapor interface. This heating in turn drives ablation, thereby providing a self-consistent mass source for the laser absorption, energy conversion, and transmission. Under typical conditions of laser intensity, pulse width and spot size, the flow patterns can be strongly two-dimensional. We have modified the inertial confinement fusion code LASNEX to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects for the relatively low intensity, long-pulse-length conditions to interest in many laser-related applications. The unique aspect to our treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model, at present, treats the dense material as a rigid, two-dimensional simulational mass and heat reservoir, suppressing all hydrodynamical motion in the dense material. The modeling is being developed and refined through simulation of experiments, as well as through the investigation of internal inconsistencies, and some simulations of model problems. 5 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Goldman, S.R.; Dingus, R.S.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Kopp, R.A.; Stover, E.K.; Watt, R.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Kinetic-energy-angle differential distribution of photofragments in multiphoton above-threshold dissociation of D{sub 2}{sup +} by linearly polarized 400-nm intense laser fields: Effects of highly excited electronic states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed a detailed calculation of the double-differential angular-kinetic-energy distribution of photofragments in above threshold dissociation (ATD) of D{sub 2}{sup +} from initial vibrational-rotational levels v{sub i}=4,5 and J{sub i}=0,1 in an intense linearly polarized laser field of wavelength 400 nm and intensity 3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The calculation used a time-independent close-coupling (CC) formalism with eight (ten) electronic states included in the basis-set expansion of the molecular wave function. The molecular electronic states included, apart from the two lowest 1s{sigma}{sub g} and 2p{sigma}{sub u} states, were 2p{pi}{sub u}{sup {+-}}, 2s{sigma}{sub g}, 3p{sigma}{sub u}, 3d{sigma}{sub g}, 3d{pi}{sub g}{sup {+-}}, and 4f{sigma}{sub u}. All the higher electronic states dissociate to the atomic state D(2l). A sufficient number of photon absorption channels, n=0-7, and molecular rotational quantum numbers J=0-11 were taken into account to ensure the convergence of the multiphoton ATD probability. Altogether 198 coupled channels had to be considered in the calculation. The calculations reveal signatures of significant ejection of the photodissociation fragments away from the laser polarization direction due to the inclusion of the higher excited electronic states. The ratio of the photofragments perpendicular to and along the polarization axis shows good quantitative agreement with the experimental result. The angular distributions show considerable structures depending on the relative kinetic energies of the photofragments, and the fragments with different kinetic energies show peaks at different dissociation angles.

Khan, Basir Ahamed; Saha, Samir; Bhattacharyya, S. S. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Section, Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

High power laser perforating tools and systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

EECS 598 Special Topics 005: Laser Plasma Diagnostics High power laser pulses are used to both create and diagnose high-energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EECS 598 Special Topics 005: Laser Plasma Diagnostics High power laser pulses are used to both to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. We will explore the diagnostics used to characterize high-energy density plasmas through optical and other radiation measurements as well as backlighting techniques. Other

Sarabandi, Kamal

99

The role of the molecular dynamics in the local intensity instabilities of large aperture dye lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the molecular dynamics in the local intensity instabilities of large aperture dye fluctuations of large aperture dye lasers, and find dependencies on solvent viscosity and active molecular size dye lasers are used in a great deal of practical applications, from isotope enrichment to photody

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

100

Intensity-resolved Above Threshold Ionization Yields of Atoms with Ultrashort Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Electron ionization yields of xenon were measured for a set of laser pulse intensities using a time of flight (TOF) setup. Horizontally polarized, unchirped, pulses were used in the ionization process. All laser parameters other than the radiation.... The photoelectron yield rate for xenon ............................................................... 37 Fig. 20. The Runge divergence calculated for the model xenon probability function using (6...

Hart, Nathan Andrew

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electron acceleration by a self-diverging intense laser pulse K. P. Singh,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron acceleration by a self-diverging intense laser pulse K. P. Singh,1, * D. N. Gupta,1 V. K, India 2 Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, New Delhi-110021, India (Received 23 October 2003; published 28 April 2004) Electron acceleration by a laser pulse having a Gaussian radial

Singh, Kunwar Pal

102

Asymmetric explosion of clusters in intense laser fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine asymmetric expansion of argon clusters illuminated by 800 nm laser pulses of duration Almost-Equal-To 23fs, using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. For this short pulse duration, laser energy absorption by cluster electrons is dominated by the nonlinear resonance (NLR) absorption process [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)]. In this work, we concentrate, particularly, on the ionic outcome in the NLR regime and show that higher charge states of argon ions are produced along the laser polarization than in the transverse directions leading to the anisotropy (asymmetry) in the ion energy distribution. This anisotropy already established during the short pulse duration (or in the early duration of a long pulse) may contribute to the anisotropic ion emission reported in cluster experiments with pulse duration longer than 100 fs. Our PIC results are compared with a charged-sphere model showing that cluster explosion is mainly due to Coulomb repulsion between the cluster ions.

Kundu, M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Yu, W.; Luan, S. X. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, C. T. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Peng, X. J. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Bass, Isaac L. (Castro Valley, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

High-intensity beam collimation and targetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Principles, design criteria and realization of reliable collimation systems for the high-power accelerators and hadron colliders are described. Functionality of collimators as the key elements of the machine protection system are discussed along with the substantial progress on the crystal collimation front. The key issues are considered in design of high-power target systems and achieving their best performance. Simulation code requirements are presented.

Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Researchers at...

109

Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

Xu, Han [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, College of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, M. Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn [Physics Department, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany); Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Wang, J. W. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Suppression of intensity noise of a laser-diode-pumped single-frequency Nd:YVO4 laser by optoelectronic control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by optoelectronic control Jing Zhang, Hongliang Ma, Changde Xie, and Kunchi Peng The intensity-noise reduction of a laser-diode-pumped single-frequency ring Nd:YVO4 laser when differ- ent optoelectronic control systems techniques, optoelectronic feedback control of the drive current of the pump laser diode and feed

Zhang, Jing

114

Ultraviolet poling of pure fused silica by high-intensity femtosecond Costantino Corbari and Peter G. Kazansky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field of 200 kV/cm and irradiating it with high-intensity 40 GW/cm2 femtosecond 220 fs laser pulses a second-order nonlinearity in glass by poling has some very intriguing possibilities for fiber optics, first realized by Fujiwara et al.,1 consists of the irradiation of highly Ge-doped 15.7 mol % fused

Nikogosyan, David N.

115

Ultrafast dynamics and fragmentation of C60 in intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiation-induced fragmentation of the C60 fullerene was investigated by the tight-binding electron-ion dynamics simulations. In intense laser field, the breathing vibrational mode is much more strongly excited than the pentagonal-pinch mode. The fragmentation effect was found more remarkable at long wavelength lambda>800 nm rather than the resonant wavelengths due to the internal laser-induced dipole force, and the production ratio of C and C2 rapidly grows with increasing wavelength. By such fragmentation law, C atoms, C2 dimers or large Cn fragments could be selectively obtained by changing the laser wavelength. And the fragmentation of C60 by two laser pulses like the multi-step atomic photoionization was investigated.

Lin, Zheng-Zhe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Using X-ray free-electron lasers for probing of complex interaction dynamics of ultra-intense lasers with solid matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advance the understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. In this paper, we focus on XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions based on quantitative calculations using synthesized data and evaluate the feasibility of various imaging and scattering techniques with special focus on the small angle X-ray scattering technique.

Kluge, T., E-mail: t.kluge@hzdr.de; Huang, L. G.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Gutt, C. [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

X-Ray Radiation from Nonlinear Thomson Scattering of an Intense Femtosecond Laser on Relativistic Electrons in a Helium Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Radiation from Nonlinear Thomson Scattering of an Intense Femtosecond Laser on Relativistic laser beam on plasma electrons. A collimated x-ray radiation with a broad continuous spectrum peaked by the ultraintense laser fields. The results show the existence of several physical mecha- nisms for the x-ray

Umstadter, Donald

118

High-power terahertz optically pumped NH{sub 3} laser for plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parameter of a terahertz (THz) laser intended for plasma diagnostics in electrodynamic accelerators and tokamaks with a strong magnetic field are discussed. Generation of THz radiation in an ammonia laser under the action of high-power pulsed optical pumping by the radiation of a 10P(32) CO{sub 2} laser is simulated numerically. The main characteristics of the output radiation, such as its spectrum, peak intensity, time dependence, and total energy, are calculated.

Mishchenko, V. A.; Petrushevich, Yu. V.; Sobolenko, D. N.; Starostin, A. N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

A proposal for testing subcritical vacuum pair production with high power lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a proposal for testing the prediction of non-equilibrium quantum field theory below the Schwinger limit. The proposed experiments should be able to detect a measurable number of gamma rays resulting from the annihilation of pairs in the focal spot of two opposing high intensity laser beams. We discuss the dependence of the expected number of gamma rays with the laser parameters and compare with the estimated background level of gamma hits for realistic laser conditions.

G. Gregori; D. B. Blaschke; P. P. Rajeev; H. Chen; R. J. Clarke; T. Huffman; C. D. Murphy; A. V. Prozorkevich; C. D. Roberts; G. Röpke; S. M. Schmidt; S. A. Smolyansky; S. Wilks; R. Bingham

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

Niemann, Christoph

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for Spectroscopy & Micromachining PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES. In addition to the OPO, a custom designed ultrafast pump source, provides high pulse energy (.res.hw.ac.uk Professor Derryck Reid (Principal Investigator) www.ultrafast.hw.ac.uk BENEFITS & APPLICATIONS: · High pulse

Painter, Kevin

123

Hot electron energy coupling in ultra-intense laser matter interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the hydrodynamic response of plasma gradients during the interaction with ultra-intense energetic laser pulses, using one-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. As energetic laser pulses are capable of compressing the preformed plasma over short times, the coupling efficiency as well as the temperature of hot electrons drop, leading to localized heating near the point of absorption. We describe the cause of this drop, explain the electron spectra and identify the parametric region where strong compression occurs. Finally, we discuss implications for fast ignition and other applications.

Kemp, A J; Sentoku, Y; Tabak, M

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Electronic and intraband optical properties of single quantum rings under intense laser field radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of an intense laser field on one-electron states and intraband optical absorption coefficients is investigated in two-dimensional GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As quantum rings. An analytical expression of the effective lateral confining potential induced by the laser field is obtained. The one-electron energy spectrum and wave functions are found using the effective mass approximation and exact diagonalization technique. We have shown that changes in the incident light polarization lead to blue- or redshifts in the intraband optical absorption spectrum. Moreover, we found that only blueshift is obtained with increasing outer radius of the quantum ring.

Radu, A. [Department of Physics, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, Bucharest RO-060042 (Romania); Kirakosyan, A. A.; Baghramyan, H. M.; Barseghyan, M. G., E-mail: mbarsegh@ysu.am [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

Jahangiri, Fazel [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

126

Replica Symmetry Breaking in the Intensity Fluctuation Overlap of Random Laser Emission Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report about a newly introduced overlap parameter of intensity fluctuations of waves in random media with arbitrary amount of disorder and non-linearity and its relationship to the replica theory overlap in the $2+4$ spherical complex spin-glass model. Symmetry breaking in the intensity fluctuation overlap is shown to be equivalent to the one occurring in the complex amplitude overlap, providing an easily verifiable test in typical experimental setups. The relevance of this order parameter is considered in describing the laser transition in random media and in explaining its glassy nature in terms of emission spectra data. The theoretical analysis is compared to recent measurements.

Antenucci, Fabrizio; Leuzzi, Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g . brown dwarfs) early in the interaction to extremely high energy densities of {approx}10{sup 11} J/cm{sup 3} at peak, dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Furthermore, whereas today this regime can only be accessed on very few dedicated facilities, employing special targets and pulse cleaning technology, the next generation of laser facilities like RAL-10PW, ELI, or Gekko-Exa will operate in this regime by default, turning its understanding in a necessity rather than a curiosity.

Hegelich, Bjorn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electric dipole-forbidden nuclear transitions driven by super-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric dipole-forbidden transitions of nuclei interacting with super-intense laser fields are investigated considering stable isotopes with suitable low-lying first excited states. Different classes of transitions are identified, and all magnetic sublevels corresponding to the near-resonantly driven nuclear transition are included in the description of the nuclear quantum system. We find that large transition matrix elements and convenient resonance energies qualify nuclear M1 transitions as good candidates for the coherent driving of nuclei. We discuss the implications of resonant interaction of intense laser fields with nuclei beyond the dipole approximation for the controlled preparation of excited nuclear states and important aspects of possible experiments aimed at observing these effects.

Adriana Pálffy; Jörg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High density laser-driven target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

Lindl, John D. (San Ramon, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Bishop, Alan R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Santa Fe, NM); Gorshkov, Vacheslav N. (Kiev, UA)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/mechanical property changes experiment for baseline materials Carbon-Carbon composite This low-Z composite gives;PHASE I: Graphite & Carbon-Carbon Targets #12;E951 Results: ATJ Graphite vs. Carbon-Carbon CompositePLAN MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS Nicholas Simos, Harold Kirk

McDonald, Kirk

134

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, Donald J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schamaun, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Donald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Potter, R. Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Joseph A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

A. Tawfik

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High performance tunnel injection quantum dot comb laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-speed multiwavelength quantum dot comb laser, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, is demonstrated. The device is characterized with a 75.9 nm (full width at half maximum) and a 91.4 nm (DELTA{sub -15dB}) wide lasing spectrum. There are 105 and 185 simultaneously emitted longitudinal modes with a maximum channel intensity nonuniformity of less than 3 dB in the spectral range of 1231-1252 nm and 1274-1311 nm, respectively, for a laser with 1040 mum cavity length. The channel spacing can be tuned with cavity length and remains invariant in the temperature range of 300-323 K. The small signal modulation bandwidth is 7.5 GHz.

Lee, C.-S.; Guo Wei; Basu, Debashish; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Laser-driven hole boring and gamma-ray emission in high-density plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion acceleration in laser-produced dense plasmas is a key topic of many recent investigations thanks to its potential applications. Besides, at forthcoming laser intensities ($I \\gtrsim 10^{23} \\text{W}\\,\\text{cm}^{-2}$) interaction of laser pulses with plasmas can be accompanied by copious gamma-ray emission. Here we demonstrate the mutual influence of gamma-ray emission and ion acceleration during relativistic hole boring in high-density plasmas with ultra-intense laser pulses. If gamma-ray emission is abundant, laser pulse reflection and hole-boring velocity are lower and gamma-ray radiation pattern is narrower than in the case of low emission. Conservation of energy and momentum allows one to elucidate the effects of gamma-ray emission which are more pronounced at higher hole-boring velocities.

Nerush, Evgeny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense ultrashort laser pulses a variety of models has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target. The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our inves...

Liseykina, T; Murakami, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coherent beam combiner for a high power laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phase conjugate laser mirror employing Brillouin-enhanced four wave mixing allows multiple independent laser apertures to be phase locked producing an array of diffraction-limited beams with no piston phase errors. The beam combiner has application in laser and optical systems requiring high average power, high pulse energy, and low beam divergence. A broad range of applications exist in laser systems for industrial processing, especially in the field of metal surface treatment and laser shot peening.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Trends in packaging of high power semiconductor laser bars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different approaches to packaging high power diode laser bars for pumping solid state lasers or for direct diode laser applications are examined. The benefit and utility of each package is strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made.

Solarz, R.W.; Emanuel, M.A.; Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.; Krupke, W.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Aston, Mary Kay (Moscow, PA); Elder, Melanie L. (Dublin, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Toward a self-consistent model of the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse with an overdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a recent work by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046411 (2012)], we elaborate upon a one-dimensional model describing the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse and an overdense plasma. The analytical solutions of the reflected laser field, the electrostatic field, and the plasma surface oscillation are obtained within the cold-fluid approximation. The high-order harmonic spectrum is calculated from the exact solution of the plasma surface oscillations. In agreement with particle-in-cell simulations, two regimes of harmonic generation are predicted: for moderately relativistic laser intensities, or high plasma densities, the harmonic spectrum is determined by the discontinuity in the derivative of the reflected field when the electron plasma boundary oscillates across the fixed ion boundary. For higher intensities, the electron plasma boundary is confined inside the ion region and oscillates at relativistic velocities, giving rise to a train of reflected attosecond pulses. In both cases, the harmonic spectrum obeys an asymptotic ?{sup ?4} scaling. The acceleration of electrons and the related laser absorption efficiency are computed by a test particle method. The model self-consistently reproduces the transition between the “anomalous skin effect” and the “J × B” heating predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. Analytical estimates of the different scalings are presented.

