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1

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

2

Arrhenius and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Although concern about global atmospheric warming has intensified in recent decades, research into the greenhouse effect actually began in the 19th century. Fourier and other scientists appreciated that without heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere, the temperature on the ground would be considerably lower, making life as we know it impossible. In 1896, the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius was the first to make a quantitative link between changes in carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Publication of his paper was celebrated at a recent Swedish workshop. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Uppenbrink, J.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Changes in Tropical Cyclone Activity due to Global Warming: Results from a High-Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possible changes that greenhouse global warming might generate in the characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs). The analysis has been performed using scenario climate simulations carried out with a fully coupled high-...

S. Gualdi; E. Scoccimarro; A. Navarra

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

5

The Psychology of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence in support of global warming and the lack of significant published evidence to the contrary provides an extraordinarily strong foundation for the scientific community's call for action on greenhouse gas emissions. However, public ...

Ben R. Newell; Andrew J. Pitman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth`s radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. [Physics Today, New York, NY (United States); Hafemeister, D. [Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States); Scribner, R. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. (Physics Today, New York, NY (United States)); Hafemeister, D. (Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States)); Scribner, R. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)) (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Global warming continues in 1989  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen eight-nine ranks as one of the warmest years on record despite the chill of unusually cool water in the tropical Pacific. The continued robustness of the warming trend that began in the mid-1970s lends support to claims that an intensifying greenhouse effect is behind it all, although that case has not yet been made definitively. Even at the current rate of global warming it will take another 10 years or so to be confident that the greenhouse effect is with us. Although the global warming trend is consistent with an increasing contribution by the greenhouse effect, direct signs that the greenhouse effect is intensifying are still hard to come by in the temperature record. Greenhouse models agree that if that is happening, the temperature increase should be most pronounced around the Arctic. Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Siberia warmed sharply in the 1980s, but the region from eastern Canada through Greenland and into Scandinavia cooled markedly.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Motor vehicles and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in transportation is one of the contributors to the concern over global warming. The primary greenhouse gases released by the transportation sector are carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons. When all greenhouse gases are considered, CO{sub 2} emissions from the operation of highway vehicles worldwide represent about 4.7% of global warming enhancement. CO{sub 2} emissions from U.S. highway vehicles along represent about 2 to 2.5% of worldwide greenhouse gases. The use of CFCs in automotive air conditioning, in blowing foams for seats and padding and in the manufacture of electronic circuit boards accounted for 15% of the global usage of CFC-12 in 1985 according to the U.S. EPA. The Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association supports the phase-out of CFC use provided that safe substitutes are available and that adequate lead time is allowed for.They suggest that reduction of greenhouse gases would require planning on a global scope to be effective. One alternative they suggest for further study is a carbon fee for reducing emissions of carbon dioxide. This fee would be levied on each type of fossil fuel, proportional to its carbon content per unit of energy.

Halberstadt, M.L.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Heard Island global warming test  

SciTech Connect

In late January and early February 1991, an international team will conduct an experiment to test the possibility of measuring global warming in the world's oceans. The goal is to provide early indications of warming caused by the so-called greenhouse effect, the atmospheric buildup of CO{sub 2} and other gases. The method is based on the principle that acoustic energy travels through water between a source and receiver at a speed determined primarily by the water temperature. Thus acoustic travel time can be used as a temperature gauge. The idea is an outgrowth of suggestions made by Professor Walter Munk of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Professor Carl Wunsch of MIT in the early 1980s to use long-range underwater acoustic transmissions to measure changes in the heat content of the oceans.

Spindel, R.C. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book is based on presentations given at the World Wildlife Fund's Conference on Consequences of the Greenhouse Effect for Biological Diverisity in 1988, and includes updated literature citations. The general topics covered in the book include the following: overview; summary of past responses of plants to climatic change; general ecological and physiological responses; ecosystems in 4 specific regions (arctic marine, Alaskan North Slope, NW US forests, and Mediterranean); global warming's implications for conservation. Ideas and data from many ecosystems and information about the relationships between biodiversity and climatic change are brought together with a balance of factual information and defensible scientific prognostication.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hotel energy use contributes to global warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Before learning about the consequences of global warming and the efforts hotels are making to reverse the effects, it is important to get a better… (more)

Faja, Christine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Decarbonization and Sequestration for Mitigating Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING M. Steinberg (msteinbe@bnl.gov); 631-344-3036 Brookhaven National Laboratory 12 South Upton Street Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA ABSTRACT Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO

15

Response to Skeptics of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of the scientific community involved in climate research is convinced of the reality of a current and future global warming due to the greenhouse effect, a change that must be largely caused by human activities. However, a minority ...

William W. Kellogg

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Monitoring Global Climate Change: The Case of Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent record high temperatures and drought conditions in many regions of the United States have prompted heightened concern about whether these are early manifestations of the global green house warming projected by the major climate models. An ...

Fred B. Wood

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Television news coverage of global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Citizens are expressing increased concern over the number and variety of environmental problems. Global warming in particular is a focus of concern for scientists and environmental groups. Such concern should naturally motivate individuals to seek information about these topics. Many people turn to the media, most usually television, for information on the nature of these problems. Consequently, this paper studied media coverage of environmental issues, specifically global warming. Television coverage was examined for: (1) the general nature of coverage; (2) biases in coverage; (3) visual images used to cover global warming; and (4) the congruity between visual and verbal messages in newscasts. Nightly newscasts from the three major American television networks were analyzed from 1993--1995 to determine the overall nature of global warming coverage since the Earth Summit in 1992. Results indicated that television news suffers from some serious inadequacies in its portrayal of global warming issues. The paper concludes by first discussing how its results intertwine with other work in the global warming and mass media field. Finally, the implications of inadequacies in media coverage for policy-makers when it comes to sound management of critical resources in this area are also discussed.

Nitz, M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). School of Communication; Jarvis, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Speech Communication; Kenski, H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Communication

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydrological consequences of global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

Miller, Norman L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the response of global water vapor to global warming in a series of fully coupled climate model simulations. We find that a roughly 7% per Kelvin rate of increase of water vapor with global surface temperature is robust only for rapid ...

Larissa Back; Karen Russ; Zhengyu Liu; Kuniaki Inoue; Jiaxu Zhang; Bette Otto-Bliesner

20

Global warming: A Northwest perspective  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A. (eds.)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Hermann Held Date: July 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone The Copenhagen Accord (2009) recognizes that 'the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees Celsius' (compared to pre-industrial levels, '2° target'). In recent years, energy economics have derived welfare-optimal investment streams into low-emission energy mixes and associated costs. According to our analyses, auxiliary targets that are in line with the 2° target could be achieved at relatively low costs if energy investments were triggered rather swiftly. While such analyses assume 'perfect foresight' of a benevolent 'social planner', an accompanying suite of experiments explicitly

22

Forecast cloudy; The limits of global warming models  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on climate models used to study global warming. It discusses factors which must be included in climate models, shortcomings of existing climate models, and scenarios for global warming.

Stone, P.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Global Warming Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy

24

Mechanisms for Global Warming Impacts on Precipitation Frequency and Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming mechanisms that cause changes in frequency and intensity of precipitation in the tropics are examined in climate model simulations. Under global warming, tropical precipitation tends to be more frequent and intense for heavy ...

Chia Chou; Chao-An Chen; Pei-Hua Tan; Kuan Ting Chen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects by Richard J: _______________________________________ Date #12;California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects Richard J, 2006 #12;#12;ABSTRACT California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming

Kammen, Daniel M.

27

Rethinking the economics of global warming  

SciTech Connect

Most of the debates over the impact of the greenhouse effect have centered around the reliability of computer models and have neglected considerations of the economic effects of attempts to reduce global warming. Economic models have certain limitations but the input of cost benefit analysis is needed for arriving at suitable policies for lowering anthropogenic input into warming of the earth. Care must be used in extrapolating from data of time periods which are inappropriate. Estimates of costs of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions also must include possible benefits; at present this is not being done. Economic models must address differences in the distribution of global warming's consequences over time and geographical space. The costs of delaying or accelerating reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions need to be included in policy considerations. A global agreement must not adversely affect developing countries. Faulty assumptions of the effect of market forces on costs impair economic models. We have to recognize that economic and environmental goals need not be incompatible. If economic models are viewed as possible scenarios and not as predictions, then these scenarios can be useful in determining policies for reducing the greenhouse effect without harming populations and their economies.

Miller, A.; Mintzer, I.; Brown, P.G. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 11/11/2013 | NR-13-11-04 Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that observed changes in global precipitation are directly affected by human activities. LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rain in Spain may lie mainly on the plain, but the location and intensity of that rain is changing not only in Spain but around the globe. A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone. The research appears in the Nov. 11 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

29

Mechanisms of Global Warming Impacts on Regional Tropical Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms that determine the tropical precipitation anomalies under global warming are examined in an intermediate atmospheric model coupled with a simple land surface and a mixed layer ocean. To compensate for the warm tropospheric temperature, ...

Chia Chou; J. David Neelin

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate Layer ... would serve as energy sources as well as carbon dioxide storage sites in the ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cheap coal said top enemy in fighting global warming By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cheap coal said top enemy in fighting global warming By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO, Sept 28 (Reuters) - Cheap coal will be the main enemy in a fight against global warming in the 21st century because high oil prices are likely to encourage a shift to coal before wind or solar power

Calov, Reinhard

32

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Accelerated melting of Greenland ice is a clear indication that consequences of global warming are real and impending. The underlying causes of global warming are well enough understood, but the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases to prevent irreversible climate change is unlikely to happen before the point of no return is reached. To reverse the impending sea level rise, geoengineering counter- measures may be required to counter the current global energy imbalance due to global warming. Of the many proposed remedies, deploying aerosols within the stratosphere offers realistic prospects. Sulfur injections in the lower stratosphere would have the cooling effect of naturally occurring volcanic aerosols. Soot at

33

A global warming forum: Scientific, economic, and legal overview  

SciTech Connect

A Global Warming Forum covers in detail five general subject areas aimed at providing first, the scientific background and technical information available on global warming and second, a study and evaluation of the role of economic, legal, and political considerations in global warming. The five general topic areas discussed are the following: (1) The role of geophysical and geoengineering methods to solve problems related to global climatic change; (2) the role of oceanographic and geochemical methods to provide evidence for global climatic change; (3) the global assessment of greenhouse gas production including the need for additional information; (4) natural resource management needed to provide long-term global energy and agricultural uses; (5) legal, policy, and educational considerations required to properly evaluate global warming proposals.

Geyer, R.A. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Applied engineering on biosystems: the reduction in global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns the problem of decision making in the context of investment allocation in clean technology and in reforestation, aimed at reducing the global warming. In order to model the government actions, fuzzy rules are employed to represent ... Keywords: biosystems modeling, fuzzy control, global warming, optimization, simulation

J. A. M. Felippe de Souza; Marco A. L. Caetano; Douglas F. M. Gherardi; Takashi Yoneyama

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Global crop yield losses from recent warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

Lobell, D; Field, C

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Global Warming, El Nińo, and High-Impact Storms at Extreme Altitude: Historical Trends and Consequences for Mountaineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The twentieth century was bracketed by two high-profile events on Mount Everest: the 1924 Mallory and Irvine disappearance and the 1996 Into Thin Air storm. During both events, fatalities occurred high on the mountain during deteriorating weather ...

G. W. K. Moore; J. L. Semple; G. Hoyland

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mechanisms Affecting the Overturning Response in Global Warming Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models used to produce global warming scenarios exhibit widely diverging responses of the thermohaline circulation (THC). To investigate the mechanisms responsible for this variability, a regional Atlantic Ocean model driven with forcing ...

U. Schweckendiek; J. Willebrand

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Does Global Warming Cause Intensified Interannual Hydroclimate Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea that global warming leads to more droughts and floods has become commonplace without clear indication of what is meant by this statement. Here, the authors examine one aspect of this problem and assess whether interannual variability of ...

Richard Seager; Naomi Naik; Laura Vogel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Interpretation of Simulated Global Warming Using a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gas–induced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the ...

I. G. Watterson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

California Winter Precipitation Change under Global Warming in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of possible precipitation change in California under global warming have been subject to considerable uncertainty because California lies between the region anticipated to undergo increases in precipitation at mid-to-high latitudes and ...

J. David Neelin; Baird Langenbrunner; Joyce E. Meyerson; Alex Hall; Neil Berg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The 7. global warming international conference and expo: Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This conference was held April 1--3, 1996 in Vienna, Austria. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on global warming. Topics of interest include the following: global and regional natural resource management; energy, transportation, minerals and natural resource management; industrial technology and greenhouse gas emission; strategies for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emission; greenhouse gas production/utilization and carbon budgets; strategies for promoting the understanding of global change; international policy strategy and economics; and global warming and public health. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the observed climate warming than current estimates show. July 9, 2013 Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "The fact that we are experiencing more fires and that climate change may increase fire frequency underscores the need to include these specialized particles in the computer models, and our results show how this can be done," Dubey said. Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, 2013-Wildfires produce a witch's brew of

43

Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the observed climate warming than current estimates show. July 9, 2013 Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "The fact that we are experiencing more fires and that climate change may increase fire frequency underscores the need to include these specialized particles in the computer models, and our results show how this can be done," Dubey said. Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, 2013-Wildfires produce a witch's brew of

44

Global Ocean Warming: An Acoustic Measure?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosions of 300 lbs of TNT at 1 km depth off Perth, Australia were recorded on Bermuda hydrophones, demonstrating 30 years age the feasibility of global acoustic transmissions. Climate-induced changes in ocean temperature (and hence in sound ...

W. H. Munk; A. M. G. Forbes

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

More data needed to support or disprove global warming theory  

SciTech Connect

Reports of global warming are prevalent in the popular press. With the exception of Scandinavia, no major energy tax laws have been passed to date. But environmental pressures may change this, and the change could have a profound effect on refiners. These are the views of Gerald T. Westbrook, of TSBV Consultants, Houston. Westbrook summarized recent global-warming research, and his position on the subject, at the National Petroleum Refiners Association annual meeting, held March 16--18, in San Antonio. The greenhouse effect is real, says Westbrook. It is important, however, to distinguish between the two major mechanisms of the greenhouse effect: natural warming and anthropogenic warming (changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases caused by man). Without greenhouse gases the earth`s equilibrium temperature would be {minus}18 C. The effect of the gases is to raise the equilibrium temperature to 15 C. In the early 1980s, computer models estimated global warming over the past 100 years to be as much as 2.3 C. By 1986, those estimates had been reduced to 1.0 C, and in 1988, a range of 0.63 {+-} 0.2 C was reported. In 1995, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change (IPCC) cited a range of 0.3--0.6 C. Westbrook asserts that the earth`s motion anomalies--orbit eccentricity, axial tilt, and wobbles--lead to dramatic changes in insolation, and are the dominant force over the last 160,000 years.

1997-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

UNEP/GRID and global warming mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Resource Information Database (GRID) is a system of cooperating Centres within the United Nations Environment Programme that is dedicated to making environmental information more readily accessible to environmental analysts as well as international and national decision makers. Its mission is to provide timely and reliable geo-referenced environmental information and access to a unique international data service to help address environmental issues at global, regional, and national levels in order to bridge the gap between scientific understanding of earth processes and sound management of the environment. The paper, briefly, describes the role of various GRID centers, some of the data set development activities in which GRID is involved, as well as projects and studies carried out within the GRID system as related to climate change impact assessments.

Singh, A. (UNEP/GRID, Sioux Falls, SD (United States). EROS Data Center)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising Sea Levels Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W. Washington) Select to enlarge. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could greatly lessen the impacts of climate change. However, the gases already added to the atmosphere ensure a certain amount of sea level rise to come, even if future emissions are reduced. A study by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

48

8th Global warming international conference and exposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from The 8th Annual Global Warming international conference and expo. Topics centered around greenhouse gas emission and disposal methods, policy and economics, carbon budget, and resource management. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of hurricane damage, which ...

Kerry Emanuel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Biotic prognostications: Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the impacts of the greenhouse effect on biological diversity and on natural ecosystems. Included are chapters which include the following topics: government attitudes to climate change problems; general conclusions and deficiencies of general circulation models; impacts of past climate changes on global biota; effects of climate on vegetation, soils, wildlife diversity, animal physiology, ecology, behavior, migration, and parasites and diseases; arctic mariene ecosystems and coasta marine zones; tropical forests; arctic tundra; western North American forests, etc.; indirect linkages and snyergisms among climate change, biodiversity, geosphere, and anthropogenic stresses.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang 2012; revised 18 February 2012; accepted 20 February 2012; published 16 March 2012. [1] Monsoons of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

Li, Tim

52

Myth or reality; Some data dispute global warming theory  

SciTech Connect

Science in March 1990 published a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) analysis of data collected from 1979 through 1988 by the TIROS-N series of weather satellites. The data include the most precise global temperature measurements ever taken. The study found no evidence of global warming from the greenhouse effect during that period. If anything, the short-term trend was toward cooling, since the average of the first five years, 1979 to 1983, was warmer than the most recent five. The NASA findings can be added to a burgeoning body of scientific data seriously questioning the contention that Earth is threatened by global warming resulting from a greenhouse effect primarily instigated by man. Ironically, James Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, has been the nation's most outspoken advocate of the thesis that, because concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other greenhouse gases, such as methane, have risen by 30 percent in the last 100 years and are expected to rise another 40 percent by 2050, the planet eventually will warm by about 4 degrees Celsius. According to this hypothesis, the warming will cause major coastal flooding, inland droughts and sundry other catastrophes. But Reid Bryson, founder of the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, contends Hansen's thesis cannot be accepted, and Michael Schlesinger, professor of meteorology at the University of Illinois, asserts the chance that global warming has already been detected is pretty close to zero.

Lee, R.W.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Higher Hydroclimatic Intensity with Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of their dependence on water, natural and human systems are highly sensitive to changes in the hydrologic cycle. The authors introduce a new measure of hydroclimatic intensity (HY-INT), which integrates metrics of precipitation intensity ...

F. Giorgi; E.-S. Im; E. Coppola; N. S. Diffenbaugh; X. J. Gao; L. Mariotti; Y. Shi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Response of Tropical Precipitation to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations with different CO2 concentrations, local precipitation fluxes are found to obey Clausius–Clapeyron (CC) scaling. Previous studies of the effect of CO2 concentration on precipitation extremes have ...

David M. Romps

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Fluids Low GWP Working Fluids Low GWP Refrigerants - CRADA Ed Vineyard Oak Ridge National Laboratory vineyardea@ornl.gov (865) 574-0576 3 April 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: - High GWP refrigerants increase CO 2 equivalent emissions for HVAC&R equipment - Low GWP alternatives may increase energy consumption, introduce safety risks, require significant modifications to equipment, and have higher costs

56

Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Fluids Low GWP Working Fluids Low GWP Refrigerants - CRADA Ed Vineyard Oak Ridge National Laboratory vineyardea@ornl.gov (865) 574-0576 3 April 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: - High GWP refrigerants increase CO 2 equivalent emissions for HVAC&R equipment - Low GWP alternatives may increase energy consumption, introduce safety risks, require significant modifications to equipment, and have higher costs

57

Phase Speed Spectra and the Latitude of Surface Westerlies: Interannual Variability and Global Warming Trend  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extratropical annular-mode-like atmospheric responses to ENSO and global warming and the internal variability of annular modes are associated with similar, yet distinct, dynamical characteristics. In particular, La Nińa, global warming, and ...

Gang Chen; Jian Lu; Dargan M. W. Frierson

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

How Dry is the Tropical Free Troposphere? Implications for Global Warming Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The humidity of the free troposphere is being increasingly scrutinized in climate research due to its central role in global warming theory through positive water vapor feedback. This feedback is the primary source of global warming in general ...

Roy W. Spencer; William D. Braswell

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculations Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 campo.jpg These maps show the changes in air temperatures over land as measured using thermometers (left side) and as calculated by the 20th Century Reanalysis project (left side). While more than 80 percent of the observed variation is captured by the computer model, the results show interesting differences in some regions such as the midwestern United States, Argentina and eastern Brazil. The differences may be due previously unrecognized issues with the pressure observations, variations in land use and land cover over time,

60

Winners and losers in a world with global warming: Noncooperation, altruism, and social welfare  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, global warming is an asymmetric transboundary externality which benefits some countries or regions and harms others. Few environmental problems have captured the public`s imagination as much and attracted as much scrutiny as global warming. The general perception is that global warming is a net social bad, and that across-the-board abatement of greenhouse gas emissions is therefore desirable. Despite many interesting academic contributions, not all of the basic economics of this phenomenon have been fully worked out. The authors use a simple two-country model to analyze the effects of global warming on resource allocations, the global-warming stock, and national and global welfare.

Caplan, A.J. [Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ellis, C.J.; Silva, E.C.D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Economics

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

North Florida Global Warming Study Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Global Warming Study Group Florida Global Warming Study Group Jump to: navigation, search Name North Florida Global Warming Study Group Address 8342 Compass Rose Dr S Place Jacksonville, Florida Zip 32216 Year founded 2003 Phone number 9047379211 Website [atilley@unf.edu atilley@unf.edu ] Notes This is an email newslist. Coordinates 30.259044°, -81.571333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.259044,"lon":-81.571333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

[Global warming and the running average sunspot number  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported in your pages that the Bush administration`s views and actions regarding how or whether to react to possible global warming due to greenhouse gases have been influenced by the so-called Marshall report. This unrefereed report, released by the George C. Marshall Institute, had as its principal conclusion the finding that the 0.5{degree} C global warming of the last century was mostly due to solar variability and, thus, the greenhouse warming of the 21st century can be expected to be a relatively small l{degree} C or so. The authors support this finding by comparing the 33-year running average sunspot number with the trend in annual average global temperature and noting the parallel between the two, especially during the 1940s--1960s when the temperature trend was downward. Subsequent letters to Science debated the merits of this and other conclusions contained in the report. I now present additional technical evidence which shows that, quite aside from the question of whether the data presented in the report support its conclusions, the actual figure on which the above conclusion is based is in error.

Fernau, M.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Global Warming: some back-of-the-envelope calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We do several simple calculations and measurements in an effort to gain understanding of global warming and the carbon cycle. Some conclusions are interesting: (i) There has been global warming since the end of the "little ice age" around 1700. There is no statistically significant evidence of acceleration of global warming since 1940. (ii) The increase of CO_2 in the atmosphere, beginning around 1940, accurately tracks the burning of fossil fuels. Burning all of the remaining economically viable reserves of oil, gas and coal over the next 150 years or so will approximately double the pre-industrial atmospheric concentration of CO_2. The corresponding increase in the average temperature, due to the greenhouse effect, is quite uncertain: between 1.3 and 4.8K. This increase of temperature is (partially?) offset by the increase of aerosols and deforestation. (iii) Ice core samples indicate that the pre-historic CO_2 concentration and temperature are well correlated. We conclude that changes in the temperatures o...

