Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

2

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

3

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

4

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

5

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

6

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

8

CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

9

CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

10

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

11

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Lujan Neutron Scattering...

12

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs.

Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon| ArgonneHigh Flux

19

High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

late 1950s as a production reactor to meet anticipated demand for transuranic isotopes ("heavy" elements such as plutonium and curium). HFIR today is a DOE Office of Science User...

20

CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

22

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

23

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

24

CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

25

CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

26

CRAD, Environmental Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

27

CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

28

CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

29

CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

30

CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

31

CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

32

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

33

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

34

CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

35

CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

36

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

37

CRAD, Quality Assurance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Quality Assurance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

38

High Flux Isotope Reactor | Neutron Science at ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home| Visitors|Upcoming EventsFriday, May 1, 2015High

39

Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

Thoms, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Determination of the theoretical feasibility for the transmutation of europium isotopes from high flux isotope reactor control cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a 100 MWth light-water research reactor designed and built in the 1960s primarily for the production of transuranic isotopes. The HFIR is equipped with two concentric cylindrical blade assemblies, known as control cylinders, that are used to control reactor power. These control cylinders, which become highly radioactive from neutron exposure, are periodically replaced as part of the normal operation of the reactor. The highly radioactive region of the control cylinders is composed of europium oxide in an aluminum matrix. The spent HFIR control cylinders have historically been emplaced in the ORNL Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The control cylinders pose a potential radiological hazard due to the long lived radiotoxic europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 155}Eu. In a 1991 health evaluation of WAG 6 (ERD 1991) it was shown that these cylinders were a major component of the total radioactivity in WAG 6 and posed a potential exposure hazard to the public in some of the postulated assessment scenarios. These health evaluations, though preliminary and conservative in nature, illustrate the incentive to investigate methods for permanent destruction of the europium radionuclides. When the cost of removing the control cylinders from WAG 6, performing chemical separations and irradiating the material in HFIR are factored in, the option of leaving the control cylinders in place for decay must be considered. Other options, such as construction of an engineered barrier around the disposal silos to reduce the chance of migration, should also be analyzed.

Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

Ruggles, A.E.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

Kohring, M.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Large break loss-of-coolant accident analyses for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was analyzed to evaluate it's response to a spectrum of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) with potential for leading to core damage. The MELCOR severe accident analysis code (version 1.7.1) was used to evaluate the overall dynamic response of HFIR. Before conducting LOCA analyses, the steady-state thermal-hydraulic parameters evaluated by MELCOR for various loop sections were verified against steady-state operating data. Thereafter, HFIR depressurization tests were simulated to evaluate the system pressure change for a given depletion in coolant inventory. Interesting and important safety-related phenomena were observed. The current analyses (which should be considered preliminary) that occur over a period from 1 to 3 seconds do not lead to core wide fuel melting. Core fluid flashing during the initial rapid depressurization does cause fuel temperature excursions due to adiabatic-like heatup. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Taleyarkhan, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Lessons Learned in the Update of a Safety Limit for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent unreviewed safety question (USQ) regarding a portion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) transient decay heat removal analysis focused on applicability of a heat transfer correlation at the low flow end of reactor operations. During resolution of this issue, review of the correlations used to establish the safety limit (SL) on reactor flux-to-flow ratio revealed the need to change the magnitude of the SL at the low flow end of reactor operations and the need to update the hot spot fuel damage criteria to incorporate current knowledge involving parallel channel flow stability. Because of the original safety design strategy for the reactor, resolution of the issues for the flux-to-flow ratio involved reevaluation of all key process variable SLs and limiting control settings (LCSs) using the current version of the heat transfer analysis code for the reactor. Goals of the work involved updating and upgrading the SL analysis where necessary, while preserving the safety design strategy for the reactor. Changes made include revisions to the safety design criteria at low flows to address the USQ, update of the process- and analysis input-variable uncertainty considerations, and upgrade of the safety design criteria at high flow. The challenges faced during update/upgrade of this SL and LCS are typical of the problems found in the integration of safety into the design process for a complex facility. In particular, the problems addressed in the area of instrument uncertainties provide valuable lessons learned for establishment and configuration control of SLs for large facilities.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as the code''). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

Freels, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as ``the code``). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