Debayle, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France) [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sanz, J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mima, K. [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)] [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

Mansfield, Dennis K. (E. Windsor, NJ); Vocaturo, Michael (Columbus, NJ); Guttadora, Lawrence J. (Iselin, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source

Gubin, K V; Bak, P A; Kot, N K; Logatchev, P V

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

High energy femtosecond fiber laser at 1018 nm and high power Cherenkov radiation generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two novel laser systems for ultrafast applications have been designed and built. For the seeding of a high energy cryogenically cooled Yb:YLF laser, a novel 1018 nm fiber laser system is demonstrated. It produces >35 nJ ...

Yang, Hongyu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Generation of high-energy-density ion bunches by ultraintense laser-cone-target interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scheme in which carbon ion bunches are accelerated to a high energy and density by a laser pulse (?10{sup 21}?W/cm{sup 2}) irradiating cone targets is proposed and investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The laser pulse is focused by the cone and drives forward an ultrathin foil located at the cone's tip. In the course of the work, best results were obtained employing target configurations combining a low-Z cone with a multispecies foil transversely shaped to match the laser intensity profile.

Yang, X. H.; Zhuo, H. B., E-mail: hongbin.zhuo@gmail.com; Ma, Y. Y.; Zou, D. B.; Yu, T. P.; Ge, Z. Y.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Yu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Xu, H., E-mail: xuhanemail@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Computing, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Borghesi, M., E-mail: m.borghesi@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

High power laser workover and completion tools and systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Workover and completion systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser workover and completion of a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform laser workover and completion operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­?energy-­? density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­?energy-­? density plasma the ideas for steady-­?state current drive developed for low-­?energy-­? density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­?energy-­?density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

Fisch, Nathaniel J

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Relativistic nonlinear dynamics of an intense laser beam propagating in a hot electron-positron magnetoactive plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study is devoted to investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of an intense laser beam interacting with a hot magnetized electron-positron plasma. Propagation of the intense circularly polarized laser beam along an external magnetic field is studied using a relativistic two-fluid model. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived based on the quasi-neutral approximation, which is valid for hot plasma. Light envelope solitary waves and modulation instability are studied, for one-dimensional case. Using a three-dimensional model, spatial-temporal development of laser pulse is investigated. Occurrence of some nonlinear phenomena such as self-focusing, self-modulation, light trapping, and filamentation of laser pulse is discussed. Also the effect of external magnetic field and plasma temperature on the nonlinear evolution of these phenomena is studied.

Sepehri Javan, N.; Adli, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Loss of spatial coherence and limiting of focal plane intensity by small-scale laser-beam filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a nonlinear optical mechanism that leads to a decrease of the degree of (transverse) spatial coherence of a laser beam as a function of propagation distance. This prediction is in direct contrast with those of the van Cittert-Zernike theorem, which applies to propagation through a linear, homogeneous material. The mechanism by which coherence is lost is the growth of small phase irregularities initially present on the laser wave front. We develop a detailed theoretical model of this effect and present experimental results that validate this model. The practical importance of this result is that by being able to controllably decrease the spatial coherence of a laser beam, one can limit the maximum intensity that is produced in its focal region. By limiting the intensity, one can prevent laser damage to bulk optical components or to sensitive photodetectors. This mechanism thus provides an alternative to current approaches of sensor protection based on optical power limiting.

Schweinsberg, Aaron; Kuper, Jerry [The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Boyd, Robert W. [The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canda K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

Roser, T.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Liquid crystal films as on-demand, variable thickness (50–5000?nm) targets for intense lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a new type of target for intense laser-matter experiments that offers significant advantages over those currently in use. The targets consist of a liquid crystal film freely suspended within a metal frame. They can be formed rapidly on-demand with thicknesses ranging from nanometers to micrometers, where the particular value is determined by the liquid crystal temperature and initial volume as well as by the frame geometry. The liquid crystal used for this work, 8CB (4?-octyl-4-cyanobiphenyl), has a vapor pressure below 10{sup ?6}?Torr, so films made at atmospheric pressure maintain their initial thickness after pumping to high vacuum. Additionally, the volume per film is such that each target costs significantly less than one cent to produce. The mechanism of film formation and relevant physics of liquid crystals are described, as well as ion acceleration data from the first shots on liquid crystal film targets at the Ohio State University Scarlet laser facility.

Poole, P. L., E-mail: poole.134@osu.edu; Andereck, C. D.; Schumacher, D. W.; Daskalova, R. L.; Feister, S.; George, K. M.; Willis, C.; Akli, K. U.; Chowdhury, E. A. [Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Electron acceleration by an intense short pulse laser in a static magnetic field in vacuum K. P. Singh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron acceleration by an intense short pulse laser in a static magnetic field in vacuum K. P 2003; revised manuscript received 22 December 2003; published 28 May 2004) Electron acceleration the peak of the pulse interacts with the electron and the direction of the static magnetic field is taken

Roy, Subrata

164

Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa... I. D. Kaganovich beams,13 the physics of solar flares,14 high-intensity high- energy particle beam propagation Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range

Kaganovich, Igor

165

Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Selective emission and luminescence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} under intense laser excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) layers was observed upon interaction of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 200 – 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength ? = 10.6 ?m) and resonant laser (? ? 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 400 – 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions formed under intense laser excitation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er{sup 3+} ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Marchenko, V M; Studenikin, M I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L D [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high- energy hadron beamsFREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA# Yaroslav S. Derbenev, TJNAF, Newport News, VA, USA) Abstract Cooling intense high

168

High power solid state laser modulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-stage magnetic modulator provides a pulse train of .+-.40 kV electrical pulses at a 5-7 kHz repetition rate to a metal vapor laser. A fractional turn transformer steps up the voltage by a factor of 80 to 1 and magnetic pulse compression is used to reduce the pulse width of the pulse train. The transformer is fabricated utilizing a rod and plate stack type of construction to achieve a high packing factor. The pulses are controlled by an SCR stack where a plurality of SCRs are electrically connected in parallel, each SCR electrically connected to a saturable inductor, all saturable inductors being wound on the same core of magnetic material for enhanced power handling characteristics.

Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

X-Ray Radiation Measurements With Photodiodes In Plasmas Generated By 1017 W/Cm2 Intensity Krf Excimer Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out using a prepulse-free hybrid KrF excimer-dye laser system (700fs pulse duration, 248nm wavelength, 15mJ pulse energy). The intensity of the p-polarized, focused laser beam was 1.5{center_dot}1017 W/cm2. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-rays from solid state laser plasmas were generated in the laser-plasma interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses of nonrelativistic laser intensities. An x-ray sensitive FLM photodiode (ITE, Warsaw) was used to detect x-rays between 1-19 keV in front of the targets. The diode was filtered by a 4{mu}m Al foil. The dependence of the x-ray flux on laser intensity and the angular distribution of x-rays for aluminum and copper targets in the half space of the front side of the targets were investigated.

Racz, E.; Foeldes, I. B. [KFKI RMKI, EURATOM Association, P.O.Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ryc, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparison of direct and indirect positron-generation by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive comparison of the properties of positron beams produced by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser in direct and indirect schemes has been performed with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the positron beam generated in the indirect scheme has a higher yield (10{sup 10}), a higher temperature (28.8 MeV), a shorter pulse duration (5 ps), and a smaller divergence (8°) than in the direct case (10{sup 9} yield, 4.4 MeV temperature, 40 ps pulse duration, and 60° divergence). In addition, it was found that the positron/gamma ratio in the indirect scheme is one order of magnitude higher than that in the direct one, which represents a higher signal/noise ratio in positron detection. Nevertheless, the direct generation method still has its own unique advantage, the so-called target normal sheath acceleration, which can result in quasi-monoenergetic positron beams that may serve in some specialized applications.

Yan, Yonghong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yuchi; Dong, Kegong; Gu, Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Zeen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Analysis of strained surface layers of ZnO single crystals after irradiation with intense femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural modifications of ZnO single crystals that were created by the irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at fluences far above the ablation threshold were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. After light-matter interaction on the femtosecond time scale, rapid cooling and the pronounced thermal expansion anisotropy of ZnO are likely to cause residual strains of up to 1.8% and also result in the formation of surface cracks. This process relaxes the strain only partially and a strained surface layer remains. Our findings demonstrate the significant role of thermoelastic effects for the irradiation of solids with intense femtosecond laser pulses.

Schneider, Andreas; Sebald, Kathrin; Voss, Tobias [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Wolverson, Daniel [Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Bath, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom)] [Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Bath, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom); Hodges, Chris; Kuball, Martin [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)] [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsoft PowerPoint - High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hi h G di t Hi h i High Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser at BNL P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy ATF user meeting April 2-3 2009 Outline...

173

High energy XeBr electric discharge laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Laser-Plasma Acceleration of Electrons and Plasma Diagnostics at High Laser Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-Plasma Acceleration of Electrons and Plasma Diagnostics at High Laser Fields Mike Downer-GeV electron energies. I will review initial results in this regime, and discuss plasma diagnostics needed.5395) Plasma diagnostics 1. Introduction 30 years ago, Tajima and Dawson proposed the idea of accelerating

Shvets, Gennady

177

Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Apparatus for injecting high power laser light into a fiber optic cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High intensity laser light is evenly injected into an optical fiber by the combination of a converging lens and a multisegment kinoform (binary optical element). The segments preferably have multi-order gratings on each which are aligned parallel to a radial line emanating from the center of the kinoform and pass through the center of the element. The grating in each segment causes circumferential (lateral) dispersion of the light, thereby avoiding detrimental concentration of light energy within the optical fiber.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Interaction of intense fields with plasmaInteraction of intense fields with plasma Strathclyde Intense Laser Interaction Studies (SILIS) Group, Department Of PhysicsStrathclyde Intense Laser Interaction Studies (SILIS) Group, Department Of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Large scale thermonuclear fusion processes, involving l i f i t t i tt t In an operating fusion reactor fusion is the process in which two or more atomic nuclei join together, or "fuse", to form a single at very high densities and temperatures. fusion reaction. It is one of the earliest controlled fusion

Strathclyde, University of

180

Safety approaches for high power modular laser operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 20 years ago, a program was initiated at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study the feasibility of using lasers to separate isotopes of uranium and other materials. Of particular interest has been the development of a uranium enrichment method for the production of commercial nuclear power reactor fuel to replace current more expensive methods. The Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program has progressed to the point where a plant-scale facility to demonstrate commercial feasibility has been built and is being tested. The U-AVLIS Program uses copper vapor lasers which pump frequency selective dye lasers to photoionize uranium vapor produced by an electron beam. The selectively ionized isotopes are electrostatically collected. The copper lasers are arranged in oscillator/amplifier chains. The current configuration consists of 12 chains, each with a nominal output of 800 W for a system output in excess of 9 kW. The system requirements are for continuous operation (24 h a day, 7 days a week) and high availability. To meet these requirements, the lasers are designed in a modular form allowing for rapid change-out of the lasers requiring maintenance. Since beginning operation in early 1985, the copper lasers have accumulated over 2 million unit hours at a >90% availability. The dye laser system provides approximately 2.5 kW average power in the visible wavelength range. This large-scale laser system has many safety considerations, including high-power laser beams, high voltage, and large quantities ({approximately}3000 gal) of ethanol dye solutions. The Laboratory`s safety policy requires that safety controls be designed into any process, equipment, or apparatus in the form of engineering controls. Administrative controls further reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Selected examples of engineering and administrative controls currently being used in the U-AVLIS Program are described.

Handren, R.T.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Array detector for high energy laser based on diffuse transmission sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to improve the ability and accuracy of measuring the temporal–spatial distribution of the intensity of a large-size, high-energy laser beam, a novel array detecting method based on diffuse transmission sampling is proposed. The measurement principle and the design of the sampling and attenuating unit are presented. High-temperature-resistant diffuse transmission material is used to sample and attenuate a high energy laser beam. Pure copper, whose surface is first sand-blasted and then gold-plated, is applied to scatter the incident high-energy laser beam. The formula for the attenuation ratio was derived in detail. We developed two large-aperture array detectors with spatial resolution of 5 mm, spatial duty ratio of 20%, and useable angle range of ±30° without varying the responsivity, the non-uniformity in the laser profile measurement is below 1%, and the repeatability error in the laser power measurement is approximately 1%. The maximal energy density that the array detector can endure is more than 10 kJ/cm{sup 2}.

Pang, Miao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China) [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 China (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Laser, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Rong, Jian [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)] [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhou, Shan; Wu, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiaoyang [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 China (China)] [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900 China (China); Fan, Guobin [Key Laboratory of High Energy Laser, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Key Laboratory of High Energy Laser, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design of high efficiency Mid IR QCL lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed research is a study of designing high-efficiency Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL). This thesis explores "injector-less" designs for achieving lower voltage defects and improving wall plug efficiencies through ...

Hsu, Allen Long

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store scanners, construction tools, and laser pointers are generally lower powered lasers emit high-intensity, directional light beams that vary in strength, they are a particular hazard

Burke, Peter

184

High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30?MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ?10{sup 21} W cm{sup ?2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for ?m-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500?nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

Green, J. S., E-mail: james.green@stfc.ac.uk; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dance, R. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, C. D. [SUPA, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)] [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

High Power Lasers... Another approach to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an integrated system Simultaneously addressing the science and engineering Direct Drive Pellet Designs Computer and technologies together, using the end goal of a practical power source as a guide Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) KrF (NRL) Target Fabrication Target Injection Chamber/Materials Final Optics Target Design (+NRL & LLE ) #12

187

HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

Bieniosek, F.M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

Henestroza, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

High-power laser source evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports progress in these areas: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM NOVA: TAMPED XENON UNDERDENSE X-RAY EMITTERS; MODELING MULTI-KEV RADIATION PRODUCTION OF XENON-FILLED BERYLLIUM CANS; MAPPING A CALCULATION FROM LASNEX TO CALE; HOT X RAYS FROM SEEDED NIF CAPSULES; HOHLRAUM DEBRIS MEASUREMENTS AT NOVA; FOAM AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE CALCULATIONS FOR NIF NEUTRON EXPOSURE SAMPLE CASE ASSEMBLY DESIGN; NON-IGNITION X-RAY SOURCE FLUENCE-AREA PRODUCTS FOR NUCLEAR EFFECTS TESTING ON NIF. Also appended are reprints of two papers. The first is on the subject of ``X-Ray Production in Laser-Heated Xe Gas Targets.`` The second is on ``Efficient Production and Applications of 2- to 10-keV X Rays by Laser-Heated Underdense Radiators.``

Back, C.A.; Decker, C.D.; Dipeso, G.J.; Gerassimenko, M.; Managan, R.A.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Simonson, G.F.; Suter, L.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

High energy KrCl electric discharge laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Experimental study on GaP surface damage threshold induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface damage threshold of undoped bulk <110> GaP induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond pulse at 1040 nm with a duration of 61 fs was studied. The threshold value was obtained by a linear fit of the incident single pulse fluence and was confirmed with a breakdown test around the threshold level. The result will be useful in high intensity, high repetition rate laser applications and ultrafast processes.

Li Yi; Liu Feng; Li Yanfeng; Chai Lu; Xing Qirong; Hu Minglie; Wang Chingyue

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter 2004 Diesel...

194

FETSHIPSTER (Front End Test Stand High Intensity Proton Source for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Activated samples would be supplied to collaborating institutes for post irradiation examination to a water cooled back plate Main Challenges ­ Potentially high heat flux to cooling water Pulsed power density results in unsteady sample temperature Temperature difference between sample and cooling plate

McDonald, Kirk

195

Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams , H. Ludewig1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an intensive search has been under way for both "smart" target designs and target materials that exhibit and "smart" materials have recently become available to serve the needs of special industries and someTarget Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams N. Simos1* , H. Kirk1 , H

McDonald, Kirk

196

Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B., E-mail: Narendra.Dahotre@unt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle, 305310 Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Trapping and Destruction of Long-Range High-Intensity Optical Filaments by Molecular Quantum Wakes in Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Air S. Varma, Y.-H. Chen, and H. M. Milchberg Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied in atmospheric air on the long-range filamentary propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a pump following a pump pulse filamenting in air has a dramatic effect on the propagation of an intense probe pulse

Milchberg, Howard

198

Dichroic beamsplitter for high energy laser diagnostics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wavefront control techniques are provided for the alignment and performance optimization of optical devices. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor can be used to measure the wavefront distortion and a control system generates feedback error signal to optics inside the device to correct the wavefront. The system can be calibrated with a low-average-power probe laser. An optical element is provided to couple the optical device to a diagnostic/control package in a way that optimizes both the output power of the optical device and the coupling of the probe light into the diagnostics.