Fabara, C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Signal and noise in global warming detection. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of this study were the following: (1) What is the expected sampling error and bias incurred in estimation of the global average temperature from a finite number of point gauges? (2) What is the best one can do by optimally arranging N point gauges, how can one make best use of existing data at N point gauges by optimally weighting them? (3) What is a good estimation of the signal of global warming based upon simple models of the climate system? (4) How does one develop an optimal signal detection technique from the knowledge of signal and noise?

North, G.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

A. Bershadskii

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

A mechanism for landocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism for land­ocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate J. Fasullo of the global monsoon record involves reported decreases in rainfall over land during an era in which the global in the monsoons in a warming climate while bolstering the concept of the global monsoon in the context of shared

Fasullo, John

67

Scientists studying the greenhouse effect challenge fears of global warming  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses the controversy in the scientific community about the significance of the increased gases causing the greenhouse effect to be detrimental to the earth's ecosystems. He states that the most important aspect of the controversy is the fact that governments are embarking on foolish activities in order to prevent global warming. The fact that scientists offer research with contradicting results furthers the confusion as to what the best course of action is. The government agencies that control policy need to appropriate funds to study specific climatic changes and what effect carbon dioxide and other gases have on the atmosphere.

Wheeler, D.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The rising tide: Global warming and world sea levels  

SciTech Connect

The author presents a broad-based and well-written approach to the impacts of sea level rise. Besides chapters on global warming, sources of sea level variability and the future, the effects on coastal nations, the book contains an important action-oriented discussion of proposed legislation and guidelines for planning and management aimed at reducing loss and damage produced by sea-level rise. The list of acknowledgements includes all the leading practitioners in the field. The references and information are current; reports and information from 1989 and 1990 meetings are included.

Edgerton, L.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Global Warming Solutions Inc previously Southern Investments Inc | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warming Solutions Inc previously Southern Investments Inc Warming Solutions Inc previously Southern Investments Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Warming Solutions Inc (previously Southern Investments Inc) Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Solar Product Developer of a combined PV and thermal energy solar system called light electric and thermal generator (LETG). Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature''. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

Hoffert, M.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Response of Upper Clouds in Global Warming Experiments Obtained Using a Global Nonhydrostatic Model with Explicit Cloud Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud processes, upper-cloud changes are investigated by comparing the present climate condition under the perpetual July setting and the global warming condition, in which the sea surface ...

Masaki Satoh; Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Akira T. Noda

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

New electric technologies to reduce global warming impacts  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric technologies hold significant potential to reduce global warming impact through reduction of primary fuel needed to power end-use applications. These reductions can occur in two forms: (1) reduced kilowatt-hour usage and power plant emissions through efficiency improvements and technological enhancements of existing electrically-driven applications; (2) the development of new electric technologies to replace traditional fossil-fuel driven applications which can result in less overall primary energy consumption and lower overall emissions. Numerous new electric technologies are presently being developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. The technologies reviewed in this paper include: Microwave Fabric Dryer, Advanced Heat Pumps, Heat Pump Water Heater, Infrared Sand Reclaimer, Freeze Concentration, Membrane Water Recovery, Microwave Petrochemical Production, Infrared Drying, and Electric Vehicles. Full commercialization of these technologies can result in significant energy savings and CO[sub 2] reductions, in addition to improving the competitiveness of businesses using these technologies.

Courtright, H.A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy and environmental policy and electric utilities' choice under uncertain global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper reviews and discusses uncertainty about global warming science, impact on society. It also discusses what assumptions have been made and how appropriate the assumptions in scenarios have been for estimating global ...

Takahashi, Masaki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Comparative Analysis of Global Warming Policies for California's Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i A Comparative Analysis of Global Warming Policies for California's Electricity Sector Sara Kamins #12;ii A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL WARMING POLICIES FOR CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SECTOR By: Sara...................................................................................................................11 1.4. Literature Review on Comparisons of Carbon-Reducing Electricity Policies

Kammen, Daniel M.

77

Global warming---The role for nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is currently making an important contribution to our energy requirements. It provides 17% of the world's electricity today --- almost 20% in the US. Reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide over the next 30 to 50 years sufficiently to address the issue of global warming can only be accomplished by a combination of much improved energy efficiency, substantial growth in use of nuclear power, and substantial growth in use of renewable energy. This paper discusses new initiatives in the major nuclear technologies (LWR, HTGR, LMR) which are emerging from a fundamental reexamination of nuclear power in response to the challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. To fulfill its role, nuclear power must gain worldwide acceptance as a viable energy option. The use of modern technology and passive'' safety features in next-generation nuclear power plants offers the potential to simplify their design and operation, enhance their safety, and reduce the cost of electricity. With such improvements, we believe nuclear power can regain public confidence and make a significant contribution to our energy future. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Jones, J.E. Jr.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Observational Constraints on Past Attributable Warming and Predictions of Future Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of aerosol forcing uncertainty on the robustness of estimates of the twentieth-century warming attributable to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Attribution analyses on three coupled climate models with ...

Peter A. Stott; John F. B. Mitchell; Myles R. Allen; Thomas L. Delworth; Jonathan M. Gregory; Gerald A. Meehl; Benjamin D. Santer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The greenhouse effect: Chicken Little and our response to global warming  

SciTech Connect

In this article the author suggests that global warming studies are ambiguous and have generated a chicken little response in the public and in policymakers. Uncertainties in studies of ocean warming and ozone depletion are discussed as well as the role of other trace gases such as methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrogen oxides.

Michaels, P.J.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Do Models and Observations Disagree on the Rainfall Response to Global Warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently analyzed satellite-derived global precipitation datasets from 1987 to 2006 indicate an increase in global-mean precipitation of 1.1%–1.4% decade?1. This trend corresponds to a hydrological sensitivity (HS) of 7% K?1 of global warming, ...

Beate G. Liepert; Michael Previdi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Global Warming Shifts the Monsoon Circulation, Drying South Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monsoon rainfall over South Asia has decreased during the last 5 to 6 decades according to several sets of observations. Although sea surface temperature (SST) has risen across the Indo-Pacific warm pool during this period, the expected ...

H. Annamalai; Jan Hafner; K. P. Sooraj; P. Pillai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Probing the Fast and Slow Components of Global Warming by Returning Abruptly to Preindustrial Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast and slow components of global warming in a comprehensive climate model are isolated by examining the response to an instantaneous return to preindustrial forcing. The response is characterized by an initial fast exponential decay with an ...

Isaac M. Held; Michael Winton; Ken Takahashi; Thomas Delworth; Fanrong Zeng; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decadal Fluctuations in Planetary Wave Forcing Modulate Global Warming in Late Boreal Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The warming trend in global surface temperatures over the last 40 yr is clear and consistent with anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Over the last 2 decades, this trend appears to have accelerated. In contrast to this general behavior, ...

Judah Cohen; Mathew Barlow; Kazuyuki Saito

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the equatorial Indian Ocean climate to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. In all of the analyzed climate models, the SSTs ...

Chie Ihara; Yochanan Kushnir; Mark A. Cane; Victor H. de la Peńa

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean tropospheric circulation change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) to a spatial-uniform sea surface temperature (SST) increase (SUSI) with the response of a ...

Jian Ma; Shang-Ping Xie; Yu Kosaka

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Changes in Interannual Variability and Decadal Potential Predictability under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming will result in changes in mean temperature and precipitation distributions and is also expected to affect interannual and longer time-scale internally generated variability as a consequence of changes in climate processes and ...

G. J. Boer

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

“Climategate” Undermined Belief in Global Warming Among Many American TV Meteorologists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Television (TV) meteorologists are a potentially important source of informal climate change education in that most American adults watch local TV news and consider TV weather reporters to be a trusted source of global warming information. In ...

Edward Maibach; James Witte; Kristopher Wilson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Amazonian Deforestation: Impact of Global Warming on the Energy Balance and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled biosphere–atmosphere statistical–dynamical model is used to study the relative roles of the impact of the land change caused by tropical deforestation and global warming on energy balance and climate. Three experiments were made: 1) ...

E. C. Moraes; Sergio H. Franchito; V. Brahmananda Rao

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Regional Tropical Precipitation Change Mechanisms in ECHAM4/OPYC3 under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms of global warming impacts on regional tropical precipitation are examined in a coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model (ECHAM4/OPYC3). The pattern of the regional tropical precipitation changes, once established, tends to ...

Chia Chou; J. David Neelin; Jien-Yi Tu; Cheng-Ta Chen

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Global warming, energy efficiency and the role of the built environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts to explore the relationships between the Buildings Sector, energy efficiency and global warming. Through a qualitative analysis the author illustrates the connection between these three areas and shows ...

DiBona, Donna K

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Emission Scenario Dependency of Precipitation on Global Warming in the MIROC3.2 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation sensitivity per 1 K of global warming in twenty-first-century climate projections is smaller in an emission scenario with larger greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol emissions, according to the Model for Interdisciplinary ...

Hideo Shiogama; Seita Emori; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Tatsuya Nagashima; Tomoo Ogura; Toru Nozawa; Toshihiko Takemura

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Possible Constraint on Regional Precipitation Intensity Changes under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in daily precipitation versus intensity under a global warming scenario in two regional climate simulations of the United States show a well-recognized feature of more intense precipitation. More important, by resolving the precipitation ...

W. J. Gutowski Jr.; E. S. Takle; K. A. Kozak; J. C. Patton; R. W. Arritt; J. H. Christensen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fast and Slow Response to Global Warming: Sea Surface Temperature and Precipitation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent response of sea surface temperature (SST) to global warming and the associated atmospheric changes are investigated based on a 1% year-1 CO2 increase to quadrupling experiment of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate ...

Shang-Min Long; Shang-Ping Xie; Xiao-Tong Zheng; Qinyu Liu

94

A Dynamical Interpretation of the Poleward Shift of the Jet Streams in Global Warming Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role played by enhanced upper-tropospheric baroclinicity in the poleward shift of the jet streams in global warming scenarios is investigated. Major differences between the twentieth- and twenty-first-century simulations are first detailed ...

Gwendal Rivičre

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Increased Runoff from Melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet: A Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors attribute significantly increased Greenland summer warmth and Greenland Ice Sheet melt and runoff since 1990 to global warming. Southern Greenland coastal and Northern Hemisphere summer temperatures were uncorrelated between the 1960s ...

Edward Hanna; Philippe Huybrechts; Konrad Steffen; John Cappelen; Russell Huff; Christopher Shuman; Tristram Irvine-Fynn; Stephen Wise; Michael Griffiths

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Global warming projections: Sensitivity to deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climatological impact of increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, despite being a subject of intensive study in recent years, is still very uncertain [1, 2]. One major uncertainty affecting possible climate change that has not received enough attention is the uncertainty in heat uptake by the deep ocean. We analyze the influence of this process and its uncertainty on climate predictions by means of numerical simulations with a 2-dimensional (2D) climate model. In the case of high climate sensitivity, as a result of uncertainty in deep ocean heat uptake, there is more than a factor of two uncertainty in the predicted increase of surface temperature. The corresponding uncertainty in the sea level rise due to thermal expansion is much larger than the uncertainty in the predicted temperature change and is significant even in the case of low climate sensitivity. The uncertainty in the rate of heat uptake by the deep ocean has not been included in the projections of climate change made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [1,2]. However, our results show that this uncertainty plays a very important role in defining the ranges ofĘpossible warming and, especially, of sea level rise. To assess the uncertainty we have used a 2-dimensional (zonally averaged) climate model, the MIT 2D model [3,4,5]. This model allows us to

Andrei P. Sokolov; Peter H. Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming  

SciTech Connect

Snow accumulation is critical for water availability in the Northern Hemisphere1,2, raising concern that global warming could have important impacts on natural and human systems in snow-dependent regions1,3. Although regional hydrologic changes have been observed (for example, refs 1,3 5), the time of emergence of extreme changes in snow accumulation and melt remains a key unknown for assessing climate- change impacts3,6,7. We find that the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble exhibits an imminent shift towards low snow years in the Northern Hemisphere, with areas of western North America, northeastern Europe and the Greater Himalaya showing the strongest emergence during the near- termdecadesandat2 Cglobalwarming.Theoccurrenceof extremely low snow years becomes widespread by the late twenty-first century, as do the occurrences of extremely high early-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing flood risk), and extremely low late-season snowmelt and runoff (implying increasing water stress). Our results suggest that many snow-dependent regions of the Northern Hemisphere are likely to experience increasing stress from low snow years within the next three decades, and from extreme changes in snow-dominated water resources if global warming exceeds 2 C above the pre-industrial baseline.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; Scherer, Martin [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparative Global Warming Impacts of Electric Vapor-Compression and Direct-fired Absorption Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the global warming impacts of electric vapor-compression and gas-fired absorption-cycle equipment for commercial cooling applications. Absorption chillers do not use ozone depleting refrigerants but substitution of alternative refrigerants in electrically driven vapor-compression cycle equipment also offers radically reduced or eliminated potential for stratospheric ozone depletion. Therefore, when comparing absorption-cycle and vapor-compression equipment, net global warming impacts...

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

Steinberg, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Structuring energy supply and demand networks in a general equilibrium model to simulate global warming control strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming control strategies which mandate stringent caps on emissions of greenhouse forcing gases can substantially alter a country's demand, production, and imports of energy products. Although there is a large degree of uncertainty when attempting to estimate the potential impact of these strategies, insights into the problem can be acquired through computer model simulations. This paper presents one method of structuring a general equilibrium model, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program/Global Climate Change (ENPEP/GCC), to simulate changes in a country's energy supply and demand balance in response to global warming control strategies. The equilibrium model presented in this study is based on the principle of decomposition, whereby a large complex problem is divided into a number of smaller submodules. Submodules simulate energy activities and conversion processes such as electricity production. These submodules are linked together to form an energy supply and demand network. Linkages identify energy and fuel flows among various activities. Since global warming control strategies can have wide reaching effects, a complex network was constructed. The network represents all energy production, conversion, transportation, distribution, and utilization activities. The structure of the network depicts interdependencies within and across economic sectors and was constructed such that energy prices and demand responses can be simulated. Global warming control alternatives represented in the network include: (1) conservation measures through increased efficiency; and (2) substitution of fuels that have high greenhouse gas emission rates with fuels that have lower emission rates. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hamilton, S.; Veselka, T.D.; Cirillo, R.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course - NERSC Science News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

It's Not Too Late to It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course Simulations Show That Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Save Arctic Ice, Reduce Sea Level Rise October 27, 2009 | Tags: Climate Research mitigation1.jpg Computer simulations show the extent that average air temperatures at Earth's surface could warm by 2080-2099 compared to 1980-1999, if (top) greenhouse gases emissions continue to climb at current rates, or if (middle) society cuts emissions by 70 percent. In the latter case, temperatures rise by less than 2°C (3.6°F) across nearly all of Earth's populated areas (the bottom panel shows warming averted). However, unchecked emissions could lead to warming of 3°C (5.4°F) or more across parts of Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia. (Image: Geophysical

102

Implications for the creation of warm saline deep water: Late Paleocene reconstructions and global climate model simulations  

SciTech Connect

A global warming trend began during the late Paleocene that culminated in the early Eocene with the highest global temperatures of the Cenozoic. We have reconstructed late Paleocene surfacial boundary conditions and modeled atmospheric conditions using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model version II (GISS GCM II). These experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that warm saline deep water formed during the late paleocene and to understand atmospheric circulation near the beginning of a period of global warming. The warming is attributed primarily to increased sea surface temperatures at high latitudes. The sensitivity of the climate to ocean temperature was tested using two sea surface temperature distributions, each delimited latitudinally by oxygen isotope values, but with different east-west gradients. The simulations discussed here contain several features unique among warm climate experiments. The first experiment (P-1) used latitudinally constant (zonal) sea surface temperatures. The zonally distributed sea surface temperatures strengthen the general circulation of the atmosphere. In particular, Hadley Cell circulation is intensified, leading to extremes of precipitation in the equatorial region and extreme evaporation across subtropical oceans. The unusual results prompted a second experiment with modern east-west sea surface temperature gradients superimposed and referred to as P-Gradient (P-Grad). 84 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

O`Connell, S. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States); Chandler, M.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Ruedy, R. [Goddard Inst. of Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollution simultaneously, namely wind- and solar energy for electric power, electric vehicles and diesel vehicles currently cause. 4) Studies to date suggest little reduction or an exacerbation of global estimates of the effects of cellulosic ethanol on global warming to date are premature and low. 6) Wind

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

104

Global Warming and the Problem of Testing for Trend in Time Series Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years a number of statistical tests have been proposed for testing the hypothesis that global warming is occurring. The standard approach is to examine one or two of the more prominent global temperature datasets by letting Yt = a + bt +...

Wayne A. Woodward; H. L. Gray

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

SPECIAL EARTH DAY COLLOQUIUM: How Global Warming Is Heating Things...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)-here defined as a global population-weighted metric...

106

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tradeable CO sub 2 emission permits for cost-effective control of global warming  

SciTech Connect

Many current global warming mitigation policy proposals call for large, near-term reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions, thereby entailing high initial carbon emission tax rates or permit prices. This paper claims that these high initial tax rates or permit prices are not cost-effective in achieving the desired degree of climate change control. A cost-effective permit system is proposed and described that, under certain assumptions, would allow markets to optimally lead permit prices along a gradually increasing trajectory over tie. This price path presents the Hotelling result and would ease the abrupt, inefficient, and costly adjustments imposed on the fossil fuel and other industries in current proposals. This finding is demonstrated using the Argonne Model, a linear programming energy- environmental-economic model that allows for intertemporal optimization of consumer energy well-being. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Kosobud, R.F.; South, D.W.; Daly, T.A.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related to Global Temperature versus Sea Level Rise," Nature Climate Change 2, 576-580 (2012), doi:10.1038nclimate1529. About NERSC and Berkeley Lab The National Energy Research...

109

BioFacts: Fueling a stronger economy, Global warming and biofuels emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of numerous federal and state regulations being proposed and approved today is the reduction of automobile emissions -- particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), which is the greenhouse gas considered responsible for global warming. Studies conducted by the USDOE through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) indicate that the production and use of biofuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, and methanol could nearly eliminate the contribution of net CO{sub 2} from automobiles. This fact sheet provides and overview of global warming, followed by a summary of NREL`s study results.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Comprehensive monitoring of CO2 sequestration in subalpine forest ecosystems and its relation to global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming is an increasing concern worldwide. Assessing the contribution of CO2 to this phenomenon is an important issue. This project's goal is to improve understanding of CO2 and H2O transport in a mountainous terrain that confound current efforts ... Keywords: biogeochemistry, carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-modal, multi-scale, multi-tier, self organized, sensor array, trigger, wireless

Lynette Laffea; Russ Monson; Richard Han; Ryan Manning; Ashly Glasser; Steve Oncley; Jielun Sun; Sean Burns; Steve Semmer; John Militzer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming Our the opinion. Can the VCCER with its mandated interests in coal and energy be any different? Well, we do try QUARTERLY COAL PRODUCTION STATISTICS 5 GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS 6 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980

113

Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy that can contribute to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide to maintain adsorbed methane in the coalbed formation. But now carbon dioxide will replace the methane

Mohaghegh, Shahab

114

VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fossil fuel­based energy then the production of carbon dioxide will also, inevitably, increaseVIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming Our the opinion. Can the VCCER with its mandated interests in coal and energy be any different? Well, we do try

115

Atmospheric Responses of Gill-Type and Lindzen–Nigam Models to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial Pacific atmosphere responds differently to global warming in the Gill-type and Lindzen–Nigam models. Under an assumption of no change in the zonal sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the Gill-type model, the Walker circulation ...

Soon-Il An

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abyssal global and deep Southern Ocean temperature trends are quantified between the 1990s and 2000s to assess the role of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming rates with ...

Sarah G. Purkey; Gregory C. Johnson

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Regional growth management policies: Toward reducing global warming at state and local levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State and local governments in the United States are accepting mandates to coordinate legislated land use and growth management planning with vigorous environmental protection and resource conservation. These mandates, implemented or planned in states with populations totaling over 100 million, will directly impact growth patterns and ultimately affect the level of atmospheric gases and particulates generated within their borders. This paper addresses the issues of growth management and land use planning at the local, state and regional levels and identifies areas impacting global warming. A review of existing systems will be presented, and recommendations will be made to improve monitoring of growth management mechanisms and organizational structures with the goal of global atmospheric improvement. The issues discussed include urban sprawl, transportation, and growth patterns as managed by policies also designed to protect environments and provide for sustainable growth. Areas for improved coordination between jurisdictions to ease global warming will also be examined.

Purdie, J. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Washington Center for Real Estate Research

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Part 1, Progress report  

SciTech Connect

During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, ``Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature``. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

Hoffert, M.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Stochastic modeling and global warming trend extraction for ocean acoustic travel times. Interim technical report  

SciTech Connect

A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is a negative trend for the travel time of an acoustic pulse along a fixed long path, or paths, in the ocean over a period of many years. The goal of this report is the development of methods specifically for determining the presence of a long term trend for climate change from a temporal sequence of measurements of acoustic propagation times. Robust statistical methods for determining whether a significant trend is present in a given set of time series data have been developed and, for illustration, applied to some specific traveltime time series generated by the MASIG and GFDL ocean models. In this report we consider line + noise and ARIMA statistical models. We show that if the time series are long enough, somewhat over 20 years, then series such as those simulated by the MASIG and GFDL models can be classified reliably as line + noise when this is the case. However, it is shown that the results are considerably different for the two ocean models under consideration and that these models can not currently be relied upon by themselves to predict global warming. Experimental data is most certainly needed, not only to measure global warming itself, but to help improve the ocean model themselves.

Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Global warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oceans will rise because the ice caps will melt. whole countries may disappear underwater. In addition, there will be drastic climate changes all over the world. Scientists...

122

Can Advances in Science and Technology Prevent Global Warming? A Critical Review of Limitations and Challenges  

SciTech Connect

The most stringent emission scenarios published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would result in the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at concentrations of approximately 550 ppm which would produce a global temperature increase of at least 2 C by 2100. Given the large uncertainties regarding the potential risks associated with this degree of global warming, it would be more prudent to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at or below current levels which, in turn, would require a greater than 20-fold reduction (i.e., ?95%) in per capita carbon emissions in industrialized nations within the next 50 to 100 years. Using the Kaya equation as a conceptual framework, this paper examines whether CO2 mitigation approaches such as energy efficiency improvements, carbon sequestration, and the development of carbon-free energy sources would be sufficient to bring about the required reduction in per capita carbon emissions without creating unforeseen negative impacts elsewhere. In terms of energy efficiency, large improvements (?5-fold) are in principle possible given aggressive investments in R&D and if market imperfections such as corporate subsidies are removed. However, energy efficiency improvements per se will not result in a reduction in carbon emissions if, as predicted by the IPCC, the size of the global economy has expanded 12-26 fold by 2100. Terrestrial carbon sequestration via reforestation and improved agricultural soil management has many environmental advantages but has only limited CO2 mitigation potential because the global terrestrial carbon sink (ca. 200 Gt C) is small relative to the size of fossil fuel deposits (?4000 Gt C). By contrast, very large amounts of CO2 can potentially be removed from the atmosphere via sequestration in geologic formations and oceans, but carbon storage is not permanent and is likely to create many unpredictable environmental consequences. Renewable solar energy can in theory provide large amounts of carbon-free power. However, biomass and hydroelectric energy can only be marginally expanded and large-scale solar energy installations (i.e., wind, photovoltaics, and direct thermal) are likely to have significant negative environmental impacts. Expansion of nuclear energy is highly unlikely due to concerns over reactor safety, radioactive waste management, weapons proliferation, and cost. In view of the serious limitations and liabilities of many proposed CO2 mitigation approaches it appears that there remain only few no-regrets options such as drastic energy efficiency improvements, extensive terrestrial carbon sequestration, and cautious expansion of renewable energy generation. These promising CO2 mitigation technologies have the potential to bring about the required 20-fold reduction in per capita carbon emission only if population and economic growth are halted without delay. Thus, addressing the problem of global warming requires not only technological research and development but also a reexamination of core values that mistakenly equate material consumption and economic growth to happiness and well-being.