Freels, J.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A system analysis computer model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIRSYS Version 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system transient analysis computer model (HFIRSYS) has been developed for analysis of small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and operational transients. The computer model is based on the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) that produces the FORTRAN code automatically and that provides integration routines such as the Gear`s stiff algorithm as well as enabling users with numerous practical tools for generating Eigen values, and providing debug outputs and graphics capabilities, etc. The HFIRSYS computer code is structured in the form of the Modular Modeling System (MMS) code. Component modules from MMS and in-house developed modules were both used to configure HFIRSYS. A description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, theoretical bases for the modeled components of the system, and the verification and validation efforts are reported. The computer model performs satisfactorily including cases in which effects of structural elasticity on the system pressure is significant; however, its capabilities are limited to single phase flow. Because of the modular structure, the new component models from the Modular Modeling System can easily be added to HFIRSYS for analyzing their effects on system`s behavior. The computer model is a versatile tool for studying various system transients. The intent of this report is not to be a users manual, but to provide theoretical bases and basic information about the computer model and the reactor.

Sozer, M.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL] [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL] [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reactor physics input to the safety analysis report for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HFIR specific, few group neutron and coupled neutron-gamma libraries have been prepared. These are based on data from ENDF/B-V and beginning-of-life (BOL) conditions. The neutron library includes actinide data for curium target rods. Six critical experiments, collectively designated HFIR critical experiment 4, were analyzed. Calculated k-effective was 2% high at BOL-typical conditions but was 1.0 at end-of-life-typical conditions. The local power density distributions were calculated for each of the critical experiments. The axially averaged values at a given radius were frequently within experimental error. However at individual points, the calculated local power densities were significantly different from the experimentally derived values (several times greater than experimental uncertainty). A reassessment of the foil activation data with transport theory techniques seems desirable. Using the results of the critical experiments study, a model of current HFIR configuration was prepared. As with the critical experiments, BOL k-effective was high (3%). However, end-of-life k-effective was high (2%). The end-of-life concentrations of fission products were compared to those generated using the ORIGEN code. Agreement was generally good through differences in the inventories of some important nuclides, Xe and I, need to be understood. End-of-cycle curium target isotopics based on measured, discharged target rods were compared to calculated values and agreement was good. Axial flux plots at various irradiation positions were generated. Time-dependent power distributions based on two-dimensional calculations were provided.

Primm, R.T. III.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

60

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A...

62

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Radioisotopic Impurities in Promethium-147 Produced at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??There is an intense interest in the availability of radioactive isotopes that could be developed into nuclear batteries. Promethium-147 is one of the isotopes of… (more)

Hinderer, James Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S. [comp.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Flanagan, G.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam Wildgruber, wildgrubercu@ornl.gov. VISION CallforProposals neutrons.ornl.gov Neutron Scattering Science - Oak time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Spallation Neutron Source

Pennycook, Steve

75

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

Primm, R. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, R. J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, J. C. [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, K. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, K. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Moses, D. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

80

High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon| ArgonneHigh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios High EnergyEliane

82

Large break loss of coolant severe accident sequences at the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of many potential HFIR severe accident phenomena was conducted during the HFIR design effort, and many severe accident mitigating features were designed into the plant. These evaluation typically incorporated a bounding'' or highly conservative analysis approach and employed tools and techniques representative of the state of knowledge in the mid-1960s. Recently, programs to address severe accident issues were initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and equipment qualification and accident management studies. This paper presents the results of environment condition calculations conducted to evaluate a response of HFIR's heat exchanger cell environment to a double-ended rupture of a 0.25 m diameter coolant loop downstream of the circulating pump and check valve. The confinement calculations were performed using an atmospheric fission product source for the heat exchanger cell consistent with, but more conservative than that stipulated in Regulatory Guide 1.89. The results of the calculations indicate that the heat exchanger cell atmospheric temperature peaks at 377 K 225 seconds into the transient and then begins decreasing at approximately 1.7 K per minute. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Simpson, D.B.; Greene, S.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

Primm, R.T., III

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Trace Element and Isotopic Fluxes/ Subducted Slab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.20.7.2.1 Devolatilization 34 3.20.7.2.2 Boron and lithium isotopes 35 3.20.7.3 Carbon and Nitrogen forearcs. In addi- tion, subduction erosion from the forearc hanging walls can impact geochemical evolut

Bebout, Gray E.

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

89

High Heat Flux Components Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

Whitley, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

93

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulf of Mexico Fact SheetHFIR User

94

High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

95

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

96

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers November 2006; published 4 May 2007. [1] Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils-based technique to investigate the relative importance of three mechanisms for explaining landscape

98

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February...

100

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A...

102

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

103

Long-Term Assessment of Isotopic Exchange of Carbon Dioxide in a Subalpine Forest (Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux Site)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005 we began a long-term measurement program of CO{sub 2} and its stable isotopes at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site. Measurements are ongoing.