LaFortune, Kai N (Livermore, CA); Hurd, Randall (Tracy, CA); Fochs, Scott N (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D (San Ramon, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

Zhang, Shukui

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ultrahigh intensity laser-plasma interaction: A Lagrangian approach* J.-M. Flax+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instability leading to collisionless heating. Second, in the generation of plasma wakes using ultrahigh of the wake amplitude occurs. Third, in the generation of third-harmonic waves using ultrahigh intensity, long should also consider a fourth regime, (iv) SW

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bright High Average Power Table-top Soft X-Ray Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by ultrafast solid state lasers. These lasers have numerous applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Curtis, Alden [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nichols,, Anthony [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Furch, Federico [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Patel, Dinesh [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Marconi, Mario [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Menoni, Carmen [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

Zhao, Zhuang; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Laser-driven formation of a high-pressure phase in amorphous silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination of electron diffraction and infrared reflectance measurements shows that synthetic silica transforms partially into stishovite under high-intensity (GW/cm2) laser irradiation, probably by the formation of a dense ionized plasma above the silica surface. During the transformation the silicon coordination changes from four-fold to six-fold and the silicon-oxygen bond changes from mostly covalent to mostly ionic, such that optical properties of the transformed material differ significantly from those of the original glass. This phase transformation offers one suitable mechanism by which laser-induced damage grows catastrophically once initiated, thereby dramatically shortening the service lifetime of optics used for high-power photonics applications such as inertial confinement fusion.

Salleo, Alberto; Taylor, Seth T.; Martin, Michael C.; Panero, Wendy R.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Genin, Francois Y.; Sands, Timothy

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ultrafast dynamics of a near-solid-density layer in an intense femtosecond laser-excited plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the picosecond dynamics of a near-solid-density plasma generated by an intense, infrared (??=?800?nm) femtosecond laser using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. An initial red-shift is observed in the reflected third harmonic (??=?266?nm) probe pulse, which gets blue-shifted at longer probe-delays. A combination of particle-in-cell and radiation-hydrodynamics modelling is performed to model the pump laser interaction with the solid target. The results are post-processed to predict the Doppler shift. An excellent agreement is found between the results of such modelling and the experiment. The modelling suggests that the initial inward motion of the critical surface observed in the experiment is due to the passage of a shock-wave-like disturbance, launched by the pump interaction, propagating into the target. Furthermore, in order to achieve the best possible fit to the experimental data, it was necessary to incorporate the effects of bulk ion-acceleration resulting from the electrostatic field set up by the expulsion of electrons from the laser envelope. We also present results of time-resolved pump-probe reflectometry, which are corroborated with the spectrometry results using a 1-D reflectivity model.

Adak, Amitava; Chatterjee, Gourab; Kumar Singh, Prashant; Lad, Amit D.; Brijesh, P.; Kumar, G. Ravindra, E-mail: grk@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Blackman, David R. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DQ (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX10 0QX (United Kingdom); Pasley, John [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DQ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX10 0QX (United Kingdom)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and should enable substantial capital cost savings in new furnace applications. Recent performance improvements established from tests of high intensity combustion systems are described along with advances made in the analytical prediction of design...

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The effects of high intensity continuous auditory stimulation on the perception of visual display information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF HIGH INTENSITY CONTINUOUS AUDITORY STIMULATION ON THE PERCEPTION OF VISUAL DISPLAY INFORMATION A Thesis by WILLIAM HAROLD PERSKY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AS M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECTS OF HIGH INTENSITY CONTINUOUS AUDITORY STIMULATION ON THE PERCEPTION OF VISUAL DISPLAY INFORMATION A Thesis by WILLIAM HAROLD PERSKY Approved...

Persky, William Harold

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A High Intensity Linear e+ e- Collider Facility at Low Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss a proposal for a high intensity $e^+e^-$ linear collider operated at low center of mass energies $\\sqrt{s}intensity beams. Such a facility would provide high statistics samples of (charmed) vector mesons and would permit searches for LFV with unprecedented precision in decays of $\\tau$ leptons and mesons. Implications on the design of the linear accelerator are discussed together with requirements to achieve luminosities of $10^{35}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ or more.

A. Schoning

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Driving-laser wavelength dependence of high-order harmonic generation in H{sub 2}{sup +} molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electron-nuclear dynamics of one-dimensional H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular high harmonic generation is investigated by numerical integration of the non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. It is found that the nuclear motion and electron ionization are more significant for the longer wavelength and the stronger intensity of the driving laser pulse. When the ground-state H{sub 2}{sup +} molecule is driven by a short laser pulse (ten optical cycles in the calculations), a strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the wavelength scaling (800-2000 nm) of harmonic yield, following a {lambda}{sup -(7-8)} scaling law at a constant laser intensity. It is attributed to the fast ground-state depletion induced by the strong nuclear motion, when using the long wavelength. Consequently, the wavelength scaling gives an insight into the nuclear dynamics.

Liu Candong; Zeng Zhinan; Wei Pengfei; Liu Peng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quantum and semiclassical simulations in intense laser-H{sub 2}{sup +} interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a set of quantum and semiclassical simulations of the response of H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ions, when submitted to a strong and ultrashort (femtosecond) infrared laser pulse. Going beyond the framework of the fixed nuclei (Born-Oppenheimer) approximation, we have addressed several questions related to the competition between excitation, dissociation, and ionization. In this context, it is shown that semiclassical simulations can provide valuable informations about the dynamics of the processes considered.

Ruiz, Camilo; Plaja, Luis [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Taieeb, Richard; Veniard, Valerie; Maquet, Alfred [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 11, Rue Pierre et Marie Curie 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

La Rosa, Andres H.

212

High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a production tool and process. The developed technique will have an reducing impact on product pricing. As efficiency has a substantial impact on the economics of solar cell production due to the high material cost content; in essence, improved efficiency through cost-effective texturing reduces the material cost component since the product is priced in terms of $/W. The project is a collaboration between Fraunhofer USA, Inc. and a c-Si PV manufacturer.

Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin back-scattering of a long intense laser pulse in a finite temperature relativistic plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear dynamics of electromagnetic waves propagating through a plasma considering the effects of relativistic mass and ponderomotive nonlinearities is investigated. The modified electron density distribution, the dispersion relation, and the spatial profiles of electromagnetic wave amplitude in the plasma are obtained. It is shown that the cut-off frequency decreases, and there is an intensity range in which the ponderomotive self-focusing takes place. In the upper limit of this range, the laser beam is defocused due to the relativistic ponderomotive force. In addition, the stability of electromagnetic waves to stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied, and the backscattered wave resulting from decay of high power electromagnetic beam is resolved in relativistic regime. The study of effects of electron density and temperature on the growth rate of backscattered wave has been shown that by increasing these effects, the growth rate of instability increases.

Niknam, A. R.; Barzegar, S. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemzadeh, M. [Faculty of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Faculty of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays LEDs Accelerometer Vibration Buttons Laser & LEDs Unlike conventional input devices like mouse and keyboard, laser pointers do that are displayed on large high-resolution screens. The laser pointer technology was developed in cooperation

Reiterer, Harald

215

Self-focusing of intense high frequency electromagnetic waves in a collisional magnetoactive plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-focusing of an intense electromagnetic beam in a collisional magnetoactive plasma has been investigated by the perturbation method. Considering the relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities and the first three terms of perturbation expansion for the electron density and velocity, the nonlinear wave equation is obtained. This wave equation is solved by applying the source dependent expansion method and the evolution of electromagnetic beam spot-size is discussed. It is shown that the laser spot-size decreases with increasing the collision frequency and external magnetic field strength.

Niknam, A. R.; Hashemzadeh, M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aliakbari, A.; Majedi, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tafresh University, Tafresh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haji Mirzaei, F. [Physics Department, Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

Freitas, Barry L. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions to the fast ion emission process. The interest in laser plasmas and interaction phenomena of heavy ion beams!. Thus there is a tradition to investigate accelerator related issues like beam transport phenomena

219

Generation of high intensity rf pulses in the ionosphere by means of in situ compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate, using a simple model, that high intensity pulses can be generated from a frequency-chirped modifier of much lower intensity by making use of the dispersive properties of the ionosphere. We show that a frequency-chirped pulse can be constructed so that its various components overtake each other at a prescribed height, resulting in large (up to one hundred times) transient intensity enhancements as compared to those achievable from a steady modifier operating at the same power. We examine briefly one possible application: the enhancement of plasma wave amplitudes which occurs as a result of the interaction of such a compressed pulse with pre-generated turbulence.

Cowley, S.C.; Perkins, F.W.; Valeo, E.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigation of relativistic intensity laser generated hot electron dynamics via copper K{sub ?} imaging and proton acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous experimental measurements of copper K{sub ?} imaging and the maximum target normal sheath acceleration proton energies from the rear target surface are compared for various target thicknesses. For the T-cubed laser (?4 J, 400 fs) at an intensity of ?2 × 10{sup 19} W cm{sup ?2}, the hot electron divergence is determined to be ?{sub HWHM}?22{sup °} using a K{sub ?} imaging diagnostic. The maximum proton energies are measured to follow the expected reduction with increasing target thickness. Numerical modeling produces copper K{sub ?} trends for both signal level and electron beam divergence that are in good agreement with the experiment. A geometric model describing the electron beam divergence reproduces the maximum proton energy trends observed from the experiment and the fast electron density and the peak electric field observed in the numerical modeling.

Willingale, L.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Maksimchuk, A; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Morace, A. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States) [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Università di Milano-Biocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Bartal, T.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Laser damage of dichroic coatings in a high average power laser vacuum resonator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our application, dichroics in a high average power, near-infrared, laser system have short operating lifetimes. These dichroics were used as the resonator fold mirrors and permitted the transmission of the pumping argon (Ar) ion laser light. Representative samples of two different dichroic optics were taken off-line and the transmission performance monitored in various scenarios. Irradiating these optics under resonator vacuum conditions, ({le}1 mT, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) resulted in a degradation of transmission with time. Irradiating these optics in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere (1 to 10 T of oxygen, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) the transmission remained steady over a period of days. The transmission loss observed in the optic tested in vacuum was somewhat reversible if the optic was subsequently irradiated in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere. This reversibility was only possible if the transmission degradation was not too severe. Further tests demonstrated that an atmosphere of 10 T of air also prevented the transmission degradation. In addition, tests were performed to demonstrate that the optic damage was not caused by the ultra-violet component in the Ar ion laser. Mechanisms that may account for this behavior are proposed.

Arnold, P A; Berzins, L V; Chow, R; Erbert, G V

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide unstable cavity: Misprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide unstable cavity: Misprints D. Kouznetsov. Kouznetsov, J.-F. Bisson, K. Takaichi K. Ueda. High-power single mode solid state laser with short wide

Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

225

Improvement in surface fatigue life of hardened gears by high-intensity shot peening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two groups of carburized, hardened, and ground spur gears that were manufactured from the same heat vacuum induction melted vacuum arc melted (VIM VAR) AISI 9310 steel were endurance tested for surface fatigue. Both groups were manufactured with a standard ground 16 rms surface finish. One group was subjected to a shot peening (SP) intensity of 7 to 9A, and the second group was subjected to a SP intensity of 15 to 17A. All gears were honed after SP to a surface finish of 16 rms. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. Test conditions were a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa, a gear temperature of 350 K, and a speed of 10000 rpm. The lubricant used for the tests was a synthetic paraffinic oil with an additive package. The following results were obtained: The 10 pct. surface fatigue (pitting) life of the high intensity (15 to 17A) SPed gears was 2.15 times that of the medium intensity (7 to 9A) SPed gears, the same as that calculated from measured residual stress at a depth of 127 microns. The measured residual stress for the high intensity SPed gears was 57 pct. higher than that for the medium intensity SPed gears at a depth of 127 microns and 540 pct. higher at a depth of 51 microns.

Townsend, D.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

High power KrF laser development at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the high power laser development program at Los Alamos is to appraise the potential of the KrF laser as a driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), ultimately at energy levels that will produce high target gain (gain of order 100). A KrF laser system prototype, the 10-kJ Aurora laser, which is nearing initial system operation, will serve as a feasibility demonstration of KrF technology and system design concepts appropriate to large scale ICF driver systems. The issues of affordable cost, which is a major concern for all ICF drivers now under development, and technology scaling are also being examined. It is found that, through technology advances and component cost reductions, the potential exists for a KrF driver to achieve a cost goal in the neighborhood of $100 per joule. The authors suggest that the next step toward a multimegajoule laboratory microfusion facility (LMF) is an ''Intermediate Driver'' facility in the few hundred kilojoule to one megajoule range, which will help verify the scaling of driver technology and cost to an LMF size. An Intermediate Driver facility would also increase the confidence in the estimates of energy needed for an LMF and would reduce the risk in target performance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

McDonald, T.; Cartwright, D.; Fenstermacher, C.; Figueira, J.; Goldstone, P.; Harris, D.; Mead, W.; Rosocha, L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solidi cation of a high-Reynolds-number ow in laser percussion drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solidi#12;cation of a high-Reynolds-number ow in laser percussion drilling W. R. Smith y and R. M laser percussion drilling. 1 Introduction Laser percussion drilling is used to machine gas turbine with conventional mechanical drills. The term percussion refers to the repeated operation of the laser in short

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

228

1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. HIGH-ACCURACY LASER POWER AND ENERGY METER CALIBRATION SYSTEM . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. HIGH-ACCURACY LASER POWER AND ENERGY METER CALIBRATION SYSTEM . . . . . . . . 2 2.1 Calibration

229

Laser acceleration of ion beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Specific features of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense 500-ps-long laser pulse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 3}) short (0.5 ps) 1.064-?m laser pulse were studied. It is found that, even at plasma densities exceeding the critical density, a small fraction of the incident laser radiation penetrates through the plasma in which the processes of density and temperature equalization still take place. The intensification (as compared to plasmas produced from denser foams and solid films) of transport processes in such plasma along and across the laser beam can be caused by the initial microheterogeneity of the solid target. The replacement of a small (10% by mass) part of the polymer with copper nanoparticles leads to a nearly twofold increase in the intensity of the plasma X-ray emission.

Borisenko, N. G.; Merkul’ev, Yu. A.; Orekhov, A. S., E-mail: orekhov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S.; Munda, D. S.; Dhareshwar, L. J. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, High-Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division (India)] [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, High-Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division (India); Pimenov, V. G.; Sheveleva, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zelinksy Institute of Organic Chemistry (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zelinksy Institute of Organic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

High energy laser optics manufacturing: a preliminary study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents concepts and methods, major conclusions, and major recommendations concerning the fabrication of high energy laser optics (HELO) that are to be machined by the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of concepts and methods proposed for metrological operations, polishing of reflective surfaces, mounting of optical components, construction of mirror substrates, and applications of coatings are included.

Baird, E.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems (e.g., multi-component turbomachine simulation); · Management of very large parameter space / Boeing Remote Help Desk that will provide aircraft field maintenance personnel use of coupled video1 The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing William

234

High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating Engine PM Emissions High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating...

235

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30?MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5??m-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ?1 ps.

Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electron Cloud induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab Main Injector (MI) for the High Intensity Neutrinofor the Fermilab maininjector (MI) show the existence of amitance growth. The Fermilab MI is being considered for an

Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine; Grote, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Note: Characterization of the plasma parameters of a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide to guide an intense laser pulse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrated the production of an optical waveguide in a capillary discharge-produced plasma using a cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of its waveguide were characterized by use of both a Nomarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 400 A. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Hikida, Masafumi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai Jinxiang [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kikuchi, Takashi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Tao Yezheng [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0438 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

High power laser heating of low absorption materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7?ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17?kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13?MW/cm{sup 2}, on 500??m diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500??m to 5?mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m{sup 2}) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W/m??tan{sup ?1}(?(t)/m) in the transition region between the two.