Huesemann, Michael H.

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hemispherical Asymmetry of Tropical Precipitation in ECHAM5/MPI-OM during El Nińo and under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Similarities and differences between El Nińo and global warming are examined in hemispherical and zonal tropical precipitation changes of the ECHAM5/Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-OM) simulations. Similarities include hemispherical ...

Chia Chou; Jien-Yi Tu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Response of Tropical Cyclone Potential Intensity to a Global Warming Scenario in the IPCC AR4 CGCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an analysis of the tropical cyclone (TC) potential intensity (PI) and its control parameters in transient global warming simulations. Specifically, the TC PI is calculated for phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison ...

Jinhua Yu; Yuqing Wang; Kevin Hamilton

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on assessing connections between anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and global climatic change. it has been supported since the early 1990s in part by the DOE ``Quantitative Links`` Program (QLP). A three-year effort was originally proposed to the QLP to investigate effects f global cloudiness on global climate and its implications for cloud feedback; and to continue the development and application of climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by clouds and oceans. It is well-known that cloud and ocean processes are major sources of uncertainty in the ability to predict climatic change from humankind`s greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions. And it has always been the objective to develop timely and useful analytical tools for addressing real world policy issues stemming from anthropogenic climate change.

Hoffert, M.I.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Controls of Global-Mean Precipitation Increases in Global Warming GCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the controls on global precipitation that are evident in the transient experiments conducted using coupled climate models collected for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). The ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Todd D. Ellis

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Global warming risk in Russia: National actions and some options for international cooperation  

SciTech Connect

In the management of global environmental risks the Russia case is a special one regarding certain specific features which determine the position of the country, particularly in a new international community emerged on the territory of the former Soviet Union, large scientific interest to the global physical processes and low interest and capabilities to deal with such risks on the part of social institutions inherited from the USSR. The largest country in the world with visible geopolitical role and probably biggest regional differences could not be ignored as a one of major players in the management of global environmental risks. The understanding of all deficiencies and positive sides of global risks management process in this country are absolutely important for extrapolating the appropriate trends in some other parts of the world. At the same time the ex-Soviet Union case shows clearly how the social learning process can radically ``change the course``, diverting to the opposite direction the social goals and preferences. Starting the studies on possibilities to change the climate for improving the human being, the former soviet society perceived the risks of human impact on climate and started to regulate it and to participate in the process of international management of global warming. The level of activity in this process on the part of Russia will however depend heavily on how much national interests will be reflected in the specific prevention measures realized by the international community.

Sokolov, V.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Global warming, January 1988-March 1991 (citations from the NTIS database). Rept. for Jan 88-Mar 91  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning policies and general studies on global warming. Topics include the greenhouse effect, global climatic models, and climatic effects from combustion of fossil fuels. (The new bibliography contains 150 citations.) (Also includes title list and subject index.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Global Warming: A Science Overview for the A/C Industry  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels (i.e., coal, oil, and natural gas) provide about 85% of the world's energy, sustaining our standard-of-living. They are inexpensive, transportable, safe, and relatively abundant. At the same time, their use contributes to problems such as air quality and acid rain that are being addressed through various control efforts and to the problem of global warming, which is now being considered by governments of the world. This talk will focus on six key aspects of the scientific findings that are leading to proposals for significant limitation of the emissions of fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide and limitations on emissions of other greenhouse gases that can influence the global climate, including substances used in the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries.

MacCracken, M.C.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Global warming impacts of ozone-safe refrigerants and refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

International agreements mandate the phase-out of many chlorine containing compounds that are used as the working fluid in refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating equipment. Many of the chemical compounds that have been proposed, and are being used in place of the class of refrigerants eliminated by the Montreal Protocol are now being questioned because of their possible contributions to global warming. Natural refrigerants are put forth as inherently superior to manufactured refrigerants because they have very low or zero global warming potentials (GWPs). Questions are being raised about whether or not these manufactured refrigerants, primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), should be regulated and perhaps phased out in much the same manner as CFCs and HCFCs. Several of the major applications of refrigerants are examined in this paper and the results of an analysis of their contributions to greenhouse warming are presented. Supermarket refrigeration is shown to be an application where alternative technologies have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly with no clear advantage to either natural or HFC refrigerants. Mixed results are presented for automobile air conditioners with opportunities to reduce GHG emissions dependent on climate and comfort criteria. GHG emissions for hermetic and factory built systems (i.e. household refrigerators/freezers, unitary equipment, chillers) are shown to be dominated by energy use with much greater potential for reduction through efficiency improvements than by selection of refrigerant. The results for refrigerators also illustrate that hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide blown foam insulation have lower overall effects on GHG emissions than HFC blown foams at the cost of increased energy use.

Fischer, S.; Sand, J.; Baxter, V.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Energy and global warming impacts of next generation refrigeration and air conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

Significant developments have occurred in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and the application of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerant working fluids since the original TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) report in 1991. System operating and performance data on alternative refrigerants and refrigeration technologies justify and updated evaluation of these new alternative refrigerants and competing technologies in well-characterized applications. Analytical and experimental results are used to show quantitative comparisons between HFCS, HFC blends, hydrocarbons, and ammonia, used as refrigerants. An objective evaluation is presented for commercial and near commercial non-CFC refrigerants/blowing agents and alternative refrigeration technologies. This information is needed for objective and quantitative decisions on policies addressing greenhouse gas emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The evaluation assesses the energy use and global warming impacts of refrigeration and air conditioning technologies that could be commercialized during the phase out of HCFCS. Quantitative comparison TEWI for two application areas are presented. Opportunities for significant reductions in TEWI are seen with currently known refrigerants through improved maintenance and servicing practices and improved product designs.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison of global warming impacts of automobile air-conditioning concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global warming impacts of conventional vapor compression automobile air conditioning using HFC-134a are compared with the potential impacts of four alternative concepts. Comparisons are made on the basis of total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) which accounts for the effects of refrigerant emissions, energy use to provide comfort cooling, and fuel consumed to transport the weight of the air conditioning system. Under the most favorable assumptions on efficiency and weight, transcritical compression using CO{sub 2} as the refrigerant and adsorption cooling with water and zeolite beds could reduce TEWI by up to 18%rlative to HFC-134a compression air conditioning. Other assumptions on weight and efficiency lead to significant increases in TEWI relative to HFC-134a, and it is impossible to determine which set of assumptios is valid from existing data, Neither Stirling cycle or thermoelectric cooling will reduce TEWI relative to EFC-134a. Brief comments are also made concerning technical barriers that must be overcome for succesful development of the new technologies.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global warming implications of non-fluorocarbon technologies as CFC replacements  

SciTech Connect

Many technologies could be developed for use in place of conventional compression systems for refrigeration and air conditioning. Comparisons of the global warming impacts using TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) can be used to identify alternatives that have the potential for lower environmental impacts than electric-driven vapor compression systems using HCFCs and HFCs. Some options, such as secondary heat transfer loops in commercial refrigeration systems to reduce refrigerant charge and emission rates, could be useful in reducing the losses of refrigerants to the atmosphere. Use of ammonia instead of a fluorocarbon in a system with a secondary loop offers only a small potential for decreasing TEWI, and this may not warrant the increased complexity and risks of using ammonia in a retail sales environment. A few technologies, such as adsorption heat pumps, have efficiency levels that show reduced TEWI levels compared to conventional and state of the art compression systems, and further development could lead to an even more favorable comparison. Health and safety risks of the alternative technologies and the materials they employ must also be considered.

Fischer, S.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Global warming and the future of coal carbon capture and storage  

SciTech Connect

The paper considers how best to change the economic calculus of power plant developers so they internalize CCS costs when selecting new generation technologies. Five policy tools are analyzed: establishing a greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program; imposing carbon taxes; defining CCS systems as a so-called Best Available Control Technology for new power plants under the USA Clean Air Act's New Source Review program; developing a 'low carbon portfolio' standard that requires utilities to provide an increasing proportion of power from low-carbon generation sources over time; and requiring all new coal power plants to meet an 'emission performance' standard that limits CO{sub 2} emissions to levels achievable with CCS systems. Each of these tools has advantages and drawbacks but an emission performance standard for new power plants is likely to be most effective in spurring broad-scale adoption of CCS systems. Chapter headings are: global warming and the future of coal; new coal-fired power plants threaten all other efforts to combat global warming; a potential path to zero emissions through carbon capture and storage; CO{sub 2} capture at coal plants: the promise of IGCC and other technologies; barriers to commercialization of IGCC technology; crossing the chasm: a new policy framework to push ccs implementation forward; encouraging CCS systems with carbon caps and trading programs; using the existing Clean Air Act to require CCS systems for new coal plants; retail low carbon portfolio standard; carbon tax; emission performance standards for new coal power plants; and conclusions. 16 figs.

Ken Berlin; Robert M. Sussman [Skadden Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

How America can look within to achieve energy security and reduce global warming.  

SciTech Connect

Making major gains in energy efficiency is one of the most economical and effective ways our nation can wean itself off its dependence on foreign oil and reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. Transportation and buildings, which account for two thirds of American energy usage, consume far more than they need to, but even though there are many affordable energy efficient technologies that can save consumers money, market imperfections inhibit their adoption. To overcome the barriers, the federal government must adopt policies that will transform the investments into economic and societal benefit. And the federal government must invest in research and development programs that target energy efficiency. Energy efficiency is one of America's great hidden energy reserves. We should begin tapping it now. Whether you want the United States to achieve greater energy security by weaning itself off foreign oil, sustain strong economic growth in the face of worldwide competition or reduce global warming by decreasing carbon emissions, energy efficiency is where you need to start. Thirty-five years ago the U.S. adopted national strategies, implemented policies and developed technologies that significantly improved energy efficiency. More than three decades have passed since then, and science and technology have progressed considerably, but U.S. energy policy has not. It is time to revisit the issue. In this report we examine the scientific and technological opportunities and policy actions that can make the United States more energy efficient, increase its security and reduce its impact on global warming. We believe the findings and recommendations will help Congress and the next administration to realize these goals. Our focus is on the transportation and buildings sectors of the economy. The opportunities are huge and the costs are small.

Richter, B.; Goldston, D.; Crabtree, G.; Glicksman, L.; Goldstein, D.; Greene, D.; Kammen, D.; Levin, M.; Lubell, M.; Savitz, M.; Sperling, D.; Schlachter, F.; Scofield, J.; Dawson, J. (Materials Science Division); (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.); (National Resources Defense Council); (Harvard Univ.); (ORNL); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (LBNL); (American Physical Society); (City Coll. of CUNY); (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center); (Stanford Univ.); (The Advisory Group); (Univ. of California at Davis)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sensitivity of the Ocean’s Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity in an EMIC. Part II: Global Warming Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the ocean’s climate to the diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is studied for a global warming scenario in which CO2 increases by 1% yr?1 for 75 yr. The thermohaline circulation slows down for about 100 yr and recovers afterward,...

Fabio Dalan; Peter H. Stone; Andrei P. Sokolov

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

National US public policy on global warming derived from optimization of energy use and environmental impact studies  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss possible United States policy responses to global warming. The components of a voluntary program for emissions control will be presented as well as regulatory options, including a carbon tax and tradeable permits. The advantages and disadvantages of both options will be discussed as well as the need for a consistent overall policy response to climate change.

Reck, R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Antarctic Bottom Water Warming and Freshening: Contributions to Sea Level Rise, Ocean Freshwater Budgets, and Global Heat Gain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freshening and warming of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) between the 1980s and 2000s are quantified, assessing the relative contributions of water-mass changes and isotherm heave. The analysis uses highly accurate, full-depth, ship-based, ...

Sarah G. Purkey; Gregory C. Johnson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dust Bowl migration as an analog for possible global warming-induced migration from Mexico  

SciTech Connect

As a result of increases in CO{sub 2} and other radiatively important trace gases, scientists have predicted increases in mean worldwide temperatures of 2--5 degrees C over the next 50 to 100 years. Such temperature increases may result in climate modifications that would in turn be associated with increases in drought and desertification and could even change the patterns of the monsoons and tropical rains, which are important to agriculture throughout the world. They predicted that the rise in sea level caused by melting and thermal expansion of glaciers and polar icecaps could flood large population centers, destroying habitation and displacing populations. This will result in approximately 50 million ``environmental refugees`` worldwide, triple the number of today. The expected shifts in precipitation are also likely to result in (1) increased runoff contaminated with pesticides, salts, garbage, sewage, and eroded soil, and (2) drought also leading to increased soil erosion and salinization, as well as depletion of limited water resources. The total impact of global warming on agriculture and human habitation could considerably slow the economic development of some nations and would particularly affect agricultural production. Loss of homes, the inability to raise food, an increased prevalence of disease and worsened economic conditions may drive people to leave their homelands, seeking entry into countries which have more resources and greater resistance to the economic consequences of climatic change. This report looks at the possible environmental impacts and economic impacts of the greenhouse effect on Mexico while using the American Dust Bowl event as an analog.

Turner, M.H.; Longstreth, J.D.; Johnson, A.K.; Rosenberg, N.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Modeling the response of the California Current system to global greenhouse warming. Final report to the National Institute for Global Environmental Change (August 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the project ``Modeling the Response of the California Current System to Global Greenhouse Warming,`` supported 1990 and 1991 by NIGEC. The scientists involved are Dr. Richard C.J. Somerville and Alejandro Paries-Sierra of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD. A copy of papers submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography, and Geofisica Internacional that were supported in part or whole by WEST-GEC, as well as a summary of a talk delivered at the XX General Assembly of the IUGG, Vienna (1991) are appended to this report. The objective of the research was to improve the understanding of the response of the California Current system to the large-scale anomalous forcing thought to be associated with greenhouse warming. The authors viewed this as a necessary initial step in the study of the California climate response to global change.

Pares-Sierra, A.; Somerville, R.C.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Constraining the Ratio of Global Warming to Cumulative CO2 Emissions Using CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenarios and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Constraining the ratio of global warming to cumulative CO2 emissions using CMIP5 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenario, and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

146

Responding to the threat of global warming: Options for the Pacific and Asia  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, global climate change has rapidly been transformed from an esoteric topic of interest mainly to scientists to one of worldwide concern to policymakers, the business communities, the media, and the general public. In response to this heightened interest, a number of high-level international meetings dealing with this issue have been held in the past two years. With growing recognition that the global climate change phenomenon would result in different regional (and local) effects, a workshop was organized by Argonne National Laboratory and the East-West Center to assess the likely consequences of this threat and the possible remediation options available to the countries of the Pacific Asia. This paper summarizes the deliberations and conclusion of the workshop, which was held at the East-West center in Honolulu, Hawaii, from June 21--27, 1989. 35 refs., 4 figs.

Bhatti, N.; Streets, D.G.; Siddiqi, T.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Changes in Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent as a Result of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates changes in the types of storm events occurring in the Fertile Crescent as a result of global warming. Regional climate model [fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research ...

J. P. Evans

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act August 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

150

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hurricanes and Global Warming: Results from Downscaling IPCC AR4 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in tropical cyclone activity are among the more potentially consequential results of global climate change, and it is therefore of considerable interest to understand how anthropogenic climate change may affect such storms. Global climate ...

Kerry Emanuel; Ragoth Sundararajan; John Williams

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cool Roofs Are Ready to Save Energy, Cool Urban Heat Islands, and Help Slow Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofing is the fastest growing sector roofing is the fastest growing sector of the building industry, as building owners and facility managers realize the immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun. Studies exploring the energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of cool roofs show that in warm or hot climates, substituting a cool roof for a conventional roof can: * Reduce by up to 15% the annual air-

154

Evaluation of food waste disposal options by LCC analysis from the perspective of global warming: Jungnang case, South Korea  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Various food waste disposal options were evaluated from the perspective of global warming. > Costs of the options were compared by the methodology of life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis. > Carbon price and valuable by-products were used for analyzing environmental credits. > The benefit-cost ratio of wet feeding scenario was the highest. - Abstract: The costs associated with eight food waste disposal options, dry feeding, wet feeding, composting, anaerobic digestion, co-digestion with sewage sludge, food waste disposer, incineration, and landfilling, were evaluated in the perspective of global warming and energy and/or resource recovery. An expanded system boundary was employed to compare by-products. Life cycle cost was analyzed through the entire disposal process, which included discharge, separate collection, transportation, treatment, and final disposal stages, all of which were included in the system boundary. Costs and benefits were estimated by an avoided impact. Environmental benefits of each system per 1 tonne of food waste management were estimated using carbon prices resulting from CO{sub 2} reduction by avoided impact, as well as the prices of by-products such as animal feed, compost, and electricity. We found that the cost of landfilling was the lowest, followed by co-digestion. The benefits of wet feeding systems were the highest and landfilling the lowest.

Kim, Mi-Hyung, E-mail: mhkim9@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yul-Eum, E-mail: yesong0724@dongguk.edu [Department of Philosophy, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Han-Byul, E-mail: kuackyang@ssu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Sangdo-Ro 369, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Wk, E-mail: kimjw@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sun-Jin, E-mail: sjhwang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Center for Environmental Studies, Kyung Hee University, Seocheon-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

A New Perspective on Recent Global Warming: Asymmetric Trends of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures for over 50% (10%) of the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere landmass, accounting for 37% of the global landmass, indicate that the rise of the minimum temperature has occurred at a rate three times that ...

Thomas R. Karl; Richard W. Knight; Kevin P. Gallo; Thomas C. Peterson; Philip D. Jones; George Kukla; Neil Plummer; Vyacheslav Razuvayev; Janette Lindseay; Robert J. Charlson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Multimodel Update on the Detection and Attribution of Global Surface Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an update on the detection and attribution of global annual mean surface air temperature changes, using recently developed climate models. In particular, it applies a new methodology that permits the inclusion of many more ...

DáithíA. Stone; Myles R. Allen; Peter A. Stott

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Projected Changes in Mean and Extreme Precipitation in Africa under Global Warming. Part I: Southern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates likely changes in mean and extreme precipitation over southern Africa in response to changes in radiative forcing using an ensemble of global climate models prepared for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) ...

M. E. Shongwe; G. J. van Oldenborgh; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; B. de Boer; C. A. S. Coelho; M. K. van Aalst

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Tropical Stabilization of the Thermohaline Circulation in a Greenhouse Warming Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most global climate models simulate a weakening of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) in response to enhanced greenhouse warming. Both surface warming and freshening in high latitudes, the so-called sinking region, contribute to ...

M. Latif; E. Roeckner; U. Mikolajewicz; R. Voss

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A procedure for analyzing energy and global warming impacts of foam insulation in U.S. commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to develop a procedure for evaluating the energy and global warming impacts of alternative insulation technologies for US commercial building applications. The analysis is focused on the sum of the direct contribution of greenhouse gas emissions from a system and the indirect contribution of the carbon dioxide emission resulting from the energy required to operate the system over its expected lifetime. In this paper, parametric analysis was used to calculate building related CO{sub 2} emission in two US locations. A retail mail building has been used as a model building for this analysis. For the analyzed building, minimal R-values of insulation are estimated using ASHRAE 90.1 requirements.

Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Desjarlais, A.O.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

Garcia-Montero, Luis G., E-mail: luisgonzaga.garcia@upm.e [Dept. Forest Engineering, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Montes, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Lopez, Elena, E-mail: elopez@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Monzon, Andres, E-mail: amonzon@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Otero Pastor, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.otero@upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

WORKINGPAPER SERIES Number 150CAP AND DIVIDEND: HOW TO CURB GLOBAL WARMING WHILE PROTECTING THE INCOMES OF AMERICAN FAMILIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines the distributional effects of a “cap-and-dividend ” policy for reducing carbon emission in the United States: a policy that auctions carbon permits and rebates the revenue to the public on an equal per capita basis. The aim of the policy is to reduce U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide, the main pollutant causing global warming, while at the same time protecting the real incomes of middle-income and lower-income American families. The number of permits is set by a statutory cap on carbon emissions that gradually diminishes over time. The sale of carbon permits will generate very large revenues, posing the critical question of who will get the money. The introduction of carbon permits – or, for that matter, any policy to curb emissions – will raise prices of fossil fuels, Key words: Global warming; fossil fuels; climate change; carbon permits; cap-and-dividend; cap-and-auction; cap-and-trade. and have a regressive impact on income distribution, since fuel expenditures represent a larger fraction of income for lower-income households than for upper-income households. The net effect of carbon emission-reduction policies depends on who gets the money that households pay in higher prices. We find that a cap-and-dividend policy would have a strongly progressive net effect. Moreover, the majority of U.S. households would be net winners in purely monetary terms: that is, their real incomes, after paying higher fuel prices and receiving their dividends, would rise. From the standpoints of both distributional equity and political feasibility, a cap-and-dividend policy is therefore an attractive way to curb carbon emissions. s s

James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle; James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Northern High-Latitude Heat Budget Decomposition and Transient Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models simulate a wide range of climate changes at high northern latitudes in response to increased CO2. They also have substantial disagreement on projected changes of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Here, two ...

Maria A. A. Rugenstein; Michael Winton; Ronald J. Stouffer; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert Hallberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Short-Term Cooling but Long-Term Global Warming Due to Biomass Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning releases gases (e.g., CO2, CO, CH4, NOx, SO2, C2H6, C2H4, C3H8, C3H6) and aerosol particle components (e.g., black carbon, organic matter, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, H+, Cl?, H2SO4, HSO4?, SO42?, NO3?). To date, the global-scale climate response of ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Signal and noise in global warming detection. Final progress report, July 15, 1990--July 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This research considers the mean squared error (MSE) incurred in estimating an idealized earth`s global average temperature with a finite network of point gauges distributed optimally over the globe. The construction of a linear smoothing filter is considered for estimating the forced part of a change in a climatological field such as the surface temperature. The filter is optimal in the sense that is suppresses the natural variability of noise relative to the forced part or signal to the maximum extent possible.

North, G.D.