Bowling, David [University of Utah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

High flux isotope reactor. Quarterly report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine reactor operation with four end-of-cycle shutdowns and one scheduled shutdown for training purposes resulted in an on-stream time of 92.1% for the quarter. The outer control plates were changed. The control plate track guide bearings, the control plate extension tubes, and the shock absorbers were replaced and a semiannual core component inspection was made. Cracks were discovered in the outermost ring of the beryllium reflector.

Corbett, B.L.; Poteet, K.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) subcriticality monitoring methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of subcritical source multiplication measurements during refueling has been investigated as a possible replacement for out-of-reactor subcriticality measurements formerly made on fresh HFIR fuel elements at the ORNL Critical Experiment Facility. These measurements have been used in the past for preparation of estimated critical rod positions, and as a partial verification, prior to reactor startup, that the requirements for operational shutdown margin would be met. Results of subcritical count rate data collection during recent HFIR refuelings and supporting calculations are described illustrating the intended measurement method and its expected uncertainty. These results are compared to historical uses of the out-of-reactor core measurements and their accuracy requirements, and a planned in-reactor test is described which will establish the sensitivity of the method and calibrate it for future routine use during HFIR refueling. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rothrock, R.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High flux isotope reactor: Quarterly report October through December 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two routine cycles of operation of the HFIR reactor were completed during the quarter. The shutdowns to end these cycles were both scheduled. The end-of-cycle 287 shutdown was extended indefinitely to investigate the embrittlement of reactor vessel materials due to radiation damage. The reactor remains down at the end of the quarter. Following the scheduled end-of-cycle 287 shutdown period, subsequent shutdown time was designated as unscheduled. The two scheduled shutdowns, fourth quarter downtime resulting from a third quarter scheduled shutdown, and the extended unscheduled shutdown account for the low 44.2% on-stream time for the quarter. The scheduled control plate replacement and vessel internals inspection was completed at the end-of-cycle 287. The inspection revealed a blister on control cylinder 9. This flaw was attributed to a manufacturing defect.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High Flux Isotope Reactor quarterly report, January-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four routine cycles of operation were completed during the first quarter. Four scheduled end-of-cycle shutdowns and two unscheduled shutdowns resulted in an on-stream time of 86.9%. An unscheduled control plate and control cylinder replacement was performed after tantalum contamination in the primary coolant system was traced to the inner cylinder.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Flux Isotope Reactor quarterly report, April-June 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four routine cycles of operation were completed during the second quarter. Four scheduled end-of-cycle shutdowns, three other scheduled shutdowns, and two unscheduled shutdowns resulted in an on-stream time of 90.7%. The control plates and cylinder were replaced during the end-of-cycle 281 shutdown. Control plate set 2 and previously unirradiated cylinder No. 9 were inserted into the reactor.

Corbett, B.L.; Farrar, M.B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Calibration and application of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera for high-resolution climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibration and application of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera for high proxies. Here, we present a new calibration of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera based

Gilli, Adrian

111

High flux heat transfer in a target environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

McDonald, Kirk

112

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

114

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Dynamics of Flux Tubes in a High Beta Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high $\\beta$ turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter the macroscopic properties of the fluid or the large scale magnetic field. In either case we show that the Sweet-Parker reconnection rate is much faster than an eddy turnover time. Realistic stellar plasmas are expected to either be in the ideal limit (e.g. the solar photosphere) or the resistive limit (most of the solar convection zone). All current numerical simulations of three dimensional MHD turbulence are in the viscous regime and are inapplicable to stars or accretion disks.

E. T. Vishniac

1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Sparks, Dennis O [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes {Gamma}{sub p}10{sup 23} m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2}. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to {approx}0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in He and 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

