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1

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

2

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

3

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

4

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

5

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

6

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

7

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

8

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

9

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

10

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

11

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

12

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

14

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

15

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

16

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

17

Studies of Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the asbestos, was volume reduced via a private contract mechanism established by BJC. After volume reduction, the waste was packaged for rail shipment. This large waste management project successfully met cost and schedule goals.

Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The HIgh Flux Isotope Reactor: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HFIR construction began in 1965 and completed in 1966. During the first 15 years of operation, the heavy actinide isotope production mission was dominant. HFIR is now positioned as one of the most versataile research reactors in the world.

Beierschmitt, Kelly J [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proposed Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a desire to implement a reliability-centered maintenance at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak-Centered Maintenance (RCM) structure is proposed for implementation at the HFIR. This proposed RCM structure is based on widely used and accepted industry practices. The HFIR primary cleanup system is used to provide specific

30

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

31

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

32

A brief History of Neutron Scattering at the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory dates back to 1945 when Ernest Wollan installed a modified x-ray diffractometer on a beam port of the original graphite reactor. Subsequently, Wollan and Clifford Shull pioneered neutron diffraction and laid the foundation for an active neutron scattering effort that continued through the 1950s, using the Oak Ridge Research reactor after 1958, and, starting in 1966, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, or HFIR.

Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

Winn,B.L.; Robertson, J.L.; Iverson, E.B.; Selby, D.L.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recent Studies Related to Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Validation of KENO V.a Code for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is composed of two concentric annular elements, inner and outer, each containing highly enriched uranium fuel as a mixture of triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and aluminum encapsulated within aluminum alloy plates. The fuel plates are of involute shape and the fuel within the plates has a distribution across the plate width. Previous KENO code validation efforts have used a relatively simple single region homogeneous fuel model for each of the two annular regions by assuming that the materials in each were homogenized within the total volume of the fueled region. The computed results have tended to be about 2 to 3% greater than experimentally measured results. To improve computed results, a multi-zone fuel model was developed and used to validate the KENO code.

Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Preliminary Notice of Violation - High Flux Isotope Reactor, November 18, 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 18, 2003 Dr. Jeffrey Wadsworth [ ] UT-Battelle P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6255 EA 2003-10 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $151,250 Dear Dr. Wadsworth: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as

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41

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

COMSOL Simulations for Steady State Thermal Hydraulics Analyses of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Simulation models for steady state thermal hydraulics analyses of Oak Ridge National Laboratory s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software. A single fuel plate and coolant channel of each type of HFIR fuel element was modeled in three dimensions; coupling to adjacent plates and channels was accounted for by using periodic boundary conditions. The standard k- turbulence model was used in simulating turbulent flow with conjugate heat transfer. The COMSOL models were developed to be fully parameterized to allow assessing impacts of fuel fabrication tolerances and uncertainties related to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design and reactor operating parameters. Heat source input for the simulations was obtained from separate Monte Carlo N Particle calculations for the axially non-contoured LEU fuel designs at the beginning of the reactor cycle. Mesh refinement studies have been performed to calibrate the models against the pressure drop measured across the HFIR core.

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PRELIMINARY SOLUTION CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS FOR THE HIGH-FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was supported by a series of preliminary experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1960. The experiments yielded results describing directly some of the expected performance characteristics of the reactor and strengthened the calculational methods used in its design. The critical assembly, like the reactor, was of a flux-trap type in which a central 6-in.-dia column of H/sub 2/O was surrounded by an annulus of fissile material and, in turn, by an annular neutron reflector. The fuel region contained a solution of enriched uranyl nitrate in a mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and the reflector was a composite of two annuli, the inner one of D/sub 2/O surrounded by one of H/sub 2/O. In most experiments the ends of the assembly were reflected by H/sub 2/O. Important results evaluate the absolute thermal-neutron flux to be expected in the design reactor and describe the flux distributions within this type of assembly. It was also observed that the cadmium ratio along the axis of the assembly was about 100, showing that a highly thermal-neutron flux was truly developed in the trap. It was shown that reduction of the hydrogen density in the central water column to about 80% of its normal value increased the reactivity about 6% and that further hydrogen density reduction decreased the reactivity as the effect of the loss of neutron moderation dominated the effect of the increased coupling across the central column. These considerations are of importance to the safety of the reactor. Additional experiments gave values of the usual critical dimensions and explored the effects on both the dimensions and the flux distributions of changing the concentration of the uranyl nitrate solution, of changing the composition of the solvent, and of adding neutron-absorbing materials to the D/ sub 2/O reflector. These changes were made to alter the neutron properties of the fuel solution over a range including those expected in the reactor itself. (auth)

Fox, J.K.; Gilley, L.W.; Magnuson, D.W.

1963-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL> The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an approval in principal of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the US Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A 3D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. The present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on side during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

SELECTED STUDIES OF PAST OPERATIONS AT THE ORNL HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are being reviewed and include determining whether HFIR fuel can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) and determining whether HFIR beryllium reflectors are discharged as transuranic (TRU) waste. The LEU conversion and TRU waste studies are being performed in accordance with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and the Integrated Facility Disposition Project, respectively. While assessing data/analysis needs for LEU conversion such as the fuel cycle length and power needed to maintain the current level of reactor performance, a reduction of about 8% (~200 MWD) in the end-of-cycle exposure for HFIR fuel was observed over the lifetime of the reactor (43 years). The SCALE 6.0 computational system was used to evaluate discharged beryllium reflectors and it was discovered if the reflectors are procured according to the current HFIR standard, discharged reflectors would not be TRU waste, but the removable reflector (closest to core) would become TRU waste approximately 40 years after discharge. However, beryllium reflectors have been fabricated with a greater uranium content than that stipulated in the standard and these reflectors would be discharged as TRU waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Response of aluminum and its alloys to exposure in the high flux isotope reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pure aluminum and some aluminum alloys were irradiated to very high neutron fluences in the cooling water at 328 K in the high flux region of HFIR. Displacement levels of 270 dpa and transmutation-produced silicon levels of 7.15 wt % were reached. Damage microstructures consisted of dislocations, cavities, and precipitates which caused substantial strengthening and associated loss in ductility. Formation of cavities and related swelling were considerably reduced by alloying elements and by the presence of fine Mg/sub 2/Si precipitate.

Farrell, K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Flanagan, G.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Engineering personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and with CS operations and hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment

68

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has established programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit awareness of public and worker safety, health, and environmental protection requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 2) Criteria * Line management has integrated programs within its existing ISMS and implementing mechanisms that appropriately address the major changes implemented during this outage, notably the CS, in order to continue to assure safe accomplishment of work. * Senior management and RRD management exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation, with emphasis on the

69

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) OBJECTIVE QA-1: The RRD QA program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, and sufficient numbers of qualified QA personnel are provided to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation. The QA functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. QA personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of QA personnel related to reactor

70

PREPARING THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR FOR CONVERSION TO LOW ENRICHED URANIUM FUEL ? EXTENDING CYCLE BURNUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor performance studies have been completed for conceptual plate designs and show that maintaining reactor performance while converting HFIR from high enriched to low enriched uranium (20 wt % 235U) fuel requires extending the end-of-life burnup value for HFIR fuel from the current nominal value of 2200 MWD to 2600 MWD. The current fuel fabrication procedure is discussed and changes that would be required to this procedure are identified. Design and safety related analyses that are required for the certification of a new fuel are identified. Qualification tests and comments regarding the regulatory approval process are provided along with a conceptual schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) OBJECTIVE EW-1: UT-Battelle line management has established environmental protection and waste management programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work (or is adequately applying an existing, approved program). Personnel exhibit an awareness of environmental protection and waste management requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 14) Criteria * All environment compliance and waste management matrix support functions are identified for HFIR's operations. * Appropriate environmental protection/waste management plans and procedures for HFIR have been issued. * Adequate staffing is available to support the environmental protection and

72

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Occupational Safety & Health OBJECTIVE ESH-1: Personnel exhibit an awareness of public and worker safety and health requirements and, through their actions, demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Should also be coordinated with OP-1, MT-1, AB-2, EP-1, and ES-2) (CR-1) Criteria Personnel understand their right and responsibility to identify safety issues and invoke work suspension and stop work authority when necessary. Personnel anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and appropriately respond to hazards that may be present in the work place. Approach Record Review: Review the site policies and procedures which promote the identification and promulgation of safety concerns and work suspension and stop work

73

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) OBJECTIVE IS&H-1: The RRD industrial safety and hygiene (IS&H) program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified IS&H staff and management are provided, and adequate IS&H facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation with the CS. The IS&H functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. IS&H staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-

74

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS OPERATIONS OBJECTIVE OP-1: Operations staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to CS operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of reactor operations and CS system operations managers and staff related to CS operations, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS is adequate based on interviews. Sufficient numbers of qualified reactor operations and CS system operations staff and management are available to conduct and support safe operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. (CR - 1, CR - 4, CR - 6) Criteria * Minimum staffing requirements have been established for operations and support

75

Multiphysics Simulations of the Complex 3D Geometry of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel Elements Using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research and development project is ongoing to convert the currently operating High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from highly-enriched Uranium (HEU U3O8) fuel to low-enriched Uranium (LEU U-10Mo) fuel. Because LEU HFIR-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL is chosen to provide the needed multiphysics simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and calculations, and predict the performance of the LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. The focus of this paper is on the unique issues associated with COMSOL modeling of the 3D geometry, meshing, and solution of the HFIR fuel plate and assembled fuel elements. Two parallel paths of 3D model development are underway. The first path follows the traditional route through examination of all flow and heat transfer details using the Low-Reynolds number k-e turbulence model provided by COMSOL v4.2. The second path simplifies the fluid channel modeling by taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge provided by decades of design and safety analyses, data from experiments and tests, and HFIR operation. By simplifying the fluid channel, a significant level of complexity and computer resource requirements are reduced, while also expanding the level and type of analysis that can be performed with COMSOL. Comparison and confirmation of validity of the first (detailed) and second (simplified) 3D modeling paths with each other, and with available data, will enable an expanded level of analysis. The detailed model will be used to analyze hot-spots and other micro fuel behavior events. The simplified model will be used to analyze events such as routine heat-up and expansion of the entire fuel element, and flow blockage. Preliminary, coarse-mesh model results of the detailed individual fuel plate are presented. Examples of the solution for an entire fuel element consisting of multiple individual fuel plates produced by the simplified model are also presented.

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

Primm, R.T., III

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the bounds of known technology and are adaptable to the high-volume production required to process {approx} 2.5 to 4 tons of U/Mo and produce {approx}16,000 flat plates for U.S. reactors annually ({approx}10,000 of which are needed for HFIR operations). The reference flow sheet is not intended to necessarily represent the best or the most economical way to manufacture a LEU foil fuel for HFIR but simply represents a 'snapshot' in time of technology and is intended to identify the process steps that will likely be required to manufacture a foil fuel. Changes in some of the process steps selected for the reference flow sheet are inevitable; however, no one step or series of steps dominates the overall flow sheet requirements. A result of conceptualizing a reference flow sheet was the identification of the greater number of steps required for a foil process when compared to the dispersion fuel process. Additionally, in most of the foil processing steps, bare uranium must be handled, increasing the complexity of these processing areas relative to current operations. Based on a likely total cost of a few hundred million dollars for a new facility, it is apparent that line item funding will be necessary and could take as much as 8 to 10 years to complete. The infrastructure cost could exceed $100M.

Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assumptions and criteria for performing a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the operating power for the High Flux Isotope Reactor when fuelled with low enriched uranium (LEU). Uncertainties in the fuel fabrication and inspection processes are reviewed for the current fuel cycle [highly enriched uranium (HEU)] and the impact of these uncertainties on the proposed LEU fuel cycle operating power is discussed. These studies indicate that for the power distribution presented in a companion paper in these proceedings, the operating power for an LEU cycle would be close to the current operating power. (authors)

Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6399 (United States); Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Moses, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6050 (United States); Binder, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6162 (United States); Xoubi, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, Rhodes Hall, ML 72, PO Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cross section generation and physics modeling in a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study has been initiated at ORNL to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The current study is limited to steady-state, nominal operation and are focused on the determination of the fuel requirements, primarily density, that are required to maintain the performance of the reactor. Reactor physics analyses are reported for a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. An LEU core design has been obtained and requires an increase in {sup 235}U loading of a factor of 1.9 over the current HEU fuel. These initial results indicate that the conversion from HEU to LEU results in a reduction of the thermal fluxes in the central flux trap region of approximately 9 % and in the outer beryllium reflector region of approximately 15%. Ongoing work is being performed to improve upon this initial design to further minimize the impact of conversion to LEU fuel. (authors)

Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

86

Use of a cryogenic sampler to measure radioactive gas concentrations in the main off-gas system at a high-flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for measuring gamma-emitting radioactive gases in air has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This method combines a cryogenic air-sample collector with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy system. This methodology was developed to overcome the inherently difficult collection and detection of radioactive noble gases. The cryogenic air-sampling system and associated HPGe detector has been used to measure the concentration of radioactive gases in the primary coolant main off-gas system at ONRL's High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper provides: (1) a description of the cryogenic sampler, the radionuclide detection technique, and a discussion of the effectiveness of sampling and detection of gamma-emitting noble gases; (2) a brief description of HFIR and its associated closed high off-gas system; and (3) quantification of gamma-emitting gases present in the off-gas of the HFIR primary core coolant (e.g. radioisotopes of argon, xenon, and krypton).

Berven, B.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Kark, J.B.; Gibson, M.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

88

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

91

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

92

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

93

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

94

Molecular isotopic effects on coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes  

SciTech Connect

A full quantum treatment shows that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes exhibit a strong sensitivity to a small mass change in a vibrating molecule. This has been exemplified with the existing isotopes of H{sub 2}{sup +} as well as few fictitious ones. We find that the fluxes undergo a significant change as one goes from one isotope of reduced mass {mu} to another. Other well-defined observables are likewise affected. It turns out that as a general rule, the heavier the isotope, the larger the flux, the smaller the dispersion, and the longer the revival period. While we were able to confirm analytically that the time at the first turning point scales as {radical}({mu}) and that the revival period changes linearly with {mu}, the mechanism of other observables remains subtle as the result of quantum interference highlighted by the pronounced difference observed on the dispersion pattern.

Kenfack, A.; Paulus, B. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Barth, I. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Marquardt, F. [Visualisierung und Datenanalyse, Zuse Institut Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007, A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Managment Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

96

The Effects of Flux Spectrum Perturbation on Transmutation of Actinides: Optimizing the Production of Transcurium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

This research presented herein involves the optimization of transcurium production in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Due to the dependence of isotope cross sections on incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the flux spectrum. There are certain energy bands in which the rate of fission of transcurium production feedstock materials is minimized, relative to the rate of non-fission absorptions. It is proposed that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to increase the amount of key isotopes, such as 249Bk and 252Cf, that are produced during a transmutation cycle, relative to the consumption of feedstock material. This optimization process is carried out by developing an iterative objective framework involving problem definition, flux spectrum and cross section analysis, simulated transmutation, and analysis of final yields and transmutation parameters. It is shown that it is possible to perturb the local flux spectrum in the transcurium target by perturbing the composition of the target. It is further shown that these perturbations are able to alter the target yields in a non-negligible way. Future work is necessary to develop the optimization framework, and identify the necessary algorithms to update the problem definition based upon progress towards the optimization goals.

Hogle, Susan L [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

98

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

Scott, S.W.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center...

102

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

104

Isotope correlation studies relative to high enrichment test reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

Several correlations of fission product isotopic ratios with atom percent fission and neutron flux, for highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel irradiated in two different water moderated thermal reactors, have been evaluated. In general, excellent correlations were indicated for samples irradiated in the same neutron spectrum; however, significant differences in the correlations were noted with the change in neutron spectrum. For highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel, the correlation of the isotopic ratio /sup 143/Nd//sup 145 +146/Nd with atom percent fission has wider applicability than the other fission product isotopic ratio evaluated. The /sup 137/Cs//sup 135/Cs atom ratio shows promise for correlation with neutron flux. Correlations involving heavy element ratios are very sensitive to the neutron spectrum.

Maeck, W.J.; Tromp, R.L.; Duce, F.A.; Emel, W.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities HFIR How to Work with HFIR How to Work with HFIR HFIR Workflow Please contact the experiment interface or coordinator for additional information and...

106

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

108

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

110

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

112

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A...

113

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor...

114

High-Precision Isotopic Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sources, is now capable of measuring isotope ratios with ... revolution in the use of isotopes by revealing ... This program will have an impact in several ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Plutonium isotopic analysis of highly enriched mixed oxides  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the analysis method used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine the plutonium isotopic composition of highly enriched mixed oxides (MOX). The IAEA currently uses the Cicero multichannel analyzer and the IAEAPU algorithm for its analysis. In our investigation the plutonium isotopic measurements were found to be good for PuO/sub 2/ powder or low-enriched MOX, but acceptable for highly enriched MOX in IAEA special nuclear material (SNM) accountability applications. The gamma-ray interferences from /sup 235/U resulted in underestimation of the isotopic composition of /sup 239/Pu and overestimation of all other plutonium isotopes. Samples with high /sup 240/Pu content were found to have significantly higher error in plutonium isotopic analyses of highly enriched MOX. Code modifications or use of calibration curves are necessary for plutonium isotopic analyses of highly enriched MOX in IAEA SNM accountability applications.

Clement, S.D.; Augustson, R.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 2, Interpretation and validation of results  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5/MOD2 code was used to predict the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the HFIR core during decay heat removal through boiling natural circulation. The low system pressure and low mass flux values associated with boiling natural circulation are far from conditions for which RELAP5 is well exercised. Therefore, some simple hand calculations are used herein to establish the physics of the results. The interpretation and validation effort is divided between the time average flow conditions and the time varying flow conditions. The time average flow conditions are evaluated using a lumped parameter model and heat balance. The Martinelli-Nelson correlations are used to model the two-phase pressure drop and void fraction vs flow quality relationship within the core region. Systems of parallel channels are susceptible to both density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations. Periodic variations in the mass flux and exit flow quality of individual core channels are predicted by RELAP5. These oscillations are consistent with those observed experimentally and are of the density wave type. The impact of the time varying flow properties on local wall superheat is bounded herein. The conditions necessary for Ledinegg flow excursions are identified. These conditions do not fall within the envelope of decay heat levels relevant to HFIR in boiling natural circulation. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ruggles, A.E.; Morris, D.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Available Technologies: Real Time High Throughput Isotopic ...  

Space exploration; Any scientific research involving the tracking of isotopic labels, as in: Solar power; Scintillators (deuterated, 10 B, 6 Li, 3 He) Batteries (doping)

120

Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division Home Reactor Projects Celebrating DOE's Cleanup Accomplishments (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) HFBR Overview HFBR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision HFBR Complex Cleanup Actions HFBR Documents HFBR Science & Accomplishments Groundwater Protection Group Environmental Protection Division Contact > See also: HFBR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor Under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) underwent stabilization and partial decommissioning to prepare the HFBR confinement for long-term safe

122

Preliminary Notice of Violation - High Flux Isotope Reactor,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work processes involving HFIR maintenance planning, implementation and post maintenance testing; (2) work processes involving REDC operations; (3) quality improvement and...

123

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? HFBR The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is being decommissioned because the Department of Energy (DOE) decided in 1999 that it would be permanently closed. The reactor was shut down in 1997 after tritium from a leak in the spent-fuel pool was found in the groundwater. The HFBR, which had operated from 1965 to 1996, was used solely for scientific research, providing neutrons for materials science, chemistry, biology, and physics experiments. The reactor was shut down for routine maintenance in November of 1996. In January 1997, tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen and a by-product of reactor operations, was found in groundwater monitoring wells immediately south of the HFBR. The tritium

124

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of Isotope Separation as Applied to the Large~scale Production of 235 u National Nuclear Energy

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Remote high temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in high temperature environments. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet light. The luminescence emitted by the two thermographic-phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, B.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Design of a high-gain flux-compression generator  

SciTech Connect

The current gain of a high-gain, high-explosive helical magnetic-flux-compression generator (HEG) is limited both by nonuniformities in stator expansion and by armature-stator misalignment. We set out to achieve three goals: first, an output current of at least 2 MA with a current gain greater than 1000 to drive a 150- to 300-nH load; second, a generator with an acceptably small volume and length; and finally, generator output of a reliable magnitude. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Pincosy, P.A.; Abe, D.K.; Chase, J.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Computer Study of Isotope Production in High Power Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for radionuclide production calculation in a high power proton accelerator have been developed and applied to study production of 22 isotopes by high-energy protons and neutrons. These methods are readily applicable to accelerator, and reactor, environments other than the particular model we considered and to the production of other radioactive and stable isotopes. We have also developed methods for evaluating cross sections from a wide variety of sources into a single cross section set and have produced an evaluated library covering about a third of all natural elements. These methods also are applicable to an expanded set of reactions. A 684 page detailed report on this study, with 37 tables and 264 color figures is available on the Web at http://t2.lanl.gov/publications/publications.html, or, if not accessible, in hard copy from the authors.

Van Riper, K A; Wilson, W B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Computer Study of Isotope Production in High Power Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for radionuclide production calculation in a high power proton accelerator have been developed and applied to study production of 22 isotopes by high-energy protons and neutrons. These methods are readily applicable to accelerator, and reactor, environments other than the particular model we considered and to the production of other radioactive and stable isotopes. We have also developed methods for evaluating cross sections from a wide variety of sources into a single cross section set and have produced an evaluated library covering about a third of all natural elements. These methods also are applicable to an expanded set of reactions. A 684 page detailed report on this study, with 37 tables and 264 color figures is available on the Web at http://t2.lanl.gov/publications/publications.html, or, if not accessible, in hard copy from the authors.

K. A. Van Riper; S. G. Mashnik; W. B. Wilson

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

134

High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Neutron Flux Measurements and Calculations in the Gamma Irradiation Facility Using MCNPX.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma irradiation facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)is used to deliver a pure gamma dose to any target of interest. in addition… (more)

Giuliano, Dominic Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

Camil Ghiu

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-Voltage Power Supply System for Laser Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents several concepts for Laser High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS) Systems for a Laser Isotope Separation facility. Selection of equipments and their arrangement into operational systems is based on proven designs and on application concepts now being developed. This report has identified a number of alternative system arrangements and has provided preliminary cost estimates for each. The report includes a recommendation for follow-on studies that will further define the optimum Laser HVPS Systems. Brief descriptions are given of Modulator/Regulator circuit trade-offs, system control interfaces, and their impact on costs.

Ketaily, E.C.; Buckner, R.P.; Uhrik, R.L.

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

High-Resolution Satellite Surface Latent Heat Fluxes in North Atlantic Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new high-resolution satellite-derived ocean surface flux product, XSeaFlux, which is evaluated for its potential use in hurricane studies. The XSeaFlux employs new satellite datasets using improved retrieval methods, and uses ...