1995-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comments on [open quotes]Global warming: A reduced threat [close quotes] by P. J. Michaels and D. E. Stooksbury  

SciTech Connect

The author of this letter criticizes Michaels and Stooksbury (1992) for arguing that, because climate models predict more warming for the last century than has been observed, the model predictions of major greenhouse warming must be wrong. It is the position of the author that this is not a valid argument, although the warming may have been relatively mild. In this letter, the author defends the belief that the magnitude of the recent warming actually tells very little about the sensitivity of the climate system to greenhouse gas emissions. Reasons for the warming observed over the last hundred years are summarized. 4 refs.

Duffy, P.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

1 2 3 4 5 6 Review of Solutions to Global Warming, Air Pollution, and Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 This paper reviews and ranks major proposed energy-related solutions to global warming, 15 air pollution mortality, and energy security while considering other impacts of the 16 17 proposed solutions, such as on water supply, land use, wildlife, resource availability, thermal pollution, water chemical pollution, nuclear proliferation, and undernutrition. 18 Nine electric power sources and two liquid fuel options are considered. The electricity 19 sources include solar-photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), wind, 20 geothermal, hydroelectric, wave, tidal, nuclear, and coal with carbon capture and storage 21 (CCS) technology. The liquid fuel options include corn-ethanol (E85) and cellulosic E85. 22 To place the electric and liquid fuel sources on an equal footing, we examine their 23 comparative abilities to address the problems mentioned by powering new-technology 24 vehicles, including battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), hydrogen fuel cell vehicles 25 (HFCVs), and flex-fuel vehicles run on E85. Twelve combinations of energy source-

Mark Z. Jacobson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

REVIEW www.rsc.org/ees | Energy & Environmental Science Review of solutions to global warming, air pollution, and energy security†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and ranks major proposed energy-related solutions to global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy security while considering other impacts of the proposed solutions, such as on water supply, land use, wildlife, resource availability, thermal pollution, water chemical pollution, nuclear proliferation, and undernutrition. Nine electric power sources and two liquid fuel options are considered. The electricity sources include solar-photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, wave, tidal, nuclear, and coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. The liquid fuel options include corn-ethanol (E85) and cellulosic-E85. To place the electric and liquid fuel sources on an equal footing, we examine their comparative abilities to address the problems mentioned by powering new-technology vehicles, including battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs), and flex-fuel vehicles run on E85. Twelve combinations of energy source-vehicle type are considered. Upon ranking and weighting each combination with respect to each of 11 impact categories, four clear divisions of ranking, or tiers, emerge. Tier 1 (highest-ranked) includes wind-BEVs and wind-HFCVs. Tier 2 includes CSP-BEVs, geothermal-BEVs, PV-BEVs, tidal-BEVs, and wave-BEVs. Tier 3 includes hydro-BEVs, nuclear-BEVs, and CCS-BEVs. Tier 4 includes corn- and cellulosic-E85. Wind-BEVs ranked first in seven out of 11 categories, including the two most

Mark Z. Jacobson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission  

SciTech Connect

Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O due to an impulse of CH{sub 4}. This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH{sub 4} resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O{sub 3} indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}27 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H{sub 2}O indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}2 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH{sub 4} GWPs vary from {approximately}53 at 20 yrs to {approximately}7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH{sub 4} GWP is {approximately}20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH{sub 4} GWP due to a CH{sub 4} response time ({approximately}17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH{sub 4} response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH{sub 4} impulse. The CH{sub 4} radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O{sub 3} radiative forcing calculations (10%).

Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Global Warming Local Warning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

informed consumption and lifestyle decisions. "Green energy must be put at the heart of sustainable from the expected increase in freak and extreme weather conditions. My concern as Green Party MEP working to combat aviation subsidies, since air transport is the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas

Williams, Paul

171

Hurricanes and Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews recent research on tropical cyclones and climate change from the perspective of event risk—the physical behavior of storms; vulnerability—the characteristics of a system that create the potential for impacts, but are ...

R. A. Pielke Jr.; C. Landsea; M. Mayfield; J. Laver; R. Pasch

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Understanding Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I' conlaminalion issues are wilh fracking, especially with Ihe wasle waler Ilral's gelling inlo rivers thai

Klein, David

173

Perspectives on global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IT industries and in the nuclear energy sector, industry interests and science rub .... cannot be a sceptic about a heliocentric solar system because the science is settled, ... of the recent history of US science policy, Oreskes and Conway devote  ...

174

Concerning the Actions Japan Should Take for the Expansion of Nuclear Energy Use in the World as a Measure against Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005, in which, a portfolio of actions for developing safe and secure nuclear energy across three different time frames; near-term, medium-term and long-term are presented under the recognition that such development does and will contribute to global energy security, while simultaneously addressing the climate change challenge. In recent days, due to steady increase in the primary energy consumption worldwide, energy security is becoming a major global concern. Simultaneously, it has been recognized that a major reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions is required to combat climate change. In May 2007, Japanese government presented to the world an initiative to address global warming entitled "Invitation to Cool Earth 50, ” under which a target of cutting global emission of greenhouse-gases by 50 % from the current level by the year 2050 was proposed. In the Heiligendamm G8 summit 2007 declaration, “Growth and Responsibility in the World Economy, ” it is mentioned that the decisions made by European Union, Canada and Japan which include at least a halving of global emissions of greenhouse-gases by 2050 will be considered seriously in setting a global goal for emissions reductions. Considering such circumstances, AEC set up in June 2007, Round-table Conference on the

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

Race, Caitlin [University of Minnesota; Steinbach, Michael [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Semazzi, Fred [North Carolina State University; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

An Assessment of the Primary Sources of Spread of Global Warming Estimates from Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate feedback analysis constitutes a useful framework for comparing the global mean surface temperature responses to an external forcing predicted by general circulation models (GCMs). Nevertheless, the contributions of the different radiative ...

Jean-Louis Dufresne; Sandrine Bony

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mapping High Sea Winds from Space: A Global Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High winds at sea are feared by sailors, but their distribution is poorly known because ships have avoided them as much as possible. The accumulation of spaceborne scatterometer measurements now allows a global mapping of high winds over the ...

Takeaki Sampe; Shang-Ping Xie

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination of the conventional linkage that begins with northward Ekman transport and extends to the North Atlantic (NA) overturning, the author investigates a new linkage that begins with the Southern Hemisphere (SH) sea-ice – ocean interaction perturbed by the anomalous SO winds and extends to the SH overturning, the response of the NA overturning, and the long-term baroclinic adjustment of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). How the above two linkages will interact with each other in a warming world is also investigated. An interactive momentum flux forcing, allowing for the strength of momentum flux between atmosphere and sea ice to vary in response to the simulated sea-ice conditions, enhances wind-driven ice divergence to increase the fraction of leads and polynyas, which increases dense water formation, and thus intensifies convection. Within three experimental frameworks, this increased dense water consistently increases the Antarctic Bottom Water formation, which directly intensifies the SH overturning and indirectly weakens the NA overturning. As a result of the hemispheric change in overturning circulations, the meridional density gradient across the ACC appears to increase, ultimately increasing the baroclinic part of the ACC via an enhanced thermal wind shear. Subsequently, impacts of the poleward shifted and intensified SH subpolar westerly winds (SWWs) on the global ocean circulation are investigated in phases. When the SWWs are only shifted poleward, the effect of the anomalous winds is transmitted to the northern NA, decreasing both the NA overturning and the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) outflow. However, when the SWWs are shifted poleward and intensified, this effect is cut off by the intensified Deacon cell overturning, and is not transmitted to the northern NA, and instead increases the NADW outflow substantially. To sum up, with respect to the SO winds perturbed by the global warming, the SH overturning cell and the NADW outflow increase, leading to an increase in the volume transport of the ACC.

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental and theoretical investigations on the warm-up of a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp  

SciTech Connect

Modern high-pressure discharge lamps are forced to provide instant light and hot relight capabilities - if possible at lower power units. A detailed understanding of the warm-up of high-pressure discharge lamps is therefore required. Complex fluid model codes were developed for the past years including more and more processes like two-dimensional treatment of convection trying to provide a more comprehensive and consistent description of high-pressure discharge lamps. However, there is a lack of experimental data to examine the performance of these models. This work provides a very complete set of geometrical, electrical, spectroscopic, and thermographic data according to the warm-up of a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp that is compared to the results of a state of the art fluid code. Quantitative agreement is achieved for single parameters like wall temperatures. But the paper also reveals the need for further investigations and improvements of the code.

Zalach, J.; Franke, St.; Schoepp, H. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K. [Unite d'Etude des Milieux Ionises et Reactifs, IPEIM, rte de Kairouan, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Zissis, G. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie, 118 rte Narbonne, Bat3R2, 31062 Toulouse (France)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Response of ice and liquid water paths of tropical cyclones to global warming simulated by a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud feedback plays a key role in the future climate projection. Using global non-hydrostatic model (GNHM) simulation data for a present-day (CTL) and a warmer (GW) experiment, we estimate the contribution of tropical cyclones (TC) to ice/liquid ...

Yohei Yamada; Masaki Satoh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NOGAPS-ALPHA Simulations of the 2002 Southern Hemisphere Stratospheric Major Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-altitude version of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) spectral forecast model is used to simulate the unusual September 2002 Southern Hemisphere stratospheric major warming. Designated as NOGAPS-Advanced ...

Douglas R. Allen; Lawrence Coy; Stephen D. Eckermann; John P. McCormack; Gloria L. Manney; Timothy F. Hogan; Young-Joon Kim

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Decomposition of Feedback Contributions to Polar Warming Amplification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar surface temperatures are expected to warm 2-3 times faster than the global mean surface temperature; a phenomenon referred to as polar warming amplification. Therefore, understanding individual process contributions to the polar warming is ...

Patrick C. Taylor; Ming Cai; Aixue Hu; Jerry Meehl; Warren Washington; Guang J. Zhang

183

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

184

Incorporating global warming risks in power sector planning: A case study of the New England region. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Growing international concern over the threat of global climate change has led to proposals to buy insurance against this threat by reducing emissions of carbon (short for carbon dioxide) and other greenhouse gases below current levels. Concern over these and other, non-climatic environmental effects of electricity generation has led a number of states to adopt or explore new mechanisms for incorporating environmental externalities in utility resource planning. For example, the New York and Massachusetts utility commissions have adopted monetized surcharges (or adders) to induce emission reductions of federally regulated air pollutants (notably, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates) beyond federally mandated levels. These regulations also include preliminary estimates of the cost of reducing carbon emissions, for which no federal regulations exist at this time. Within New England, regulators and utilities have also held several workshops and meetings to discuss alternative methods of incorporating externalities as well as the feasibility of regional approaches. This study examines the potential for reduced carbon emissions in the New England power sector as well as the cost and rate impacts of two policy approaches: environmental externality surcharges and a target- based approach. We analyze the following questions: Does New England have sufficient low-carbon resources to achieve significant reductions (10% to 20% below current levels) in fossil carbon emissions in its utility sector? What reductions could be achieved at a maximum? What is the expected cost of carbon reductions as a function of the reduction goal? How would carbon reduction strategies affect electricity rates? How effective are environmental externality cost surcharges as an instrument in bringing about carbon reductions? To what extent could the minimization of total electricity costs alone result in carbon reductions relative to conventional resource plans?

Krause, F.; Busch, J.; Koomey, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Could global warming affect space weather? : case studies of intense ionospheric plasma turbulence associated with natural heat sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on observations of a series of highly-structured ionospheric plasma turbulence over Arecibo on the nights of 22/23 and 23/24 July, 2006. Incoherent scatter measurements by Arecibo radar, airglow measurements using ...

Pradipta, Rezy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The challenge of global warming  

SciTech Connect

This book summarizes the scientific aspects of the greenhouse effect and climatic change, explains why the issue is important, and shows that there are measures which, if implemented soon, can reduce the social, economic, environmental, and political impact of changing climate.

Abrahamson, D.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Diet, Energy, and Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The energy consumption of animal- and plant-based diets and, more broadly, the range of energetic planetary footprints spanned by reasonable dietary choices are compared. It is demonstrated that the greenhouse gas emissions of various diets vary by as much as the difference between owning an average sedan versus a sport-utility vehicle under typical driving conditions. The authors conclude with a brief review of the safety of plant-based diets, and find no reasons for concern. KEYWORDS: Diet; Energy consumption; Public health

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide when you burn the gasoline in your car. ? ? #12;#12;WHERE DOES YOUR ELECTRIC ENERGY COME FROM? 50 40 30 20 10 0 PercentofTotal Coal Natural Gas Oil Hydro Geothermal Solar Wind Biomass Nuclear SOURCES

Schwartz, Stephen E.

190

Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST is producing new suites of primary gas standards for carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide in air at atmospheric levels ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Global Warming* The Perfect Storm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrates Shale Oil Tar Sands ? ** #12;Caption if needed #12;"Free Will" Alternative 1. Phase Out Coal CO2 Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100 300 0 500 *Oil & gas from EIA ** Unconventional oil & gas; uncertain, could be large Other Methane

Hansen, James E.

192

Diet, Energy, and Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy consumption of animal- and plant-based diets and, more broadly, the range of energetic planetary footprints spanned by reasonable dietary choices are compared. It is demonstrated that the greenhouse gas emissions of various diets vary ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Global Warming: A Reduced Threat?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One popular and apocalyptic vision of the world influenced by increasing concentrations of infrared-absorbing trace gases is that of ecological disaster brought about by rapidly rising temperatures, sea level, and evaporation rates. This vision ...

Patrick J. Michaels; David E. Stooksbury

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Global Warming: Connecting the Dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Conservation More Efficient Technology Life Style Changes 2. Renewable & CO2-Free Energy Hydro Solar, Wind) Carbon Tax/Technology Investment, (3) Energy Efficiency Standards, (4) NAS study on ice sheets, (5 for CO2 Emissions and Climate Change #12;Methods to Reduce CO2 Emissions 1. Energy Efficiency

Hansen, James E.

195

Greenhouse warming and the tropical water budget  

SciTech Connect

The present work takes issue with some of the theses of Lindzen's (1990) work on global warming, arguing in particular that Lindzen's work is hampered by the use of oversimplified models. Lindzen then presents a detailed reply to these arguments, emphasizing the fundamental importance of the upper tropospheric water-vapor budget to the question of global warming. 26 refs.

Betts, A.K.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Response of monsoon precipitation in the Himalayas to global Keqin Duan,1,2,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of monsoon precipitation in the Himalayas to global warming Keqin Duan,1,2,3 Tandong Yao,4 reveals monsoon precipitation variability in the central Himalayas over the past three centuries. We found of summer monsoon precipitation in High Asia is a consequence of global warming. For the period 1900

Howat, Ian M.

197

Global Talent Program Explore High technology in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, , , , , . . , , `GE Nuclear Energy Global Outreach', , `Make, Believe', , `New Strategy, New Audience. , . . #12;20 2011 Global Talent Program 07 Nikko Cordial Securities Inc. Nikko Cordial Securities Inc. Citi

Bahk, Saewoong

198

Warm Gas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Cleanup Warm Gas Cleanup NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 5 Project Description The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established strict regulations for the trace contaminant emissions from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for trace contaminant removal were selected to meet or exceed EPA's standard limits for contaminants, as well as to avoid poisoning of: the catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas the electrodes in fuel cells selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts The objective of the NETL's ORD Warm Gas Cleanup project is to assist in achieving both DOE and EPA targets for trace contaminant capture from coal gasification, while preserving the high thermal efficiency of the IGCC system. To achieve this, both lab and pilot-scale research is underway to develop sorbents capable of removing the following contaminants from high temperature syngas (up to 550°F):

199

Hurricane Prediction with a High Resolution Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global spectral model is used to carry out a number of short to medium range prediction experiments with global datasets. The primary objective of these studies is to examine the formation and motion of the hurricanes/typhoons with a fairly ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; D. Oosterhof; Nancy Dignon

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Global warming potentials; Part 7 of 7 supporting documents. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the general guidelines for voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Public review draft  

SciTech Connect

This document provides methods to account for the different effects of different gases on the atmosphere. It discusses the rationale and uses for simplified measures to represent human-related effects on climate and provides a brief introduction to a major index, the global warming potential (GWP) index. Appendix 7.A analyzes the science underlying the development of indices for concerns about climate, which is still evolving, evaluates the usefulness of currently available indices, and presents the state of the art for numerical indices and their uncertainties. For concerns about climate, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been instrumental in examining relative indices for comparing the radiative influences of greenhouse gases. The IPCC developed the concept of GWPs to provide a simple representation of the relative effects on climate resulting from a unit mass emission of a greenhouse gas. Alternative measures and variations on the definition of GWPs have also been considered and reported.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Global warming. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Toxic Substances and Environmental Oversight of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, December 10, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Scientists and public officials testified at a hearing held to explore the evidence and speculation that a warming trend is changing the global environment that was the conclusion of a 29-nation conference of private and government scientists. The witnesses described the potential environmental destruction caused by the greenhouse effect, but also noted that technological solutions in the form of controlling gases and reforestation are available. A consensus has emerged in recent years that gases formed under the greenhouse effect will have a greater effect on climate than any other factor. The witnesses included Ralph Circerone of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Syukuro Manage of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Carl Sagan of Cornell. Two additional statements submitted for the record follow the testimony of the six witnesses.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Global Dataset of Palmer Drought Severity Index for 1870–2002: Relationship with Soil Moisture and Effects of Surface Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monthly dataset of Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) from 1870 to 2002 is derived using historical precipitation and temperature data for global land areas on a 2.5° grid. Over Illinois, Mongolia, and parts of China and the former Soviet ...

Aiguo Dai; Kevin E. Trenberth; Taotao Qian

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, and then varies roughly as $n^{1/2}$ for higher densities.} {The global statistical properties of such molecular clouds are reasonably consistent with observational determinations. Our numerical simulations suggest that molecular clouds formed by the moderately supersonic collision of warm atomic gas streams.}

P. Hennebelle; R. Banerjee; E. Vazquez-Semadeni; R. Klessen; E. Audit

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

204

Estimation of Surface Solar Global Radiation from NOAA AVHRR Data in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physical method for estimating the instantaneous global irradiance and daily cumulative insolation based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data was developed and tested at high latitudes in a boreal subarctic region. The satellite ...

Vesa Laine; Ari Venäläinen; Martti Heikinheimo; Otto Hyvärinen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Studies say - tentatively - that greenhouse warming is here  

SciTech Connect

Published studies on greenhouse warming have been ambivalent as to whether warming has arrived. Now two independent studies of the climate record have incriminated the green-house effect in global warming, although they fall short of convicting it. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg are confident they have exonerated natural climatic variability, saying the observed global warming seems to large to account for the warming effect. A group from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory directly implicates greenhouse warming by finding its geographic `fingerprinting` in the climate record of the past century. This article discusses both studies and how the results will affect future concerns in the area of greenhouse warming.

Kerr, R.A.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Addendum to Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Effect of 1992 revision of global warming potential (GWP) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  

SciTech Connect

This addendum contains 2 important messages. (1) This document supersedes all previous versions of this work. Please do not use any older versions any more. (2) The atmospheric-science community now believes that it cannot estimate confidently the ''Global Warming Potentials'' (GWPs) of the indirect effects of greenhouse gases. A GWP is a number that converts a mass-unit emission of a greenhouse gas other than CO{sub 2} into the mass amount of CO{sub 2} that has an equivalent warming effect over a given period of time. This report refers to GWPs as ''CO{sub 2}-equivalency factors.'' For example, a forthcoming report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change disavows many of the GWPs estimated in an earlier IPCC report, and states that GWPs for the indirect effects of the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases cannot be estimated accurately yet. However, this does not mean that in principle there are no GWPs for the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases; rather, it means that some of the GWPs are uncertain, and that the earlier IPCC estimates of the GWPs may or may not turn out to be right (albeit, in at lease one case, discussed in this paper, the earlier estimates almost certainly will be wrong). In this report the author used the IPCC's 1990 estimates of the GWPs for 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons, and expressed the bottom-line results for each of these three time horizons. However, the recent uncertainty about the GWPs affects how you should interpret the results. Because the IPCC has disclaimed some of its GWPs, the GWPs as a group no longer are the best estimates of the warming effects over 20, 100, and 500 years. Instead, they are just a collection of possible values for the GWPs--in short, scenarios. Therefore, you should interpret the ''20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons'' as three general GWP scenarios--say, scenarios, A, B, and C.--and not as time-period scenarios. For example, you should not think that the results shown here under the ''100-year time horizon'' actually embody the scientific community's best estimates of the relative warming potentials of the various greenhouse gases over a 100-year period. Instead, you should understand the results to be the outcome of making a particular set of assumptions about what the GWPs might be. The ''time horizons'' no longer necessarily represent time horizons, but rather general scenarios for, or assumptions about, the GWPs.

DeLuchi, M. A.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sensitivities and Mechanisms of the Zonal Mean Atmospheric Circulation Response to Tropical Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although El Nińo and global warming are both characterized by warming in the tropical upper troposphere, the latitudinal changes of the Hadley cell edge and midlatitude eddy-driven jet are opposite in sign. Using an idealized dry atmospheric model,...

Lantao Sun; Gang Chen; Jian Lu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Enhanced NOAA Global Land Dataset from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global mapped data of reflected radiation in the visible (0.63 ?m) and near-infrared (0.85 ?m) wavebands of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites have been ...

Garik Gutman; Dan Tarpley; Aleksandr Ignatov; Steve Olson

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Leo Archipelago: A System of Earth-Rings for Communications, Mass-Transport to Space, Solar Power, and Control of Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many major problems hindering man's quest to get into space. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the ring systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A Low-Earth-Orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring," is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., communications, space solar power, radiation dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, potential applications, and trade-offs associated with an earlier model. The impact of Colossal Carbon Tubes, CCT, a material with high tensile strength, extremely-low density, and other favorable properties and new technologies (e.g., solar-powered lasers, power beaming to near-space and earth, and thermal-control systems) on the development of associated LEO-Ring systems (e.g., "Solar-Shade Rings" and "Power Rings") is also explored. The material's effect on the timeline for the system development indicates the feasibility of near-term implementation of the system (possibly within the decade). The Sling-on-a-Ring can provide a less-expensive, environment-friendly, mode of access to space. This would pave the way (via eventual operation at >1000 tonnes per day by 2050) for large scale development of space-based technologies.

Andrew Meulenberg; Karthik Balaji

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Conversion efficiency, scaling and global optimization of high harmonic generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closed form expressions for the high harmonic generation (HHG) conversion efficiency in the plateau and cut-off region are derived showing agreement with previous observations. Application of these results to optimal ...

Falcao-Filho, Edilson L.

211

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

212

High-Latitude Filtering in Global Grid-Point Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latitude-longitude grid-point models with explicit time schemes require filtering of unstable short waves at high latitudes to avoid the use of prohibitively short time steps. Using a shallow water model and a Rossby–Haurwitz wave as an initial ...