Buxbaum, Robert

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

Shapiro, S.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Conversion feasibility studies for the Grenoble high flux reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies for conversion of the High Flux Reactor (RHF) at Grenoble France have been performed at the Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The uranium densities required for conversion of the RHF to reduced enrichment fuels were computed to be 7.9 g/cm{sup 3} with 20% enrichment, 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 29% enrichment, and 2.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 45% enrichment. Thermal flux reductions at the peak in the heavy water reflector were computed to be 3% with 45% enriched fuel and 7% with 20% enriched fuel. In each case, the reactor's 44 day cycle length was preserved and no changes were made in the fuel element geometry. If the cladding thickness could be reduced from 0.38 mm to 0.30 mm, the required uranium density with 20% enrichment would be about 6.0 g/cm{sup 3} and the thermal flux reduction at the peak in the heavy water reflector would be about 7%. Significantly higher uranium densities are required in the RHF than in heavy water reactors with more conventional designs because the neutron spectrum is much harder in the RHF. Reduced enrichment fuels with the uranium densities required for use in the RHF are either not available or are not licensable at the present time. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Mo, S.C.; Matos, J.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Structural design criteria for high heat flux components.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high temperature design rules of the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC), are applied to first wall designs with high heat flux. The maximum coolant pressure and surface heat flux capabilities are shown to be determined not only by the mechanical properties of the first wall material but also by the details of the blanket design. In a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket, the maximum primary stress in the first wall is controlled by many of the geometrical parameters of the blanket, such as, first wall span, first wall curvature, first wall thickness, side wall thickness, and second wall thickness. The creep ratcheting lifetime of the first wall is also shown to be controlled by many of the same geometrical parameters as well as the coolant temperature. According to most high temperature design codes, the time-dependent primary membrane stress allowable are based on the average temperature (ignoring thermal stress). Such a procedure may sometimes be unconservative, particularly for embrittled first walls with large temperature gradients. The effect of secondary (thermal) stresses on the accumulation of creep deformation is illustrated with a vanadium alloy flat plate first wall design.

Majumdar, S.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Detailed images of deposits identified...

126

Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution recorded by five Swiss peat profiles: Enrichment factors, fluxes, isotopic composition, and sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution was studied in western, central, and southern Switzerland using five rural peat bogs. Similar temporal patterns were found in western and central Switzerland, with two distinct periods of Pb enrichment relative to the natural background: between 1880 and 1920 with enrichments ranging from 40 to 80 times, and between 1960 and 1980 with enrichments ranging from 80 to 100 times. The fluxes also were generally elevated in those time periods: in western Switzerland between 1.16 and 1.55 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2} y{sup {minus}1} during the second period. Between the Industrial Revolution and 1985, nonradiogenic Pb became increasingly important in all five cores because of the replacement of coal by oil after ca. 1920, the use of Australian Pb in industry, and the extensive combustion of leaded gasoline after 1950. The introduction of unleaded gasoline in 1985 had a pronounced effect on the Pb deposition in all five cores. Enrichments dropped sharply, and the isotopic ratios reverted back toward natural values. The cores from western and central Switzerland showed very similar isotopic trends throughout the time period studied, implying that these sites were influenced contemporaneously by similar pollution sources and atmospheric pathways. Southern Switzerland revealed a different record with respect to the Pb pollution: it was dominated by a single massive Pb enrichment dated between 1930 and 1950.

Weiss, D.; Shotyk, W.; Kramers, J.D. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland)] [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland); Appleby, P.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences] [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Cheburkin, A.K. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Geological Sciences] [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Geological Sciences

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

Camil Ghiu

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

INNOVATIVE DESIGN AND MATERIAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL CONTACT LAYERS FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX APPLICATIONS IN FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INNOVATIVE DESIGN AND MATERIAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL CONTACT LAYERS FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX APPLICATIONS of sacrificial plasma facing components that have to handle the high heat and particle fluxes in ITER armour thermal and electrical contact with the cooled sub-structure while promoting remote, in

Tillack, Mark

133

High-Resolution Triple Resonance Autoionization of Uranium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-threshold autoionization (AI) spectrum of uranium has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with single-mode continuous lasers. Spectra were recorded over the first {approx}30 cm-1 above the first ionization limit at a resolution of 3x10-4 cm 1 using intermediate states with different J values (6, 7, 8) to assign AI level total angular momentum JAI = 5 to 9. Resonances with widths ranging from 8 MHz to 30 GHz were observed; the strongest ones have JAI = 9 and widths of {approx} 60 MHz. Hyperfine structures for 235U and isotope shifts for 234,235U have been measured in the two intermediate levels and in the final AI level for the most favorable excitation path. These measurements were performed using aqueous samples containing sub-milligram quantities of uranium at natural isotopic abundances, indicating the potential of this approach for trace isotope ratio determinations.