Olson, K.; Talghader, J., E-mail: joey@umn.edu [Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Ogloza, A. [Naval Postgraduate School, 1 University Cir, Monterey, California 93943 (United States); Thomas, J. [Electro Optics Center, Pennsylvania State University, 222 Northpointe Blvd., Freeport, Pennsylvania 16229 (United States)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MATERIAL R&D FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM PROGRESS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIAL R&D FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS PROGRESS REPORT Nick Simos, BNL May 5, 2006 #12-weaved Carbon-Carbon Composite · Toyota "Gum Metal" · Graphite (IG-43) · AlBeMet · Beryllium · Ti Alloy (6Al-4V of it put together in 6 weeks · 3D-weaved Carbon-Carbon Composite · 2D-weaved Carbon-Carbon · Toyota "Gum

McDonald, Kirk

242

HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER to the required energy. · Capability to accelerate ion beams of q/A=1/6 (up to 1 mA) in the future. The initial Abstract A superconducting linac driver, delivering deuterons with an energy up to 40 MeV (5 mA) and heavy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

High-intensity positron microprobe at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity high-brightness slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10?}e{sup +}/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T{sub +} below 600?keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. This design progressed through Monte Carlo optimizations of: electron/positron beam energies and converter target thickness, transport of the e{sup +} beam from the converter to the moderator, extraction of the e{sup +} beam from the magnetic channel, a synchronized raster system, and moderator efficiency calculations. For the extraction of e{sup +} from the magnetic channel, a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental results on the effectiveness of the prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

Golge, S., E-mail: serkan.golge@nasa.gov; Vlahovic, B. [North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina 27707 (United States); Wojtsekhowski, B. [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Diode laser measurements of H[sub 2]O line intensities and self-broadening coefficients in the 1. 4-[mu]m region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precise knowledge of water vapor radiative properties in the infrared spectrum is needed for many applications. Such applications include atmospheric sounding experiments, radiative sensing of combustion processes, and optical diagnostics for gas-dynamic and aerodynamic studies. Spectrally resolved measurements of pure water vapor absorption spectra have been performed with a tunable diode laser. The laser, a distributed feedback InGaAsP diode, emits in the 1.4-[mu]m region. A total of 12 lines were studied corresponding to rovibrational transitions within the [nu][sub 1] + [nu][sub 3] and 2[nu][sub 1] vibrational bands. A Voigt profile analysis of lineshape is used to infer both intensities and self-collision-broadening coefficients of the water vapor. Good agreements is found between the observed line intensities and those recently measured by Toth. These results are apparently the first published measurements of the broadening coefficient within this spectral range.

Langlois, S.; Birbeck, T.P.; Hanson, R.K. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

High power CW dye laser emission around 888 nm M. Leduc and G. Trenec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

355 High power CW dye laser emission around 888 nm M. Leduc and G. Trenec Laboratoire de report a maximum output power of 1.5 W at 888 nm from a HITC jet stream dye laser pumped by a Kr+ laser above previously reported results. Good stability of the dye solution is observed over months

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

CONSTRAINTS ON LASER-DRIVEN ACCELERATORS FOR A HIGH-ENERGY LINEAR COLLIDER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRAINTS ON LASER-DRIVEN ACCELERATORS FOR A HIGH-ENERGY LINEAR COLLIDER* J.S. Wurtele and AV on 1 TeV) are applied to free-space laser and laser/plasma accelerators. It is shown that the requirements impose very severe constraints upon the new accelerators-- so severe, that it seems unlikely

Wurtele, Jonathan

248

High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source A precision laser spectrometer for the detection of CO2 isotopes is reported. The spectrometer measures the fundamental absorption signatures of 13 C and 12 C isotopes in CO2 at 4.32 m using a tunable mid-IR laser

249

ISSUANCE 2015-01-26: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

250

Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO{sub 2}-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351 nm interaction beams at an intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351 nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO{sub 2}. The 527 nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527 nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C. [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

253

Laser Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events; (2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers can calibrate astrophysical observations, investigate underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. In this article we give an overview of the exciting prospect of laser cosmology. In particular, we showcase its unique capability of investigating frontier cosmology issues such as cosmic accelerator and quantum gravity.

Pisin Chen

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Laser hazard analysis for LASIRIS Model MAG-501L-670M-1000-45[degree]-K diode laser associated with high resolution pulsed scanner.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for the LASIRISTM Model MAG-501L-670M-1000-45o-K diode laser associated with the High Resolution Pulse Scanner based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The laser was evaluated for both indoor and outdoor use.

Augustoni, Arnold L.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been developed for measuring the rates of chemical reactions liquids and in supercritical Co[sub 2]. A pulsed (Q-switch) Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm was the pump beam for laser flash photolysis studies of molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls undergoing ligand displacement reactions by bidentate chelating agents such as 2,2[prime]-bipyridine in toluene. Experiments were carried out at 0.1 to 150 MPa. In the case of molybdenum complexes, the reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2[prime]-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Similar high pressure flash photolysis experiments with tungsten hexacarbonyl have also been completed. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative decay quantum yields for cresyl violet in several solvent have been reported as well as stability constants for the complexation of lithium ion by four different crown ethers dissolved in a room temperature molten salt.

Eyring, E.M.

1993-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microwave power spectral density and its effects on exciting electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of a microwave source generating a spectrally dense power spectrum on the operation of an electrodeless high intensity discharge lamp were measured. Spectrally pure sources operating within ISM bands at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz produce stable capacitively coupled discharges useful for producing flicker-free light for numerous applications. The internal plasma temperature distribution and lamp geometry define acoustic resonance modes within the lamp which can be excited with power sidebands. The operation of lamps with commercially available power sources and custom built generators are discussed. Estimates of the spectral purity required for stable operation are provided.

Butler, S.J.; Goss, H.H.; Lapatovich, W.P. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

High-field half-cycle terahertz radiation from relativistic laser interaction with thin solid targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is found that half-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses with the peak field over 100 MV/cm can be produced in ultrashort intense laser interactions with thin solid targets. These THz pulses are shown to emit from both the front and rear sides of the solid target and are attributed to the coherent transition radiation by laser-produced ultrashort fast electron bunches. After the primary THz pulses, subsequent secondary half-cycle pulses are generated while some refluxing electrons cross the vacuum-target interfaces. Since such strong THz radiation is well synchronized with the driving lasers, it is particularly suitable for applications in various pump-probe experiments.

Ding, W. J.; Koh, W. S. [A-STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)] [A-STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Sheng, Z. M. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China) [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Methods for enhancing the efficiency of creating a borehole using high power laser systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena to enhance the formation of Boreholes. Methods for the laser operations to reduce the critical path for forming a borehole in the earth. These methods can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

Overview of High Energy Lasers: Past, Present, and Future? D. L. Carroll1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at high energy laser systems and their effects, respectively. Einstein published the concept of stimulated for a problem" and this needed to be addressed. Weapon-type "ray guns" were commonly envisioned (and liberally) to be a daunting challenge, especially so for handheld weapon systems. Still, several impressive high energy laser

Carroll, David L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High-throughput metal nanoparticle catalysis by pulsed laser ablation Selim Senkan a,*, Michael Kahn a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-throughput metal nanoparticle catalysis by pulsed laser ablation Selim Senkan a,*, Michael online 18 July 2006 Abstract A high-throughput pulsed laser ablation (HT-PLA) system was developed-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, respectively. The supported nanoparticles created by HT

Senkan, Selim M.

262

Very-high-order harmonic generation from Ar atoms and Ar+ ions in superintense pulsed laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very-high-order harmonic generation from Ar atoms and Ar+ ions in superintense pulsed laser fields-high-order harmonic generation HHG from Ar atoms and Ar+ ions by means of the self-interaction-free time-order harmonic generation HHG is one of the most rapidly developing topics in the field of laser-atom molecule

Chu, Shih-I

263

Generation of quasi-monochromatic beams of accelerated electrons during interaction of weak-contrast intense femtosecond laser radiation with a metal-foil edge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of monoenergetic beams of accelerated electrons by focusing femtosecond laser radiation with an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2} onto an edge of aluminium foil has been experimentally demonstrated. The electrons had energy distributions peaking in the range from 0.2 to 0.8 MeV and an energy spread less than 20 %. The acceleration mechanism related to the generation of a plasma wave as a result of self-modulation instability of the laser pulse in the subcritical plasma formed the prepulse of the laser system (arriving 10 ns before the main pulse) is considered. Onedimensional PIC simulation of the interaction between the laser radiation and plasma with a concentration of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} showed that effective excitation of a plasma wave, as well as the trapping and acceleration of the electron beam with an energy on the order of 1 MeV, may occur in the presence of inhomogeneities in the density at the plasma boundary and in the temporal shape of the beam. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Malkov, Yu A; Stepanov, A N; Yashunin, D A; Pugachev, L P; Levashov, P R; Andreev, N E; Andreev, Aleksandr A

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

High-repetition-rate CF/sub 4/ laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 16 ..mu..m CF/sub 4/ laser oscillator has operated at 1 kHz in a cooled static cell. Threshold pump energies required from the low pressure, Q-switched, cw discharge CO/sub 2/ laser were as low as 60 ..mu..J. The laser cavity employed the multiple-pass off-axis path resonator in a ring configuration. CF/sub 4/ laser power at 615 cm/sup -1/ and a 1 kHz repetition rate exceeded 300 ..mu..W.

Telle, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a...

266

High repetition rate fiber and integrated waveguide femtosecond lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond lasers and the development of frequency combs have revolutionized multiple fields like metrology, spectroscopy, medical diagnostics and optical communications. However, to enable wider adoption of the technology ...

Sander, Michelle Y. (Michelle Yen-Ling)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11LargeLaser EnablesLaserLaserLaser

268

Electronic and structural response of InSb to ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity of Ac 2. 00 gauss. cm. lrn(&(l'1)) for lnSb for a field intensity of A&i ? 2. 23 gauss cm. Im(e(E)) for InSb for a field intensity of A&i -- 2. 40 gauss cm. hn(e(E)) for InSb for a field intensity of A&i 2. 82 gauss cm. Im(&(E)) for InSb for a...-correlation function for InSb for a field intcnsit, y of Ac ? 2. 00 gauss cin. 21 Tiiiic. cvoluti&m of thc pair-correlation function for lnSb for a field intensity of As = 2. 46 gauss cm. 44 Time evolution of the pair-correlation function for InSb for a field...

Burzo, Andrea Mihaela

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

Eyring, E.M.

1991-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

270

Photon self-induced spin-to-orbital conversion in a terbium-gallium-garnet crystal at high laser power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present experimental evidence of a third-order nonlinear optical process, self-induced spin-to-orbital conversion (SISTOC) of the photon angular momentum. This effect is the physical mechanism at the origin of the depolarization of very intense laser beams propagating in isotropic materials. The SISTOC process, like self-focusing, is triggered by laser heating leading to a radial temperature gradient in the medium. In this work we tested the occurrence of SISTOC in a terbium-gallium-garnet rod for an impinging laser power of about 100 W. To study the SISTOC process we used different techniques: polarization analysis, interferometry, and tomography of the photon orbital angular momentum. Our results confirm, in particular, that the apparent depolarization of the beam is due to the occurrence of maximal entanglement between the spin and orbital angular momentum of the photons undergoing the SISTOC process. This explanation of the true nature of the depolarization mechanism could be of some help in finding novel methods to reduce or to compensate for this usually unwanted depolarization effect in all cases where very high laser power and good beam quality are required.

Mosca, S.; De Rosa, R.; Milano, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Canuel, B.; Genin, E. [EGO, European Gravitational Observatory, Via E. Amaldi, 56021 S. Stefano a Macerata, Cascina (Italy); Karimi, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Piccirillo, B.; Santamato, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM-Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, Napoli (Italy); Marrucci, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-INFM Coherentia, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

On the GCR intensity and the inversion of the heliospheric magnetic field during the periods of the high solar activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the long-term behavior of the solar and heliospheric parameters and the GCR intensity in the periods of high solar activity and the inversions of heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). The classification of the HMF polarity structures and the meaning of the HMF inversion are discussed. The procedure is considered how to use the known HMF polarity distribution for the GCR intensity modeling during the periods of high solar activity. We also briefly discuss the development and the nearest future of the sunspot activity and the GCR intensity in the current unusual solar cycle 24.

Krainev, M B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic â??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemâ? during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossâ??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCâ??08 and SCâ??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesâ?? resources.

Wang, Jun

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

High-frequency surface wave pumped He-Ne laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new electrodeless He-Ne laser using a plasma produced by an electromagnetic surface wave as the active medium is described. Gain measurements are reported as a function of the pump wave frequency from 200 to 915 MHz. The dependence of laser performance on the gas mixture and pressure is also presented.

Moutoulas, C.; Moisan, M.; Bertrand, L.; Hubert, J.; Lachambre, J.L.; Ricard, A.

1985-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

The High Average Power Laser Program 15th HAPL meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Georgia Tech 4. UCLA 5. U Rochester, LLE 6. UC Santa Barbara 7. UC Berkeley 8. UNC 9. Penn State Electro-optics Final opticsFinal optics #12;3 The HAPL program is developing two lasers: Diode Pumped Solid State Laser k continuous) Ceramic Honeycomb* "Primary" emitter *325 ppi cordierite honeycomb with gamma

275

High average power laser using a transverse flowing liquid host  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser includes an optical cavity. A diode laser pumping device is located within the optical cavity. An aprotic lasing liquid containing neodymium rare earth ions fills the optical cavity. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for circulating the aprotic lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump and a heat exchanger.

Ault, Earl R.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

High energy, high average power solid state green or UV laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for producing a green or UV output beam for illuminating a large area with relatively high beam fluence. A Nd:glass laser produces a near-infrared output by means of an oscillator that generates a high quality but low power output and then multi-pass through and amplification in a zig-zag slab amplifier and wavefront correction in a phase conjugator at the midway point of the multi-pass amplification. The green or UV output is generated by means of conversion crystals that follow final propagation through the zig-zag slab amplifier.

Hackel, Lloyd A.; Norton, Mary; Dane, C. Brent

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status of an Emerging Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of ideal tumor surgery is to remove the neoplastic tissue without damaging adjacent normal structures. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach. In clinical practice, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid benign and malignant lesions, including pancreas, liver, prostate, and breast carcinomas, soft tissue sarcomas, and uterine fibroids. More recently, magnetic resonance guidance has been applied for treatment monitoring during focused ultrasound procedures (magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound, MRgFUS). Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging provides the best possible tumor extension and dynamic control of energy deposition using real-time magnetic resonance imaging thermometry. We introduce the fundamental principles and clinical indications of the MRgFUS technique; we also report different treatment options and personal outcomes.

Napoli, Alessandro, E-mail: napoli.alessandro@gmail.com; Anzidei, Michele, E-mail: michele.anzidei@gmail.com; Ciolina, Federica, E-mail: federica.ciolina@gmail.com; Marotta, Eugenio, E-mail: eugenio.marotta@gmail.com; Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice, E-mail: beatrice.cavalloamarincola@gmail.com; Brachetti, Giulia, E-mail: giuliabrachetti@gmail.com; Mare, Luisa Di, E-mail: luisadimare@gmail.com; Cartocci, Gaia, E-mail: gaia.cartocci@gmail.com; Boni, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizioboni00@gmail.com; Noce, Vincenzo, E-mail: vinc.noce@hotmail.it; Bertaccini, Luca, E-mail: lucaone84@libero.it; Catalano, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.catalano@uniroma1.it [Sapienza, University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy)] [Sapienza, University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Project-X: A new high intensity proton accelerator complext at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab has been working with the international particle physics and nuclear physics communities to explore and develop research programs possible with a new high intensity proton source known as "Project-X". Project X will provide multi-megawatt proton beams from the Fermilab Main Injector over the energy range 60-120 GeV simultaneous with multi-megawatt protons beams at 3 GeV with very flexible beam-timing characteristics and up to 300 kW of pulsed beam at 8 GeV. The Project-X research program includes world leading sensitivity in longbaseline neutrino experiments, neutrino scattering experiments, a rich program of ultra-rare muon and kaon decays, opportunities for next-generation electric dipole moment experiments and other nuclear/particle physics probes that reach far beyond the Standard Model.