Lawrence L. Takacs; Ramesh C. Balgovind

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Three-Dimensional Studies of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Milky Way using WHAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) is a high throughput Fabry-Perot facility developed specifically to detect and explore the warm, ionized component of the interstellar medium at high spectral resolution. It began operating at Kitt Peak, Arizona in 1997 and has recently completed the WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS), providing the first global view of the distribution and kinematics of the warm, diffuse H II in the Milky Way. This H-alpha survey reveals a complex spatial and kinematic structure in the warm ionized medium and provides a foundation for studies of the temperature and ionization state of the gas, the spectrum and strength of the ionizing radiation, and its relationship to other components of the interstellar medium and sources of ionization and heating within the Galactic disk and halo. More information about WHAM and the Survey can be found at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/.

R. J. Reynolds; L. M. Haffner; G. J. Madsen

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Three-Dimensional Studies of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Milky Way using WHAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) is a high throughput Fabry-Perot facility developed specifically to detect and explore the warm, ionized component of the interstellar medium at high spectral resolution. It began operating at Kitt Peak, Arizona in 1997 and has recently completed the WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS), providing the first global view of the distribution and kinematics of the warm, diffuse H II in the Milky Way. This H-alpha survey reveals a complex spatial and kinematic structure in the warm ionized medium and provides a foundation for studies of the temperature and ionization state of the gas, the spectrum and strength of the ionizing radiation, and its relationship to other components of the interstellar medium and sources of ionization and heating within the Galactic disk and halo. More information about WHAM and the Survey can be found at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the errors in disaster planning, preparation and response to2. Government Response to Disasters .. HEAT WAVEgov- ernment response to the disaster, and the vastly larger

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reluctant to turn on their air conditioning. 91 83. NationalB. The Importance of Air Conditioning .. 1. Coolinga. Air Conditioning Required . b. ' Funding

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Combating global warming while the Senate fiddles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No action in Congress? A simpler, more effective solution would be to allow utilities to use existing economic dispatch but require cost to include a price of pollution. Dispatchers would use current pricing models to calibrate the costs of various plants, so that cheaper units equal cleaner units. Working within current rules avoids the complexity of EPA regulation and the disruption of enacting new dispatch rules. It offers a more comprehensive solution than state-by-state permit proceedings. (author)

Rokach, Joshua Z.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Wednesday, December 8, 2010 Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rising and people in developing countries are consuming more energy per capita... ...and more demand, but not renewable) Energy consumption is rising faster than the renewables are growing, so more oil, coal that are emitted directly to air So this is $100 per 400 gallons, or 25 cents per gallon. Per capita emissions

Toohey, Darin W.

219

Large-Scale Dynamics and Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of future climate change raise a variety of issues in large-scale atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. Several of these are reviewed in this essay, including the sensitivity of the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean to increasing ...

Isaac M. Held

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Style Changes 2. Renewable & CO2-Free Energy Hydro Solar, Wind, Geothermal Nuclear 3. CO2 Capture #12;Methods to Reduce CO2 Emissions 1. Energy Efficiency & Conservation More Efficient Technology Life

Hansen, James E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment High-resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new generation of integrated sea surface temperature (SST) data products are being provided by the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) High-Resolution SST Pilot Project (GHRSST-PP). These combine in near–real time various SST data ...

C. Donlon; N. Rayner; I. Robinson; D. J. S. Poulter; K. S. Casey; J. Vazquez-Cuervo; E. Armstrong; A. Bingham; O. Arino; C. Gentemann; D. May; P. LeBorgne; J. Piollé; I. Barton; H. Beggs; C. J. Merchant; S. Heinz; A. Harris; G. Wick; B. Emery; P. Minnett; R. Evans; D. Llewellyn-Jones; C. Mutlow; R. W. Reynolds; H. Kawamura

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable resolution global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable resolution global climate understand regional aspects of the South Asian monsoon rainfall distribution and the interactions between monsoon circulation and precipitation. For this purpose, two sets of ten member realizations are produced

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

223

Pacific Ocean Heat Transport at 24°N in a High-Resolution Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meridional heat transport in the North Pacific Ocean in a seasonally forced high-resolution global ocean general circulation model is compared to observations. At 24°N, annual mean heat transport in the model of 0.37×1011W is half the most recent ...

John L. Wilkin; James V. Mansbridge; J. Stuart Godfrey

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Estimating impacts of warming temperatures on California's electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impacts of warming temperatures on California's electricity impacts of warming temperatures on California's electricity system Title Estimating impacts of warming temperatures on California's electricity system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sathaye, Jayant A., Larry L. Dale, Peter H. Larsen, Gary A. Fitts, Kevin Koy, Sarah M. Lewis, and André Frossard Pereira de Lucena Journal Global Environmental Change Volume 23 Start Page 499 Issue 2 Pagination 499-511 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords EES-EG, electricity markets and policy group Abstract Despite a clear need, little research has been carried out at the regional-level to quantify potential climate-related impacts to electricity production and delivery systems. This paper introduces a bottom-up study of climate change impacts on California's energy infrastructure, including high temperature effects on power plant capacity, transmission lines, substation capacity, and peak electricity demand. End-of-century impacts were projected using the A2 and B1 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenarios. The study quantifies the effect of high ambient temperatures on electricity generation, the capacity of substations and transmission lines, and the demand for peak power for a set of climate scenarios. Based on these scenarios, atmospheric warming and associated peak demand increases would necessitate up to 38% of additional peak generation capacity and up to 31% additional transmission capacity, assuming current infrastructure. These findings, although based on a limited number of scenarios, suggest that additional funding could be put to good use by supporting R&D into next generation cooling equipment technologies, diversifying the power generation mix without compromising the system's operational flexibility, and designing effective demand side management programs.

225

Land–Ocean Warming Contrast over a Wide Range of Climates: Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Theory and Idealized Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface temperatures increase at a greater rate over land than ocean in simulations and observations of global warming. It has previously been proposed that this land–ocean warming contrast is related to different changes in lapse rates over land ...

Michael P. Byrne; Paul A. O’Gorman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Why the Earth has not warmed as much as expected?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) over the industrial era is less than 40% of that expected from observed increases in long-lived greenhouse gases together with the best-estimate equilibrium climate sensitivity given by the 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Possible reasons for this warming discrepancy are systematically examined here. The warming discrepancy is found to be due mainly to some combination of two factors: the IPCC best estimate of climate sensitivity being too high and/or the greenhouse gas forcing being partially offset by forcing by increased concentrations of atmospheric aerosols; the increase in global heat content due to thermal disequilibrium accounts for less than 25% of the discrepancy, and cooling by natural temperature variation can account for only about 15%. Current uncertainty in climate sensitivity is shown to preclude determining the amount of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions that would be compatible with any chosen maximum allowable increase in GMST; even the sign of such allowable future emissions is unconstrained. Resolving this situation, by empirical determination of the earth's climate sensitivity from the historical record over the industrial period or through use of climate models whose accuracy is evaluted by their performance over this period, is shown to require substantial reduction in the uncertainty of aerosol forcing over this period.

Schwartz, S.E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.  

SciTech Connect

Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Variability and Trends of High Temperature, High Humidity, and Sultry Weather in the Warm Season in China during the Period 1961–2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the daily maximum air temperature and mean humidity observations at 394 surface weather stations across China, the changes in the annual number of days of high temperature weather (HTW), high humidity weather (HHW), and sultry weather (STW) ...

Xiaohui Shi; Chungu Lu; Xiangde Xu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

231

Response of Tropical Cyclones to Idealized Climate Change Experiments in a Global High-Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present an assessment of how tropical cyclone activity might change owing to the influence of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, using the U.K. High-Resolution Global Environment Model (HiGEM) with N144 resolution (~...

Ray Bell; Jane Strachan; Pier Luigi Vidale; Kevin Hodges; Malcolm Roberts

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon dioxide and global change  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an analysis and review of the many potential consequences of the rapidly rising CO{sub 2} content of Earth's atmosphere. Covering both the physical (climatic) and biological effects of atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment, the book presents an overview of the interrelated aspects of this complex and demanding subject. Focus is on the search for evidence of global warming (the highly speculative climatic greenhouse effect) and global vegetative stimulation (the well established biological greenhouse effect). The pros and cons of all issues related to these phenomena are discussed. The author's estimate of where the world is headed as a result of mankind's great geophysical experiments is offered.

Idso, S.B. (Arizona State Univ. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Global-Aware and Multi-Order Context-Based Prefetching for High-Performance Processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data prefetching is widely used in high-end computing systems to accelerate data accesses and to bridge the increasing performance gap between processor and memory. Context-based prefetching has become a primary focus of study in recent years due to its general applicability. However, current context-based prefetchers only adopt the context analysis of a single order, which suffers from low prefetching coverage and thus limits the overall prefetching effectiveness. Also, existing approaches usually consider the context of the address stream from a single instruction but not the context of the address stream from all instructions, which further limits the context-based prefetching effectiveness. In this study, we propose a new context-based prefetcher called the Global-aware and Multi-order Context-based (GMC) prefetcher. The GMC prefetcher uses multi-order, local and global context analysis to increase prefetching coverage while maintaining prefetching accuracy. In extensive simulation testing of the SPEC-CPU2006 benchmarks with an enhanced CMP$im simulator, the proposed GMC prefetcher was shown to outperform existing prefetchers and to reduce the data-access latency effectively. The average Instructions Per Cycle (IPC) improvement of SPEC CINT2006 and CFP2006 benchmarks with GMC prefetching was over 55% and 44% respectively.

Chen, Yong [ORNL; Zhu, Huaiyu [Illinois Institute of Technology; Roth, Philip C [ORNL; Jin, Hui [Illinois Institute of Technology; Sun, Xian-He [Illinois Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

PHYSICS IS THE LIBERAL ARTS OF HIGH TECH Physics for future presidents? Yes, that is a serious title. Energy, global warming,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was restricted, mineral-catalyzed Fisher-Tropsch like synthesis of hydrocarbons and CH4 may have occurred. However, asteroidal samples (chondrites) do not reveal signs of Fisher-Tropsch type synthesis (Alexander-17 to 10-9 m2 (Fisher 1998). At mid-ocean ridges on Earth and in other places where tec- tonic activity

Landweber, Laura

235

Pacific Warm Pool Temperature Regulation during TOGA COARE: Upper Ocean Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hasselmann feedback model was applied to hindcast western Pacific warm pool sea surface temperatures (SST) with heat flux observations obtained near 2°S, 156°E from October 1992 to February 1993 during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere ...

Gary S. E. Lagerloef; Roger Lukas; Robert A. Weller; Steven P. Anderson

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Warming of the North Pacific Ocean: Local Air–Sea Coupling and Remote Climatic Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, global climatic response to the North Pacific oceanic warming is investigated in a series of coupled ocean–atmosphere modeling experiments. In the model, an idealized heating is imposed over the North Pacific Ocean, while the ocean ...

Lixin Wu; Chun Li

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Planetary Wave Breaking and Tropospheric Forcing as Seen in the Stratospheric Sudden Warming of 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) of January 2006 is examined using meteorological fields from Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 (GEOS-4) analyses and forecast fields from the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction ...

Lawrence Coy; Stephen Eckermann; Karl Hoppel

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Multiscale Variability of the Atmospheric Mixed Layer over the Western Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sounding data from Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) have provided a first opportunity to document the variability of the atmospheric mixed layer over the western Pacific warm pool on ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski; Jennifer A. Cotturone

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

WARM SPRINGS, OREGON  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Warming and Freshening in the Abyssal Southeastern Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming and freshening of abyssal waters in the eastern Indian Ocean between 1994/95 and 2007 are quantified using data from two closely sampled high-quality occupations of a hydrographic section extending from Antarctica northward to the ...

Gregory C. Johnson; Sarah G. Purkey; John L. Bullister

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Diurnal Variations of Warm-Season Precipitation over Northern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the diurnal variations of the warm-season precipitation over northern China using the high-resolution precipitation products obtained from the Climate Prediction Center’s morphing technique (CMORPH) during May–August of 2003–...

Huizhong He; Fuqing Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable4 resolution global climate model5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1 2 3 High resolution simulation of the South Asian monsoon using a variable4 resolution global of the South Asian monsoon rainfall distribution and the interactions27 between monsoon circulation of resolution on the overall quality of the simulated regional33 monsoon fields. It is found that the monsoon

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

243

Response of tropical cyclones to idealized climate change experiments in a global high resolution coupled general circulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an assessment of how tropical cyclone activity might change due to the influence of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, using the UK’s High Resolution Global Environment Model (HiGEM) with N144 resolution (~90 km in the ...

Ray Bell; Jane Strachan; Pier Luigi Vidale; Kevin Hodges; Malcolm Roberts

244

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Operational Global Icosahedral–Hexagonal Gridpoint Model GME: Description and High-Resolution Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The German Weather Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst) has recently developed a new operational global numerical weather prediction model, named GME, based on an almost uniform icosahedral–hexagonal grid. The GME gridpoint approach avoids the ...

Detlev Majewski; Dörte Liermann; Peter Prohl; Bodo Ritter; Michael Buchhold; Thomas Hanisch; Gerhard Paul; Werner Wergen; John Baumgardner

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Global Ocean Circulation from Satellite Altimetry and High-Resolution Computer Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea surface elevation relative to the geoid, a dynamic boundary condition for the three-dimensional oceanic pressure field, is being determined over the global ocean every 10 days by a precision radar altimeter aboard the TOPEX/POSEIDON ...

Lee-Lueng Fu; Richard D. Smith

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Authropogenic Warming in North Alaska?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using permafrost boreholes, Lachenbruch and Marshall recently reported evidence for a 2°–4°C warming in North Alaska occurring at some undetermined time during the last century. Popular accounts suggest their findings are evidence for ...

Patrick J. Michaels; David E. Sappington; David E. Stooksbury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen K [DALLHOUSIE UNIV.; Wang, Muyin [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

On High Winds and Foehn Warming Associated with Mountain-Wave Events in the Western Foothills of the Southern Appalachian Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremely high winds of 40–49 m s?1 [90–110 miles per hour (mph)] were reported across the western foothills of the southern Appalachian Mountains on 22–23 December 2004, 17 October 2006, 24–25 February 2007, and 1 March 2007. The high winds in ...

David M. Gaffin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? January 23, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis An efficient heater can save money and energy while keeping you warmer. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20288. An efficient heater can save money and energy while keeping you warmer. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20288. Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How can I participate? Get an energy audit and learn about your heating options to warm your home while saving money. Last week, I turned on the weather forecast to find that the entire central United States was hovering somewhere between 5 and 20 degrees. Talk about frigid! I've lived all over the country, and I know how incredibly miserable it is to do anything when the high barely ekes above 0 degrees

251

Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? Are You Keeping Warm This Winter? January 23, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis An efficient heater can save money and energy while keeping you warmer. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20288. An efficient heater can save money and energy while keeping you warmer. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20288. Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How can I participate? Get an energy audit and learn about your heating options to warm your home while saving money. Last week, I turned on the weather forecast to find that the entire central United States was hovering somewhere between 5 and 20 degrees. Talk about frigid! I've lived all over the country, and I know how incredibly miserable it is to do anything when the high barely ekes above 0 degrees

252

High-Resolution Downscaled Simulations of Warm-Season Extreme Precipitation Events in the Colorado Front Range under Past and Future Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution case-based approach for dynamically downscaling climate model data is presented. Extreme precipitation events are selected from regional climate model (RCM) simulations of past and future time periods. Each event is further ...

Kelly Mahoney; Michael Alexander; James D. Scott; Joseph Barsugli

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Earth observations and global change decision making, 1990: A national partnership. Vol. 2  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented on multispectral sensor technology to monitor global change, the global change master directory, application of the dynamic systems-engineering process to global change initiative data systems, and global change and biodiversity loss. Also considered are rational guidelines for national and international decision about global warming, and the dissemination of global change research data available to educators.

Ginsberg, I.W.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.; (Michigan, Environmental Research Institute, Ann Arbor; Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global mean surface temperature ...

Brian E. J. Rose; David Ferreira

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Diagnosis of the Warm Rain Process in Cloud-Resolving Models Using Joint CloudSat and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the warm rain formation process in global and regional cloud-resolving models. Methodologies developed to analyze CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations are employed to ...

Kentaroh Suzuki; Graeme L. Stephens; Susan C. van den Heever; Takashi Y. Nakajima

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Particle Growth and Drop Collection Efficiency of Warm Clouds as Inferred from Joint CloudSat and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes an approach for combining CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations to investigate the microphysical processes of warm clouds on the global scale. MODIS column optical thickness ...

Kentaroh Suzuki; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Graeme L. Stephens

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ocean Warming Effect on Surface Gravity Wave Climate Change for the End of the Twenty-First Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface wind (U10) and significant wave height (Hs) response to global warming are investigated using a coupled atmosphere–wave model by perturbing the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) with anomalies generated by the Working Group on Coupled ...

Yalin Fan; Isaac M. Held; Shian-Jiann Lin; Xiaolan L. Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

259

Ocean Warming effect on Surface Gravity Wave Climate Change for the end of the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface wind (U10) and significant wave height (Hs) response to global warming are investigated using a coupled atmosphere-wave model by perturbing the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) with anomalies generated by WGCM CMIP-3 coupled models that use ...

Yalin Fan; Isaac M. Held; Shian-Jiann Lin; Xiaolan L. Wang

260

ENSO Warm (El Nińo) and Cold (La Nińa) Event Life Cycles: Ocean Surface Anomaly Patterns, Their Symmetries, Asymmetries, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies by the authors have described the composite global marine surface anomalies of ENSO warm (El Nińo) events and cold (La Nińa) events. Here the similarities and differences in these life cycles are examined. Qualitatively different ...

Narasimhan K. Larkin; D. E. Harrison

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Policy implications of greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

Contents: background; the greenhouse gases and their effects; policy framework; adaptation; mitigation; international considerations; findings and conclusions; recommendations; questions and answers about greenhouse warming; background information on synthesis panel members and professional staff; and membership lists for effects, mitigation, and adaptation panels.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Rethinking Tropical Ocean Response to Global Warming: The Enhanced Equatorial Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of tropical Pacific SST to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is reexamined with a new focus on the latitudinal SST gradient. Available evidence, mainly from climate models, suggests that an important tropical SST fingerprint to ...

Zhengyu Liu; Steve Vavrus; Feng He; Na Wen; Yafang Zhong

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

U.K. HiGEM: The New U.K. High-Resolution Global Environment Model—Model Description and Basic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the development and evaluation of the U.K.’s new High-Resolution Global Environmental Model (HiGEM), which is based on the latest climate configuration of the Met Office Unified Model, known as the Hadley Centre Global ...

L. C. Shaffrey; I. Stevens; W. A. Norton; M. J. Roberts; P. L. Vidale; J. D. Harle; A. Jrrar; D. P. Stevens; M. J. Woodage; M. E. Demory; J. Donners; D. B. Clark; A. Clayton; J. W. Cole; S. S. Wilson; W. M. Connolley; T. M. Davies; A. M. Iwi; T. C. Johns; J. C. King; A. L. New; J. M. Slingo; A. Slingo; L. Steenman-Clark; G. M. Martin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Why Are There Tropical Warm Pools?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical warm pools appear as the primary mode in the distribution of tropical sea surface temperature (SST). Most previous studies have focused on the role of atmospheric processes in homogenizing temperatures in the warm pool and establishing ...

Amy C. Clement; Richard Seager; Raghu Murtugudde

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

266

SUBTASK 7.2 GLOBAL WARMING AND GREEHOUSE GASES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of current climatic trends and reconstruction of paleoclimatic conditions for Devils Lake have been conducted based on diatom-inferred salinity for the last 2000 years. The 3-year cross-disciplinary research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was carried out by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and St. Croix Watershed Research Station (SCWRS) at the Science Museum of Minnesota. The results indicate that frequent climatic fluctuations resulting in alternating periods of drought and wet conditions are typical for the northern Great Plains and suggest that the severity and length of extremes exceeded those on modern record. Devils Lake has experienced five fresh periods and two minor freshening periods in the last 2000 years. Transitions between fresh and saline periods have been relatively fast, representing lake level changes that have been similar to those observed in the last 150 years. From 0 to 1070 A.D., Devils Lake showed more variable behavior, with fresh phases centered at 200, 500, 700, and 1000 A.D. From 1070 A.D. to present, Devils Lake was generally saline, experiencing two minor freshening periods at 1305-1315 and 1800-1820 A.D and the major current freshening from 1960 A.D. to present.

Jaroslav Solc; Kurt Eylands; Jaroslav Solc Jr.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Global warming: An energy technology R and D challenge  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that two major uncertainties cloud the picture of future energy technology needs: (1) growth of energy demand and (2) the seriousness and urgency of the Greenhouse effect. The outlook for research and development (R and D) projects to meet the problems resulting from these two uncertainties is great. Even if the problems do not exist, new and better energy sources that reduce CO{sub 2} emissions are very desirable. Funds to finance R and D in this field should come from a combination of effort from private and public sector. 16 refs., 2 figs.

Fulkerson, W.; Reister, D.B.; Auerbach, S.I.; Perry, A.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Crane, A.T. (Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (USA)); Kash, D.E. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (USA))

1989-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Global Warming Pattern Formation: Sea Surface Temperature and Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial variations in sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall changes over the tropics are investigated based on ensemble simulations for the first half of the twenty-first century under the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenario A1B with ...

Shang-Ping Xie; Clara Deser; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Jian Ma; Haiyan Teng; Andrew T. Wittenberg

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Global Warming and the Weakening of the Tropical Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the response of the tropical atmospheric and oceanic circulation to increasing greenhouse gases using a coordinated set of twenty-first-century climate model experiments performed for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Brian J. Soden

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 - AUGUST 2009 8 - AUGUST 2009 This is a compilation of the past year's monthly National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Newsletter. The newsletter is produced by the NETL to provide information on activities and publications related to carbon sequestration. It covers domestic, international, public sector, and private sector news. This compilation covers newsletters issued between September 2008 and August 2009. It highlights the primary news and events that have taken place in the carbon sequestration arena over the past year. Information that has become outdated (e.g. conference dates, paper submittals, etc.) was removed. To navigate this document please use the Bookmarks tab or the Acrobat search tool (Ctrl+F). To subscribe to this newsletter, please visit:

271

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

272

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON STORAGE CARBON STORAGE NEWSLETTER: ANNUAL INDEX (FORMERLY THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION NEWSLETTER) SEPTEMBER 2012 - AUGUST 2013 This is a compilation of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) monthly Carbon Storage Newsletter published over the last year. The newsletter is produced by NETL to provide information on activities and publications related to carbon storage. It covers domestic, international, public sector, and private sector news. This compilation covers newsletters issued from September 2012 to August 2013. Outdated Information (e.g., conference dates, paper submittals, etc.) has been removed. To navigate this document, please use the Bookmarks tab or the Acrobat search tool (Ctrl+F). For more information on DOE's Carbon Storage Program, click here.

273

Global Warming And Lifestyle Choices: A Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lifestyle analysis with car usage. I will criticizecould interpret the usage of the same car as a contribution

Schuetzenmeister, Falk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANNUAL INDEX SEPTEMBER 2011 - AUGUST 2012 This is a compilation of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter published over the...