Schumann, Philipp G.; Wendt, K; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number_sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

Ignatiev, A. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

Ignatiev, A [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Apparatus for high flux photocatalytic pollution control using a rotating fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus based on optimizing photoprocess energetics by decoupling of the process energy efficiency from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to both low- and high-flux photoreactor design and scale-up. An apparatus for high-flux photocatalytic pollution control is based on the implementation of multifunctional metal oxide aerogels and other media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. [City College of New York, New York (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B. [Bonner Nuclear Lab., Houston, TX (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS SINGLE-PHASE FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forced convection micro-channel heat sinks for minimum pump power at high heat fluxes. Results gained orders of magnitude, especially for high heat flux devices. Using water and air as coolants, designs for heat fluxes of >10 kW/cm2 and >100 W/cm2 respectively with pump/fan power expenses less than 1

Müller, Norbert

142

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency|Fuel

143

Dynamic Motor Parameter Identification for High Speed Flux Weakening Operation of Brushless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance torque control. Advanced high speed salient-pole synchronous machine drives use vector control Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines Abstract: An experimental investigation is conducted to determine the behaviour of brushless PM synchronous machine parameters in the high speed flux weakening operating range

Szabados, Barna

144

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Exotic fission properties of highly neutron-rich Uranium isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The series of Uranium isotopes with $N=154 \\sim 172$ around the magic number N=162/164 are identified to be thermally fissile. The thermal neutron fission of a typical representative $^{249}$U of this region amenable to synthesis in the radioactive ion beam facilities is considered here. Semiempirical study of fission barrier height and width shows this nucleus to be infinitely stable against spontaneous fission due to increase in barrier width arising out of excess neutrons. Calculation of probability of fragment mass yields and microscopic study in relativistic mean field theory, show this nucleus to undergo a new mode of thermal fission decay termed {\\it multifragmentation fission} where a number of prompt scission neutrons are simultaneously released along with the two heavy fission fragments.

L. Satpathy; S. K. Patra; R. K. Choudhury

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sources and fluxes of carbon in a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada: an isotopic approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources and fluxes of carbon in a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada Hydroelectric reservoirs emit greenhouse gases (GHGs). Although a few hypothesis have been put forward at the surface of a large boreal hydroelectric reservoir of eastern Canada (Robert-Bourassa) as well

Long, Bernard

147

Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The benefits are expected to be more substantial for more energetic positron emitting isotopes such as Oxygen-15 and Rubidium-82.

Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom)] [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia)] [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom)] [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland) [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its promise as an attractive, environmentally acceptable energy source[2]. Carbon based materials have-mechanical response o f graphite and carbon fiber composite (CFC) to very high heat flux includes sublimation, heating of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR inner limiter and have a surface layer

Harilal, S. S.

149

High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,. 1. * . High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak Erosion of Carbon Fibre composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak H. Bolt, T. Scholz, J. Boedo*, KH. The materials tested were carbon fibre reinforced materials w"th and without Si-addition. The probe w

Harilal, S. S.

150

Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil Kristen R of Colorado, Campus Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Summary Soil-dominated ecosystems, with little-elevation, subnival zone soil (i.e. elevations higher than the zone of continuous vegetation), the structure

Hammerton, James

151

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications A Abstract Fusion power plant studies have found helium to be an attractive coolant based on its safety tend to provide modest heat transfer performance due to their inherently low heat capacity and heat

Raffray, A. René

152

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIS-0291: High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Transition Project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EIS evaluates the range of reasonable alternatives and their impacts regarding the future management of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

154

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it lead...

Gandhi, Raj; Watanabe, Atsushi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering...

159

Achieving increased spent fuel storage capacity at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR facility was originally designed to store approximately 25 spent cores, sufficient to allow for operational contingencies and for cooling prior to off-site shipment for reprocessing. The original capacity has now been increased to 60 positions, of which 53 are currently filled (September 1994). Additional spent cores are produced at a rate of about 10 or 11 per year. Continued HFIR operation, therefore, depends on a significant near-term expansion of the pool storage capacity, as well as on a future capability of reprocessing or other storage alternatives once the practical capacity of the pool is reached. To store the much larger inventory of spent fuel that may remain on-site under various future scenarios, the pool capacity is being increased in a phased manner through installation of a new multi-tier spent fuel rack design for higher density storage. A total of 143 positions was used for this paper as the maximum practical pool capacity without impacting operations; however, greater ultimate capacities were addressed in the supporting analyses and approval documents. This paper addresses issues related to the pool storage expansion including (1) seismic effects on the three-tier storage arrays, (2) thermal performance of the new arrays, (3) spent fuel cladding corrosion concerns related to the longer period of pool storage, and (4) impacts of increased spent fuel inventory on the pool water quality, water treatment systems, and LLLW volume.