Jiping Liu; Judith A. Curry; Carol Anne Clayson; Mark A. Bourassa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world`s premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR`s value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory`s scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor`s research capabilities.

Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

1974-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production Typical capsules used in the transport of 252Cf source material inside heavily shielded shipping casks. ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), and Irradiated Materials Examination Testing facility (IMET) are routinely used in the production, purification, packaging, and shipping of a number of isotopes of national importance, including: 75Se, 63Ni, 238Pu, 252Cf, and others. The intense neutron flux of the HFIR (2.0 x 1015 neutrons/cm²·s) permits the rapid formation of such isotopes. These highly irradiated materials are then processed and packaged for shipping using the facilities at the REDC, IFEL, and IMET.

147

Parallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbonate rocks record the inorganic carbon isotope composition of the oceanic reservoir through geologicalParallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur, University of California-Riverside, Riverside California 92521-0423, USA b Department of Geological Sciences

Saltzman, Matthew R.

148

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar regions have great sensitivity to climate forcing; however, understanding of the physical processes coupling the atmosphere and ocean in these regions is relatively poor. Improving our knowledge of high-latitude surface fluxes will require close ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Sarah T. Gille; Cecilia Bitz; David Carlson; Ivana Cerovecki; Carol Anne Clayson; Meghan F. Cronin; Will M. Drennan; Chris W. Fairall; Ross N. Hoffman; Gudrun Magnusdottir; Rachel T. Pinker; Ian A. Renfrew; Mark Serreze; Kevin Speer; Lynne D. Talley; Gary A. Wick

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PRELIMINARY HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BROOKHAVEN HIGH FLUX BEAM RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Beam Reactor, HFBR, is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water and designed to produce 40 Mw with a total epithermal flux of ~1.6 X 10/sup 15/cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ and a flector thermal maximum flux of 7 X 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, using a core formed by ETR plate-type fuel elements in a close-packed array. The hazards summary is given in terms of site description, reactor design, building design, plant operation, disposal of radioactive wastes and effluents, and safety analysis. (B.O.G.)

Hendrie, J.M.; Kouts, H.J.C.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15-year life, has no embrittlement, and produces 50 standard cubic feet per hour per square foot (scfhft 2 ) of ultra high purity hydrogen at P 200 pounds per square inch...

152

ORNL Facilities and Equipment for Use in High-Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................2 High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR of pressure conditions ranging from high vacuum to 15 atm in liquid nitrogen. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), a DOE National User Facility (CMSD) Description: HFIR is a versatile, 85-MW isotope production and test

153

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Since early 1900-s, when vacuum techniques and ion detectors first enabled investigations of gas-phase ions, two approaches to their separation and characterization have emerged - mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both exploit that distinct charged species move in electric fields differently, MS is performed in vacuum and is based only on the ion mass/charge (m/q) ratio while IMS involves sufficiently dense buffer gases and relies on ion transport properties. The first major discovery enabled by MS was the existence of isotopes by Thomson and Aston,3 and isotopic analyses have since been integral to MS. In particular, the preparative separation of U isotopes using Lawrence’s Calutron was the first industrial application of MS,4 and isotopic labeling is key to MS quantification methods. With IMS, the issue of isotopes was largely ignored as the resolving power (R) was generally too low for their separation. Here, we demonstrate that recently developed high-resolution differential IMS can separate isotopic molecular ions, including nominal isobars with different isotopic content and isotopomers. This capability may enable a new method for isotope separation in a small-scale format at ambient pressure and aid localization of labeled sites in various molecules. Perhaps most importantly, the isotopic shifts depend on the labeled atom position and thus may contain the kind of detailed structural information that is available in solution or solid state using tools such as NMR but has not generally been obtainable for gas-phase ions.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Clemmer, David E.; Smith, Richard D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels ~30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm2. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant–hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Exotic fission properties of highly neutron-rich Uranium isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The series of Uranium isotopes with $N=154 \\sim 172$ around the magic number N=162/164 are identified to be thermally fissile. The thermal neutron fission of a typical representative $^{249}$U of this region amenable to synthesis in the radioactive ion beam facilities is considered here. Semiempirical study of fission barrier height and width shows this nucleus to be infinitely stable against spontaneous fission due to increase in barrier width arising out of excess neutrons. Calculation of probability of fragment mass yields and microscopic study in relativistic mean field theory, show this nucleus to undergo a new mode of thermal fission decay termed {\\it multifragmentation fission} where a number of prompt scission neutrons are simultaneously released along with the two heavy fission fragments.

L. Satpathy; S. K. Patra; R. K. Choudhury

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dry Blending to Achieve Isotopic Dilution of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide Materials  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war produced large amounts of excess fissile materials in the United States and Russia. The Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies for disposition of these excess materials. To date, many of these planning strategies have included isotopic dilution of highly enriched uranium as a means of reducing the proliferation and safety risks. Isotopic dilution by dry blending highly enriched uranium with natural and/or depleted uranium has been identified as one non-aqueous method to achieve these risk (proliferation and criticality safety) reductions. This paper reviews the technology of dry blending as applied to free flowing oxide materials.

Henry, Roger Neil; Chipman, Nathan Alan; Rajamani, R. K.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

High-resolution clouds and radiative fluxes from satellites| Transferabilty of methods and application to monsoon issues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? High-resolution information on clouds and radiative fluxes is produced for the Indian and African monsoon regions of interest to the GEWEX Project as articulated… (more)

Wonsick, Margaret M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Compact high-flux two-stage solar collectors based on tailored edge-ray concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach permits the design of compact two-stage high-flux solar collectors, with a focusing primary reflector and a non-imaging TERC secondary reflector. We present a new primary reflector shape based on the TERC approach and a secondary TERC tailored to its particular flux map, such that more compact concentrators emerge at flux concentration levels in excess of 90% of the thermodynamic limit. Calculations and raytrace simulation results are also offered which demonstrate that V-cone approximations to a wide variety of TERCs attain the concentration of the TERC to within a few percent. These V-cones represent practical secondary concentrators that may be superior to corresponding compound parabolic concentrator or trumpet secondaries. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Friedman, R.P. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Gordon, J.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel)]|[Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) OBJECTIVE CM-1: The facility systems and procedures, as affected by the facility modifications, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (Core Requirement 9) Criteria * The CS and reactor systems affected by the CS and facility modifications are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA. * The reactor and CS procedures (including system drawings, operating procedures, annunciator response procedures, abnormal operating procedures, emergency operating procedures, surveillance test procedures, and other procedures affected by the CS modification) are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSAs.

164

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management and Organization Management and Organization OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has integrated within its existing ISM system and implementing mechanisms, programs that appropriately address CS operations, hazards, and reactor interface to assure safe accomplishment of work. Safety management programs of particular interest include the following (CR - 1): * maintenance and testing (addressed by MT-1) * conduct of operations (addressed by OP-1and -5) * training/qualification (addressed by TR-1) * nuclear safety (addressed by AB-2) * emergency management (addressed by EP-1and -2) * configuration management (addressed by ES-3) * fire protection (addressed by ESH-4) * industrial safety and hygiene (addressed by ESH-2) * quality assurance (addressed by ESH-6)

165

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAINING AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) TRAINING AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) OBJECTIVE TQ-1: The RRD selection, training, and qualification program for operations and operations support personnel has been established, documented, and implemented. The selection process and applicable position-specific training for managers ensures competence commensurate with responsibilities. (The training and qualification program encompasses the range of duties and activities that are required to be performed.) (Core Requirement 3) Criteria * The RRD training program has been defined, established, documented, and implemented. An assigned RRD staff member tracks the training requirements, including site-level training requirements, and completion by RRD personnel. * The selection process and implementation of position-specific training for

166

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP) OBJECTIVE EP-1: A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. (Core Requirement 11) Criteria * Reactor operation with the CS has been appropriately incorporated into the emergency preparedness hazards analysis and emergency response procedures. * The implemented routine and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have incorporated the CS SSCs and the CS's operation, hazards, and reactor interface. * Proficiency to appropriately respond to incidents and accidents associated with reactor operation has been demonstrated through the implemented routine and emergency operations drill program. Approach Record Review: Examine ORNL/RRD/INT-114, HFIR Emergency Planning Hazards

167

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRE PROTECTION (FP) FIRE PROTECTION (FP) OBJECTIVE FP-1: The fire protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified fire protection personnel are available to support operations, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure fire protection services are adequate for operations. The fire protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships, including those between the line operating organization and the fire protection organization, are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management responsibility for control of safety. The level of knowledge of fire protection personnel related to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards is adequate.

168

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Oversight DOE Oversight OBJECTIVE DOE-1: The DOE field office oversight programs, such as occurrence reporting, facility representative, corrective action, and quality assurance programs, are adequate. (Core Requirement 18) Criteria * The DOE field office oversight programs, such as occurrence reporting, facility representative, corrective action, and quality assurance programs, have been documented in ORO directives and are adequate. * The DOE oversight program is adequate and effective. Approach Record Review: Evaluate the assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships of the DOE Facility Representative(s) and program elements to ensure that Headquarters program direction is properly implemented. Review a sample of the Facility Representative's logs and ORION walkthrough reports.

169

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE AND TESTING (MT) MAINTENANCE AND TESTING (MT) OBJECTIVE MT-1: A program is in place to confirm and periodically reconfirm the condition and operability of safety SSCs. This includes examinations of test and calibration records of these systems. The material condition of all safety, process, and utility systems will support the safe conduct of work. (Core Requirement 8) Criteria * A test program is in place to confirm the condition and operability of safety SSCs for HFIR. * Testing is performed after maintenance activities to confirm the effectiveness of the maintenance and the operability of safety SSCs. * Surveillance testing is performed to maintain the operability of safety SSCs consistent with the TSR surveillance requirements. * The material condition of all safety, process, and utility systems will support

170

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) OBJECTIVE OP-1: The formality and discipline of operations are adequate to conduct work safely, and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline (e.g., DOE Order 5480.19). (Core Requirement 13) Criteria * The formality and discipline of operations are adequate to conduct work safely, and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. * Implementation of ADM-0001, HFIR Conduct of Operations, is adequate for operations. * Implementation of ADM-0601, Cold Source Conduct of Operations, is adequate for operations. Approach Record Review: Review of ADM-0601 and ADM-0001 to confirm that those procedures fully capture the expectations for formality and discipline of operations.

171

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management Configuration Management OBJECTIVE CM-1: The CS system and reactor systems affected by the CS modification and associated drawings are consistent with the description and accident analysis included in the DSA and a system to maintain control over their design and modification is established. (CR-9) Criteria * The design requirements have been formally established, documented, and maintained for the CS. * An adequate process has been implemented to ensure that documentation for systems critical to the safety of the facility during operation with the CS exists and is kept current as appropriate for their safety functions, and the documentation is available to the operators. * Cold Source and reactor interface equipment has been included in the

172

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING ENGINEERING OBJECTIVE ES-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR- 6) Criteria * The engineering organization and associated programs are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and

173

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training & Qualification Training & Qualification OBJECTIVE TR-1: The selection, training and qualification programs associated with CS modifications, operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS have been established, documented, and implemented. The selection process and applicable position-specific training for managers and staff, associated with CS modifications and hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen- moderated CS ensures competence commensurate with responsibilities (the training and qualification program encompasses the range of duties required to be performed). (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The Training program is established, documented, and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

174

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE MT-1: The maintenance and test programs have been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified maintenance and testing staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR - 1, CR - 2, CR - 6) Criteria * The maintenance and test programs and organizations are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

175

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION (RP) OBJECTIVE RP-1: The RRD radiological protection program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified radiological protection personnel are provided, and adequate radiological protection facilities and equipment are available to ensure that services are adequate to conduct and support HFIR operation. The radiological protection functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Radiological protection personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable radiological protection requirements pertaining to HFIR operation and the associated hazards.