275

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEPTEMBER 2006 - AUGUST 2007 This is a compilation of the past year's monthly National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Newsletter. The newsletter is produced...

276

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEPTEMBER 2005 - AUGUST 2006 This is a compilation of the past year's monthly National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Newsletter. The newsletter is produced...

277

On Modification of Global Warming by Sulfate Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increasing evidence that the response of climate to increasing greenhouse gases may be modified by accompanying increases in sulfate aerosols. In this study, the patterns of response in the surface climatology of a coupled ocean–...

J. F. B. Mitchell; T. C. Johns

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sector, nine from iron and steel, 18 from cement, 16 from ammonia, and three from oil refinery) are estimated and their total emission amounts to 231.7 MtCO 2 year with...

279

GOVERNMENT Steps Up Fight to Curb Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which holds approximately 75 percent in the project. Located at Statoil's Mongstad oil refinery in Norway, the CO 2 Technology Centre would have access to flue gas from the...

280

Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming  

SciTech Connect

It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

Steinberg, M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Minimizing the Global Warming Impact of Industrial Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 4, 2010... widely used in air conditioning and the manufacturing of electronics, ... spectrum through which radiation from Earth is released into space.

282

ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Evans, Jason

283

Global Warming And Lifestyle Choices: A Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The case of electric and hybrid cars’. Utilities Policy 16(The environmental effect of hybrid cars has been overrated (recycling, driving a hybrid-car). If sustainable behavior

Schuetzenmeister, Falk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ozone Depletion and Global Warming an Integrated Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Time frame for decommissioning Weight equivalent for replacements Halon 1301 ODP 16 ... for future destruction. Time frame for decommissioning ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sands, Oil Shale, Methane Hydrates. Coal phase-out by 2030 peak CO2 ~400-425 ppm, depending on oil sands, oil shale, and methane hydrates potentially contain an even greater amount of carbon, but most" = Tar Sands, Oil Shale, Methane Hydrates Coal phase-out by 2030 peak CO2 ~400-425 ppm, depending on oil

Hansen, James E.

286

DOES FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION LEAD TO GLOBAL WARMING?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By acceptance of this article, the publisher and/or recipient acknowledges the U.S. Government's right to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper. This research was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH00016.

Stephen E. Schwartz; Stephen E. Schwartz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy and Global Warming Impacts of CFC Alternative Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FONCTIONNANT AVEC DES MELANGES ALTERNATIFS ZEOTROPES DE FLUIDES FRIGORIGENES............................... 77 (différence moyenne de température) ODP Ozone Depletion Potential (PAOS) ORC Organic Rankine Cycle PAC Pompe à compression mécanique de vapeur (CMV), cycles de Rankine organiques (ORC) ou à basse pression de vapeur d

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

288

Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Permian­Triassic boundary in the continental realm of the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa, Palaeoworld­Triassic boundary in the continental realm of the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa Louise Coneya,, W. Uwe Reimolda Province) in the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa, have been undertaken to provide further input

Svensen, Henrik

289

The Stability of the Thermohaline Circulation in Global Warming Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified climate model of the coupled ocean–atmosphere system is used to perform extensive sensitivity studies concerning possible future climate change induced by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Supplemented with an active ...

Andreas Schmittner; Thomas F. Stocker

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Climate Protection and Green Economy Act, Global Warming Solutions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

establish a regional greenhouse gas registry. Emissions reporting is required from generation sources producing electricity that is consumed in the Commonwealth, as well as from...

291

ViewpointGlobal warming toward open educational resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seeking to realize the potential for significantly improving and advancing the world's standard of education.

Richard G. Baraniuk; C. Sidney Burrus

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Generation of warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas using the High Radiation on Materials facility at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dedicated facility named High Radiation on Materials (HiRadMat) is being constructed at CERN to study the interaction of the 450 GeV protons generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) with fixed solid targets of different materials. The main purpose of these future experiments is to study the generation and propagation of thermal shock waves in the target in order to assess the damage caused to the equipment, including collimators and absorbers, in case of an accident involving an uncontrolled release of the entire beam at a given point. Detailed numerical simulations of the beam-target interaction of several cases of interest have been carried out. In this paper we present simulations of the thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of a solid tungsten cylindrical target that is facially irradiated with the SPS beam with nominal parameters. These calculations have been carried out in two steps. First, the energy loss of the protons is calculated in the solid target using the FLUKA code (Fasso et al....

Tahir, N A; Brugger, M; Assmann, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E; Deutsch, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Towards an Improved High Resolution Global Long-Term Solar Resource Database  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of an ongoing project to develop and deliver a solar mapping processing system to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using the data sets that are planned for production at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NCDC will be producing a long-term radiance and cloud property data set covering the globe every three hours at an approximate resolution of 10 x 10 km. NASA, the originators of the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy web portal are collaborating with SUNY-Albany to develop the production system and solar algorithms. The initial result will be a global long-term solar resource data set spanning over 25 years. The ultimate goal of the project is to also deliver this data set and production system to NREL for continual production. The project will also assess the impact of providing these new data to several NREL solar decision support tools.

Stackhouse, Jr., P. W.; Cox, S. J.; Chandler, W. S.; Hoell, J. M.; Zhang, T.; Westberg, D.; Perez, R.; Hemker, C.; Schlemmer, J.; Renne, D.; Sengupta, M; Bates, J.; Knapp, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramicâ?˘ and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumiledsâ?? LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

Decai Sun

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Prediction of domestic warm-water consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents methodologies able to predict dynamic warm water consumption in district heating systems, using time-series analysis. A simulation model according to the day of a week has been chosen for modeling the domestic warm water consumption ... Keywords: autoregressive model, district heating systems, domestic warm water, prediction, simulation, time series models

Elena Serban; Daniela Popescu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: might they be connected  

SciTech Connect

Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {+-} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming.

Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M. (Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A7)

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Potential bias of model projected greenhouse warming in irrigated regions  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) used to project climate responses to increased CO{sub 2} generally omit irrigation of agricultural land. Using the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to a slab-ocean model, we find that inclusion of an extreme irrigation scenario has a small effect on the simulated temperature and precipitation response to doubled CO{sub 2} in most regions, but reduced warming by as much as 1 C in some agricultural regions, such as Europe and India. This interaction between CO{sub 2} and irrigation occurs in cases where agriculture is a major fraction of the land surface and where, in the absence of irrigation, soil moisture declines are projected to provide a positive feedback to temperature change. The reduction of warming is less than 25% of the temperature increase modeled for doubled CO{sub 2} in most regions; thus greenhouse warming will still be dominant. However, the results indicate that land use interactions may be an important component of climate change uncertainty in some agricultural regions. While irrigated lands comprise only {approx}2% of the land surface, they contribute over 40% of global food production. Climate changes in these regions are therefore particularly important to society despite their relatively small contribution to average global climate.

Lobell, D; Bala, G; Bonfils, C; Duffy, P

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Scientific Basis and Initial Evaluation of the CLAVR-1 Global Clear/Cloud Classification Algorithm for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for the remote sensing of global cloud cover using multispectral radiance measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting ...

Larry L. Stowe; Paul A. Davis; E. Paul McClain

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tropical Cyclogenesis Factors in a Warming Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the underlying causes of tropical cyclone formation is crucial to predicting tropical cyclone behavior in a warming environment, given the Earth's current warming trend. This study examines two sets of simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model version 3.1 (CAM3): one with aerosol forcings and one without. We looked at how four factors known to be important to tropical cyclone formation vary as carbon dioxde and the ensuing temperature changes increase to very high levels. These factors include Maximum Potential Intensity (MPI), mid-tropospheric moisture content, 200-850 mb vertical wind shear, and 850 mb absolute vorticity. We considered different representations of mid-tropospheric moisture by examining both relative humidity and chi, a non-dimensional measure of the saturation entropy deficit at 600 mb. We also looked at different combinations of these factors, including several variations of a Genesis Potential Index (GPI) and an incubation parameter, gamma, that is related to the length of time required to saturate the middle troposphere and aid tropical cyclogenesis. Higher MPI, lower saturation deficits and higher relative humidity, lower wind shear, and higher absolute vorticity all act to enhance the GPI and lower the incubation time, meaning larger environmental support for tropical cyclone development and intensification. In areas where tropical cyclone development is prevalent today, we found that shear generally decreased, but MPI decreased, absolute vorticity decreased, and the saturation deficit increases. Thus, in today's prevalent tropical cyclone regions, conditions become less favorable for development and intensification as the climate warms. On the other hand, genesis regions tend to push northward into the subtropics, as conditions become much more favorable for development up to ~40 degrees North due to both decreased wind shear and much higher MPI values.

Cathey, Stephen Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar thermal, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have high maximum theoretical efficiencies; experimental systems fall short because of losses by selective solar absorbers and TPV selective emitters. To ...

Chester, David A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

303

Telecontrol of Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscope over Global IPv6 Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Osaka University has an Ultra-High VoltageElectron Microscope (UHVEM) which can provide highquality specimen images for worldwide researchers. Forusability improvements, we have worked on thetelecontrol of the UHVEM. In this paper, we would liketo introduce ...

Toyokazu Akiyama; Shinji Shimojo; Shojiro Nishio; Yoshinori Kitatsuji; Steven Peltier; Thomas Hutton; Fang-Pang Lin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Tropical Warm Pool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre Mather, James Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Jakob, Christian BMRC One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) in the area around Darwin in late 2005 and early 2006. The aims of the experiment will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment design includes an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with a large range of low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing

305

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

306

Global dynamics of high area-to-mass ratios GEO space debris by means of the MEGNO indicator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we provide an extensive analysis of the global dynamics of high-area-to-mass ratios geosynchronous (GEO) space debris, applying a recent technique developed by Cincotta et al. (2000), Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO), which provides an efficient tool to investigate both regular and chaotic components of the phase space. We compute a stability atlas, for a large set of near-geosynchronous space debris by numerically computing the MEGNO indicator, to provide an accurate understanding of the location of stable and unstable orbits as well as the timescale of their exponential divergence in case of chaotic motion. The results improve the analysis presented in Breiter et al. (2005a) notably by considering the particular case of high-area-to-mass ratios space debris. The results indicate that chaotic orbits region can be highly relevant, especially for very high area-to-mass ratios. Then, we provide some numerical investigations and an analytical theory which lead to a detailed understanding of the resonance structures appearing in the phase space. These analyses bring to the fore a relevant class of secondary resonances on both sides of the well-known pendulum-like pattern of geostationary space debris, leading to complex dynamics of such objects.

S. Valk; N. Delsate; A. Lemaitre; T. Carletti

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Globally Distributed System for Job, Data, and Information Handling for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The computing infrastructures of the modern high energy physics experiments need to address an unprecedented set of requirements. The collaborations consist of hundreds of members from dozens of institutions around the world and the computing power necessary to analyze the data produced surpasses already the capabilities of any single computing center. A software infrastructure capable of seamlessly integrating dozens of computing centers around the world, enabling computing for a large and dynamical group of users, is of fundamental importance for the production of scientific results. Such a computing infrastructure is called a computational grid. The SAM-Grid offers a solution to these problems for CDF and DZero, two of the largest high energy physics experiments in the world, running at Fermilab. The SAM-Grid integrates standard grid middleware, such as Condor-G and the Globus Toolkit, with software developed at Fermilab, organizing the system in three major components: data handling, job handling, and information management. This dissertation presents the challenges and the solutions provided in such a computing infrastructure.

Garzoglio, Gabriele; /DePaul U.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on simulations of CO2 concentrations, the model could be used for other atmospheric compounds with known estimated emissions.

Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of planet formation and structures as well as the evolution of an imploding inertial fusion capsule depends on our understanding of matter in the complex warm dense matter...

310

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

311

Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America Using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The Impact of the Great Lakes System on Regional Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale global warming projections produced using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The analyses are focused on the Great Lakes Basin of North America and the ...

Jonathan Gula; W. Richard Peltier

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Damage of Land Biosphere due to Intense Warming by 1000-Fold Rapid Increase in Atmospheric Methane: Estimation with a Climate–Carbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal-time-scale responses of climate and the global carbon cycle to warming associated with rapid increases in atmospheric methane from a massive methane release from marine sedimentary methane hydrates are investigated with a coupled climate–...

Atsushi Obata; Kiyotaka Shibata

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

314

The Sinking of Warm-Core Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense cooling of a warm-core ring or warming of the fluids surrounding a ring can increase the density of that ring relative to the surrounding fluids. This increase in density can cause the ring to sink under the surrounding fluids. A simple ...

Rick Chapman; Doron Nof

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Global climate change and infectious diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Solar Warming Submitted to Avalanche.ca Journal Feb. 2008 Can solar warming contribute to dry slab avalanches?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Warming Submitted to Avalanche.ca Journal Feb. 2008 Can solar warming contribute to dry slab, when signs of warming, such as relatively warm air temperatures, strong solar radiation, and moist by a skier on a steep south-west facing aspect. Solar warming may have contributed to this release. (photo

Jamieson, Bruce

318

Status of fossil energy resources: A global perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with recently status of global fossil energy sources. Fossil energy sources have been split into three categories: oil,coal, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are highly efficient and cheap. Currently oil is the fastest primary energy source in the world (39% of world energy consumption). Coal will be a major source of energy for the world for the foreseeable future (24% of world energy consumption). In 2030, coal covers 45% of world energy needs. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption (23% of world energy consumption). Fossil fuel extraction and conversion to usable energy has several environmental impacts. They could be a major contributor to global warming and greenhouse gases and a cause of acid rain; therefore, expensive air pollution controls are required.

Balat, M. [SILA Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mechanisms for the Interannual Variability of SST in the East Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In comparison with the western and equatorial Pacific Ocean, relatively little is known about the east Pacific warm pool (EPWP). Observations indicate that the interannual variability of sea surface temperature (SST) in the EPWP is highly ...

Kristopher B. Karnauskas; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Heat Balance in the Pacific Warm Pool Atmosphere during TOGA COARE and CEPEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere above the western equatorial Pacific warm pool (WP) is an important source for the dynamic and thermodynamic forcing of the atmospheric general circulation. This study uses a high-resolution reanalysis and several observational ...

Baijun Tian; Guang Jun Zhang; V. Ramanathan

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Comparison of explicitly simulated and downscaled tropical cyclone activity in a high-resolution global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of tropical cyclone activity to climate change is a matter of great inherent interest and practical importance. Most current global climate models are not, however, capable of adequately resolving tropical ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

322

CMORPH: A Method that Produces Global Precipitation Estimates from Passive Microwave and Infrared Data at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique is presented in which half-hourly global precipitation estimates derived from passive microwave satellite scans are propagated by motion vectors derived from geostationary satellite infrared data. The Climate Prediction Center ...

Robert J. Joyce; John E. Janowiak; Phillip A. Arkin; Pingping Xie

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A Possible Effect of an Increase in the Warm-Pool SST on the Magnitude of El Nińo Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

El Nińo warming corresponds to an eastward extension of the western Pacific warm pool; one thus naturally wonders whether an increase in the warm pool SST will result in stronger El Nińos. This question, though elementary, has not drawn much ...

De-Zheng Sun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

325

Global warming and ice ages: I. prospects for physics based modulation of global change  

SciTech Connect

It has been suggested that large-scale climate changes, mostly due to atmospheric injection of greenhouse gases connected with fossil-fired energy production, should be forestalled by internationally-agreed reductions in, e.g., electricity generation. The potential economic impacts of such limitations are obviously large: greater than or equal to $10{sup 11}/year. We propose that for far smaller - less than 1% - the mean thermal effects of greenhouse gases may be obviated in any of several distinct ways, some of them novel. These suggestions are all based on scatterers that prevent a small fraction of solar radiation from reaching all or part of the Earth. We propose research directed to quite near-term realization of one or more of these inexpensive approaches to cancel the effects of the greenhouse gas injection. While the magnitude of the climatic impact of greenhouse gases is currently uncertain, the prospect of severe failure of the climate, for instance at the onset of the next Ice Age, is undeniable. The proposals in this paper may lead to quite practical methods to reduce or eliminate all climate failures.

Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Hyde, R.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Global fish production and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Dynamics of Warm and Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric dynamics of five different climate simulations with the GISS GCM are compared to investigate the changes that occur as climate warms or cools. There are two ice age simulations, the current and doubled CO2 climates, and a ...

D. Rind

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Initial Precipitation Formation in Warm Florida Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical processes that lead to the development of precipitation in small, warm cumulus are examined using data from the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study near Cape Canaveral, Florida. Aircraft measurements are used to determine the ...

Neil F. Laird; Harry T. Ochs III; Robert M. Rauber; L. Jay Miller

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset describing tropical cloud systems and their environmental setting and impacts has been collected during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and Aerosol and Chemical Transport in Tropical ...

Peter T. May; James H. Mather; Geraint Vaughan; Keith N. Bower; Christian Jakob; Greg M. McFarquhar; Gerald G. Mace

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of clouds, surface evaporation, and ocean heat transport in limiting maximum sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Pacific warm pool are investigated by means of simple and intermediate coupled ocean–atmosphere models. ...

Tim Li; Timothy F. Hogan; C-P. Chang

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Numerical Simulation of Sudden Stratospheric Warmings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanistic, quasi-geostrophic, semi-spectral model with a self-consistent calculation of the mean zonal flow fields is used to numerically simulate sudden stratospheric warmings generated by a single zonal harmonic (m) planetary wave. The ...

Mark R. Schoeberl; Darrell F. Strobel

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited ...

Jacob Scheff; Dargan M. W. Frierson

333

Separating signal and noise in climate warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11162011 | NR-11-11-03 Separating signal and noise in climate warming Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly A National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

334

Cold-blooded and warm-blooded  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold-blooded and warm-blooded Cold-blooded and warm-blooded Name: Walter Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What is the fundamental difference between cold-blooded and warm- blooded creatures? I know that reptile blood is a bit different than mammal blood, but is that the difference or is it a difference in the other cells of the body? Replies: Warm blooded refers to an animals ability to maintain its body temperature at a constant level. Cold blooded animal's bodies stay at the temperature of environment around them (more or less). The mechanism by which a warm blooded animal does this is by generating heat, mostly through muscle movement (but by other biochemical processes too). An example of this is shivering. Warm blooded animals also cool themselves off by sweating, panting (and other ways). In mammals the hypothalamic area of the brain has much to do with controlling these reflex processes

335

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

336

What do people know about global climate change 1. Mental models  

SciTech Connect

A set of exploratory studies and mental model interviews was conducted in order to characterize public understanding of climate change. In general, respondents regarded global warming as both bad and highly likely. Many believed that warming has already occurred. They tended to confuse stratospheric ozone depletion with the greenhouse effect and weather with climate. Automobile use, heat and emissions from industrial processes, aerosol spray cans, and pollution in general were frequently perceived as primary causes of global warming. Additionally, the [open quotes]greenhouse effect[close quotes] was often interpreted literally as the cause of a hot and steamy climate. The effects attributed to climate change often included increased skin cancer and changed agricultural yields. The mitigation and control strategies proposed by interviewees typically focused on general pollution control, with few specific links to carbon dioxide and energy use. Respondents appeared to be relatively unfamiliar with such regulatory developments as the ban on CFCs for nonessential uses. These beliefs must be considered by those designing risk communications or presenting climate-related policies to the public. 20 refs., 4 tabs.

Bostrom, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)); Morgan, M.G.; Fischhoff, B.; Read, D. (Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Look at Global Tropical Cyclone Activity during 1995: Contrasting High Atlantic Activity with Low Activity in Other Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1995, there was a near-record number of named tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic basin. This unusual event fueled speculation that it marked a tangible signal of global climate change, or that it marked a return to a period of higher ...

Mark A. Lander; Charles P. Guard

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Total environmental warming impact (TEWI) calculations for alternative automative air-conditioning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Montreal Protocol phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has required manufacturers to develop refrigeration and air-conditioning systems that use refrigerants that can not damage stratospheric ozone. Most refrigeration industries have adapted their designs to use hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; new automobile air- conditioning systems use HFC-134a. These industries are now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants on global warming. Automobile air-conditioning has three separate impacts on global warming; (1) the effects of refrigerant inadvertently released to the atmosphere from accidents, servicing, and leakage; (2) the efficiency of the cooling equipment (due to the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to power the system); and (3) the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to transport the system. The Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) is an index that should be used to compare the global warming effects of alternative air-conditioning systems because it includes these contributions from the refrigerant, cooling efficiency, and weight. This paper compares the TEWI of current air-conditioning systems using HFC-134a with that of transcritical vapor compression system using carbon dioxide and systems using flammable refrigerants with secondary heat transfer loops. Results are found to depend on both climate and projected efficiency of C0{sub 2}systems. Performance data on manufacturing prototype systems are needed to verify the potential reductions in TEWI. Extensive field testing is also required to determine the performance, reliability, and ``serviceability`` of each alternative to HFC-134a to establish whether the potential reduction of TEWI can be achieved in a viable consumer product.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The role of nuclear energy in mitigating greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

A behavioral, top-down, forced-equilibrium market model of long-term ({approximately} 2,100) global energy-economics interactions has been modified with a bottom-up nuclear energy model and used to construct consistent scenarios describing future impacts of civil nuclear materials flows in an expanding, multi-regional (13) world economy. The relative measures and tradeoffs between economic (GNP, tax impacts, productivity, etc.), environmental (greenhouse gas accumulations, waste accumulation, proliferation risk), and energy (resources, energy mixes, supply-side versus demand-side attributes) interactions that emerge from these analyses are focused herein on advancing understanding of the role that nuclear energy (and other non-carbon energy sources) might play in mitigating greenhouse warming. Two ostensibly opposing scenario drivers are investigated: (a) demand-side improvements in (non-price-induced) autonomous energy efficiency improvements; and (b) supply-side carbon-tax inducements to shift energy mixes towards reduced- or non-carbon forms. In terms of stemming greenhouse warming for minimal cost of greenhouse-gas abatement, and with the limitations of the simplified taxing schedule used, a symbiotic combination of these two approaches may offer advantages not found if each is applied separately.

Krakowski, R.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Time-Varying Greenhouse Warming Pattern and the Tropical–Extratropical Circulation Linkage in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Cai and Whetton provided modeling evidence that the greenhouse warming pattern has undergone a systematic change from a pattern with maximum warming in subtropical and mid- to high latitudes to one that is El Nińo–like from the 1960s ...

Wenju Cai; P. H. Whetton

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Possible Change of Extratropical Cyclone Activity due to Enhanced Greenhouse Gases and Sulfate Aerosols—Study with a High-Resolution AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the possible impacts of enhanced greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols on extratropical cyclone activity, two 20-yr time-slice experiments—the control run and the global warming run—are performed with a high-resolution AGCM (T106) ...