Cook, D.H.; Chang, S.J.; Dabs, R.D.; Freels, J.D.; Morgan, K.A.; Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griess, J.C. [Griess (J.C.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

operations with the CS. (4) Review equipment and component designations in the computer history and maintenance planning system database for agreement with the designations of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Meeting notes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) futures group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the notes from the ten meetings. The group charter is: (1) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities and necessities for keeping the HFIR operating for at least the next 15 years; (2) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities for enhancing the scientific and technical utility of the HFIR; (3) to evaluate the benefits or impacts of these possibilities on the various scientific fields that use the HFIR or its products; (4) to evaluate the benefits or impacts on the operation and maintenance of the HFIR facility and the regulatory requirements; (5) to estimate the costs, including operating costs, and the schedules, including downtime, for these various possibilities; and one possible impact of proposed changes may be to stimulate increased pressure for a reduced enrichment fuel for HFIR.

Houser, M.M. [comp.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Functions,...

163

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to conduct and support operations with the CS modification. Functions, assignments,...

164

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

reactor operations and CS system operations staff and management are available to conduct and support safe operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. (CR - 1, CR - 4, CR -...

165

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the minimum manning requirements for CS operations described in ADM-0601, Cold Source Conduct of Operations. Examine the RRD IWP to confirm that the current and projected...

166

CRAD, Fire Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

167

CRAD, DOE Oversight- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors.

168

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM) OBJECTIVE CM-1: The facility systems and procedures, as affected by the facility modifications, are consistent with the description of the facility,...

169

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has established programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit awareness of public and worker safety, health, and...

170

Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartmentRestrictions on Federal EmployeestheReview of the

172

R and D of crystal scintillators from enriched isotopes for high sensitivity double ? decay experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments to search for neutrinoless double beta decay enters to a new phase when a sensitivity on the level of T{sub 1/2}?10{sup 26}?10{sup 28} yr is required. Scintillating low temperature detectors possess important properties required for high-sensitivity double beta decay experiments: presence of elements of interest, high energy resolution and detection efficiency, low level of background thanks to excellent particle discrimination ability. High concentration of isotope of interest and as low as possible radioactive contamination are important requirements to crystal scintillators. Other crucial issues are maximal output of detectors and minimal loss of enriched materials. Prospects of several scintillation materials, enriched in isotopes promising for double beta decay experiments, are discussed.

Danevich, F. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing, and fracture toughness master curve issues.

Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Purification of fire derived markers for lg scale isotope analysis C) using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purification of fire derived markers for lg scale isotope analysis (d13 C, D14 C) using high successfully analyzed the 14 C content of individual benzene polycarboxy- lic acids with a sample size as small the expansion of isotopic BC studies to samples that have either been too small or strongly affected by non

Gilli, Adrian

175

Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ?. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

Stranak, Vitezslav, E-mail: stranak@prf.jcu.cz [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin [Institute of Physics v. v. i., Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Tichy, Milan [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

178

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

179

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

Gille, Sarah T.

180

RFNC-VNIIEF Capabilities to Production High Pure Isotopes for Scientific and Medical Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the technical paper there is presented the information on the basic equipment and more than thirty-year experience of RFNC-VNIIEF activities in the sphere of producing highly enriched isotopes of actinide elements--thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium--for scientific researches and practical applications. Electromagnetic separator and radiochemical methods provide obtaining of superpure isotope samples for nuclear-physical radiometric and mass-spectrometric equipment, and also as tracers when analyzing environmental contamination. There are presented the structure of the laboratory occupied with these isotopes electromagnetic separation as well as the nomenclature and characteristics of the specimens supplied. There are stated science and engineering elaborations of technologies aimed at producing alpha-ray radiating radionuclides--thorium-229, thorium-228, actinium-225, radium-224--for the purpose of anti-cancer therapy using bismuth-212 and bismuth-213 produced by the specially developed generators. There are presented the basic directions of cooperation with other Russian Institutes in developing this promising line of conversion.