176

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Preparedness Emergency Preparedness OBJECTIVE EP-1: The emergency preparedness program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified emergency preparedness staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria * The emergency preparedness program and organization are established and functioning to support the RRD operations organization. Functions,

177

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) OBJECTIVE NS-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure that nuclear safety services are adequate to support HFIR operation with the CS. The nuclear safety functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. The level of knowledge of nuclear safety personnel with respect to operation of HFIR with the CS is adequate. (Core Requirements 1, 2, 4, and 6) Criteria * The nuclear safety program is established and functioning to support HFIR

178

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT AUTHORIZATION BASIS MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVE AB-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety staff and management are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support operations with the CS modification. Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. (CR-1, CR-2, CR-6) Criteria The nuclear safety program and organization are established and functioning to support reactor operations with the CS modification. Functions, responsibilities, and

179

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORIZATION BASIS (AB) AUTHORIZATION BASIS (AB) OBJECTIVE AB-1: Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the safety envelope of the facility. The safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should identify preventive and mitigating measures (such as systems, procedures, and administrative controls) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. The SSCs are defined, and a system to maintain control over their design and modification is established. Adequate, correct procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the process and utility systems that include revisions for the modifications that have been made to the facility. (Core Requirements 7, 10, and 14)

180

Impact induced response spectrum for the safety evaluation of the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic impact to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel caused by heavy load drop is analyzed. The impact calculation is carried out by applying the ABAQUS computer code. An impact-induced response spectrum is constructed in order to evaluate whether the HFIR vessel and the shutdown mechanism may be disabled. For the frequency range less than 10 Hz, the maximum spectral velocity of impact is approximately equal to that of the HFIR seismic design-basis spectrum. For the frequency range greater than 10 Hz, the impact-induced response spectrum is shown to cause no effect to the control rod and the shutdown mechanism. An earlier seismic safety assessment for the HFIR control and shutdown mechanism was made by EQE. Based on EQE modal solution that is combined with the impact-induced spectrum, it is concluded that the impact will not cause any damage to the shutdown mechanism, even while the reactor is in operation. The present method suggests a general approach for evaluating the impact induced damage to the reactor by applying the existing finite element modal solution that has been carried out for the seismic evaluation of the reactor.

Chang, S.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Proposal: Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;User Program and Community ­ User Statistics HFIR FY 2009HFIR FY 2009 Goal 300Goal 300SNS FY 2009SNS FY 2009 Goal 260Goal 260 358358 307307 250 300 350 400 queUsers 09 50 100 150 200 HFIR SNS 200 250 HFIR SNS niqueUsers 009 6060 3232 44 3030 11 6767 3737 11 2727 11 50 100 NumberofUn FY20 2

182

Reference (Axially Graded) Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past five years, staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have studied the issue of whether the HFIR could be converted to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel without degrading the performance of the reactor. Using state-of-the-art reactor physics methods and behind-the-state-of-the-art thermal hydraulics methods, the staff have developed fuel plate designs (HFIR uses two types of fuel plates) that are believed to meet physics and thermal hydraulic criteria provided the reactor power is increased from 85 to 100 MW. The paper will present a defense of the results by explaining the design and validation process. A discussion of the requirements for showing applicability of analyses to approval for loading the fuel to HFIR lead test core irradiation currently scheduled for 2016 will be provided. Finally, the potential benefits of upgrading thermal hydraulics methods will be discussed.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Meeting notes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) futures group  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the notes from the ten meetings. The group charter is: (1) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities and necessities for keeping the HFIR operating for at least the next 15 years; (2) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities for enhancing the scientific and technical utility of the HFIR; (3) to evaluate the benefits or impacts of these possibilities on the various scientific fields that use the HFIR or its products; (4) to evaluate the benefits or impacts on the operation and maintenance of the HFIR facility and the regulatory requirements; (5) to estimate the costs, including operating costs, and the schedules, including downtime, for these various possibilities; and one possible impact of proposed changes may be to stimulate increased pressure for a reduced enrichment fuel for HFIR.

Houser, M.M. [comp.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recent High Heat Flux Tests on W-Rod-Armored Mockups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the authors initial high heat flux tests on small mockups armored with W rods, done in the small electron beam facility (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, the mockups exhibited excellent thermal performance. However, to reach high heat fluxes, they reduced the heated area to only a portion ({approximately}25%) of the sample. They have now begun tests in their larger electron beam facility, EB 1200, where the available power (1.2 MW) is more than enough to heat the entire surface area of the small mockups. The initial results indicate that, at a given power, the surface temperatures of rods in the EB 1200 tests is somewhat higher than was observed in the EBTS tests. Also, it appears that one mockup (PW-10) has higher surface temperatures than other mockups with similar height (10mm) W rods, and that the previously reported values of absorbed heat flux on this mockup were too high. In the tests in EB 1200 of a second mockup, PW-4, absorbed heat fluxes of {approximately}22MW/m{sup 2} were reached but the corresponding surface temperatures were somewhat higher than in EBTS. A further conclusion is that the simple 1-D model initially used in evaluating some of the results from the EBTS testing was not adequate, and 3-D thermal modeling will be needed to interpret the results.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; MCDONALD,JIMMIE M.; LUTZ,THOMAS J.; MISZKIEL,MARK E.

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field about the ion geometry, potentially enabling a new approach to molecular structure characterization

Clemmer, David E.

186

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial and atmospheric neutron flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under current conditions, the cosmic ray spectrum incident on the Earth is dominated by particles with energies solar flares, supernovae and gamma ray bursts produce high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) with drastically higher energies. The Earth is likely episodically exposed to a greatly increased HECR flux from such events, some of which lasting thousands to millions of years. The air showers produced by HECRs ionize the atmosphere and produce harmful secondary particles such as muons and neutrons. Neutrons currently contribute a significant radiation dose at commercial passenger airplane altitude. With higher cosmic ray energies, these effects will be propagated to ground level. This work shows the results of Monte Carlo simulations quantifying the neutron flux due to high energy cosmic rays at various primary energies and altitudes. We provide here lookup tables that can be used to determine neutron fluxes from primaries with total energies 1 GeV - 1 PeV. By convolution, one can compute the neutron flux for any arbitrary CR spectrum. Our results demonstrate that deducing the nature of primaries from ground level neutron enhancements would be very difficult.

Andrew Overholt; Adrian Melott; Dimitra Atri

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Equation-of-state for fluids at high densities-hydrogen isotope measurements and thermodynamic derivations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen isotopes play an important role in energy technologies, in particular, the compression to high densities for initiation of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy. At high densities the properties of the compressed hydrogen isotopes depart drastically from ideal thermodynamic predictions. The measurement of accurate data including the author's own recent measurements of n-H/sub 2/ and n-D/sub 2/ in the range 75 to 300 K and 0.2 to 2.0 GPa (2 to 20 kbar) is reviewed. An equation-of-state of the Benedict type is fit to these data with a double-process least-squares computer program. The results are reviewed and compared with existing data and with a variety of theoretical work reported for fluid hydrogens. A new heuristic correlation is presented for simplicity in predicting volumes and sound velocity at high pressures. 9 figures, 1 table.

Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

Pond, R. B.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A High-Flux, Flexible Membrane with Parylene-encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present fabrication and characterization of a membrane based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene. Carbon nanotubes have shown orders of magnitude enhancement in gas and water permeability compared to estimates generated by conventional theories [1, 2]. Large area membranes that exhibit flux enhancement characteristics of carbon nanotubes may provide an economical solution to a variety of technologies including water desalination [3] and gas sequestration [4]. We report a novel method of making carbon nanotube-based, robust membranes with large areas. A vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube array is infiltrated with parylene. Parylene polymer creates a pinhole free transparent film by exhibiting high surface conformity and excellent crevice penetration. Using this moisture-, chemical- and solvent-resistant polymer creates carbon nanotube membranes that promise to exhibit high stability and biocompatibility. CNT membranes are formed by releasing a free-standing film that consists of parylene-infiltrated CNTs, followed by CNT uncapping on both sides of the composite material. Thus fabricated membranes show flexibility and ductility due to the parylene matrix material, as well as high permeability attributed to embedded carbon nanotubes. These membranes have a potential for applications that may require high flux, flexibility and durability.

Park, H G; In, J; Kim, S; Fornasiero, F; Holt, J K; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Identifying the sources of subsurface contamination at the Hanford site in Washington using high-precision uranium isotopic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.K. and Cowart, J.B. in Uranium Series Disequilibrium:using High-Precision Uranium Isotopic Measurements John N.groundwater plume of uranium (U) was detected in monitoring

Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Flux Pinning and AC Loss in Second Generation High Temperature Superconductor Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major advances have been made in the last 18 years in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) reserach and development, resulting in increased use of HTS materials in commerical and pre-commercial electric-power applications. This new and important book addresses the issues related to flux pinning, AC losses and thick YBCO film growth. Written by top most scientists in the world, it presents the current status and issues related to YBCO coated conductors and the need for further fundamental materials science work in YBCO coated conductor. It will be a useful handbook for years to come.

Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

198

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Coherent Doppler Profiler for High-Resolution Particle Velocimetry in the Ocean: Laboratory Measurements of Turbulence and Particle Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler has been developed for high-resolution particle velocimetry in the ocean, in particular for remote measurements of suspended sediment flux and turbulence in the nearshore and continental shelf ...

Len Zedel; Alex E. Hay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Preliminary investigation of actinide and xenon reactivity effects in accelerator transmutation of waste high-flux systems  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of an unstable positive reactivity growth in an accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW)-type high-flux system is investigated. While it has always been clear that xenon is an important actor in the reactivity response of a system to flux changes, it has been suggested that in very high thermal flux transuranic burning systems, a positive, unstable reactivity growth could be caused by the actinides alone. Initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change caused by the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or startup. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response caused by the actinides. The capabilities and applications of both the current actinide model and the xenon model are discussed. Finally, the need for a complete dynamic model for the high-flux fluid-fueled ATW system is addressed.

Olson, K.R.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics; Woosley, M.L. Jr. [Univ. of virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering; Sailor, W.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Estimations of Mass Fluxes for Cumulus Parameterizations from High-Resolution Spatial Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core of the mass flux formulation, on which the majority of the current cumulus parameterizations are based, is to transport physical variables by the so-called mass flux for individual physical components, such as convective updrafts, ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Francoise Guichard; Jean-Philippe Lafore; Jean-Luc Redelsperger; Peter Bechtold

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Interdecadal Variability of the Thermohaline Circulation and High-Latitude Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized North Atlantic Ocean model is forced by climatological wind stress, restoring temperature, and a diagnosed salinity flux. Both centennial and interdecadal oscillations are sustained in the model if the diagnosed salinity flux is ...

Fei Chen; Michael Ghil

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nanofluid-based receivers for high-temperature, high-flux direct solar collectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar power plants with surface receivers have low overall energy conversion efficiencies due to large emissive losses at high temperatures. Alternatively, volumetric receivers promise increased performance because solar ...

Lenert, Andrej

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Spray-Mediated Enthalpy Flux to the Atmosphere and Salt Flux to the Ocean in High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts for the intensity and intensity changes of tropical cyclones have not improved as much as track forecasts. In high winds, two routes exist by which air and sea exchange heat and momentum: by spray-mediated processes and by interfacial ...