Quanzhen Geng; Masato Sugi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

EL Program: Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... challenge, and the Office of Management and Budget has ... 1 White House Office of Science and ... refrigerants with a low global warming potential and ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of the first nonhydrostatic nested-grid grid-point global atmospheric modeling system on parallel machines  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Evaluating the importance of global and regional climate response to increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases requires a comprehensive global atmospheric modeling system (GAMS) capable of simulations over a wide range of atmospheric circulations, from complex terrain to continental scales, on high-performance computers. Unfortunately, all of the existing global circulation models (GCMs) do not meet this requirements, because they suffer from one or more of the following three shortcomings: (1) use of the hydrostatic approximation, which makes the models potentially ill-posed; (2) lack of a nested-grid (or multi-grid) capability, which makes it difficult to consistently evaluate the regional climate response to the global warming, and (3) spherical spectral (opposed to grid-point finite-difference) representation of model variables, which hinders model performance for parallel machine applications. The end product of the research is a highly modularized, multi-gridded, self-calibratable (for further parameterization development) global modeling system with state-of-the-science physics and chemistry. This system will be suitable for a suite of atmospheric problems: from local circulations to climate, from thunderstorms to global cloud radiative forcing, from urban pollution to global greenhouse trace gases, and from the guiding of field experiments to coupling with ocean models. It will also provide a unique testbed for high-performance computing architecture.

Kao, C.Y.J.; Langley, D.L.; Reisner, J.M.; Smith, W.S.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Can we delay a greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews a book published by the Environmental Protection Agency. The book discussed the Greenhouse Effect which is a warming of the earth's atmosphere caused by the doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The excess carbon dioxide is pollution derived from the burning of fossil fuels. The report suggested that the warming of the atmosphere would cause thawing of the polar regions which in turn would cause a rise in sea levels and flooding of the coastal lowlands. In addition to the flooding, the report predicted climate changes that would effect the productivity of croplands in the west. The authors of the report stressed that there was no way to avoid this warming of the earth. They suggested that people should start preparing for the inevitable.

Seidel, S.; Keyes, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme temperatures and pressures, WDM tends to be drastically transient and thus difficult to study in the laboratory. Now, researchers have set up ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the ALS to measure the electronic structure of WDMs, demonstrating that fast-changing electron temperatures of matter under extreme conditions can be determined with picosecond resolution.

346

The Global Hydrological Cycle and Atmospheric Shortwave Absorption in Climate Models under CO2 Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spread among the predictions by climate models for the strengthening of the global hydrological cycle [i.e., the global mean surface latent heat flux (LH), or, equivalently, precipitation] at a given level of CO2-induced global warming is of ...

Ken Takahashi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part I: Climatology and potential vorticity evolution.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global climatology of warm conveyor belts (WCBs) is presented for the years 1979-2010, based upon trajectories calculated with ERA-Interim reanalyses. WCB trajectories are identified as strongly ascending air parcels (600 hPa in 2 days) near ...

Erica Madonna; Heini Wernli; Hanna Joos; Olivia Martius

348

On the Linkage between Antarctic Surface Water Stratification and Global Deep-Water Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suggestion is advanced that the remarkably low static stability of Antarctic surface waters may arise from a feedback loop involving global deep-water temperatures. If deep-water temperatures are too warm, this promotes Antarctic convection, ...

Ralph F. Keeling; Martin Visbeck

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Signature of ENSO in Global Temperature and Precipitation Fields Derived from the Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global temperature anomalies associated with ENSO are investigated, making use of a 13-year record of gridded temperature and precipitation data from the microwave sounding unit (MSU). The warm phase of the ENSO cycle during this period was ...

Elena Yulaeva; John M. Wallace

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hindcasting the January 2009 Arctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming with Unified Parameterization of Orographic Drag in NOGAPS. Part II: Short-Range Data-Assimilated Forecast and the Impacts of Calibrated Radiance Bias Correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is Part II of the effort to improve the forecasting of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events by using a version of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) that covers the full stratosphere. In Part I, ...

Young-Joon Kim; William Campbell; Benjamin Ruston

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Supermassive Black Holes and the Warm Ionized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive Black Holes and the Warm Ionized Gas in Early-type Galaxies Renbin Yan University stars actively. (late-type galaxies) #12;Prevalence of Supermassive Black Holes in Massive Galaxies MBH merging Right after coalescing Post-merger Star Formation Rate Black Hole Accretion Rate #12;Maintenance

Wang, Ming-Jye

353

Can we delay a greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

The author comments on the EPA report dated September 1983 Can We Delay A Greenhouse Warming. He takes exception to the widely-held interpretation that the answer is not much. The contribution of other greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide to the EPA scenarios is pointed out, and the lack of understanding of their role is emphasised. (ACR)

Perry, A.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Warm Pool Physics in a Coupled GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of the Indo–Pacific warm pool are investigated using a coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model. The model, developed at the Max-Planck-Institut fair Meteorologic, Hamburg, does not employ a flux correction and is used with ...

Niklas Schneider; Tim Barnett; Mojib Latif; Timothy Stockdale

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Properties of warm absorbers in active galaxies: a systematic stability curve analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signatures of warm absorbers are seen in soft X-ray spectra of about half of all Seyfert1 galaxies observed and in some quasars and blazars. We use the thermal equilibrium curve to study the influence of the shape of the ionizing continuum, density and the chemical composition of the absorbing gas on the existence and nature of the warm absorbers. We describe circumstances in which a stable warm absorber can exist as a multiphase medium or one with continuous variation in pressure. In particular we find the following results: i) the warm absorber exists only if the spectral index of the X-ray power-law ionizing continuum $\\alpha > 0.2$ and has a multiphase nature if $\\alpha \\sim 0.8$, which interestingly is the spectral index for most of the observed Seyfert 1 galaxies; ii) thermal and ionization states of highly dense warm absorbers are sensitive to their density if the ionizing continuum is sufficiently soft, i.e. dominated by the ultraviolet iii) absorbing gas with super-Solar metallicity is more likely to have a multiphase nature; iv) the nature of the warm absorber is significantly influenced by the absence of iron and associated elements which are produced in the later stages of star formation history in supernovae of type Ia.

Susmita Chakravorty; Ajit K. Kembhavi; Martin Elvis; Gary Ferland

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Role of Human Activity in the Recent Warming of Extremely Warm Daytime Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal detection and attribution analyses of changes in daily extremes give evidence of a significant human influence on the increasing severity of extremely warm nights and decreasing severity of extremely cold days and nights. This paper ...

Nikolaos Christidis; Peter A. Stott; Simon J. Brown

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

358

Energy Tax Credits: Stay Warm and Save MORE Money! | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credits: Stay Warm and Save MORE Money Energy Tax Credits: Stay Warm and Save MORE Money October 29, 2008 - 6:00am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL With all of...

359

An Interpretation of Sudden Warmings In Terms of Potential vorticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and concise interpretation of stratospheric sudden warmings is offered in terms Of the transient changes in the potential vorticity pattern. The warming is viewed as a manifestation of the reversal of the mean (zonally averaged) relative ...

H. C. Davies

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An Analysis of Tropical Ocean Diurnal Warm Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During periods of light surface wind, a warm stable layer forms at the ocean surface with a maximum sea surface temperature (SST) in the early afternoon. The diurnal SST amplitude (DSA) associated with these diurnal warm layers (DWLs) can reach ...

Hugo Bellenger; Jean-Philippe Duvel

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sonoluminescence test for equation of state in warm dense matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN WARM DENSE MATTER Siu-Fai Ng 1, 2 , J. J. Barnard 3 , P.IN WARM DENSE MATTER Siu-Fai Ng 1, 2 , J. J. Barnard 3 , P.

Ng, Siu-Fai

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Heat Balance of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic development of the Western Hemisphere warm pool and its four geographic subregions are analyzed. The subregional warm pools of the eastern North Pacific and equatorial Atlantic are best developed in the boreal spring, while in ...

David B. Enfield; Sang-ki Lee

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Anthropogenic Warming of the Oceans: Observations and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show the oceans have warmed over the past 40 yr, with appreciable regional variation and more warming at the surface than at depth. Comparing the observations with results from two coupled ocean–atmosphere climate models [the ...

David W. Pierce; Tim P. Barnett; Krishna M. AchutaRao; Peter J. Gleckler; Jonathan M. Gregory; Warren M. Washington

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Warm Standby in Hierarchically Structured Process-Control Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We classify standby redundancy design space in process-control programs into the following three categories: cold standby, warm standby, and hot standby. Design parameters of warm standby are identified and the reliability of a system using warm standby is evaluated and compared with that of hot standby. Our analysis indicates that the warm standby scheme is particularly suitable for longlived unmaintainable systems, especially those operating in harsh environments where burst hardware failures are possible. The feasibility of warm standby is demonstrated with a simulated chemical batch reactor system.

Ing-Ray Chen And; Ing-ray Chen; Farokh B. Bastani

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Global Trend in Sea Surface Temperature from 20 Years of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trend in sea surface temperature has been determined from 20 yr of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder data (version 5). The data span the period from January 1985 to December 2004, inclusive. The linear trends were calculated ...

S. A. Good; G. K. Corlett; J. J. Remedios; E. J. Noyes; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: Might they be connected  

SciTech Connect

Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustement to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {plus minus} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming. 15 refs., 8 figs.

Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1989-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (-128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO{sub 3}/{sup -} and SiO{sub 2} relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145{sup 0} and 196{sup 0}C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada Thermal Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and SiO/sub 2/ relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145/sup 0/ and 196/sup 0/C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

Z. Akopov; Silvia Amerio; David Asner; Eduard Avetisyan; Olof Barring; James Beacham; Matthew Bellis; Gregorio Bernardi; Siegfried Bethke; Amber Boehnlein; Travis Brooks; Thomas Browder; Rene Brun; Concetta Cartaro; Marco Cattaneo; Gang Chen; David Corney; Kyle Cranmer; Ray Culbertson; Sunje Dallmeier-Tiessen; Dmitri Denisov; Cristinel Diaconu; Vitaliy Dodonov; Tony Doyle; Gregory Dubois-Felsmann; Michael Ernst; Martin Gasthuber; Achim Geiser; Fabiola Gianotti; Paolo Giubellino; Andrey Golutvin; John Gordon; Volker Guelzow; Takanori Hara; Hisaki Hayashii; Andreas Heiss; Frederic Hemmer; Fabio Hernandez; Graham Heyes; Andre Holzner; Peter Igo-Kemenes; Toru Iijima; Joe Incandela; Roger Jones; Yves Kemp; Kerstin Kleese van Dam; Juergen Knobloch; David Kreincik; Kati Lassila-Perini; Francois Le Diberder; Sergey Levonian; Aharon Levy; Qizhong Li; Bogdan Lobodzinski; Marcello Maggi; Janusz Malka; Salvatore Mele; Richard Mount; Homer Neal; Jan Olsson; Dmitri Ozerov; Leo Piilonen; Giovanni Punzi; Kevin Regimbal; Daniel Riley; Michael Roney; Robert Roser; Thomas Ruf; Yoshihide Sakai; Takashi Sasaki; Gunar Schnell; Matthias Schroeder; Yves Schutz; Jamie Shiers; Tim Smith; Rick Snider; David M. South; Rick St. Denis; Michael Steder; Jos Van Wezel; Erich Varnes; Margaret Votava; Yifang Wang; Dennis Weygand; Vicky White; Katarzyna Wichmann; Stephen Wolbers; Masanori Yamauchi; Itay Yavin; Hans von der Schmitt

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Greenland and Antarctic Mass Balances for Present and Doubled Atmospheric CO2 from the GENESIS Version-2 Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in ...

Starley L. Thompson; David Pollard

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Phase relation between global temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary ingredient of Anthropogenic Global Warming hypothesis is the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide variations are the cause for temperature variations. In this paper we discuss this assumption and analyze it on basis of bi-centenary measurements and using a relaxation model which causes phase shifts and delays.

Stallinga, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Model Study on the 1988–89 Warming Event in the Northern North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using outputs of a high-resolution ocean general circulation model, upper-ocean heat content budget and mixed layer heat budget are analyzed to investigate the reason for the 1988–89 decadal warming event in the northern North Pacific. The model ...

Jing-Jia Luo; Toshio Yamagata

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 550 samples of fine grained carbonates, collected every 0.5 to 1.0 m from the Bloom Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation at Gallagher Peak, Idaho, were analyzed to determine the high-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy. To constrain for diagenesis, thin sections were petrographically analyzed and viewed using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using an electron microprobe. Average delta18O and delta13C values from the Bloom Member are -4.5% +/- 1.6% (1 sigma) and 2.1% +/- 1.1%, respectively. Maximum delta13C values are about 1% higher for the Desmoinesian and Missourian than the Morrowan and Atokan, similar to results from the Yukon Territory. delta18O and delta13C values are lowest for crystalline mosaic limestones and siltstones, moderate for packstones, wackestones, and mudstones, and highest for boundstones and grainstones. The delta13C profile from Gallagher Peak consists of high frequency 1% oscillations with several larger excursions. No large delta13C increase at the base of the section suggests the Mid-Carboniferous boundary is in the underlying Bluebird Mountain formation. delta13C of Gallagher Peak and Arrow Canyon, NV, correlate well from 318 to 310 Ma, but correlation becomes more difficult around 310 Ma. This may result from increased restriction of the Snaky Canyon platform beginning in the Desmoinesian. Most of the short term (<1 Ma) isotopic excursions are the result of diagenesis. Two of the largest negative excursions at Gallagher Peak correlate with two large negative excursions at Big Hatchet Peak, NM, possibly due to sea level lowstands of the Desmoinesian. Phylloid algal mounds at Gallagher Peak are associated with positive excursions because of original aragonite composition and increased open marine influence. Positive excursions related to other facies characteristics also result from increased marine influence. The delta13C curve for the upper half of Gallagher Peak contains three repeated cycles of increasing delta13C over 1-1.5 Ma, which are possibly related to long-term sea level fluctuations. Given the complexity of each local environment, without detailed biostratigraphy, detailed rock descriptions, and analysis of the various rock components, delta13C stratigraphy of whole rocks can be misinterpreted.

Jolley, Casey

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

378

Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charged particle physics Introduction . . . . . . . . .Driven Warm Dense Matter Physics, Four Point Sher- atonIntroduction to Plasma Physics, Plenum Press, New York [18

Heimbucher, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

She, With a Warm Palm, the Skin Over My Spine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??She, with a Warm Palm, the Skin over My Spine is a collection of sixnonfiction essays and three vignettes divided into two parts. The first… (more)

Cambardella, Cara Maria Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Implementation of global energy sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Modification of Precipitation from Warm Clouds—A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review is begun with a brief summary of the current status of our understanding of the physics of precipitation in warm clouds. The impact of warm-cloud precipitation processes on the evolution of the ice phase in supercooled clouds also is ...

William R. Cotton

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Abyss of the Nordic Seas Is Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, the multiyear oceanographic time series from ocean weather station Mike at 66°N, 2°E indicate a warming by about 0.01°C yr?1 in the deep water of the Norwegian Sea. The time of onset of this warming is depth dependent, ...

Svein Řsterhus; Tor Gammelsrřd

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Nonlinear Response of Sahel Rainfall to Atlantic Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response over West Africa to uniform warming of the Atlantic Ocean is analyzed using idealized simulations with a regional climate model. With warming of 1 and 1.5 K, rainfall rates increase by 30%–50% over most of West Africa. With Atlantic ...

Naresh Neupane; Kerry H. Cook

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A nonlinear response of Sahel rainfall to Atlantic warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response over West Africa to uniform warming of the Atlantic Ocean is analyzed using idealized simulations with a regional climate model. With warming of 1 K and 1.5 K, rainfall rates increase by 30-50% over most of West Africa. With Atlantic ...

Naresh Neupane; Kerry H. Cook

386

WOOD FLOORING 1. INTRODUCTION TO WARM AND WOOD FLOORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for wood flooring beginning at the waste generation reference point. 1 The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with wood flooring in the following three waste management alternatives: source reduction, combustion, and landfilling.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

WOOD PRODUCTS 1. INTRODUCTION TO WARM AND WOOD PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for wood products beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with wood products in the following four materials management alternatives: source

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

FIBERGLASS INSULATION 1. INTRODUCTION TO WARM AND FIBERGLASS INSULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for fiberglass insulation beginning at the waste generation reference point. 1 The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with fiberglass insulation in the following two waste management alternatives: source reduction and landfilling.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

High school students' perceptions of and attitudes toward globalization: an analysis of international baccalaureate students in Estado de Mexico, Mexico, and Texas, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the last few decades have seen a proliferation of debate concerning todayâ��s international system referred to as â��globalization,â� education has seen an exponential rise in curriculum (such as that promoted by global education, international education, and the International Baccalaureate Organization) that instills students with â��international understandingâ� and â��global perspectives.â� Through a two-site, interpretive study, this dissertation explored the nature of 15 studentsâ�� international understanding and their grasp of globalization. Qualitative techniques for data collection involved open-ended questionnaires and interviews, and emergent category designation was employed for qualitative data analysis. International Baccalaureate students from Estado de M�©xico and Texas revealed complex, yet well-developed, perceptions of globalization that spoke of a system which privileges the powerful and leaves the developing world behind. Both U.S. and Mexican students were skeptical of the United Statesâ�� position as the dominant player in world politics, economics, and global culture, and students from both sides of the border lamented local culture loss in globalization.

Brown, Jennifer Gayle

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Global Threat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dual application of splitting the atom, U.S. policy towards civilian use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) has historically exhibited contradictory traits. During these early...

392

The Interaction of Radiative and Dynamical Processes during a Simulated Sudden Stratospheric Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of a spontaneous sudden stratospheric warming that occurred during a 2-year integration of the Langley Research Center Atmospheric Simulation Model is presented. The simulated warming resembles observed “wave 1&rdquo warmings in the ...

R. B. Pierce; W. T. Blackshear; W. L. Grose; R. E. Turner; T. D. Fairlie

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Predictability of Stratospheric Warming Events: More from the Troposphere or the Stratosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The roles of the stratosphere and the troposphere in determining the predictability of stratospheric final warming and sudden warming events are evaluated in an idealized atmospheric model. For each stratospheric warming event simulated in the ...

Lantao Sun; Walter A. Robinson; Gang Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the Contribution of Major Warming Episodes in the Tropical East Pacific to a Useful Prognostic Relationship Based on the Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is known that the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and the mean sea surface temperature off the Peru Coast are highly coherent and that variations of the latter are dominated by infrequent warming episodes. The present study examines the ...

Robert R. Dickson; Robert E. Livezey

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings in some U.S. climate zones. The 2008 Californiain some California climate zones. The 2005 California Titlein all California climate zones (but one coastal region) and

Akbari, Hashem

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Pine Falls operations has helped destroy production of recycled paper. Manitoba is now left with a huge pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling facilities, all of which will increase greenhouse gas emissions. The pulp and paper industry is one

397

NETL: Gasification Systems - Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project ID: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Objective: The objective is to develop a warm multi-contaminant syngas cleaning system for operation between 300 and 700° F. This project will continue development of the RTI warm syngas cleanup technology suite. Based on the field testing results with real syngas from Eastman Chemical Company's gasifier under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99FT40675, additional technical issues need to be addressed to move the technologies used in warm syngas cleaning further towards commercial deployment especially for chemical/fuels production. These issues range from evaluation of startup and standby options for the more developed desulfurization processes to integration and actual pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas for the technologies that were tested at bench scale during Phase I. Development shall continue of the warm gas syngas cleaning technology platform through a combination of lab-scale R&D and larger integrated pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas as well as process/systems analysis and simulation for optimization of integration and intensification.

398

Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?  

SciTech Connect

Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evidence for dust emission in the Warm Ionised Medium using WHAM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the WHAM H_alpha survey and Leiden/Dwingeloo HI data to decompose the Far-infrared emission (from 100 to 1000 micron) at high Galactic latitude into components associated with the Warm Ionised Medium (WIM) and the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM). This decomposition is possible for the first time thanks to preliminary WHAM data that cover a significant fraction of the sky (about 10%). We confirm the first detection of dust emission from the WIM (Lagache et al. 1999) and show that the WIM dust temperature and emissivity are very similar to those in the WNM. The analysis suggests moreover that about 25% of the far-IR dust emission at high galactic latitude is uncorrelated with the HI gas. The decomposition again reveals a Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) which is determined for the first time from 100 to 1000 micron using two independant gas tracers.

Lagache, G; Reynolds, R J; Tufte, S L

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Evidence for dust emission in the Warm Ionised Medium using WHAM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the WHAM H_alpha survey and Leiden/Dwingeloo HI data to decompose the Far-infrared emission (from 100 to 1000 micron) at high Galactic latitude into components associated with the Warm Ionised Medium (WIM) and the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM). This decomposition is possible for the first time thanks to preliminary WHAM data that cover a significant fraction of the sky (about 10%). We confirm the first detection of dust emission from the WIM (Lagache et al. 1999) and show that the WIM dust temperature and emissivity are very similar to those in the WNM. The analysis suggests moreover that about 25% of the far-IR dust emission at high galactic latitude is uncorrelated with the HI gas. The decomposition again reveals a Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) which is determined for the first time from 100 to 1000 micron using two independant gas tracers.

G. Lagache; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Warm Weather and the Daily Commute | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Warm Weather and the Daily Commute Warm Weather and the Daily Commute Warm Weather and the Daily Commute May 7, 2013 - 12:02pm Addthis Biking to work helps you get some exercise while reducing your carbon footprint. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/olaser Biking to work helps you get some exercise while reducing your carbon footprint. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/olaser Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How can I participate? Check out options for busing or carpooling in your area or, if you live close, try walking or biking to work. You know the weather is starting to warm up when you start hearing about those "bike, bus, or walk to work" challenges. And while my local news just started drumming up publicity for theirs, I've seen these events pop up in

403

Brooks Warm Springs Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm Springs Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Warm Springs Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brooks Warm Springs Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Brooks Warm Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Fergus County, Montana Coordinates 47.2126745°, -109.4141° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

404

The Sensitivity of Mountain Snowpack Accumulation to Climate Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controls on the sensitivity of mountain snowpack accumulation to climate warming (?S) are investigated. This is accomplished using two idealized, physically based models of mountain snowfall to simulate snowpack accumulation for the Cascade ...

Justin R. Minder

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Successive Modulation of ENSO to the Future Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multidecadal modulation of the El Nińo–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) due to greenhouse warming has been analyzed herein by means of diagnostics of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) coupled general ...

Soon-Il An; Jong-Seong Kug; Yoo-Geun Ham; In-Sik Kang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Mechanisms of Remote Tropical Surface Warming during El Nińo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate through atmospheric general circulation model (the Community Climate Model version 3.10) simulations of the 1997/98 El Nińo that the observed “remote” (i.e., outside the Pacific) tropical land and ocean surface warming ...