R. Tschirhart

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}K) and high density plasmas (10{sup 22}-10{sup 24}cm{sup {minus}3}) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10{sup 13} - 10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2}) and subpicosecond (10{sup {minus}12}-10{sup {minus}13}s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature ({approximately}40eV) super-critical density ({approximately}10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical ({approximately}10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

Vu, B.T.V.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Limiting effects on laser compression by resonant backward Raman scattering in modern experimentsa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amplifier by high intensity radiation is avoided by the temporal stretching of the laser pulse, its the cost of the CPA laser and CPA technology approaches its practical limit. Alternatively, plasma can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11LargeLaserLaser Seeding YieldsLaser

282

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium-doped PPKTP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for high power, continuous wave and polarized laser at 946 nm (fig1.c). We demonstrate a polarized laser. Laurell, "High-power, continous-wave, second harmonic generation at 532 nm in periodically poled KTiOPO4(b)(a) (c) High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium

Boyer, Edmond

285

Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration, time- varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We ex- tend histogramBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to acceler- ate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram

286

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

287

Method for optical pumping of thin laser media at high average power  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin, planar laser material is bonded to a light guide of an index-matched material forming a composite disk. Diode array or other pump light is introduced into the composite disk through the edges of the disk. Pump light trapped within the composite disk depletes as it multi-passes the laser medium before reaching an opposing edge of the disk. The resulting compound optical structure efficiently delivers concentrated pump light and to a laser medium of minimum thickness. The external face of the laser medium is used for cooling. A high performance cooler attached to the external face of the laser medium rejects heat. Laser beam extraction is parallel to the heat flux to minimize optical distortions.

Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Honea, Eric C. (Sunol, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA)

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization and analysis of highly diagonal Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The as yet unattained milestone of room-temperature operation is essential for establishing Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers (THz QCLs) as practical sources of THz radiation. Temperature performance is hypothesized to be ...

Chan, Chun Wang Ivan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

High efficiency resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis by external laser cavity enhancement techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demand to measure high dynamic range isotope ratios on small samples with resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) continues to increase. This paper discusses high ionization efficiency methods which can be applied to continuous wave (cw) RIMS to potentially achieve several tens of percent ionization efficiencies for certain elements. The primary technique under development to achieve this is an external laser cavity which can generate very high circulating laser powers. 12 refs., 3 figs.

Johnson, S.G.; Rios, E.L.; Miller, C.M.; Fearey, B.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValuesRevolutionizingLaserLaser

291

Probing the spectral and temporal structures of high-order harmonic generation in intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tu la * nte pu m de ce ow din lid RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW A, VOLUME 61, 021802~R!cutoff. A conceptual understanding of the origin of the har- monics with energies much in excess of the ionization po- tential Ip is provided by the three... that the multiphoton mechanism dominates this lower-energy re- gime: the probability of absorbing N photons is roughly pro- portional to IN and I is proportional to E2(t). As the har- monic order is increased and closes to the ionization threshold, the time profiles...

Chu, Shih-I; Tong, Xiao-Min

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

Synchronization of high speed framing camera and intense electron-beam accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new trigger program is proposed to realize the synchronization of high speed framing camera (HSFC) and intense electron-beam accelerator (IEBA). The trigger program which include light signal acquisition radiated from main switch of IEBA and signal processing circuit could provide a trigger signal with rise time of 17 ns and amplitude of about 5 V. First, the light signal was collected by an avalanche photodiode (APD) module, and the delay time between the output voltage of APD and load voltage of IEBA was tested, it was about 35 ns. Subsequently, the output voltage of APD was processed further by the signal processing circuit to obtain the trigger signal. At last, by combining the trigger program with an IEBA, the trigger program operated stably, and a delay time of 30 ns between the trigger signal of HSFC and output voltage of IEBA was obtained. Meanwhile, when surface flashover occurred at the high density polyethylene sample, the delay time between the trigger signal of HSFC and flashover current was up to 150 ns, which satisfied the need of synchronization of HSFC and IEBA. So the experiment results proved that the trigger program could compensate the time (called compensated time) of the trigger signal processing time and the inherent delay time of the HSFC.

Cheng Xinbing; Liu Jinliang; Hong Zhiqiang; Qian Baoliang [College of Opto-electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Simulation of the Beam Dump for a High Intensity Electron Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CLIC Drive Beam is a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. A test facility for the Drive Beam electron gun will soon be commissioned at CERN. In this contribution we outline the design of a beam dump / Faraday cup capable of resisting the beam’s thermal load. The test facility will operate initially up to 140 keV. At such low energies, the electrons are absorbed very close to the surface of the dump, leading to a large energy deposition density in this thin layer. In order not to damage the dump, the beam must be spread over a large surface. For this reason, a small-angled cone has been chosen. Simulations using Geant4 have been performed to estimate the distribution of energy deposition in the dump. The heat transport both within the electron pulse and between pulses has been modelled using finite element methods to check the resistance of the dump at high repetition rates. In addition, the possibility of using a moveable dump to measure the beam profile and emittance is discussed.

Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Pepitone, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Laser System for the Spectroscopy of Highly-Charged Bismuth Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present and characterize a laser system for the spectroscopy on highly-charged ^209Bi^82+ ions at a wavelength of 243.87 nm. For absolute frequency stabilization, the laser system is locked to a near-infra-red laser stabilized to a rubidium transition line using a transfer cavity based locking scheme. Tuning of the output frequency with high precision is achieved via a tunable rf offset lock. A sample-and-hold technique gives an extended tuning range of several THz in the UV. This scheme is universally applicable to the stabilization of laser systems at wavelengths not directly accessible to atomic or molecular resonances. We determine the frequency accuracy of the laser system using Doppler-free absorption spectroscopy of Te_2 vapour at 488 nm. Scaled to the target wavelength of 244 nm, we achieve a frequency uncertainty of \\sigma_{244nm} = 6.14 MHz (one standard deviation) over six days of operation.

S. Albrecht; S. Altenburg; C. Siegel; N. Herschbach; G. Birkl

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma ‘‘La Sapienza,’’ Via Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy) [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma ‘‘La Sapienza,’’ Via Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec (Canada); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Grismayer, T. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear-Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)] [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear-Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Audebert, P.; Man?ic, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm.sup.3+ and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wing pumping a Tm.sup.3+ doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 .mu.m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm.sup.3+ absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm.sup.3+ because high Tm.sup.3+ concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation.

Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm{sup 3+} and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wing pumping a Tm{sup 3+} doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 {micro}m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm{sup 3+} absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm{sup 3+} because high Tm{sup 3+} concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation. 7 figs.

Beach, R.J.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

High repetition rate mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with complete electric field control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in fully-stabilized mode-locked laser systems are enabling many applications, including optical arbitrary waveform generation (OAWG). In this thesis work, we describe the development of high repetition-rate ...

Sickler, Jason William, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum ...

Razavipour, S. G.

302

Femtosecond fiber lasers at 1550 nm for high repetition rates and low timing jitter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond fiber lasers have become an important enabling technology for advances in many areas including: frequency combs, precise timing distribution, optical arbitrary waveform generation, and high bit rate sampling ...

Morse, Jonathan Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11LargeLaserLaser Seeding Yields

304

The botanical composition of cattle diets on a 7-pasture high-intensity low-frequency grazing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE BOTANICAL COMPOSITION OF CATTLE DIETS ON A 7-PASTURE HIGH-INTENSITY LOW-FREQUENCY GRAZING SYSTEM A Thesis by CHARLES ANDREW TAYLOR, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1973 MaJor SubJect: Range Science THE BOTANICAL COYiPOSITION OF CATTLE DIETS ON A 7-PASTI|RE HIGH-INTENSITY LOW-FREQUENCY GRAZING SYSTFM A Thesis by CHARLES ANDREW TAYLOR, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

Taylor, Charles Andrew

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Spatial Filter with Volume Gratings for High-peak-power Multistage Laser Amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The regular spatial filters comprised of lens and pinhole are essential component in high power laser systems, such as lasers for inertial confinement fusion, nonlinear optical technology and directed-energy weapon. On the other hand the pinhole is treated as a bottleneck of high power laser due to harmful plasma created by the focusing beam. In this paper we present a spatial filter based on angular selectivity of Bragg diffraction grating to avoid the harmful focusing effect in the traditional pinhole filter. A spatial filter consisted of volume phase gratings in two-pass amplifier cavity were reported. Two-dimensional filter was proposed by using single Pi-phase-shifted Bragg grating, numerical simulation results shown that its angular spectrum bandwidth can be less than 160urad. The angular selectivity of photo-thermo-refractive glass and RUGATE film filters, construction stability, thermal stability and the effects of misalignments of gratings on the diffraction efficiencies under high-pulse-energy laser...

Tan, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Guang-wei; Shen, Ben-jian; Pan, Heng-yue; Li, Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

High-resolution multi-MeV x-ray radiography using relativistic laser-solid interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When high intensity ({>=}10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser light interacts with matter, multi-MeV electrons are produced. These electrons can be utilized to generate a MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray emission spectrum as they propagate into a high-Z solid target positioned behind the interaction area. The short duration (<10 ps) and the small diameter (<500 {mu}m) of the x-ray pulse combined with the MeV x-ray spectrum offers an interesting alternative to conventional bremsstrahlung x-ray sources based on an electron accelerator used to radiograph dense, rapidly moving objects. In experiments at the Omega EP laser, a multi-MeV x-ray source is characterized consistently with number of independent diagnostics. An unfiltered x-ray dose of approximately 2 rad in air at 1 m and a source diameter of less than 350 {mu}m are inferred. Radiography of a complex and high area density (up to 61 g/cm{sup 2}) object is then performed with few hundred microns spatial resolution.

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Barbotin, M.; Bazzoli, S.; Brebion, D.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Le Dain, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Biddle, L.; Drew, D.; Gardner, M.; Ramsay, M.; Simons, A.; Sircombe, N. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three-photon absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three invented in the mid- 1990s [1]. They represent a periodic change of refractive index in an optical fiber.N. Nikogosyan). Optics Communications 255 (2005) 81­90 www.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;recording techniques

Nikogosyan, David N.

310

Title: Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Title: Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high intensity ultrasound Authors: Jérôme GATEAU, Jean-François AUBRY, Mathieu PERNOT / INSERM, U979 / Université Denis Diderot, Paris VII Key words: single nucleation events, ultrafast active

Boyer, Edmond

311

Laser spectroscopy of hyperfine structure in highly-charged ions: a test of QED at high fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview is presented of laser spectroscopy experiments with cold, trapped, highly-charged ions, which will be performed at the HITRAP facility at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany). These high-resolution measurements of ground state hyperfine splittings will be three orders of magnitude more precise than previous measurements. Moreover, from a comparison of measurements of the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen- and lithium-like ions of the same isotope, QED effects at high electromagnetic fields can be determined within a few percent. Several candidate ions suited for these laser spectroscopy studies are presented.

D. F. A. Winters; M. Vogel; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson; W. Noertershaeuser

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

Miles, Paul C. (Tracy, CA); Porter, Eldon L. (Tracy, CA); Prast, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Sunnarborg, Duane A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO{sub 2} laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

Elhadj, S; Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Cooke, D J; Bude, J D; Johnson, M; Feit, M; Draggoo, V; Bisson, S E

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Speckle-free laser imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Highly efficient second-harmonic generation of intense femtosecond pulses with a significant effect of cubic nonlinearity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A highly efficient (73%) second-harmonic generation of femtosecond pulses in a 1-mm-thick KDP crystal at a fundamentalharmonic peak intensity of 2 TW cm{sup -2} has been demonstrated experimentally. In a 0.5-mm-thick KDP crystal, a 50% efficiency has been reached at a peak intensity of 3.5 TW cm{sup -2}. We examine the key factors that limit the conversion efficiency and present numerical simulation results on further temporal compression of second-harmonic pulses.

Mironov, S Yu; Ginzburg, V N; Lozhkarev, V V; Luchinin, G A; Kirsanov, Aleksei V; Yakovlev, I V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Impedance-matching experiments using high-pressure, laser-driven shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-power laser was used to produce shock waves with pressures of 300 to 700 GPa. A series of impedance-matching experiments on aluminum-copper systems with 10% accuracy indicate several areas in which the experiment can be improved to reduce the errors. Several such improvements are now being made, including upgrading both the laser and recording systems and modifying the target characterization techniques.

Veeser, L.R.; Reeves, G.A.; Holmes, N.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Anderson, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of a frequency doubled high powered laser diode end-pumped Nd:YVO?/LBO laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine the temperature distribution within the laser media. Experiments are performed to characterize the laser diode spectral output and laser crystal response to the pump radiation. Finally, the thesis presents a simple technique to image infrared...

Barr, Aaron Maxwell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11LargeLaser

320

Dimensional scaling treatment of stability of atomic anions induced by superintense, high-frequency laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and often paradoxical electronic properties of atoms induced by high-frequency superintense radiation fields- lization of multiply charged anions of hydrogen10 and doubly charged anions of helium and lithium atoms.11 of molecular anions. II. LASER ATOM INTERACTION We consider a high-frequency monochromatic electric field

Kais, Sabre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Steerable Laser System for Atmospheric Monitoring at the High Resolution Flys Eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiometer . The energy 2 released into the sky is determined by multiplying this measurementOG 4.5.10 A Steerable Laser System for Atmospheric Monitoring at the High Resolution Flys Eye J. R. Mumford , R. C. Gray , L. R. Wiencke for the 1 1 1 High Resolution Flys Eye Collaboration 1. Physics

322

High-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Laser Ablation of Surgical Tissue1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Laser Ablation of Surgical Tissue1 Stephen A Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 Submitted for publication September 17, 1998 Background. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a compact high-speed imaging technology which uses infrared light to acquire

Boppart, Stephen

323

Improvement of the Temporal Contrast of High-Power Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high gain8 pass amplifier ultrafast pulse cleaner 107 preamplifierJ ultrafast pulse cleaner ASE for pulse amplification. In our laser system, we insert the preamplifier and ultrafast pulse cleaner before for optimizing the performance of the ultrafast pulse cleaner. After passing through the pulse cleaner, the high

324

High-harmonic generation in plasmas from relativistic laser-electron scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-harmonic generation in plasmas from relativistic laser-electron scattering S. Banerjee, A. R Results are presented on the generation of high harmonics through the scattering of relativistic electrons to be the emission of even- order harmonics, linear dependence on the electron density, significant amount

Umstadter, Donald

325

Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High power laser and materials investigation. Final report, 31 July 1978-28 October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a combined study of resonant pumped solid state lasers as fusion drivers, and the development of crystalline optical materials suitable for propagation of the high peak powers associated with laser fusion research. During this period of study the concept of rare gas halide lasers was first demonstrated by the lasing of Tm:YLF at 453 nm pumped by the 353 nm energy of XeF. Excited stata densities of 5 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ have been attained and spectroscopic measurements show that up to 60% of the pump energy can be converted into useful stored energy. Alternative lasers and pumping schemes are also discussed. In all cases the potential RGH/SS systems are evaluated in respect to internal efficiency and heat loading.

Chicklis, E.P.; Folweiler, R.C.; Pollak, T.M.; Baer, J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A high frequency polarization intensity electrooptic modulator in BSTN ferroelectric crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement. The output light was then coupled to a Thor Labs DET - 3Ge PIN photodiode with an active area of 0. 2 mm via reflection off a mirror attached to a motor. When the motor is turned on, the mirror vibrates back and forth along a center axis..., translating the waveguide output image across the photodiode horizontally. The PlN photodiode is connected to an oscilloscope (Tektronix 2245A) where the mode profile is displayed. 30 DPB laser 20 X obleclive k/2 sv 10 X objective ~ ~ oscilloscope 20...

Wilson, Erik James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

High damage-resistant Mo mirror for high-power TEA CO/sub 2/ laser systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-purity molybdenum (Mo) mirror was developed by an electron-beam melting method (e.b.m. Mo mirror). For high-power TEA CO/sub 2/ laser, the e.b.m. Mo mirror has two to four times higher surface damage threshold than that of an Au-coated glass mirror and three times longer lifetime than that of a powder metallurgy Mo mirror (p.m. Mo mirror) when laser energy density lower than 60 J/cm/sup 2/ was irradiated with a 0.5-pps repetition rate. It was found that the difference between the e.b.m. Mo mirror and the p.m. Mo mirror at the laser-damage threshold was due to the five surface without voids and the small amount of impurities.

Ichikawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Okamoto, H.; Matsusue, N.; Kitajima, K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Stimulated Brillouin scattering mirror system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

Eyring, E.M.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis of high resolution scatter images from laser damage experiments performed on KDP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in producing high damage threshold KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and (D{sub x}H{sub 1-x}){sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KD*P, DKDP) for optical switching and frequency conversion applications is being driven by the system requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). Historically, the path to achieving higher damage thresholds has been to improve the purity of crystal growth solutions. Application of advanced filtration technology has increased the damage threshold, but gives little insight into the actual mechanisms of laser damage. We have developed a laser scatter diagnostic to better study bulk defects and laser damage mechanisms in KDP and KD*P crystals. This diagnostic consists of a cavity doubled, kilohertz class, Nd:YLF laser (527 nm) and high dynamic range CCD camera which allows imaging of bulk scatter signals. With it, we have performed damage tests at 355 nm on four different {open_quotes}vintages{close_quotes} of KDP crystals, concentrating on crystals produced via fast growth methods. We compare the diagnostic`s resolution to LLNL`s standard damage detection method of 100X darkfield microscopy and discuss its impact on damage threshold determination. We have observed the disappearance of scatter sites upon exposure to subthreshold irradiation. In contrast, we have seen scatterers appear where none previously existed. This includes isolated, large (high signal) sites as well as multiple small scatter sites which appear at fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2} (fine tracking). However, we have not observed a strong correlation of preexisting scatter sites and laser damage sites. We speculate on the connection between the laser-induced disappearance of scatter sites and the observed increase in damage threshold with laser conditioning.

Runkel, M.; Woods, B.; Yan, M. [and others

1996-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Influences of carrier diffusion and radial mode field pattern on high speed characteristics for microring lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-speed directly modulated microlasers are potential light sources for on-chip optical interconnection and photonic integrated circuits. In this Letter, dynamic characteristics are studied for microring lasers by rate equation analysis considering radial carrier hole burning and diffusion and experimentally. The coupled modes with a wide radial field pattern and the injection current focused in the edge area of microring resonator can greatly improve the high speed response curve due to the less carrier hole burning. The small-signal response curves of a microring laser connected with an output waveguide exhibit a larger 3?dB bandwidth and smaller roll-off at low frequency than that of the microdisk laser with the same radius of 15??m, which accords with the simulation results.

Lv, Xiao-Meng; Huang, Yong-Zhen, E-mail: yzhuang@semi.ac.cn; Yang, Yue-De; Zou, Ling-Xiu; Long, Heng; Liu, Bo-Wen; Xiao, Jin-Long; Du, Yun [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approx}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approx}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed.

Cowan, T. E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D. M.; Perry, M. D.; Phillips, T. W.; Wilks, S. C.; Young, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Dong, B.; Takahashi, Y. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Fountain, W.; Parnell, T. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Hunt, A. W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approximately}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approximately}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Cowan, T.E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Wilks, S.C.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] Dong, B. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Parnell, T.; Takahashi, Y. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Hunt, A.W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)] Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Control of focusing fields in laser-plasma accelerators using higher-order modes E. Cormier-Michel,1,* E. Esarey,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense laser pulses in plasma channels [1] has many applications, including x-ray lasers [2], highControl of focusing fields in laser-plasma accelerators using higher-order modes E. Cormier-order laser modes are analyzed as a method to control focusing forces and improve the electron bunch quality

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

336

Natural Sciences 2005/06 Cover: Glimpses of research conducted in the Attosecond Laser Laboratory (research leaders Dr John Tisch and Prof Jon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-matter interactions, especially the use of femtosecond laser pulses to generate coherent x-ray pulses of attosecond: Glimpses of research conducted in the Attosecond Laser Laboratory (research leaders Dr John Tisch and Prof Jon Marangos). Work in this lab is focused on ultrafast laser physics and high-intensity laser

337

Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

338

Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10/sup 12/ protons per cm/sup 3/ and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F/sup +/ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

Chen, Yok; Gonzalez, R.

1985-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10.sup.12 protons per cm.sup.3 and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F.sup.+ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

Chen, Yok (Oak Ridge, TN); Gonzalez, Roberto (Madrid, ES)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

Campbell, J.H.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

Hantke, Max, F.

343

Optimization of EUV laser and discharge devices for high-volume manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of EUV laser and discharge devices for high-volume manufacturing A. Hassanein* , V for improving source brightness is to simulate the source environment in order to optimize the EUV output necessitate investigation and optimization not only of power sources but also plasma irradiation parameters

Harilal, S. S.

344

REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 043101 (2012) High passive-stability diode-laser design for use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-laser system optimized for high stability, low passive spectral linewidth, low cost, and ease of in-house assemREVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 043101 (2012) High passive-stability diode-laser design-frequency mechanical resonances. The cavity is vacuum sealed, and a custom-molded silicone external housing further

Steck, Daniel A.

345

Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interaction of a High-Power Laser Beam with Metal Sheets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments with a high-power laser beam directed onto thin aluminum sheets, with a large spot size, demonstrate that airflow produces a strong enhancement of the interaction. The enhancement is explained in terms of aerodynamic effects. As laser heating softens the material, the airflow-induced pressure difference between front and rear faces causes the metal to bulge into the beam. The resulting shear stresses rupture the material and remove it at temperatures well below the melting point. The material heating is shown to conform to an elementary model. We present an analytic model of elastic bulging. Scaling with respect to spot size, wind speed, and material parameters is determined.

Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

High performance continuous wave 1.3??m quantum dot lasers on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate record performance 1.3??m InAs quantum dot lasers grown on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy. Ridge waveguide lasers fabricated from the as-grown material achieve room temperature continuous wave thresholds as low as 16?mA, output powers exceeding 176 mW, and lasing up to 119?°C. P-modulation doping of the active region improves T{sub 0} to the range of 100–200?K while maintaining low thresholds and high output powers. Device yield is presented showing repeatable performance across different dies and wafers.

Liu, Alan Y., E-mail: ayliu01@engineering.ucsb.edu; Norman, Justin [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Zhang, Chong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Snyder, Andrew; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K. [IQE, Inc., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Gossard, Arthur C.; Bowers, John E. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detectionRecent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNLscaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable

Geddes, Cameron GR

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The role of the solvent viscosity on the spatiotemporal instabilities of large aperture dye lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the solvent viscosity on the spatiotemporal instabilities of large aperture dye lasers for publication 27 May 1998 Local intensity fluctuations in a large aperture dye laser have been measured of Physics. S0003-6951 98 00131-4 High energy flash-lamp pumped dye lasers are charac- terized by a large

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

351

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser HENRY N. CHAPMAN1 of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 Ã? 1013 W cm-2 pulse by one10 . X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expected to permit diffractive imaging at high

Loss, Daniel

352

Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

Neev, Joseph (Laguna Beach, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Glinsky, Michael E. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Rubenchik, Alexander M. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

Byer, Robert L.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-Order Harmonic Generation of Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Order Harmonic Generation of Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules in Intense Ultrashort Laser ionization (MPI) and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes of N2 and CO molecules in intense laser of the homonuclear N2 molecule can generate only odd harmonics, both even and odd harmonics can be produced from

Chu, Shih-I

356

OPERATION STATUS OF HIGH INTENSITY ION BEAMS AT GANIL F. Chautard, G. Sncal, GANIL, Caen, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · A high-energy experiment. · An auxiliary experiments sharing the CSS2 beam · Additionally, the cyclotron, Venice, Italy 54 Circular Accelerators in2p3-00396700,version1-29Jul2010 Author manuscript, published

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

Shinto, Katsuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko [Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

Vann, C.S.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Laser particle sorter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear {gamma}-ray coincidence experiments in high-intensity photon beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High energy photons are an important experimental probe in nuclear structure physics and have been used in the past decades for the investigation of low-spin structures of atomic nuclei. A topic of particular interest in recent years in this field is the Pygmy Dipole Resonance, an electric dipole (E1) excitation mode located well below the E1 giant resonance. Even though the PDR has been investigated systematically using high energy photons its decay properties were not accessible up to now. New experiments using the method of {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences will allow to study this important quantity in detail.

Savran, D.; Loeher, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Devision, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Preplasma effects on the generation of high-energy protons in ultraintense laser interaction with foil targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that the intense quasistatic electric and magnetic fields self-generated near the axis of the laser-driven channel in an appropriately profiled preplasma during ultraintense laser interaction with a thin target can create dense relativistic electron bunches. The latter easily penetrate through the target and can greatly enhance the sheath field at the rear, resulting in significant increase in the laser-to-ion energy conversion efficiency and the maximum energy of the target normal sheath accelerated ions. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a hydrogen targets a proton beam of peak energy ?38 MeV and energy conversion efficiency ?6.5% can be produced by a linearly polarized 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser. An analytical model is also proposed and its results agree well with those of the simulations.

Zheng, F. L.; Huang, T. W. [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wu, S. Z.; Zhang, H.; He, X. T. [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Zhou, C. T. [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Science College, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized pulse by laser foil interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse in ultra-intense laser thin-foil interaction is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the plasma foil as a nonlinear optical shutter has an obvious cut-out effect on the laser temporal and spatial profiles. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the high intensity part of a Gaussian laser pulse can be well extracted from the whole pulse. The transmitted pulse with longitudinal steep rise front and transverse super-Gaussian profile is thus obtained which would be beneficial for the radiation pressure acceleration regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability is observed in the simulations, which destroys the foil and results in the cut-out effect of the pulse in the rise front of a circularly polarized laser.

Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ouyang, J. M.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Wang, P. [College of Computer, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Computer, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National|Gradient High

364

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

Data Intensive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Intensive Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program In 2014 NERSC is conducting its second and last round of allocations to projects in data intensive science. This pilot aims to...

367

Generation of high power, high repetition-rate pulses using erbium-doped fiber ring laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The second setup used a ring cavity. A polarization controller and a temperature-controlled chamber were also employed to stabilize the output. The signal laser was modulated to produce pulses with the highest possible repetition rate and the highest possible...

Hinson, Brett Darren

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Along the Laser Beampath  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 20 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Laser Bay Each NIF laser bay is 122 meters (400 feet) long and contains 96 beamlines. This side view of Laser Bay 2 shows the four-high laser...

369

Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: A path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region, the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structures in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exist on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators, and associated applications.

Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Compact X-ray Source using a High Repetition Rate Laser and Copper Linac  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The accelerator is a novel high-efficiency standing-wave linac and RF photoinjector powered by a single ultrastable RF transmitter at x-band RF frequency. The high efficiency permits operation at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, which is further boosted to 100 kHz by operating with trains of 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns. The 100 kHz repetition rate is orders of magnitude beyond existing high brightness copper linacs. The entire accelerator is approximately 1 meter long and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The colliding laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 1030 nm, 100 mJ pulses at the same 1 kHz repetition rate as the accelerator. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and stored for m...

Graves, W S; Brown, P; Carbajo, S; Dolgashev, V; Hong, K -H; Ihloff, E; Khaykovich, B; Lin, H; Murari, K; Nanni, E A; Resta, G; Tantawi, S; Zapata, L E; Kärtner, F X; Moncton, D E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (?15?MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing.

Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard, E-mail: gwysocki@princeton.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Soskind, Michael G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersy 08901 (United States)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Characterization of high power flashlamps and application to Nd:glass laser pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed spectral and temporal measurements of the output radiation from Xe flashlamps are reported together with their use in predicting the pumping efficiency of Nd-doped laser glass. We have made absolute spectral-intensity measurements for 0.5, 1.5, and 4.2-cm-bore flashlamps for input powers ranging from 5 to 90 kW/cm/sup 2/ and pulselengths of 600 ..mu..s. Under quasi-stationary conditions these flashlamps emit essentially identical spectra when excited at equal input power per unit-area of the bore. This behavior is characteristic of an optically-thick radiator although it is not completely clear why flashlamps should behave this way. A simple model is also described which accounts for the transient response of flashlamps by characterizing the output spectra and radiation efficiencies in terms of the radiant output power rather than the electrical input power. 23 refs., 16 figs.

Powell, H.T.; Erlandson, A.C.; Jancaitis, K.S.

1986-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Remotely-interrogated high data rate free space laser communications link  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method of remotely extracting information from a communications station by interrogation with a low power beam. Nonlinear phase conjugation of the low power beam results in a high power encoded return beam that automatically tracks the input beam and is corrected for atmospheric distortion. Intracavity nondegenerate four wave mixing is used in a broad area semiconductor laser in the communications station to produce the return beam.

Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

High-power, low-lateral divergence broad area quantum cascade lasers with a tilted front facet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a simple technique to improve the beam quality of broad area quantum cascade lasers. Moderately tilted front facets of the laser provide suppression of higher order lateral waveguide modes. A device with a width of 60??m and a front facet angle of 17° shows a nearly diffraction limited beam profile. In addition, the peak output power and the slope efficiency of the device are increased since most of the light inside the cavity is emitted through the tilted front facet by an asymmetric light intensity distribution along the cavity.

Ahn, Sangil, E-mail: sangil.ahn@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarzer, Clemens; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald C.; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M.; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The ?rst part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam DynamicsSimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code was first developed under Computational Grand Challenge project in the mid 1990s [1]. It started as a three-dimensional (3D) data parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code written in High Performance Fortran. The code used a split-operator based method to solve the Hamiltonian equations of motion. It contained linear transfer maps for drifts, quadrupole magnets and rf cavities. The space-charge forces were calculated using an FFT-based method with 3D open boundary conditions and longitudinal periodic boundary conditions. This code was completely rewritten in the late 1990s based on a message passing parallel programming paradigm using Fortran 90 and MPI following an object-oriented software design. This improved the code's scalability on large parallel computer systems and also gave the code better software maintainability and extensibility [2]. In the following years, under the SciDAC-1 accelerator project, the code was extended to include more accelerating and focusing elements such as DTL, CCL, superconducting linac, solenoid, dipole, multipoles, and others. Besides the original split-operator based integrator, a direct integration of Lorentz equations of motion using a leap-frog algorithm was also added to the IMPACT code to handle arbitrary external nonlinear fields. This integrator can read in 3D electromagnetic fields in a Cartesian grid or in a cylindrical coordinate system. Using the Lorentz integrator, we also extended the original code to handle multiple charge-state beams. The space-charge solvers were also extended to include conducting wall effects for round and rectangular pipes with longitudinal open and periodic boundary conditions. Recently, it has also been extended to handle short-range wake fields (longitudinal monopole and transverse dipole) and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation wake fields. Besides the parallel macroparticle tracking code, an rf linac lattice design code, an envelope matching and analysis code, and a number of pre- and post-processing codes were also developed to form the IMPACT code suite. The IMPACT code suite has been used to study beam dynamics in the SNS linac, the J-PARC linac commissioning, the CERN superconducting linac design, the Los Alamos Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) halo experiment, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac design, and the FERMI{at}Elettra FEL linac design [3-8]. It has also been used to study space-charge resonance in anisotropic beams [9-11].

Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Physics with a High Intensity Proton Source at Fermilab: Project X Golden Book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the next ten years the Standard Model will likely have to be modified to encompass a wide range of newly discovered phenomena, new elementary particles, new symmetries, and new dynamics. These phenomena will be revealed through experiment with high energy particle accelerators, mainly the LHC. This will represent a revolution in our understanding of nature, and will either bring us closer to an understanding of all phenomena, through existing ideas such as supersymmetry to superstrings, or will cause us to scramble to find new ideas and a new sense of direction. We are thus entering a dramatic and important time in the quest to understand the fundamental laws of nature and their role in shaping the universe. The energy scales now probed by the Tevatron, of order hundreds of GeV, will soon be subsumed by the LHC and extended up to a few TeV. We expect the unknown structure of the mysterious symmetry breaking of the Standard Model to be revealed. We will then learn the answer to a question that has a fundamental bearing upon our own existence: 'What is the origin of mass?' All modern theories of 'electroweak symmetry breaking' involve many new particles, mainly to provide a 'naturalness' rationale for the weak scale. Supersymmetry (SUSY) represents extra (fermionic) dimensions of space, leading to a doubling of the number of known elementary particles and ushering in many additional new particles and phenomena associated with the various symmetry breaking sectors. The possibility of additional bosonic dimensions of space would likewise usher in an even greater multitude of new states and new phenomena. Alternatively, any new spectroscopy may indicate new principles we have not yet anticipated, and we may see new strong forces and/or a dynamical origin of mass. The wealth of new particles, parameters, CP-phases, and other phenomena carries important implications for precision quark flavor physics experiments that are uniquely sensitive probes of new phenomena. We have already begun to see the enlargement of the Standard Model in the leptonic sector. Neutrino masses and mixing angles, which in the early 1990's were unknown, must now be incorporated into our full description of nature. In a minimal scenario of Majorana masses and mixings amongst the three known left-handed neutrinos, we see a strong hint of a new and very large mass scale, possibly associated with grand unification or the scale of quantum gravity, the Planck mass. We are not yet sure what the proper description of neutrino masses and mixing angles will be. Experiments may reveal additional unexpected particles coupled to the neutrino sector. New phenomena, such as leptonic CP-violation, will be major focal points of our expanding understanding of the lepton sector. There is much to be done with experiment to attack the issues that neutrinos now present. Already, developments in neutrino physics and the possibility of a novel source of CP-violation in the lepton sector have spawned hopes that the cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry may be explained through leptogenesis. Neutrino physics, together with the search for new energy frontier physics, offers the possibility of experimental handles on the questions of dark matter and dark energy. Without the discovery of new particles in accelerator experiments, the telescope-based cosmological observations of the early universe would remain unexplained puzzles. The process of understanding the laws of physics in greater detail through accelerator-based high energy physics will potentially have incisive impact on our understanding of dark matter and dark energy. Precision flavor physics in both the quark and the lepton sectors offers a window on the sensitive entanglement of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics with rare processes, through quantum loop effects involving known or new states. Flavor physics offers sensitive indirect probes and may be the first place to reveal additional key components of the post-Standard Model physics. The main arenas for quark flavor physics include strange, charm and beauty, hence

Appel, Jeffrey; /Fermilab; Asner, David; /Carleton U.; Bigi, Ikaros; /Notre Dame U.; Bryman, Douglas; /British Columbia U.; Buras, Andrzej; /Munich, Tech. U.; Carena, Marcela /Fermilab; Carosi, Roberto; /INFN, Pisa; Christian, Dave; /Fermilab; Conrad, Janet; /Columbia U.; Diwan, Milind; /Brookhaven; Dukes, Craig; /Virginia U. /Fermilab

2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

379

Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Neutron Halo Isomers in Stable Nuclei and their Possible Application for the Production of Low Energy, Pulsed, Polarized Neutron Beams of High Intensity and High Brilliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose to search for neutron halo isomers populated via $\\gamma$-capture in stable nuclei with mass numbers of about A=140-180 or A=40-60, where the $4s_{1/2}$ or $3s_{1/2}$ neutron shell model state reaches zero binding energy. These halo nuclei can be produced for the first time with new $\\gamma$-beams of high intensity and small band width ($\\le$ 0.1%) achievable via Compton back-scattering off brilliant electron beams thus offering a promising perspective to selectively populate these isomers with small separation energies of 1 eV to a few keV. Similar to single-neutron halo states for very light, extremely neutron-rich, radioactive nuclei \\cite{hansen95,tanihata96,aumann00}, the low neutron separation energy and short-range nuclear force allows the neutron to tunnel far out into free space much beyond the nuclear core radius. This results in prolonged half lives of the isomers for the $\\gamma$-decay back to the ground state in the 100 ps-$\\mu$s range. Similar to the treatment of photodisintegration of the deuteron, the neutron release from the neutron halo isomer via a second, low-energy, intense photon beam has a known much larger cross section with a typical energy threshold behavior. In the second step, the neutrons can be released as a low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beam of high intensity and high brilliance, possibly being much superior to presently existing beams from reactors or spallation neutron sources.

D. Habs; M. Gross; P. G. Thirolf; P. Böni

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at high temperatures in industrial boilers and furnaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied (1) near the superheater of an electric power generation boiler burning biomass, coat, or both, (2) at the exit of a glass-melting furnace burning natural gas and oxygen, and (3) near the nose arches of two paper mill recovery boilers burning black liquor. Difficulties associated with the high temperatures and high particle loadings in these environments were surmounted by use of novel LIBS probes. Echelle and linear spectrometers coupled to intensified CCD cameras were used individually and sometimes simultaneously. Elements detected include Na, K, Ca, Mg, C, B, Si, Mn, Al, Fe, Rb, Cl, and Ti.

Walsh, Peter M. (University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL); Shaddix, Christopher R.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Blevins, Linda Gail

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

High passive-stability diode-laser design for use in atomic-physics experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the design and performance characterization of an external cavity diode-laser system optimized for high stability, low passive spectral linewidth, low cost, and ease of in-house assembly. The main cavity body is machined from a single aluminum block for robustness to temperature changes and mechanical vibrations, and features a stiff and light diffraction-grating arm to suppress low-frequency mechanical resonances. The cavity is vacuum-sealed, and a custom-molded silicone external housing further isolates the system from acoustic noise and temperature fluctuations. Beam shaping, optical isolation, and fiber coupling are integrated, and the design is easily adapted to many commonly used wavelengths. Resonance data, passive-linewidth data, and passive stability characterization of the new design demonstrate that its performance exceeds published specifications for commercial precision diode-laser systems. The design is fully documented and freely available.

Cook, Eryn C; Brown-Heft, Tobias L; Garman, Jeffrey C; Steck, Daniel A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Identification of the stimulated-emission threshold in high-{beta} nanoscale lasers through phase-space reconstruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale lasers sustain a few optical modes so that the fraction of spontaneous emission {beta} funnelled into the useful (lasing) mode is high (of the order of 10{sup -1}) and the threshold, which traditionally corresponds to an abrupt kink in the light-in-light-out curve, becomes ill defined. We propose an alternative definition of the threshold that is based on the dynamical response of the laser and is valid even for {beta}=1 lasers. The laser dynamics is analyzed through a reconstruction of its phase-space trajectory for pulsed excitations. Crossing the threshold, brings about a change in the shape of the trajectory and in the area contained in it. An unambiguous determination of the threshold in terms of this change is shown theoretically and illustrated experimentally in a photonic-crystal laser.

Hachair, X.; Elvira, D.; Le Gratiet, L.; Lemaitre, A.; Abram, I.; Sagnes, I.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-UPR20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Braive, R. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-UPR20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Universite Paris Denis Diderot, 75205 Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Lippi, G. L. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 1361 Route des Lucioles, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS UMR 6618, 1361 Route des Lucioles, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Developing high energy mode-locked fiber laser at 2 micron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While dissipative soliton operation has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 {\\mu}m and 1.5 {\\mu}m fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy of dissipative solitons at 2 {\\mu}m due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. Based on theoretical simulation, we analyze intracavity dynamics of dissipative solitons (DSs) and propose that gain fiber should be condensed to short length in order to scale the pulse energy of 2 {\\mu}m DSs. The simulation predicts pulse energy of over 10 nJ for 2 {\\mu}m dissipative solitons, comparable to that achieved in the 1 {\\mu}m and 1.5 {\\mu}m regimes. Experimental operation generates stable 2 {\\mu}m DSs from a linear cavity with pulse energy of 4.9 nJ and dechirped pulse duration of 579 fs. These results advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber laser at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media at 2 {\\mu}m.

Huang, C; Shang, W; Tang, Y; Xu, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Searching for optimal mitigation geometries for laser-resistant multilayer high-reflector coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing laser damage sites on multilayer high-reflector coatings can limit mirror performance. One of the strategies to improve laser damage resistance is to replace the growing damage sites with predesigned benign mitigation structures. By mitigating the weakest site on the optic, the large-aperture mirror will have a laser resistance comparable to the intrinsic value of the multilayer coating. To determine the optimal mitigation geometry, the finite-difference time-domain method was used to quantify the electric-field intensification within the multilayer, at the presence of different conical pits. We find that the field intensification induced by the mitigation pit is strongly dependent on the polarization and the angle of incidence (AOI) of the incoming wave. Therefore, the optimal mitigation conical pit geometry is application specific. Furthermore, our simulation also illustrates an alternative means to achieve an optimal mitigation structure by matching the cone angle of the structure with the AOI of the incoming wave, except for the p-polarized wave at a range of incident angles between 30 deg. and 45 deg.

Qiu, S. Roger; Wolfe, Justin E.; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Feit, Michael D.; Pistor, Thomas V.; Stolz, Christopher J.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. III. High-order above-threshold ionization by an elliptically polarized field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of diatomic molecules having different symmetries by an elliptically polarized laser field using the modified molecular strong-field approximation. The yields of high-energy electrons contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra strongly depend on the employed ellipticity. This is more pronounced if the major axis of the polarization ellipse is parallel or perpendicular to the molecular axis and at the end of the high-energy plateau. For the O{sub 2} molecule (characterized by {pi}{sub g} symmetry) the maximum yield is observed for some value of the ellipticity {epsilon} different from zero. On the other hand, in the same circumstances, the N{sub 2} molecule ({sigma}{sub g}) behaves as an atom, i.e., the yield is maximum for {epsilon}=0. These characteristics of the photoelectron spectra remain valid in a wide region of the molecular orientations and laser peak intensities. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra are considered in detail: by changing the molecular orientation one or other type of the symmetry emerges or disappears. Presenting differential ionization spectra in the ionized electron energy-emission angle plane we have observed similar interference effects as in the HATI spectra governed by a linearly polarized field.

Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effects of high-intensity ultrasound on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x superconductor Tanya Prozorov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

half of the speed of sound in liquid. Effective tem- peratures at the point of impact can easily exceed In liquid- powder slurries irradiated with high-intensity ultrasound, acoustic cavitation induces turbulent temperatures, 5000 K, and pressures, 300 Mpa,7­9 and the shockwaves launched into the liquid create high

Prozorov, Ruslan

390

Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica�s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the interplay of rate effects with the effects of annealing, to accurately predict the fibers� reliability and expected lifetime

Thomas Blue; Wolfgang Windl; Bryan Dickerson

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Theory of high harmonic generation in relativistic laser interaction with overdense plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High harmonic generation due to the interaction of a short ultra relativistic laser pulse with overdense plasma is studied analytically and numerically. On the basis of the ultra relativistic similarity theory we show that the high harmonic spectrum is universal, i.e. it does not depend on the interaction details. The spectrum includes the power law part $I_n\\propto n^{-8/3}$ for $nharmonic cutoff at $\\propto \\gamma_{\\max}^3$ is parametrically larger than the $4 \\gamma_{\\max}^2$ predicted by the ``oscillating mirror'' model based on the Doppler effect. The cornerstone of our theory is the new physical phenomenon: spikes in the relativistic $\\gamma$-factor of the plasma surface. These spikes define the high harmonic spectrum and lead to attosecond pulses in the reflected radiation.

T. Baeva; S. Gordienko; A. Pukhov

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.

Muller, A., E-mail: arnaud.muller@chu-lyon.fr [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Valette, P. J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Salomir, R. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

X-ray spectroscopy of buried layer foils irradiated with an ultra high intensity short pulse laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupled with other plasma diagnostics that measure radiationFor solid density plasma diagnostics, however, it is alsorange of plasma temperatures . Finally other diagnostics can

Chen, Sophia Nan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Spectral and temporal structures of high-order harmonic generation of Na in intense mid-ir laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and efficient propagation of the wave function in space and time. Excellent agreement of the HHG spectrum into different HHG mechanisms in different energy regimes of Na atoms at long wavelengths. DOI: 10.1103/Phys,2 . The generation of har- monics in rare-gas atoms that extend up to orders of about 300 well within the water

Chu, Shih-I

396

Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

Babenko, V.O. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Metrolohichna str. 14-b, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, pr. Nauky 47, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Two-gigawatt burst-mode operation of the intense microwave prototype (IMP) free-electron laser (FEL) for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MTX explored the plasma heating effects of 140 GHz microwaves from both Gyrotrons and from the IMP FEL wiggler. The Gyrotron was long pulse length (0.5 seconds maximum) and the FEL produced short-pulse length, high-peak power, single and burst modes of 140 GHZ microwaves. Full-power operations of the IMP FEL wiggler were commenced in April of 1992 and continued into October of 1992. The Experimental Test Accelerator H (ETA-II) provided a 50-nanosecond, 6-MeV, 2--3 kAmp electron beam that was introduced co-linear into the IMP FEL with a 140 GHz Gyrotron master oscillator (MO). The FEL was able to amplify the MO signal from approximately 7 kW to peaks consistently in the range of 1--2 GW. This microwave pulse was transmitted into the MTX and allowed the exploration of the linear and non-linear effects of short pulse, intense power in the MTX plasma. Single pulses were used to explore and gain operating experience in the parameter space of the IMP FEL, and finally evaluate transmission and absorption in the MTX. Single-pulse operations were repeatable. After the MTX was shut down burst-mode operations were successful at 2 kHz. This paper will describe the IMP FEL, Microwave Transmission System to MTX, the diagnostics used for calorimetric measurements, and the operations of the entire Microwave system. A discussion of correlated and uncorrelated errors that affect FEL performance will be made Linear and non-linear absorption data of the microwaves in the MTX plasma will be presented.

Felker, B.; Allen, S.; Bell, H. [and others

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviewed are the present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research at the ILE (Institute of Laser Engineering) Osaka. The Gekko XII and Peta Watt laser system have been operated for investigating the fast ignition, the relativistic laser plasma interactions and so on. In particular, the fast ignition experiments with cone shell target have been in progress as the UK and US-Japan collaboration programs. In the experiments, the imploded high density plasmas are heated by irradiating 500 J level peta watt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by injecting the peta watt laser into the cone shell target. Transport of relativistic high density electron is the critical issue as the basic physics for understanding the dense plasma heating process. By the theory, simulation and experiment, the collective phenomena in the interactions of intense relativistic electron current with dense plasmas has been investigated to find the formation of self organized flow as the result of filamentation (Weibel) instability. Through the present understanding, the new project, FIREX-I has started recently to prove the principle of the fast ignition scheme. Keywords: fast ignition, peta watt laser, relativistic electron, weibel instability

Mima Kunioki; Tanaka Kazuo. A; Kodama Ryosuke; Johzaki Tomohiro; Nagatomo Hideo; Shiraga Hiroyuki; Miyanaga Noriaki; Azechi Hiroshi; Nakai Mitsuo; Norimatsu Takayoshi; Nagai Keiji; Sunahara Atsushi; Nishihara Katsunobu; Taguchi Toshihiro; Sakagami Hitoshi; Sentoku Yasuhiko; Ruhl Hartmut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A car-borne highly sensitive near-IR diode-laser methane detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A highly sensitive automated car-borne detector for measuring methane concentration in real time is designed, developed and tested under laboratory and field conditions. Measurements were made with the help of an uncooled tunable near-IR 1.65-{mu}m laser diode. The detector consists of a multipass optical cell with a 45-m long optical path and a base length of 0.5 m. The car-borne detector is intended for monitoring the methane concentration in air from the moving car to reveal the leakage of domestic gas. The sensitivity limit (standard deviation) under field conditions is 1 ppm (20 ppb under laboratory conditions) for a measuring time of 0.4 s. The measuring technique based on the detection of a single methane line ensured a high selectivity of methane detector relative to other gases. The methane detector can be easily modified for measuring other simple-molecule gases (e.g., CO, CO{sub 2}, HF, NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) by replacing the diode laser and varying the parameters of the control program. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

Berezin, A G; Ershov, Oleg V; Shapovalov, Yu P [Natural Science Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Laser Doppler field sensor for high resolution flow velocity imaging without camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a laser sensor for highly spatially resolved flow imaging without using a camera. The sensor is an extension of the principle of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Instead of a parallel fringe system, diverging and converging fringes are employed. This method facilitates the determination of the tracer particle position within the measurement volume and leads to an increased spatial and velocity resolution compared to conventional LDA. Using a total number of four fringe systems the flow is resolved in two spatial dimensions and the orthogonal velocity component. Since no camera is used, the resolution of the sensor is not influenced by pixel size effects. A spatial resolution of 4 {mu}m in the x direction and 16 {mu}m in the y direction and a relative velocity resolution of 1x10{sup -3} have been demonstrated up to now. As a first application we present the velocity measurement of an injection nozzle flow. The sensor is also highly suitable for applications in nano- and microfluidics, e.g., for the measurement of flow rates.

Voigt, Andreas; Bayer, Christian; Shirai, Katsuaki; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fusion pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pappas, D.S.

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7?×?10{sup 21?}W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100?nm and 200?nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

Psikal, J., E-mail: jan.psikal@fjfi.cvut.cz [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Klimo, O. [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Weber, S.; Margarone, D. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers `95, eds. V.J. Corcoran and T.A. Goldman, STS Press, McLean VA, 1996, pp. 225-231. OPTIMIZING HIGH PRESSURE CHEMICAL OXYGEN-IODINE LASERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press, McLean VA, 1996, pp. 225-231. OPTIMIZING HIGH PRESSURE CHEMICAL OXYGEN-IODINE LASERS David L laser model was baselined to existing oxygen-iodine research assessment and device improvement chemical(1) generator. It may be possible to improve high pressure RADICL performance by increasing the number of large

Carroll, David L.

406

Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset.

Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

408

Single-Frequency High-Power Continuous-Wave Oscillation at 1003 nm of an Optically Pumped Semiconductor Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction of the thermal resistance of the active semiconductor medium, resulting in a high power laser powers [1,2]. However the poor thermal conductivity of III-V materials might prevent an efficient heat by bonding it to a material of high thermal conductivity and good optical quality [2,4,5]. In this work we

Boyer, Edmond

409

Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC; ,

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

In mold laser welding for high precision polymer based optical components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assemble a complete subsystem as a rear lamp, is necessary to have different machines and to perform several tasks. This necessity obliges the companies to have large structures to support all the assembling process. These huge structures are very costly and have as a consequence the reduction of the competitiveness of the companies. The process presented in this document has the intention of reducing the number of tasks needed to produce the final subsystem/product. To achieve this goal were combined several technologies, as in-mould assembling, laser welding and LEDs (light-emitting diode). One of the advantages of this process was the utilization of only one injection molding machine with three injection units to do all the assembling process. To achieve the main objective, firstly, the rear lamp was designed according to with the legislation of UNECE Vehicle Regulations - 1958 Agreements; Regulation No. 50 -Rev.2 - Position lamps, stop lamps, direction indicators for motorcycles. Posterior several polymeric materials were studied at different levels. Initial were studied several concentrations of carbon nanotubes mixed with PC (polycarbonate). This had the objective of determine, if these materials are suitable to conduct the necessary electric current to turn on the different LEDs. One of the main advantages of this process is the use of the laser transmission welded process. Since, with this welding technology is possible reduce the complexity of the final part. To understand the potentialities of this technology a combination of two materials was studied. The studied showed that all materials presented a high transparency to the laser beam. In terms of weld process, the study showed that the best welding conditions are the lowest velocity, diameter and power. With these studies was possible conclude that this new process is suitable to be implemented at the industrial level.

Oliveira, N., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt; Pontes, A. J., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt [IPC - Institute for Polymers and Composites, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Laser-induced fluorescence of fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of high-purity fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser is studied experimentally. LIF bands of the fused silica centered at 281 nm, 478 nm, and 650 nm are observed simultaneously. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the three fluorescence peaks is examined. Microscopic image of the laser modified fused silica indicates that scattering of the generated fluorescence by laser-induced damage sites is the main reason for the angular distribution of LIF signals. Finally, the dependence of LIF signals intensities of the fused silica on laser power densities is presented. LIF signals show a squared power density dependence, which indicates that laser-induced defects are formed mainly via two-photon absorption processes.

Zhang Haibo [Shanghai Key Laboratory of All Solid-state Laser and Applied Techniques, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan Zhijun; Zhou Jun; Dong Jingxing; Wei Yunrong; Lou Qihong [Shanghai Key Laboratory of All Solid-state Laser and Applied Techniques, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A proposed high-power UV industrial demonstration laser at CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Processing Consortium, a collaboration of industries, universities, and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia, has proposed building a demonstration industrial processing laser for surface treatment and micro-machining. The laser is a free-electron laser (FEL) with average power output exceeding 1 kW in the ultraviolet (UV). The design calls for a novel driver accelerator that recovers most of the energy of the exhaust electron beam to produce laser light with good wall-plug efficiency. The laser and accelerator design use technologies that are scalable to much higher power. The authors describe the critical design issues in the laser such as the stability, power handling, and losses of the optical resonator, and the quality, power, and reliability of the electron beam. They also describe the calculated laser performance. Finally progress to date on accelerator development and resonator modeling will be reported.

Benson, S.V.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bohn, C.L. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Direct laser acceleration of electrons in free-space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact laser-driven accelerators are versatile and powerful tools of unarguable relevance on societal grounds for the diverse purposes of science, health, security, and technology because they bring enormous practicality to state-of-the-art achievements of conventional radio-frequency accelerators. Current benchmarking laser-based technologies rely on a medium to assist the light-matter interaction, which impose material limitations or strongly inhomogeneous fields. The advent of few cycle ultra-intense radially polarized lasers has materialized an extensively studied novel accelerator that adopts the simplest form of laser acceleration and is unique in requiring no medium to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer directly from laser to particle. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons that undergo highly-directional multi-GeV/m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle accelerati...

Carbajo, Sergio; Wong, Liang Jie; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Laser device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers and High Power Laser Conference, Edinburgh, UK 25-30 August 1996, SPIE Vol. 3092, ed. H.J. Baker, pp. 758-763 (1997).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers and High Power Laser of 20 mm were obtained in aluminum and 41 mm in carbon steel using an N2 gas assist and 5-6 kW of power study of cutting thick aluminum and steel with a chemical oxygen-iodine laser using an N2 or O2 gas

Carroll, David L.

419

Generation of a quasi-monoenergetic high energy proton beam from a vacuum-sandwiched double layer target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An acceleration mechanism to generate a high energy proton beam with a narrow energy spread in the laser-induced plasma acceleration of a proton beam is proposed; this mechanism employs two thin foils separated by a narrow vacuum gap. Instead of a thin sheath field at the plasma surfaces, it utilizes an electrostatic field formed in the bulk of the plasma. From a one-dimensional fluid analysis, it has been found that with an appropriate target thickness, protons on the front surface of the second layer can be fed into the plasma, in which the protons are accelerated by an electrostatic field built into the bulk of the plasma. This leads to a proton beam with higher energy and a narrower energy spread than those accelerated at the rear surface of the second layer. The acceleration mechanism is also verified by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. With a 27-fs long and 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intense laser pulse, a proton beam with an 18-MeV peak energy and a 35% energy spread is generated. The peak energy is higher than that from the rear surface of the second layer by a factor of 3.

Nam Kim, Kyung; Lee, Kitae, E-mail: klee@kaeri.re.kr; Hee Park, Seong; Young Lee, Ji; Uk Jeong, Young; Vinokurov, Nikolay [Center for Quantum-Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Quantum-Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Gi Kim, Yong [Department of Physics, Kongju National University, Kongju (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Kongju National University, Kongju (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

An attempt to study LiH and Li{sub 2} molecules by high resolution pulsed laser spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As we start a program to study alkali hydrides and dimers, we have developed a two-step photoionisation experiment on Li{sub 2} molecules based on the use of an atomic beam and two pulsed dye lasers. The first resonant step which excites the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}Li{sub 2} dimer systems is a home-made cw-seeded DCM dye laser with a laser linewidth of 55 MHz (FWHM) and near the Fourier transform limit. The second step is a larger width fixed frequency UV laser which allows the photoionisation of the selectively excited molecules. The three {sup 6}Li{sub 2}, {sup 6}Li {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Li{sub 2} spectra are recorded simultaneously by the use of a doubly-accelerating time-of-flight ion analyser. Comparison between recorded and calculated absorption spectra using Dunham parameters found in the literature is satisfactory. To develop similar pulsed high-resolution investigations in LiH, we have characterized our molecular beam by using the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique with a cw blue dye laser. Two Franck-Condon LiH Doppler-free resonances have been observed.

Bouloufa, Nadia; Cabaret, Louis; Cacciani, Patrice; Camus, Pierre; Pitcheev, Boris; Vetter, Raymond [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS II, Bat 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Impact of Intrinsic Heavy Quark Distributions in the Proton on New Physics Searches at the High Intensity Frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of an intense proton facility, at 'Project X' or elsewhere, will provide many new opportunities for searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. A Project X can serve a yet broader role in the search for new physics, and in this note we highlight the manner in which thus-enabled studies of the flavor structure of the proton, particularly of its intrinsic heavy quark content, facilitate other direct and indirect searches for new physics. Intrinsic heavy quarks in both light and heavy hadrons play a key role in searches for physics BSM with hadrons - and their study at the Intensity Frontier may prove crucial to establishing its existence.

Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Present Status and Future Prospects of Laser Fusion and Related High Energy Density Plasma Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research and related laser plasma physics are reviewed. In laser fusion research, giant lasers for ignition and burn by imploding DT fuel pellets are under construction at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and CEA, France. In Japan , the Gekko XII and the Peta Watt laser system have been operated to investigate the implosion hydrodynamics, fast ignition, and the relativistic laser plasma interactions and a new project; FIREX( Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) had started toward the ignition and burn at the Institute of laser Engineering of Osaka University. Recently, heating experiments with cone shell target have been carried out. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by the peta watt laser injection to the cone shell target. The FIREX-I is planned according to this experimental results, where multi 10kJ peta watt laser is used to heat compressed DT fuel to the ignition temperature. The FIREX-II will follow for demonstrating ignition and burn, in which the implosion laser and heating laser are up-graded.

Mima, Kunioki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita , Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser Dimitrios Mandridis dmandrid@creol.ucf.edu April 29, 2011 CREOL Affiliates Day 2011 #12;2 Objective: Frequency Swept (FM) Mode-locked Laser · Develop a frequency swept laser, · linear f-sweep, · uniform-intensity, · low noise, · with long-term stability

Van Stryland, Eric

424

High-resolution mapping of quantum efficiency of silicon photodiode via optical-feedback laser microthermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We map the external quantum efficiency (QE) distribution of a silicon photodiode (PD) sample via a thermographic imaging technique based on optical-feedback laser confocal microscopy. An image pair consisting of the confocal reflectance image and the 2D photocurrent map is simultaneously acquired to delineate the following regions of interest on the sample: the substrate, the n-type region, the pn overlay, and the bonding pad. The 2D QE distribution is derived from the photocurrent map to quantify the optical performance of these sites. The thermal integrity of the sample is then evaluated by deriving the rate of change of QE with temperature T at each point on the silicon PD. These gradient maps function not only as stringent measures of local thermal QE activity but they also expose probable defect locations on the sample at high spatial resolution - a capability that is not feasible with existing bulk measurement techniques.

Cemine, Vernon Julius; Blanca, Carlo Mar; Saloma, Caesar

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151?K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

426

Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Optical channel waveguides written by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation in Li-Zn fluoroborate glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low loss, optical channel waveguides have been successfully produced by high repetition rate, femtosecond laser inscription in a Li-Zn fluoroborate glass (64.9B2O3 + 25Li2O + 10ZnF2 + 0.1Er2O3). High quality waveguides were produced at 500 kHz, 1 MHz and 2 MHz laser repetition rates, showing a refractive index contrast in the range of 3-6 x 10-3 depending on various fluences. Dependence of experimental parameters such as average laser power, pulse repetition rate and writing speed on the properties of fabricated waveguides has been discussed. The comparison of optical and compositional characterization techniques evidences an enrichment of B and Zn in the guiding region, while F migrates to the heat diffused region of the written structure.

Thomas, Sunil; Solis, Javier; Biju, P R; Unnikrishnan, N V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

Hora, Heinrich

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

Laser-Material Interactions: A Study of Laser Energy Coupling with Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1971) Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, Academic Presin Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, (Academic Press,for modeling gas discharge lasers", Boulder, Colo. : Univ.

Shannon, M.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm Damien Sangla,1,2 Marc (Doc. ID 109884); published July 9, 2009 A Nd:YVO4 crystal was pumped directly into the emitting level nm for an absorbed pump power of 14.6 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 78.7%. We

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

Compression of high-energy ultrashort laser pulses through an argon-filled tapered planar Shihua Chen,1, 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

211189, China 3 Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden (Dated. To evaluate such a tapered waveguide, the linear wave propagation theory and the solution to its complex waveguide triumphs over the ridge and stripe ones when designed for high-power diode lasers [15]. This in

Boyer, Edmond

434

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Extreme-ultraviolet polarimeter utilizing laser-generated high-order Nicole Brimhall, Matthew Turner, Nicholas Herrick, David D. Allred, R. Steven Turley,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Per-shot energy monitoring of the laser discriminates against fluctuations, the instrument could conceivably operate through other ranges of harmonic wavelengths. An advantage of high har of high harmonic EUV light to be easily rotated using a half-wave plate in the generating laser beam

Hart, Gus

436

Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

High efficiency cholesteric liquid crystal lasers with an external stable resonator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shirvani-Mahdavi,1,2 Shima Fardad,2 Ezeddin Mohajerani,1 and Shin-Tson Wu2* 1 Laser and Plasma Research

Richardson, Martin C.

438

Circularly polarized high-efficiency cholesteric liquid crystal lasers with a tunable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retarder Hamidreza Shirvani-Mahdavi,1,2 Ezeddin Mohajerani,1 and Shin-Tson Wu2* 1 Laser and Plasma Research

Wu, Shin-Tson

439

Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

A PC-PCL-based control system for the high-voltage pulsed-power operation of the Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam (IDNB) Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stand-alone, semiautomated control system for the high-voltage pulsed-power energy sources on the Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory using personal computer (PC) and programmable logic controller (PLC) technology has been developed and implemented. The control system, consisting of a PC with the graphic operator interface, the network connecting the PC to the PLC, the PLC, the PLC I/O modules, fiber-optic interfaces and software, is described.

Gribble, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high intensity laser" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEP tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.

Ben-Itzhak, Itzik (Itzhak) [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Carnes, Kevin D. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Cocke, C. Lew [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Fehrenbach, Charles W. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Kumarappan, Vinod [PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University; Rudenko, Artem [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Trallero, Carlos [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

Application of a high-power KrF laser for the study of supersonic gas flows and the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in layered media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a miniature laser shock tube for the study of a wide range of hydrodynamic phenomena in liquids at pressures greater than 10 kbar and in supersonic flows with large Mach numbers (greater than 10) is discussed. A substance filling a chamber of quadratic cross section, with a characteristic size of several centimetres, is compressed and accelerated due to local absorption of 100 ns, 100 J KrF laser pulses near the entrance window. It is proposed to focus a laser beam by a prism raster, which provides a uniform intensity distribution over the tube cross section. The system can be used to study the hypersonic flow past objects of complex shape and the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the case of a passage of a shock wave or a compression wave through the interfaces between different media. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Zvorykin, V D; Lebo, I G [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Combining Laser Ablation/Liquid Phase Collection Surface Sampling and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the coupling of ambient pressure transmission geometry laser ablation with a liquid phase sample collection method for surface sampling and ionization with subsequent mass spectral analysis. A commercially available autosampler was adapted to produce a liquid droplet at the end of the syringe injection needle while in close proximity to the surface to collect the sample plume produced by laser ablation. The sample collection was followed by either flow injection or a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the extracted components and detection with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). To illustrate the analytical utility of this coupling, thin films of a commercial ink sample containing rhodamine 6G and of mixed isobaric rhodamine B and 6G dyes on glass microscope slides were analyzed. The flow injection and HPLC/ESI-MS analysis revealed successful laser ablation, capture and, with HPLC, the separation of the two compounds. The ablated circular area was about 70 m in diameter for these experiments. The spatial sampling resolution afforded by the laser ablation, as well as the ability to use sample processing methods like HPLC between the sample collection and ionization steps, makes this combined surface sampling/ionization technique a highly versatile analytical tool.

Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

IEEEJOURNAL OF QUANTUMELECTRONICS, VOL. QE-21,NO. 7, JULY 1985 831 High-Gain Free Electron Lasers Using Induction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of producing intense cwrents (102-104A) at moderately high energy (1-50 MeV). Experiments using a 500 A, 3.3 Me of Energy under Contracts W- Research Projects Agency under ARPA Order 4856, Program Code 3B10. T. J. Future experi- ments include a high-gain, high-efficiency FEL operating at 10.6 pm using a 50 MeV beam. I

Wurtele, Jonathan

445

Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem.

Tsai, C.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Longevity of the quark-gluon plasma and the mixed phase from intensity interferometry of high energy photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-photon intensity interferometry is shown to provide an accurate measurement of lifetime of quark-gluon plasma created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions via the difference of outward and sidewardcorrelation radii. Under the assumption of a longitudinal, boost invariant expansion of the plasma, we obtain analytical expressions for the correlations from the quark-gluon plasma phase. A $3+1$ dimensional expansion of the plasma along with a first order phase transition to hadrons is next considered, and, leads to a source with two characteristic lifetimes, one for the quark-gluon plasma phase, and the other for the longer lived mixed phase. This may even help us to {\\em experimentally} determine the order of the phase transition.

Dinesh K. Srivastava; Charles Gale

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup ?3}, the peak normalized laser vector potential, a{sub 0}, increases from 1.0 to 1.85 close to the entrance plane of the capillary compared with a{sub 0} = 1.41 when the plume is neglected.

Ciocarlan, C. [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom) [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Department of Nuclear Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Wiggins, S. M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

High-resolution heterodyne spectroscopy using a tunable quantum cascade laser around 3.5 THz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A frequency tunable terahertz heterodynespectrometer, based on a third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser as a local oscillator, has been demonstrated by measuring molecular spectral lines of methanol ...

Ren, Y.

450