Edgar L. Andreas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

SciTech Connect

We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN'S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN'S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN'S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN'S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN'S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN'S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN'S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN'S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN'S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

New high-flux two-stage optical designs for parabolic solar concentrators  

SciTech Connect

We present a new two-stage optical design for parabolic dish concentrators that can realistically attain close to 90% of the thermodynamic limit to concentration with practical, compact designs (e.g., at parabola rim half-angles of around 45[degrees]). For comparison, the parabolic dish-plus-compound parabolic concentrator secondary design, at this rim angle, achieves no more than 50% of the thermodynamic limit. Our new secondary concentrator is tailored to accept edge rays from the parabolic primary, and incurs less than one reflection on average. It necessitates displacing the absorber from the parabola's focal plane, along the concentrator's optic axis, toward the primary reflector, and constructing the secondary between the absorber and the primary. The secondary tailored edge-ray concentrators described here create new possibilities for building compact, extremely high flux solar furnaces and/or commercial parabolic dish systems.

Friedman, R.P.; Gordon, J.M. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer (Israel) Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel)); Ries, H. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Bulk Turbulent Air–Sea Flux Algorithm for High-Wind, Spray Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible and latent heat can cross the air–sea interface by two routes: as interfacial fluxes controlled by molecular processes right at the interface, and as spray fluxes from the surface of sea spray droplets. Once the 10-m wind speed over the ...

Edgar L. Andreas; P. Ola G. Persson; Jeffrey E. Hare

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding luminosity and redshift to permit estimates of the neutrino flux.

D. Besson; S. Razzaque; J. Adams; P. Harris

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redirecting Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum Yu Deng a,c , Daniel G. Olson a,c , Jilai Zhou a,c , Christopher D. Herring a,b,c , A. Joe Shaw d , Lee R. Lynd a,b,c,n a Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA b Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA d Novogy, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02138, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 August 2012 Received in revised form 6 November 2012 Accepted 16 November 2012 Available online 29 November 2012 Keywords: Clostridium thermocellum Ethanol yield Pyruvate kinase Malate shunt a b s t r a c t In Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium able to rapidly ferment cellulose to ethanol, pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) is absent based on both the genome sequence and enzymatic

213

High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development  

SciTech Connect

Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

Rei, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Controls on Fluxes of Mercury in Aquatic Food Webs: Application of the Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model to Four Enclosure Experiments w ith Additions of Stable Mercury Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New controls on utility mercury emissions are under consideration in order to limit human exposure to mercury resulting from fish consumption. Evaluation of such measures requires an understanding of how mercury cycles through lakes and streams. This report describes the application of EPRI's Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM) to experiments involving the addition of stable mercury Hg(II) isotopes to four 10-meter-diameter enclosures in a lake.

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux approx. = 1 x 10/sup 18/ ions s/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ to a fluence of the order of 10/sup 21/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and at temperatures around 800/sup 0/C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480/sup 0/C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10/sup 17/ H/cm/sup 2/. The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs.

Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Design of Phosphor Thermometry System for Transient High Heat Flux Surface Thermometry  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: A transformative calibration methodology is presented for predicting transient surface temperatures in a thermally conducting medium from in-depth, time-varying temperature measurements. The surface temperature is resolved using two experimental runs and a newly devised first-kind Volterra integral equation. The first experimental run involves calibration with known surface temperature while the second run involves resolving the surface temperature of interest through the ill-posed integral equation. This paper presents the concept genesis and numerically demonstrates the concept for feasibility, robustness, stability and accuracy. From this demonstration, we propose to implement surface placed thermographic phosphors in the calibration stage of the inverse method for estimating the required surface temperature. As a preliminary study, we consider transient, constant property, onedimensional heat conduction in a semi-infinite medium. It is mathematically demonstrated that a Volterra integral equation of the first kind is developed for estimating the surface temperature using a calibrated system (host material and sensor). Sensor characterization, explicit sensor positioning and thermophysical properties are implicitly contained in the new calibration integral equation. The calibration integral equation displays only four terms; namely, the measured front surface temperature and corresponding measured in-depth temperature response associated with the calibration run; and, the unknown surface temperature and its measured in-depth temperature response associated with the second run. Preliminary numerical results indicate the merit of the concept. This paper suggests using thermographic phosphors for estimating the surface temperature in the calibration portion of the process owing to their rapid thermal response, good surface thermal contact characteristics and lack of capacitance for assuring minimal delay. Though the present paper describes the theoretical basis for resolving such problems, it is intended for near-term application using the UTK s high-heat flux laser facility which is presently under development

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Frankel, Jay I [ORNL; Beshears, David L [EMCO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A High-Volume Cryosampler and Sample Purification System for Bromine Isotope Studies of Methyl Bromide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system was developed for collecting from the ambient atmosphere the methyl halides CH3Cl and CH3Br in quantities sufficient for chlorine and bromine isotope analysis. The construction and operation of the novel cryogenic collection system (...

Brett F. Thornton; Axel Horst; Daniel Carrizo; Henry Holmstrand; Per Andersson; Patrick M. Crill; Örjan Gustafsson

222

A High-Volume Cryosampler and Sample Purification System for Bromine Isotope Studies of Methyl Bromide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system was developed for collecting from the ambient atmosphere the methyl halides CH3Cl and CH3Br in quantities sufficient for chlorine and bromine isotope analysis. The construction and operation of the novel cryogenic collection system (...

Brett F. Thornton; Axel Horst; Daniel Carrizo; Henry Holmstrand; Per Andersson; Patrick M. Crill; Örjan Gustafsson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modernization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to Provide a Cold Neutron Source and Experimentation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the installation of a cold neutron source at HFIR with respect to the project as a modernization of the facility. The paper focuses on why the project was required, the scope of the cold source project with specific emphasis on the design, and project management information.

Rothrock, Benjamin G [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Biosynthetic Approaches to Isotope Enrichment for Applications in Neutron Scattering and High Field NMR Spectroscopy: Methylotrophic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations in current isotopic labeling methods present a substantial bottleneck for the application of advanced structural techniques to many important biochemical problems. New tools are required to efficiently produce the necessary labeling patterns in biochemical precursors and incorporate them into protein molecules for structural studies. This project proposed involved one aspect of this problem, the development of expression vectors for a methylotrophic bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. If high-level, efficient expression could be obtained in such a bacterium, it would be possible to use low-cost {sup 2}H- and/or {sup 13}C-labeled substrates such as methanol to label proteins. The Lidstrom laboratory at the University of Washington worked closely with the collaborators at Los Alamos National Laboratories in the development and use of these vectors. (1) Overexpression of a target gene, bacterial dehalogenase--This enzyme was expressed in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 using a high level methanol-inducible promoter, the mxaF promoter. High expression was achieved, but most was in an insoluble form. They expressed this protein in a mutant lacking polybetahydroxybutyrate granules, and high expression was achieved, up to 10% of the total soluble protein. The recombinant protein was purified and shown to be active, with characteristics similar to the enzyme produced in E. coli. (2) Development of regulated expression systems--A number of regulated promoters were tested in M. extorquens AM1, the most promising of which appeared to be the E. coli lac promoter coupled to the Laciq regulator. The repressor was shown to be active and a chromosomal insertion construct was generated that repressed the low-level lac promoter activity in M. extorquens AM1. However, IPTG induced this system only poorly. A number of studies were carried out leading to the conclusion that IPTG entered the cell but was exported by one or more export pumps. Target genes for such pumps were mutated but none of these showed increased induction. A number of methods were used to permeabilize the cell, and a 2-fold increase in induction was obtained with one of these. The activity of the lac promoter was increased by inserting a recently-identified M. extorquens AM1 enhancer element upstream. The promoter increased in activity 5-6 fold with this addition. In summary, they have developed a suite of expression tools and host mutant strains for expressing a variety of heterologous proteins in this methylotroph. These are now available for testing by the LANL collaborators in labeling reactors to obtain labeled proteins of interest.

Mary E. lidstrom

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Neutron scattering workshop promotes high-pressure research ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

long-term goals in these areas closer to reality, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), home of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, is hosting...

230

New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Design, construction, and operation of a laboratory scale reactorfor the production of high-purity, isotopically enriched bulksilicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operation of a recirculating flow reactor designed to convert isotopically enriched silane to polycrystalline Si with high efficiency and chemical purity is described. The starting material is SiF{sub 4}, which is enriched in the desired isotope by a centrifuge method and subsequently converted to silane. In the reactor, the silane is decomposed to silicon on the surface of a graphite starter rod (3 mm diameter) heated to 700-750 C. Flow and gas composition (0.3-0.5% silane in hydrogen) are chosen to minimize the generation of particles by homogeneous nucleation of silane and to attain uniform deposition along the length of the rod. Growth rates are 5 {micro}m/min, and the conversion efficiency is greater than 95%. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si deposited along a 150 mm length of the rod. After removal of the starter rod, dislocation-free single crystals are formed by the floating zone method. Crystals enriched in all 3 stable isotopes of Si have been made: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (88.25%). Concentrations of electrically active impurities (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.

Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on simulations of CO2 concentrations, the model could be used for other atmospheric compounds with known estimated emissions.

Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

Shanahan, K.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR (abstract)[sup a  

SciTech Connect

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A high order kinetic flux-vector splitting method for the reduced five-equation model of compressible two-fluid flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a high order kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) scheme for the numerical solution of a conservative interface-capturing five-equation model of compressible two-fluid flows. This model was initially introduced by Wackers and Koren (2004) ... Keywords: 35L45, 35L65, 35L67, 65M99, 65Y99, 76T99, Central schemes, Conservation laws, Five-equation model, Hyperbolic systems, Kinetic flux-vector splitting schemes, Shock solutions

Shamsul Qamar; Munshoor Ahmed

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Constraints on the Extremely-high Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux with the IceCube 2008-2009 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for extremely-high energy neutrinos with energies greater than $10^6$ GeV using the data taken with the IceCube detector at the South Pole. The data was collected between April 2008 and May 2009 with the half completed IceCube array. The absence of signal candidate events in the sample of 333.5 days of livetime significantly improves model independent limit from previous searches and allows to place a limit on the diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos with an $E^{-2}$ spectrum in the energy range $2.0 \\times 10^{6}$ $-$ $6.3 \\times 10^{9}$ GeV to a level of $E^2 \\phi \\leq 3.6 \\times 10^{-8}$ ${\\rm GeV cm^{-2} sec^{-1}sr^{-1}}$.

IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; J. Braun; A. M. Brown; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirörs; T. Denger; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hülß; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nießen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; T. Schmidt; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stössl; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; M. Stür; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle length. Consequently, ANL and ILL have collaborated to investigate alternative designs. A promising candidate design has been selected and studied, increasing the total amount of fuel without changing the external plate dimensions by relocating the burnable poison. In this way, changes required in the fuel element are reasonably small. With this new design, neutronics analyses have shown that performance could be maintained at a high level: 2 day decrease of cycle length (to 47.5 days at 58.3 MW) and 1-2% decrease of brightness in the cold and hot sources in comparison to the current typical operation. In addition, studies have shown that the thermal-hydraulic and shutdown margins for the proposed LEU design would satisfy technical specifications.

Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO{sub 2} emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of about 100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Kevin R. Gurney; Daniel L. Mendoza; Yuyu Zhou; Marc L. Fischer; Chris C. Miller; Sarath Geethakumar; Stephane de la Rue du Can [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences/Department of Agronomy

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Oxygen Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of...