John C. H. Chiang; Benjamin R. Lintner

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AkWarm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AkWarm AkWarm AkWarm logo. Innovative, user-friendly, Windows-based software for home energy modeling. AkWarm is designed for weatherization assessment and the EPA Energy Star Home energy rating program. Features include: Graphical display of energy use by building component, improvement options analysis, design heat load, calculates CO2 emissions, and shows code compliance. Utility, weather data, and other libraries are maintained in a database library for easy updating. A separate database is available to archive all input and output data for detailed analysis of housing types, trends, amd energy use. Keywords home energy rating systems, home energy, residential modeling, weatherization Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Basic understanding of building construction, with a minimal level of

408

Warm coats, big thanks | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community / Warm coats, big thanks Community / Warm coats, big thanks Warm coats, big thanks Posted: January 9, 2014 - 2:23pm Over the last 12 years, Y-12ers have donated almost 7000 coats, sweaters and other winter wear to the Volunteer Ministry Center. As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while, Y-12ers have shown their volunteer spirit for the twelfth straight year by helping countless people stay warm thanks to another successful United Way Coat Drive to benefit the Volunteer Ministry Center. In total, the site donated 589 coats and winter wear items, 64 pairs of gloves, 47 scarves, and 66 hats and toboggans, which VMC makes available to the public through its Knoxville office. In addition, this year's efforts were expanded to include collection of toiletries for VMC. Y-12 collected more than 20 copy paper boxes full of

409

NOAA Predicts Mixed Bag of Drought, Flooding and Warm Weather...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Predicts Mixed Bag of Drought, Flooding and Warm Weather for Spring Print E-mail NOAA 2013 Spring Outlook Map Thursday, March 21, 2013 Featured by NOAA, a member of the U.S....

410

Warm Conveyor Belts in Idealized Moist Baroclinic Wave Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This idealized modeling study of moist baroclinic waves addresses the formation of moist ascending airstreams, so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), their characteristics, and their significance for the downstream flow evolution. Baroclinic wave ...

Sebastian Schemm; Heini Wernli; Lukas Papritz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Influence of Stratospheric Sudden Warming on AIRS Midtropospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midtropospheric CO2 retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) were used to explore the influence of stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) on CO2 in the middle to upper troposphere. To choose the SSW events that had strong coupling ...

Xun Jiang; Jingqian Wang; Edward T. Olsen; Thomas Pagano; Luke L. Chen; Yuk L. Yung

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

413

Rapid Development of the Tropical Cyclone Warm Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simple theoretical argument to isolate the conditions under which a tropical cyclone can rapidly develop a warm-core thermal structure and subsequently approach a steady state. The theoretical argument is based on the ...

Jonathan L. Vigh; Wayne H. Schubert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

On the Height of the Warm Core in Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The warm-core structure of tropical cyclones is examined in idealized simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. The maximum perturbation temperature in a control simulation occurs in the midtroposphere (5–6 km), in ...

Daniel P. Stern; David S. Nolan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Greenhouse Warming: Is the Mid-Holocene a Good Analogue?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mid-Holocene period (from approximately 9000 to 6000 years before present) is often suggested as an analogue for enhanced greenhouse warming. The changes in net radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere are very different; increases in ...

John F. B. Mitchell

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sudden Stratospheric Warming and Anomalous U.S. Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe distortion of tropospheric circulation is associated with major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. This distortion consisting primarily of weakening of smaller-scale synoptic mats and development of strong blocking activity, is ...

James P. McGuirk; Donald A. Douglas

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Warm Rain Study in Hawaii—Rain Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 300 hours of aircraft flights were conducted in Hawaii from 1977 to 1979 to study precipitation mechanisms in warm rain. Airborne instruments were used to measure drop size distributions over the size range from cloud droplets to ...

Tsutomu Takahashi

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Supervised Learning Approaches to Classify Sudden Stratospheric Warming Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sudden stratospheric warmings are prominent examples of dynamical wave–mean flow interactions in the Arctic stratosphere during Northern Hemisphere winter. They are characterized by a strong temperature increase on time scales of a few days and a ...

Christian Blume; Katja Matthes; Illia Horenko

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Small-Scale Variability in Warm Continental Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed small-scale fluctuations in microphysical, dynamical and thermodynamical parameters measured in two warm cumulus clouds during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) project (1981) in light of predictions of ...

P. H. Austin; M. B. Baker; A. M. Blyth; J. B. Jensen

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A 15-Year Climatology of Warm Conveyor Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first climatology of so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), strongly ascending moist airstreams in extratropical cyclones that, on the time scale of 2 days, rise from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere. The ...

Sabine Eckhardt; Andreas Stohl; Heini Wernli; Paul James; Caroline Forster; Nicole Spichtinger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Regulation of Moist Convection over the West Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms that regulate moist convection over the warm tropical oceans are not well understood. One school of thought holds that convection is caused by the convergence of moisture, which in turn is produced by an independent dynamical ...

David J. Raymond

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Definition: Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see...

423

Cloud Clusters and Superclusters over the Oceanic Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared satellite images of the oceanic warm-pool region (8O°E-160°W) have been objectively processed to reveal tropical “cloud clusters” with temperature colder than a given threshold. Cloud clusters span a somewhat lognormal distribution of ...

Brain E. Mapes; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Long-Term Evolution of Elongated Warm Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to investigate the evolution of elongated warm eddies. A shallow-water, reduced-gravity, primitive equation model is used to perform a multicase numerical experiment, which includes vortices of very different ...

Edgar G. Pavía; Manuel López

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Warm-Air Intrusions in Arizona’s Meteor Crater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic nighttime intrusions of warm air, accompanied by strong winds, enter the enclosed near-circular Meteor Crater basin on clear, synoptically undisturbed nights. Data analysis is used to document these events and to determine their spatial ...

Bianca Adler; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Manuela Lehner; Norbert Kalthoff

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Dynamics of Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric Final Warming Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lag composite analysis is performed of the zonal-mean structure and dynamics of Northern Hemisphere stratospheric final warming (SFW) events. SFW events are linked to distinct zonal wind deceleration signatures in the stratosphere and ...

Robert X. Black; Brent A. McDaniel

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model is used to investigate the mesoscale predictability of an extreme precipitation event over central Texas on 29 June 2002 that lasted through 7 July 2002. Both the intrinsic and practical aspects of warm-season predictability, ...

Fuqing Zhang; Andrew M. Odins; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Inferences of Predictability Associated with Warm Season Precipitation Episodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein preliminary findings are reported from a radar-based climatology of warm season precipitation “episodes.” Episodes are defined as time–space clusters of heavy precipitation that often result from sequences of organized convection such as ...

R. E. Carbone; J. D. Tuttle; D. A. Ahijevych; S. B. Trier

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Physics of Greenhouse Effect and Convection in Warm Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) in roughly 50% of the tropical Pacific Ocean is warm enough (SST > 300 K) to permit deep convection. This paper examines the effects of deep convection on the climatological mean vertical distributions of water vapor ...

A. K. Inamdar; V. Ramanathan

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-26000, NWFP, Pakistan 9 Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, Technische Universit¨at Darmstadt, Schlo�gartenstr. 9-temperature superconductors and nuclear matter1 . Warm dense matter, defined by temperatures of a few electron volts

Loss, Daniel

431

GIANT pandas could become even more endangered, as global warming threatens their staple diet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 in guaranteed jackpots to be won each week Your handy DIY guide brought to you by the Daily Record and Sunday

432

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venting in the eastern Aleutian subduction zone, J. Geophys.Northern California Aleutians, Bering slope California Bight

Elliott, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Weather, Climate, and the Economy: Explaining Risk Perceptions of Global Warming, 2001–10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two series of national survey datasets (2001–10), supplemented with monthly temperature and precipitation data and unemployment data, are used to examine how weather and climate, economic performance, and individuals’ sociodemographic backgrounds ...

Wanyun Shao; Barry D. Keim; James C. Garand; Lawrence C. Hamilton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Creating suites of models with system entity structure: global warming example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how to develop a suite of models in the MS4 Modeling Environment. The approach employs the operation of merging of System Entity Structures supported by the environment. After construction, the suite of models can be hosted on Model Store, ... Keywords: component-based modeling, suite of models, system entity structure, systems of systems

Bernard P. Zeigler, Chungman Seo, Robert Coop, Doohwan Kim

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Anatomizing the Ocean’s Role in ENSO Changes under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A revisit on observations shows that the tropical El Nińo–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability, after removing both the long-term trend and decadal variation of the background climate, has been enhanced by as much as 50% during the past 50 yr. ...

Haijun Yang; Qiong Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Projected Changes in Mean and Extreme Precipitation in Africa under Global Warming. Part II: East Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probable changes in mean and extreme precipitation in East Africa are estimated from general circulation models (GCMs) prepared for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Bayesian statistics are used to ...

Mxolisi E. Shongwe; Geert Jan van Oldenborgh; Bart van den Hurk; Maarten van Aalst

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

How does the hole in the ozone layer affect global warming? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other FAQs about Environment. Does EIA have projections for energy production, consumption, and prices for individual states? Does EIA report water vapor emissions data?

438

Response of the South Asian Summer Monsoon to Global Warming: Mean and Synoptic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent diagnostics with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model, version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1), coupled model’s twentieth-century simulations reveal that this particular model demonstrates skill in capturing the mean and variability ...

Markus Stowasser; H. Annamalai; Jan Hafner

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100: Natural CO2 - Rate ~100 ppm/My (0.0001 ppm/year) - Human-made rate today: ~2 ppm/year Humans Overwhelm-made forcings dwarf natural forcings that drove glacial-interglacial climate change. 5. Humans now control

Hansen, James E.

440

Profiting from socially beneficial green investment in an era of global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monetizing the value of socially beneficial green investment is complex and will play an important role in the transformation currently sweeping through the industry. A common or agreed-to approach has yet to be developed, and options under consideration have numerous barriers, the most difficult being political ones. (author)

Navarro, Peter; Brunetto, Tom

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Climate Protection and Green Economy Act, Global Warming Solutions Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act requires the Department of Natural Resources to monitor and regulate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to require emissions reporting and to establish...

442

Storing Carbon in Agricultural Soils to Help Head-Off Global Warming and to Combat Desertification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We know for sure that addition of organic matter to soil increases water-holding capacity, imparts fertility with the addition of nutrients, increases soil aggregation and improves tilth. Depeing on it's type, organic matter contains between 40 and 60% carbon. Using agricultural management practices to increase the amount of organic matter and carbon in soils can be an effective strategy to offset carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere as well as to improve the quality of the soil and slow or prevent desertification.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hello. I'm a bright guy in Canada. As a Global Warming ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... brainstorming applications for barrels of oil and bucket fulls of tar (and maybe NG depending on GWP); this qualifier preserves refinery jobs making ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Global warming of the mantle beneath continents back to the Archaean Nicolas Coltice a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the complete aggregation of Pangea: the CAMP at 200 Ma, the Karoo at 180 Ma, the Parana-Etendeka at 130 Ma and Karoo), emplaced while Pangea was still a supercontinent (McHone, 2000; DeMin et al., 2003; Jourdan et; Jourdan et al., 2006, 2007c). In what follows, we examine critical features of the CAMP and Karoo CFBs

445

GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Karoo (Chumakov and Zharkov, 2003; Royer et al., 2004). 4.3. Numerical climate models The peculiar plate Basin, eastern South America (7) Karoo, South Africa, (8) Satpura/Raniganj basins, central India, (9-humid basins such as the Karoo (Smith, 1995) or the south Urals (Newell et al., 1999), brown overbank mudstones

Benton, Michael

446

Energy and Global Warming Impacts of HFC Refrigerants and Emerging Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATING AND COOLING LOADS AND HEAT PUMP PERFORMANCE FACTORS FOR NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES AND COMMERCIAL average). . . . . . . 37 8. TEWI for residential heating and cooling options in Miami (1996 efficiency in Miami (2005 efficiency levels). . . . . . . . . . . 48 13. TEWI for residential heating and cooling

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

447

Expansion of the Hadley Cell under Global Warming: Winter versus Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scaling relationship is introduced to explain the seasonality in the outer boundary of the Hadley cell in both climatology and trend in the simulations of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In the climatological state, ...

Sarah M. Kang; Jian Lu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per capita production levels in 2030 similar to those of theby 14% between 2008 and 2030. Climate change is likely tocereal production by 2030. If done sustainably, raising

Funk, Chris C.; Brown, Molly E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Expansion of the world's deserts due to global warming and vegetation-albedo feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The desiccation of these marginal zones will have major implication for the world's food supply and other-2 in surface absorbed solar energy. Although acting on regional scale, such a large negative

Zeng, Ning

450

Introduction As the evidence of global warming continues to build-up, it is becoming clear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a transparent bottom electrode, nor- mally indium-tin-oxide (ITO), which forms the anode. To enhance the repro molecular orbital ITO Indium-tin-oxide JD Current density in the dark JL Current density under illumination on the natural balance on our planet, underscore the urgency of developing renewable energy sources. Today

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

451

Editorial – The Global Warming Fight is “Bringing Sexy Back,” Are You Ready?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

id=1750492&page 7. Hybrid Car Sales in 2006. Car.solnew.com.And here we are today; hybrid car sales are through theof that dependency. Hybrid car sales increased by 161% in

Jankowska, Marta Maja

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Transient versus the Equilibrium Response of Sea Ice to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examine the long-term stability of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, idealized simulations are carried out with the climate model ECHAM5/Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-OM). Atmospheric CO2 concentration is increased over 2000 years from ...

Chao Li; Dirk Notz; Steffen Tietsche; Jochem Marotzke

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Seasonal Changes in Solar Radiation and Relative Humidity in Europe in Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future seasonal changes in surface incident solar radiation and relative humidity (RH) over Europe and adjacent ocean areas were assessed based on phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) model ensemble. Under the A1B scenario, ...

Kimmo Ruosteenoja; Petri Räisänen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

How California Came to Pass AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999 (600-02-011F) California Energy Commission (2003), 2003P100- 03-019F) California Energy Commission (2003), ClimateNovember (100-03-017F) California Energy Commission, Public

Hanemann, W. Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Detectability of Changes in the Walker Circulation in Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the gradients in sea level pressure (SLP) and sea surface temperature (SST) along the equatorial Pacific are analyzed in observations and 101 numerical experiments performed with 37 climate models participating in the fifth phase of the ...

Pedro N. DiNezio; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Amy C. Clement

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fifty-Year Trends in Global Ocean Salinities and Their Relationship to Broad-Scale Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using over 1.6 million profiles of salinity, potential temperature, and neutral density from historical archives and the international Argo Program, this study develops the three-dimensional field of multidecadal linear change for ocean-state ...

Paul J. Durack; Susan E. Wijffels

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Warming Break Trends and Fractional Integration in the Northern, Southern, and Global Temperature Anomaly Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the estimation of time trends in temperature anomaly series. However, instead of imposing that the estimated residuals from the time trends are covariance stationary processes with spectral density that is positive and ...

Luis A. Gil-Alana

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Multiscalar Drought Index Sensitive to Global Warming: The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a new climatic drought index: the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). The SPEI is based on precipitation and temperature data, and it has the advantage of combining multiscalar character with the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguería; Juan I. López-Moreno

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a hydrate based marine desalination technology on marineentirely here. The slight desalination imparted by clathrate

Elliott, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

cfchou@phys.sinica.edu.tw Global Warming -Lohachara Island by Robert Clemenzi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chicago #12; > #12;#12; #12; #12; #12; 10 % #12;#12;#12;#12;Ocean Wave Power The Geysers San Francisco, CA Solar power plants III-VII at Kramer Junction, CA #12; #12; #12

Chen, Yang-Yuan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high global warming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nigerian coal power stations : their future in the light of global warming / E.N. Eziukwu.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nigeria is presently being faced with a growing electricity demand problem following its population growth rate. The total installed capacity is far less than the… (more)

Eziukwu, Emenike Nduaka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

CO2 Snow Deposition in Antarctica to Curtail Anthropogenic Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scientific plan is presented that proposes the construction of carbon dioxide (CO2) deposition plants in the Antarctic for removing CO2 gas from Earth’s atmosphere. The Antarctic continent offers the best environment on Earth for CO2 deposition ...

Ernest Agee; Andrea Orton; John Rogers

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

How California Came to Pass AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and market manipulation by energy suppliers caused wholesale electricity pricesmarket prices of electricity from renewable generators, and it requires CEC to certify eligible renewable energy

Hanemann, W. Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Increasing Great Lake–Effect Snowfall during the Twentieth Century: A Regional Response to Global Warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on the climate of surrounding regions is significant, especially in leeward settings where lake-effect snowfall occurs. Heavy lake-effect snow represents a potential natural hazard and plays important ...

Adam W. Burnett; Matthew E. Kirby; Henry T. Mullins; William P. Patterson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Brussels, 07.10.2003 Position paper: Europe should lead the fight against global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and continuous refinement of treaties and practices. Nuclear non-proliferation treaties can serve as examples become party to agreements such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty continue their support in part-long experience with non-proliferation and arms control apply directly to building a system of adequate network

Laughlin, Robert B.

466

ENERGY AND GLOBAL WARMING IMPACTS OF NOT-IN-KIND AND NEXT GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................. 68 iii #12;Evacuated fiberglass panels ......................................... 68 Open cell PUR on secondary evaporative cooling systems to achieve adequate dehumidification during hot humid weather

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

467

Setting the global thermostat with an exhaustible tradeable permit system  

SciTech Connect

The global warming policy debate has centered largely on near-term objectives such as freezing 1990 CO{sub 2} emissions without regard to long-run implications. A policy of freezing CO{sub 2} emissions is shown to slow but not halt global warming, while requiring expensive near-term adjustments. If the long-run temperature change outcome of the freeze policy is set as the goal of a more graduated control policy, one which allows the market to determine annual emissions, a more cost-effective solution is obtained that reduces the negative adjustment effects on the energy and other affected industries. The most cost-effective emissions time path of a graduated control policy could be achieved by an evaporative marketable CO{sub 2} emissions permit system. This paper provides a preliminary examination of an evaporative permit system used to achieve long-run stabilization of greenhouse-induced temperature change.

Kosobud, R.G.; Quinn, K.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics; South, D.W.; Daly, T.A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Symmetry energy of warm nuclear systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and symmetry free energy coefficients of infinite nuclear matter and of finite nuclei is investigated. For infinite matter, both these coefficients are found to have a weaker dependence on temperature at densities close to saturation; at low but homogeneous densities, the temperature dependence becomes stronger. For finite systems, different definitions of symmetry energy coefficients are encountered in the literature yielding different values. A resolution to this problem is suggested from a global liquid-drop-inspired fit of the energies and free energies of a host of nuclei covering the entire periodic table. The hot nucleus is modeled in a subtracted finite-temperature-Thomas-Fermi framework, with dynamical surface phonon coupling to nucleonic motion plugged in. Contrary to infinite nuclear matter, a substantial change in the symmetry energy coefficients is observed for finite nuclei with temperature.

Agrawal, B K; Samaddar, S K; Centelles, M; Vińas, X

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Symmetry energy of warm nuclear systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and symmetry free energy coefficients of infinite nuclear matter and of finite nuclei is investigated. For infinite matter, both these coefficients are found to have a weaker dependence on temperature at densities close to saturation; at low but homogeneous densities, the temperature dependence becomes stronger. For finite systems, different definitions of symmetry energy coefficients are encountered in the literature yielding different values. A resolution to this problem is suggested from a global liquid-drop-inspired fit of the energies and free energies of a host of nuclei covering the entire periodic table. The hot nucleus is modeled in a subtracted finite-temperature-Thomas-Fermi framework, with dynamical surface phonon coupling to nucleonic motion plugged in. Contrary to infinite nuclear matter, a substantial change in the symmetry energy coefficients is observed for finite nuclei with temperature.

B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; M. Centelles; X. Vińas

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

472

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Sharp Frontal Interfaces in the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the TOGA COARE rich horizontal temperature and salinity variability of the near-surface layer of the ocean in the western Pacific warm pool was observed. High-resolution measurements were made by probes mounted on the bow of the vessel in ...

Alexander Soloviev; Roger Lukas

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Cosmic global strings  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

Sikivie, P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

477

ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a Single-Column CCM3 Model. Update in May 2006 from Ric Cederwall: We were expecting 4-D variational analysis results for the IOP from Jimy Dudhia's 4DVAR model (a version of MM5), but it never happened. I don't expect that we will get the dataset. For data sets, see below. Summary Special rawinsonde soundings and profiler measurements were taken over a

478

Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Warm Springs, Georgia Coordinates 32.8904081°, -84.6810381° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

479

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal springs associated with normal faults in Utah have been analyzed for major cations and anions, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. Springs with measured temperatures averaging greater than 40°C are characterized by Na + K- and SO4 + Cl-rich waters containing 103 to 104 mg/l of dissolved solids. Lower temperature springs, averaging less than 40°C, are more enriched in Ca + Mg relative to Na + K. Chemical variations monitored through time in selected thermal springs are probably produced by

480

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs State Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Warm Springs, Montana Coordinates 46.1813145°, -112.78476° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

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481

Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace April 1, 2010 - 7:16pm Addthis Joshua DeLung For the last 56 years, Beulah Sisk has lived in the same house in Princeton, W.Va. Beulah, who worked for 25 years at Lloyd's Pastry Shop, is well known in Princeton. People still see her on the streets today and recognize her as an icon in the community. After a wind storm damaged Beulah's home last year, it came as no surprise when a senior center employee, concerned for Beulah's safety, told her about the weatherization assistance program. "A tree fell on my house and damaged a lot of things, including my furnace," Beulah says. "I tried to have it repaired, but it still

482

Stay Warm in Your Apartment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Warm in Your Apartment Stay Warm in Your Apartment Stay Warm in Your Apartment October 19, 2009 - 11:43am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Yes, the Ghost of Winters Future has officially knocked on our front doors again. The leaves here in Washington, D.C., have started to turn toward their colorful crescendo, that spectacular finish before their end on the chilly ground. It makes me cold just thinking about it. Like me, you're probably not opening your windows much at night anymore. I'm holding out still, surrendering a little more of my beloved fresh air each night and dreading that first night when I have to pop the heater on. Last night, I only open my window about an inch. I guess that means it's time to think about locking out the cold air once and for all this year.

483

Stay Warm in Your Apartment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Warm in Your Apartment Stay Warm in Your Apartment Stay Warm in Your Apartment October 19, 2009 - 11:43am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Yes, the Ghost of Winters Future has officially knocked on our front doors again. The leaves here in Washington, D.C., have started to turn toward their colorful crescendo, that spectacular finish before their end on the chilly ground. It makes me cold just thinking about it. Like me, you're probably not opening your windows much at night anymore. I'm holding out still, surrendering a little more of my beloved fresh air each night and dreading that first night when I have to pop the heater on. Last night, I only open my window about an inch. I guess that means it's time to think about locking out the cold air once and for all this year.

484

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

485

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

486

Global Decadal Upper-Ocean Heat Content as Viewed in Nine Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines nine analyses of global ocean 0-/700-m temperature and heat content during the 43-yr period of warming, 1960–2002. Among the analyses are two that are independent of any numerical model, six that rely on sequential data ...

James A. Carton; Anthony Santorelli

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels biofuels, such as wood, manure, dung, and other solid biomass used for home heating and cooking in many

488

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of6 I.3. High-Speed RailOperating High-Speed Rail .. 22 VI. Impact on Regional

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the High-speed Rail, Korea Research Institute for Humanof High-Speed Rail, Korea Research Institute for Humanhigh-speed rail (Korea Railway Research Institute) Improving

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

Murphy, J.M. [Meteorological Office, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492