244

Development of the OSO-6 high-energy neutron detector and correlation of measured solar neutron fluxes to solar flares  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. The development of a directional high energy (20 to 160 MeV) neutron detector which was flown to satellite altitudes (500 km; circular equatorial orbit) in the NASA Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-6) in August 1969 is described. Both the angle of incidence and the energy of the neutron are determined by a proton-recoil telescope (Pilot B scintillation plastic) which provides the source for proton-recoils and defines the dE/dX versus E method for particle identification and energy determination. The telescope is embedded in a scintillation plastic guard counter envelope which eliminates the unwanted charged particle background as well as recoil protons (electrons) whose energies and direction do not satisfy neutron (gamma-ray) detection requirements, respectively. Results from a Monte Carlo calculation indicate that the overall average efficiency within an average angular acceptance of about 29 deg (FWHM) is approximately (2.25 plus or minus 0.113) x 10/sup -4/. The inflight calibration procedure, the main frame data bit error analysis, and the method for determining the orientation of the detector axis in the spacecraft spin plane are described. Results indicate a discrepancy in the measured (0.461 x 10/sup -2/ plus or minus 0.254 x 10/sup -2/ n/cm/sup 2/sec) and theoretical (2 to 70 n/cm/ sup 2/sec) neutron flux es which suggests a lack of basic underatanding of mechanisms leading to high energy neutron production at the sun. (auth)

Young, F.

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

247

Conservative Transport Schemes for Spherical Geodesic Grids: High-Order Flux Operators for ODE-Based Time Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher-order finite-volume flux operators for transport algorithms used within Runge–Kutta time integration schemes on irregular Voronoi (hexagonal) meshes are proposed and tested. These operators are generalizations of third- and fourth-order ...

William C. Skamarock; Almut Gassmann

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Relative Humidity Effect on the High-Frequency Attenuation of Water Vapor Flux Measured by a Closed-Path Eddy Covariance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the high-frequency loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) fluxes, measured by a closed-path eddy covariance system, were studied, and the related correction factors through the cospectral transfer function method were ...

Ivan Mammarella; Samuli Launiainen; Tiia Gronholm; Petri Keronen; Jukka Pumpanen; Üllar Rannik; Timo Vesala

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

HEXOS—Humidity Exchange Over the Sea A Program for Research on Water-Vapor and Droplet Fluxes from Sea of Air at Moderate to High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEXOS is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray-droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field at moderate-to-high wind speeds, wind-tunnel studies, instrument development, boundary-layer ...

Kristina B. Katsaros; Stuart D. Smith; Wiebe A. Oost

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

DENSE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED MONITORING OF CTA 102 DURING HIGH STATE IN 2012 WITH OISTER: DETECTION OF INTRA-NIGHT ''ORPHAN POLARIZED FLUX FLARE''  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CTA 102, classified as a flat spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.037, produced an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2012 September. Following the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of enhanced {gamma}-ray activity, we closely monitored this source in the optical and near-infrared bands for the 10 subsequent nights using 12 telescopes in Japan and South Africa. On MJD 56197 (2012 September 27, four to five days after the peak of bright {gamma}-ray flare), polarized flux showed a transient increase, while total flux and polarization angle (PA) remained almost constant during the ''orphan polarized-flux flare.'' We also detected an intra-night and prominent flare on MJD 56202. The total and polarized fluxes showed quite similar temporal variations, but the PA again remained constant during the flare. Interestingly, the PAs during the two flares were significantly different from the jet direction. The emergence of a new emission component with a high polarization degree (PD) up to 40% would be responsible for the observed two flares, and such a high PD indicates the presence of a highly ordered magnetic field at the emission site. We argue that the well-ordered magnetic field and even the observed directions of the PA, which is grossly perpendicular to the jet, are reasonably accounted for by transverse shock(s) propagating down the jet.

Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Abe, Yuhei [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Arai, Akira [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Hayashi, Masahiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-2, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hori, Takafumi; Nakata, Chikako [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Isogai, Mizuki [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto-City 603-8555 (Japan); Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Honjo 3037-5, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Miyanoshita, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nakamoto, Jumpei [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Oasa, Yumiko, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Education, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

253

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 550 samples of fine grained carbonates, collected every 0.5 to 1.0 m from the Bloom Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation at Gallagher Peak, Idaho, were analyzed to determine the high-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy. To constrain for diagenesis, thin sections were petrographically analyzed and viewed using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using an electron microprobe. Average delta18O and delta13C values from the Bloom Member are -4.5% +/- 1.6% (1 sigma) and 2.1% +/- 1.1%, respectively. Maximum delta13C values are about 1% higher for the Desmoinesian and Missourian than the Morrowan and Atokan, similar to results from the Yukon Territory. delta18O and delta13C values are lowest for crystalline mosaic limestones and siltstones, moderate for packstones, wackestones, and mudstones, and highest for boundstones and grainstones. The delta13C profile from Gallagher Peak consists of high frequency 1% oscillations with several larger excursions. No large delta13C increase at the base of the section suggests the Mid-Carboniferous boundary is in the underlying Bluebird Mountain formation. delta13C of Gallagher Peak and Arrow Canyon, NV, correlate well from 318 to 310 Ma, but correlation becomes more difficult around 310 Ma. This may result from increased restriction of the Snaky Canyon platform beginning in the Desmoinesian. Most of the short term (<1 Ma) isotopic excursions are the result of diagenesis. Two of the largest negative excursions at Gallagher Peak correlate with two large negative excursions at Big Hatchet Peak, NM, possibly due to sea level lowstands of the Desmoinesian. Phylloid algal mounds at Gallagher Peak are associated with positive excursions because of original aragonite composition and increased open marine influence. Positive excursions related to other facies characteristics also result from increased marine influence. The delta13C curve for the upper half of Gallagher Peak contains three repeated cycles of increasing delta13C over 1-1.5 Ma, which are possibly related to long-term sea level fluctuations. Given the complexity of each local environment, without detailed biostratigraphy, detailed rock descriptions, and analysis of the various rock components, delta13C stratigraphy of whole rocks can be misinterpreted.

Jolley, Casey

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

255

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

Haller, Eugene E.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

257

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

258

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nuclear Energy Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocol for Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 16, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/April16_02 NEPRI to NERAC.ppt (2) Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Why NEPRI? 6 NEPRI implements DOE funding priorities for fiscal year 2003 6 NEPRI will * Bring order to DOE's responses to requests for research isotopes * Introduce a high-quality peer review to the selection of research isotopes * Enable DOE to concentrate on operating its unique isotope production facilities Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose chemical compositions and magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions have been previously measured.

Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

263

ISOTOPE SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

Bacon, C.G.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Selective Isotope Determination of Uranium using HR-RIMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of lowest abundances of the ultra trace isotope {sup 236}U in environmental samples requires an efficient detection method which allows a high elemental and isotopic selectivity to suppress neighbouring isotopes of the same element and other background. High Resolution Laser Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-RIMS) uses the individual electron structure of each isotope to provide an outstanding element and isotope selective ionization.

Raeder, S.; Fies, S.; Wendt, K. D. A. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Tomita, H. [Nagoya University (Japan)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

Control of the radiant flux of high-temperature solar-energy installations with respect to two parameters  

SciTech Connect

The simultaneous control of both the power level and energy density level at the center of the focal plane of a high-temperature solar-energy installation with a paraboloid concentrator is considered.

Afyan, V.V.; Vartanyan, A.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Condensed-phase kinetic deuterium isotope effects in high-energy phenomena: Mechanistic investigations and relationships. Technical report, January 1975-December 1989  

SciTech Connect

The rate-controlling mechanistic step of an energetic material's condensed phase thermochemical decomposition process is determined directly using the kinetic deuterium isotope effect (KDIE) approach. The KDIE is used with isothermal DSC and isothermal TGA analyses of TNT, HNBB, TATB, RDX, HMX, and their deuterium labeled analogs. The decomposition processes' rate-controlling step possibly can change as the energetic material physical state varies. The condensed phase KDIE approach that determines the rate-controlling mechanistic step in a slow thermochemical decomposition process, can be extended into the progressively more drastic high energy regimes encountered with the rapid pyrolytic decomposition/deflagration process, plus the higher temperature/pressure combustion, thermal explosion, and detonation events. The KDIE determined mechanistic relationships between the slow thermochemical decomposition process and more hostile high energy events are individually described for HMX, RDX, TATB, and TNT.

Shackelford, S.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High-resolution data of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion from ODP sites 1063 and 983: Existence of intense flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution data of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion from ODP sites 1063 and 983-resolution records of the 185 kyr Iceland Basin (IB) geomagnetic excursion from Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site reserved. Keywords: Geomagnetic excursions; Iceland Basin excursion; Preferred VGP longitudes; Patches

Niocaill, Conall Mac

270

A theoretical analysis of the CH{sub 3} + H reaction : isotope effects, the high pressure limit, and transition state recrossing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of methyl radicals with hydrogen atoms is studied with a combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition state theory, and classical trajectory simulations. The interaction between the two radicals, including the umbrella mode of the methyl radical, is examined at the CAS+1+2 level using an augmented correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta basis set. The implementation of an analytic representation of the ab initio data within variable reaction coordinate transition state theory yields predictions for the zero-pressure limit isotopic exchange rate constants that are about 15% greater than the available experimental data. Trajectory simulations indicate that the transition state recrossing factor for the capture process is 0.90, essentially independent of temperature and isotope. The dynamically corrected theoretical prediction for the CH{sub 3} + H high pressure rate coefficient is well reproduced by the expression 1.32 x 10{sup -10}T{sup 0.153}exp(-15.1/RT) cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}, where R = 1.987 cal mole{sup -1} K{sup -1}, for temperatures between 200 and 2400 K. This prediction is in good agreement with the converted experimental data for all but the one measurement at 200 K. Calculations for the triplet abstraction channel suggest that it is unimportant. Methyl umbrella mode variations have surprisingly little effect on the predicted rate coefficients.

Klippenstein, S. J.; Georgievskii, Y.; Harding, L.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident  

SciTech Connect

A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Glossary Term - Isotope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helios Previous Term (Helios) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Joule) Joule Isotope The Three Isotopes of Hydrogen - Protium, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms that have the same number of...

276

Isotope ratio analysis of actinides, fission products, and geolocators by high-efficiency multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

A ThermoFisher 'Triton' multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometer (MC-TIMS) was evaluated for trace and ultra-trace level isotoperatioanalysis of actinides (uranium, plutonium, and americium), fission products and geolocators (strontium, cesium, and neodymium). Total efficiencies (atoms loaded to ions detected) of up to 0.5-2% for U, Pu, and Am, and 1-30% for Sr, Cs, and Nd can be reported employing resin bead load techniques onto flat ribbon Re filaments or resin beads loaded into a millimeter-sized cavity drilled into a Re rod. This results in detection limits of <0.1 fg (10{sup 4} atoms to 10{sup 5} atoms) for {sup 239-242+244}Pu, {sup 233+236}U, {sup 241-243}Am, {sup 89,90}Sr, and {sup 134,135,137}Cs, and {le} 1 pg for natural Nd isotopes (limited by the chemical processing blank) using a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) or multiple-ion counters (MICs). Relative standard deviations (RSD) as small as 0.1% and abundance sensitivities of 1 x 10{sup 6} or better using a SEM are reported here. Precisions of RSD {approx} 0.01-0.001% using a multi-collector Faraday cup array can be achieved at sub-nanogram concentrations for strontium and neodymium and are suitable to gain crucial geolocation information. The analytical protocols reported herein are of particular value for nuclear forensic and nuclear safeguard applications.

Bürger, Stefan [New Brunswick Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Riciputi, Lee R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bostick, Debra A [ORNL; Turgeon, Steven [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; McBay, Eddie H [ORNL; Lavelle, Mark [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Improved process for preparing strontium-82 isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for making {sup 82}Sr by bombarding a molybdenum target enriched in light-mass molybdenum isotopes with high energy protons resulting in high yield, high purity {sup 82}Sr.

Michaels, G.E.; Beaver, J.E.; Moody, D.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

Egle, Brian [ORNL; Aaron, W Scott [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for collecting isotopes having a high vapor pressure, such as isotopes of mercury, in a calutron are described. Heretofore, the collected material would vaporize and escape from the ion receiver as fast as it was received. By making the receiver of pure silver, the mercury isotopes form a nonvolatile amalgam with the silver at the water cooled temperature of the receiver, and the mercury is thus retained.

Leyshon, W.E.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

High flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [2] University of Utah. [3] ORNL. TLCCR - HFBS specific - TLCCR-HFBS. Terrence Udovic. Wed 06/26/2013 10:00, 1, Instrument Calibration, ...

283

High flux compact neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory andThis Work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory and

Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... note that a larger dynamic range will result in a proportionately longer measuring time (to achieve the same counting statistics, same energy bin size ...

285

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Method for separating isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

Jepson, B.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Isotopes: Isotope Production, Medical IsotopesOffice of Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managers Put a short description of the graphic or its primary message here Isotope Production and Applications The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive...

288

Isotope separation by photochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

Suslick, Kenneth S. (Stanford, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

On-Site Calibration for High Precision Measurements of Water Vapor Isotope Ratios Using Off-Axis Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements of atmospheric water vapor (?18Ov and ?2Hv) are scarce relative to those in precipitation. This limitation is rapidly changing due to advances in absorption spectroscopy technology and the development of ...

Joshua Rambo; Chun-Ta Lai; James Farlin; Matt Schroeder; Ken Bible

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Isotope Enrichment Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... incremental isotopic percentages which are compared with an input experimentally derived profile. The theoretical profile of 15 N percentage which ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

Haller, Eugene E.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags  

SciTech Connect

In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

302

Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.  

SciTech Connect

Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. For the nuclides with a very high capture microscopic cross section, such as iridium, rhenium, and samarium, their specific activities are reduced by a factor of 30 when the self-shielding effect is included. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to maximize the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shield effect reduces the specific activity values and changes the irradiation location for obtaining the maximum possible specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the specific activity were used to define the irradiation sample size for producing each isotope.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Equation of State and Material Property Measurements of Hydrogen Isotopes at the High-Pressure, High-Temperature, Insulator-Metal Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-intensity laser was used to shock compress liquid deuterium to pressures between 0.22 and 3.4 megabars (Mbar). Shock density, pressure, and temperature were determined using a variety of experimental techniques and diagnostics. This pressure regime spans the transformation of deuterium from an insulating molecular fluid to an atomic metallic fluid. Data reveal a significant increase in compressibility and a temperature inflection near 1 Mbar, both indicative of such a transition. Single-wavelength reflectivity measurements of the shock front demonstrated that deuterium shocked above {approx}0.5 Mbar is indeed metallic. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

Cauble, R.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Silva, L. B. da; Gold, D. M.; Foord, M. E.; Budil, K. S.; Wallace, R. J.; Ng, A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

313

Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural: Hydrological: Source of fluids, circulation, andor mixing. Thermal: Heat source and general reservoir temperatures Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis: Isotopes...

314

Isotope Enrichment | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern electromagnetic isotope separator developed and being scaled-up to replace the Manhattan Project-era Calutrons used for stable isotope enrichment. Since 1945, ORNL has...

315

Isotope GeochemistryIsotope Geochemistry Isotopes do not fractionate during partial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, due to U and Th decay The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb #12;The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb µ = 238U/204Pb Primeval lead (Isotope ratios of Pb tT t eea Pb Pb -µ+= 30.90 204 206 == a Pb Pb i 29.100 204 207 == b Pb Pb i #12;The isotope geology

Siebel, Wolfgang

316

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

SciTech Connect

The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Isotope Shift Measurements of Stable and Short-Lived Lithium Isotopes for Nuclear Charge Radii Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the mean-square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a new laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8 ms lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10,000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope Li-11 at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Nörtershäuser, W; Ewald, G; Dax, A; Behr, J; Bricault, P; Bushaw, B A; Dilling, J; Dombsky, M; Drake, G W F; Götte, S; Kluge, H -J; Kühl, Th; Lassen, J; Levy, C D P; Pachucki, K; Pearson, M; Puchalski, M; Wojtaszek, A; Yan, Z -C; Zimmermann, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat-source containment materials; (3) isotope brayton system materials support; and (4) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » Isotope Research » Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority

325

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

326

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energy’s tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

WJ Apley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Isotopes as Environmental Tracers in Archived Biological ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tissue Archival and Monitoring Program (STAMP ... and isotopes) and carbon/nitrogen (isotopes). The carbon/nitrogen isotope data provide valuable ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be p...

Zhan, H; Eisenstein, D J; Katz, N; Zhan, Hu; Dave, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel; Katz, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Stable Isotopes in Hailstones. Part I: The Isotopic Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations describing the isotopic balance between five water species (vapor, cloud water, rainwater, cloud ice and graupel)have been incorporated into a one-dimensional steady-state cloud model. The isotope contents of the various water ...

B. Federer; N. Brichet; J. Jouzel

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

Moore, M.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat source containment materials; (3) /sup 144/Cm fuel development; (4) terrestrial radioisotope applications; (5) selenide isotope generator system support; (6) isotope Brayton system materials support; and (7) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ISOTOPE SEPARATION AND ISOTOPE EXCHANGE. A Bibliography with Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The unclassified literature covering 2498 reports from 1907 through 1957 has been searched for isotopic exchange and isotepic separation reactions involving U and the lighter elements of the periodic chart through atomic number 30. From 1953 to 1957, all elements were included Numerous references to isotope properties, isotopic ratios, and kinetic isotope effects were included. This is a complete revision of TID-3036 (Revised) issued June 4, 1954. An author index is included. (auth)

Begun, G.M.

1959-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

Johnston, W.H.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

The rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The envisioned Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility would add substantially to research opportunities for nuclear physics and astrophysics by combining increased intensities with a greatly expanded variety of high-quality rare-isotope beams. A flexible superconducting driver linac would provide 100 kW, 400 MeV/nucleon beams of any stable isotope from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets. Combinations of projectile fragmentation, target fragmentation, fission, and spallation would produce the needed broad assortment of short-lived secondary beams. This paper describes the project's background, purpose, and status, the envisioned facility, and the key subsystem, the driver linac. RIA's scientific purposes are to advance current theoretical models, reveal new manifestations of nuclear behavior, and probe the limits of nuclear existence [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show, respectively, examples of RIA research opportunities and the yields projected for pursuing them. Figure 3 outlines a conceptual approach for delivering the needed beams.

Christoph Leemann

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method for separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of Computational Tools for Metabolic Model Curation, Flux Elucidation and Strain Design  

SciTech Connect

An overarching goal of the Department of EnergyÂ? mission is the efficient deployment and engineering of microbial and plant systems to enable biomass conversion in pursuit of high energy density liquid biofuels. This has spurred the pace at which new organisms are sequenced and annotated. This torrent of genomic information has opened the door to understanding metabolism in not just skeletal pathways and a handful of microorganisms but for truly genome-scale reconstructions derived for hundreds of microbes and plants. Understanding and redirecting metabolism is crucial because metabolic fluxes are unique descriptors of cellular physiology that directly assess the current cellular state and quantify the effect of genetic engineering interventions. At the same time, however, trying to keep pace with the rate of genomic data generation has ushered in a number of modeling and computational challenges related to (i) the automated assembly, testing and correction of genome-scale metabolic models, (ii) metabolic flux elucidation using labeled isotopes, and (iii) comprehensive identification of engineering interventions leading to the desired metabolism redirection.

Maranas, Costas D

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

349

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)  

SciTech Connect

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After careful planning and input from regulatory agencies and the community, a decommissioning plan for the HFBR has been finalized. A Feasibility Study was completed and a...

352

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been taken to partially decommission and prepare the HFBR for safe storage. Final decommissioning of the HFBR building will be performed at the completion of the decay period. The...

353

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports HFBR Waste Loading Area, Soil Remediation (PDF) - July 2009 HFBR Decommissioning Project, Removal of the Control Rod Blades and Beam Plugs (PDF) - January 2010...

354

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

355

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February...

356

Sub-Nanometer Resolution 3D Mapping of Isotopically Modulated Si ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D atom-by-atom isotopic maps with sharp interfaces are achieved. .... Silicon Coated Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as High Capacity Anodes for Lithium ...

357

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

359

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

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361

Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin cover and 330 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH{sub 4} mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area.

Abichou, Tarek [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)]. E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu; Chanton, Jeffery [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Powelson, David [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Fleiger, Jill [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Escoriaza, Sharon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lei, Yuan [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Stern, Jennifer [Department of Geology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Observation of the Isotopic Evolution of PWR Fuel Using an Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By operating an antineutrino detector of simple design during several fuel cycles, we have observed long term changes in antineutrino flux that result from the isotopic evolution of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Measurements made with simple antineutrino detectors of this kind offer an alternative means for verifying fissile inventories at reactors, as part of IAEA and other reactor safeguards regimes.

Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R; Misner, A; Palmer, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Isotope-shift measurements of stable and short-lived lithium isotopes for nuclear-charge-radii determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8-ms-lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10 000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope {sup 11}Li at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Noertershaeuser, W.; Sanchez, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ewald, G.; Dax, A.; Goette, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kuehl, Th.; Wojtaszek, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Behr, J.; Bricault, P.; Dilling, J.; Dombsky, M.; Lassen, J.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bushaw, B. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Drake, G. W. F. [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Pachucki, K. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Puchalski, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, PL-60-780 Poznan (Poland); Yan, Z.-C. [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Molten Mold Flux Technology for Continuous Casting of the ULC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat flux from the molten steel to the cupper plate of the casting mold was .... of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD.

365

Isotopically labeled compositions and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds having stable isotopes .sup.13C and/or .sup.2H were synthesized from precursor compositions having solid phase supports or affinity tags.

Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kimball, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Williams, Robert F. (Los Alamos, NM); Martinez, Rudolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear Isotopic Dilution of Highly-Enriched Uranium-235 and Uranium-233 by Dry Blending via the RM-2 Mill Technology  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to identify strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. Two such materials are the off-specification highly enriched uranium-235 oxide powder and the uranium-233 contained in unirradiated nuclear fuel both currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the development of a technology that could dilute these materials to levels categorized as low-enriched uranium, or further dilute the materials to a level categorized as waste. This dilution technology opens additional pathways for the disposition of these excess fissile materials as existing processing infrastructure continues to be retired.

N. A. Chipman; R. N. Henry; R. K. Rajamani; S. Latchireddi; V. Devrani; H. Sethi; J. L. Malhotra

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

HEUNG, LEUNGK.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

1958-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

371

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

373

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Method of separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorne, James M. (Provo, UT); Cluff, Coran L. (Provo, UT); Hayes, John K. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

378

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Details Activities (61) Areas (32) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Origin of hydrothermal fluids; Mixing of hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies. Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in

380

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neptunium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Previous Element (Uranium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Plutonium) Plutonium Isotopes of the Element Neptunium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sulfur  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine Isotopes of the Element Sulfur Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

382

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Argon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine Previous Element (Chlorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Potassium) Potassium Isotopes of the Element Argon Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

383

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technetium Previous Element (Technetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhodium) Rhodium Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

385

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

386

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Thorium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium Isotopes of the Element Thorium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

387

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Protactinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thorium Previous Element (Thorium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Uranium) Uranium Isotopes of the Element Protactinium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

388

Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection December 11, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National Science Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 2007 Long Range Plan and the 2003 DOE report, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook." A Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) was used to solicit applications for the conceptual design and establishment of FRIB in order

389

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites

390

Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil  

SciTech Connect

Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

Egbert Schwartz

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

394

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

First AID (Atom counting for Isotopic Determination).  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has established an in vitro bioassay monitoring program in compliance with the requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. One aspect of this program involves monitoring plutonium levels in at-risk workers. High-risk workers are monitored using the ultra-sensitive Therrnal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) technique to ensure compliance with DOE standards. TIMS is used to measure atom ratios of 239Pua nd 240Puw ith respect to a tracer isotope ('Pu). These ratios are then used to calculate the amount of 239Pu and 240Pup resent. This low-level atom counting technique allows the calculation of the concentration levels of 239Pu and 240Pu in urine for at risk workers. From these concentration levels, dose assessments can be made and worker exposure levels can be monitored. Detection limits for TIMS analysis are on the order of millions of atoms, which translates to activity levels of 150 aCi 239Pua nd 500 aCi for 240Pu. pCi for Our poster presentation will discuss the ultra-sensitive, low-level analytical technique used to measure plutonium isotopes and the data verification methods used for validating isotopic measurements.

Roach, J. L. (Jeffrey L.); Israel, K. M. (Kimberly M.); Steiner, R. E. (Robert E.); Duffy, C. J. (Clarence J.); Roench, F. R. (Fred R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Studies in Photosynthesis with Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chlorophyll) SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS Fig, P Fig.2 Time of photosynthesis 60c.f M U 1646 Fig. 5 Fig. 8 Fig. 94705-eng-48 STUDIES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS WITH ISOTOPES M Calvin

Calvin, M.; Bassham, J.A.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The central bond [sup 13]C=[sup 13]C isotope effect for superconductivity in high-[Tc] [beta]*-(ET)[sub 2]I[sub 3] and its implications regarding the superconducting pairing mechanism  

SciTech Connect

The authors report a new study, based on dc magnetization measurements, of the superconducting isotope effect for [sup 13]C-substitution in the central C=C atoms of ET [bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene] in [beta]*-(ET)[sub 2]I[sub 3] [or [beta][sub H]-(ET)[sub 2]I[sub 3

Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Klemm, R.A.; Kumar, S.K.; Schlueter, J.A.; Ferraro, J.R.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Sutin, J.D.B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Parker, D.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Schirber, J.E.; Venturini, E.L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Stout, P. (Bio-Rad, Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and Al-Hf alloy heat sink system is capable of maintaining all system components below their maximum temperature limits. The maximum temperature of this conduction cooling system, 224.2°C (435.6 °F) occurs in a small, localized region in the heat sink structure near the core mid-plane. The total coolant flow rate requirement for this configuration is 207 L/min (54.7 gpm). The calculated Flow Instability Ratio and Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio for this configuration under nominal conditions are 6.5 and 8.0, respectively, which safely exceed the minimum values of 2.0. Materials and fabrication issues inspection revealed that the neutron absorber would probably best be made from powdered Al3Hf mixed with aluminum powder and extruded or hot isostatically pressed. Although Al3Hf has not been specifically studied extensively, its mechanical and chemical properties should be very much like Al3Zr, which has been studied. Its behavior under irradiation should be very satisfactory, and resistance to corrosion will be investigated to a limited extent in planned miniplate irradiation tests in ATR. Pressurized water systems needed to effect heat removal are already available in the ATR complex, and mixed gas temperature control systems needed to trim experiment temperatures have been engineered and need only be fabricated and installed. In sum, it appears the alternately cooled configuration arrived at can be very successful. The cost estimate for this configuration indicates to

Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Feldman, Barry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Materials at ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Nuclear materials Strategy: Take advantage of •Unique capabilities in synthesis, characterization, theory ... High Flux Isotope Reactor:

402

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Rapid Isotopic Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cameca IMS-1270 is a high sensitivity large ... the capability to screen the enrichment levels of ... a test run of 100 particles of highly enriched uranium. ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Eclipse Ice Core Accumulation and Stable Isotope Variability as an Indicator of North Pacific Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high accumulation rate and negligible amount of melt at Eclipse Icefield (3017 m) in the Saint Elias Range of Yukon, Canada, allows for the preservation of a high-resolution isotopic and glaciochemical records valuable for reconstruction of ...

Eric P. Kelsey; Cameron P. Wake; Kaplan Yalcin; Karl Kreutz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

409

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced Plasmas by Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry Title Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation...

410

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable. Fluid isotopes are used to characterize a fluids origin, age, and/or interaction with rocks or other fluids based on unique isotopic ratios or concentrations.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope geochemistry is an aspect of geology based upon study of the relative and absolute concentrations of the elements and their isotopes in

412

Definition: Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope analysis is the identification of isotopic signature, the distribution of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within chemical compounds. This can be applied to a food web to make it possible to draw direct inferences regarding diet, trophic level, and subsistence. Isotope ratios are measured using mass spectrometry, which separates the different isotopes of an element on the basis of their mass-to-charge

413

THE RISE AND FALL OF OPEN SOLAR FLUX DURING THE CURRENT GRAND SOLAR MAXIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use geomagnetic activity data to study the rise and fall over the past century of the solar wind flow speed V{sub SW}, the interplanetary magnetic field strength B, and the open solar flux F {sub S}. Our estimates include allowance for the kinematic effect of longitudinal structure in the solar wind flow speed. As well as solar cycle variations, all three parameters show a long-term rise during the first half of the 20th century followed by peaks around 1955 and 1986 and then a recent decline. Cosmogenic isotope data reveal that this constitutes a grand maximum of solar activity which began in 1920, using the definition that such grand maxima are when 25-year averages of the heliospheric modulation potential exceeds 600 MV. Extrapolating the linear declines seen in all three parameters since 1985, yields predictions that the grand maximum will end in the years 2013, 2014, or 2027 using V{sub SW}, F{sub S}, or B, respectively. These estimates are consistent with predictions based on the probability distribution of the durations of past grand solar maxima seen in cosmogenic isotope data. The data contradict any suggestions of a floor to the open solar flux: we show that the solar minimum open solar flux, kinematically corrected to allow for the excess flux effect, has halved over the past two solar cycles.

Lockwood, M.; Rouillard, A. P. [Space Environment Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Southampton University, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Finch, I. D. [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mike.lockwood@stfc.ac.uk

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Oak Ridge Isotope Production Cyclotron Facility and Target Handling  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee issued in August 2009 an Isotopes Subcommittee report that recommended the construction and operation of a variable-energy, high-current, multiparticle accelerator for producing medical radioisotopes. To meet the needs identified in the report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a commercial 70 MeV dual-port-extraction, multiparticle cyclotron to be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The conceptual design of the isotope production facility as envisioned would provide two types of targets for use with this new cyclotron. One is a high-power target cooled by water circulating on both sides, and the other is a commercial target cooled only on one side. The isotope facility concept includes an isotope target vault for target irradiation and a shielded transfer station for radioactive target handling. The targets are irradiated in the isotope target vault. The irradiated targets are removed from the target vault and packaged in an adjoining shielded transfer station before being sent out for postprocessing. This paper describes the conceptual design of the target-handling capabilities required for dealing with these radioactive targets and for minimizing the contamination potential during operations.

Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Egle, Brian [ORNL; Binder, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Tatum, B Alan [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Devore, Joe [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rennich, Mark [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Saltmarsh, Michael John [ORNL; Caldwell, Benjamin Cale [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Shell model description of zirconium isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate the low-lying spectra and several high-spin states of zirconium isotopes (Z=40) with neutron numbers from N=50 to N=58 using a large valence space with the {sup 78}Ni inert core, which a priori allows one to study the interplay between spherical and deformed configurations, necessary for the description of nuclides in this part of the nuclear chart. The effective interaction is derived by monopole corrections of the realistic G matrix. We reproduce essential nuclear properties, such as subshell closures in {sup 96}Zr and {sup 98}Zr. The spherical-to-deformed shape transition in {sup 100}Zr is addressed as well.

Sieja, K. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH., Planckstrasse 1, D-64-220 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nowacki, F. [Institute Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, Strasbourg (France); Langanke, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH., Planckstrasse 1, D-64-220 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean = 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were compared to CO2 fluxes measured by

418

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

420

Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, toxic contaminants that are released to the environment from various petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. In an effort to more clearly identify and trace sources of PAHs in the environment, purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing highly pure extracts using various chromatographic techniques. The method was refined by improving compound separations using purification techniques and high resolution chromatographic columns. The purification method consists of alumina/silica gel column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography and thin layer chromatography. The mean recovery of PAHs after the purification procedure was approximately 80 %. Sample purities after purification were verified by GC/FID and full scan mass spectrometry. To better resolve peaks and provide more accurate stable carbon isotope measurements, various gas chromatographic conditions were evaluated. The precision of the method ranged between 0.08 and 0.43 . The analytical protocols were evaluated to confirm compositional and stable isotopic integrity during purification and stable isotopic analysis. To confirm the utility of the purification and isotope analysis methods, various environmental samples from marine, land and lacustrine environments were analyzed. The isolates were analyzed for the composition and the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs. The stable carbon isotope ratio was measured by GC/IRMS and the results, along with quantitative compound compositions, were used to characterize and identify the contaminant sources. The sources of the PAHs in the study areas were differentiated by PAH molecular ratios and confirmed by stable carbon isotope ratios. This study confirms that compound specific isotope analysis of pollutants by GC/IRMS can be used to identify PAH sources in environmental samples. The study also confirms that the purification and stable carbon isotope analysis methods that were developed can be used to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs in environmental samples for the purpose of source identification. GC/IRMS measurement of stable isotopic compositions can be an effective fingerprinting method when used in conjunction with traditional molecular composition methods.

Kim, Moon Koo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

Fulkerson, E S

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nobelium) Nobelium Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained...

427

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neptunium) Neptunium Isotopes of the Element Uranium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

428

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium Isotopes of the Element Lithium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

429

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Helium) Helium Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

430

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Instrumentation & control architecture applied for a hydrogen isotopes storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of hydrogen storage used materials refers to their ability to high "connect" hydrogen, to have a large storage capacity, to be easily achievable and, if necessary, to allow its easy recovery. The metals and intermetallic compounds are ... Keywords: architecture, control system, hydrogen, isotopes, storage

Eusebiu Ilarian Ionete; Bogdan Monea

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope geochemistry is difficult because. Writing an effective book on geochemistry is thus even more difficult. Claude Allègre's Isotope Geology geochemistry book, given how effective the texts by Faure and Dickin are. However, Allègre's Isotope Geology

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

433

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the utilization of stable isotopes in geology, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, paleoceanography and elsewhere____________________________ ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION ____________________________ Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The term `isotope

Zeebe, Richard E.

434

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Radioisotope Radiochemical Separation & Processing Strategic Isotope Production Super Heavy Element Discovery Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems...

435

Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis  

isotopes for climate change and nuclear proliferation interests. The Invention Argonne scientists have created a novel method and system for

436

Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fact Sheet: Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.11.08 Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National

437

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

438

"Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present Mark Baskaran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 "Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present and Future Mark Baskaran 1.1 Introduction and Early History A large number of radioactive and stable isotopes of the first 95 elements unraveling many secrets of our Earth and its environmental health. These isotopes, because of their suitable

Baskaran, Mark

439

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

440

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.