Vesnovskii, S. P.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

GENERATION OF RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continued population of the International Monitoring System (IMS) network and the certification of radioxenon laboratory systems it has become necessary to calibrate and test these systems using as many of the radioxenon isotopes as possible. Several very promising techniques have been explored recently that allow for convenient production of Xe-133, Xe-131m, the short-lived isotope Xe-135, and even the difficult to obtain Xe-133m. IMS national and international laboratories have traditionally obtained Xe-133 from medical isotope suppliers. The activity of these medical dose samples is extremely high (~ 740 MBq) and requires very careful fume hood work to dilute down to appropriate levels (~ 10 Bq). By waiting for 10 or more half-lives it is possible to reduce the handling regimen considerably, while also obtaining a strong Xe-131m signature due to its longer half-life (11.9 days). The short-lived isotope Xe-135 (9.14 hrs) and the longer lived parent nuclide Xe-133m (2.2 day half-life) are never present in these samples. To obtain these isotopes another source or technique is required. This paper will discuss the two techniques developed and implemented at Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) and show the results obtained from each technique. The first is an in-house method that allows for on demand production of two of these isotopes, Xe-133 and Xe-135, using HEU and a modest flux neutron source. The second method uses a research reactor at the Pullman campus of Washington State University to produce Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-135.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Miley, Harry S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas I. Fundamental characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power deposition from electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) has components from stochastic heating, Joule heating, and from the acceleration of secondary electrons through sheaths produced by ion, electron, or photon bombardment of electrodes. The sheath accelerated electrons can produce high energy beams which, in addition to producing excitation and ionization in the gas can penetrate through the plasma and be incident on the opposite electrode. In the use of CCPs for microelectronics fabrication, there may be an advantage to having these high energy electrons interact with the wafer. To control the energy and increase the flux of the high energy electrons, a dc bias can be externally imposed on the electrode opposite the wafer, thereby producing a dc-augmented CCP (dc-CCP). In this paper, the characteristics of dc-CCPs will be discussed using results from a computational study. We found that for a given rf bias power, beams of high energy electrons having a narrow angular spread (<1 deg. ) can be produced incident on the wafer. The maximum energy in the high energy electron flux scales as {epsilon}{sub max}=-V{sub dc}+V{sub rf}+V{sub rf0}, for a voltage on the dc electrode of V{sub dc}, rf voltage of V{sub rf}, and dc bias on the rf electrode of V{sub rf0}. The dc current from the biased electrode must return to ground through surfaces other than the rf electrode and so seeks out a ground plane, typically the side walls. If the side wall is coated with a poorly conducting polymer, the surface will charge to drive the dc current through.

Wang Mingmei [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nanofluid-based receivers for high-temperature, high-flux direct solar collectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar power plants with surface receivers have low overall energy conversion efficiencies due to large emissive losses at high temperatures. Alternatively, volumetric receivers promise increased performance because solar ...

Lenert, Andrej

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

Holcomb, G.R.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

High-heat-flux removal by phase-change fluid and particulate flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept based on particulate flow in which either or both the particulates and the fluid could undergo phase changes is proposed. The presence of particulates provides not only a mechanism for additional heat removal through phase change but also the potential for increasing the rate of heat transfer by enhancing convection through surface region/bulk [open quotes]mixing[close quotes], by enhancing radiation, particularly for high-temperature cases; and for the case of multiphase fluid, by enhancing the boiling process. One particularly interesting coolant system based on this concept is [open quotes]subcooled boiling water-ice particulate[close quotes] flow. A preliminary analysis of this coolant system is presented, the results of which indicate that such a coolant system is better applied for cooling of relatively small surface areas with high local heat fluxes, where a conventional cooling system would come short of providing the required heat removal at acceptable coolant pressure levels. 14 refs., 8 figs.

Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding luminosity and redshift to permit estimates of the neutrino flux.

D. Besson; S. Razzaque; J. Adams; P. Harris

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) control rod follower  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K{sub I}) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K{sub max} values of 24.8 {plus minus} 1.0 Ksi{radical}in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)] [ed.; Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

195

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

McGuire, A. David

196

EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PEIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed enhancement of the existing infrastructure, including the possible role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located at...

197

Neutron flux and energy characterization of a plutonium-beryllium isotopic neutron source by Monte Carlo simulation with verification by neutron activation analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research was to characterize the neutron energy distribution and flux emitted from the UNLV plutonium-beryllium source, serial number MRC-N-W PuBe 453.… (more)

Harvey, Zachary R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of >1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes >0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Imhof, W.L.; Gaines, E.E.; McGlennon, J.P. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)] [and others] [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States); and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Temperture and composition dependence of the high flux plasma sputtering yield of Cu-Li binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High flux deuterium plasma sputtering and ion beam experiments have been performed on Cu-Li alloys to determine if the reduction in copper erosion previously predicted and observed in low flux ion beam experiments occurs at particle fluxes representative of an RFP first wall or tokamak limiter. Partial sputtering yields of the copper and lithium components have been measured as a function of alloy composition and sample temperature using optical plasma emission spectroscopy, weight loss and catcher foil techniques. It is found that the lithium sputtering yield increases with increasing sample temperature while the copper yield decreases by as much as two orders of magnitude. The temperature required to obtain the reduction in copper erosion is found to be a function of bulk lithium concentration. Consequences of these experimental results for anticipated erosion/redeposition properties are calculated, and the Cu-Li alloy in found to compare favorably with conventional low-Z materials.

Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Bohdansky, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Committee, Michael C. Pope Committee Members, Ethan L. Grossman Debbie J. Thomas Head of Department, Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon..., and my committee members, Dr. Ethan Grossman and Dr. Debbie Thomas, for their time and guidance. Special thanks goes to my primary advisor, Dr. Pope, for his extra guidance and time away from family collecting samples. Additionally, I?d like to thank...

Jolley, Casey

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fuel-Coolant-Interaction modeling and analysis work for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief historical background and a description of short- and long-term task plan development for effective closure of this important safety issue for the HFIR are given. Short-term aspects deal with Fuel-Coolant-Interaction (FCI) issues experimentation, modeling, and analysis for the flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in direct support of the SAR. Long-term aspects deal with addressing FCI issues resulting from other accidents in conjunction with issues dealing with aluminum ignition, which can result in an order of magnitude increase in overall energetics. Problem formulation, modeling, and computer code simulation for the various phases of steam explosions are described. The evaluation of core melt initiation propagation, and melt superheat are described. Core melt initiation and propagation have been studied using simple conservative models as well as from modeling and analysis using RELAP5. Core debris coolability, heatup, and melting/freezing aspects have been studied by use of the two-dimensional melting/freezing analysis code 2DKO, which was also benchmarked with MELCOR code predictions. Descriptions are provided for the HM, BH, FCIMOD, and CTH computer codes that have been implemented for studying steam explosion energetics from the standpoint of evaluating bounding loads by thermodynamic models or best-estimate loads from one- and two-dimensional simulations of steam explosion energetics. Vessel failure modeling and analysis was conducted using the principles of probabilistic fracture mechanics in conjunction with ADINA code calculations. Top head bolts failure modeling has also been conducted where the failure criterion was based upon stresses in the bolts exceeding the material yield stress for a given time duration. Missile transport modeling and analysis was conducted by setting up a one-dimensional mathematical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, virtual mass effects, and material inertia.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Luttrell, C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from lunar observations with the Parkes radio telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.

Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Prediction of equilibrium Li isotope fractionation between minerals and aqueous solutions at high P and T: an efficient ab initio approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass-dependent equilibrium stable isotope fractionation between different materials is an important geochemical process. Here we present an efficient method to compute the isotope fractionation between complex minerals and fluids at high pressure, P, and temperature, T, representative for the Earth's crust and mantle. The method is tested by computation of the equilibrium fractionation of lithium isotopes between aqueous fluids and various Li bearing minerals such as staurolite, spodumene and mica. We are able to correctly predict the direction of the isotope fractionation as observed in the experiments. On the quantitative level the computed fractionation factors agree within 1.0 permil with the experimental values indicating predictive power of ab initio methods. We show that with ab initio methods we are able to investigate the underlying mechanisms driving the equilibrium isotope fractionation process, such as coordination of the fractionating elements, their bond strengths to the neighboring atoms, c...

Kowalski, Piotr M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High-precision optical measurements of 13 isotope ratios in organic compounds at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

range with an average precision of 0.95 and 0.67 for ethane and propane, respec- tively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3 of the values determined using isotope ratio mass place in chemistry, especially in geochemistry, for determining reaction mechanisms and pro- viding

Zare, Richard N.

210

Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups: Report on the joint meeting, July 9, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains a collection of viewgraphs from a joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups. A list of contributing topics is: PPPL update, ATF update, Los Alamos RFP program update, status of DIII-D, PMI graphite studies at ORNL, PMI studies for low atomic number materials, high heat flux materials issues, high heat flux testing program, particle confinement in tokamaks, helium self pumping, self-regenerating coatings technical planning activity and international collaboration update. (LSP)

Watson, R.D. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas. II. Effects on twisting in high aspect ratio etching of dielectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high aspect ratio (HAR) plasma etching of holes and trenches in dielectrics, sporadic twisting is often observed. Twisting is the randomly occurring divergence of a hole or trench from the vertical. Many causes have been proposed for twisting, one of which is stochastic charging. As feature sizes shrink, the fluxes of plasma particles, and ions in particular, into the feature become statistical. Randomly deposited charge by ions on the inside of a feature may be sufficient to produce lateral electric fields which divert incoming ions and initiate nonvertical etching or twisting. This is particularly problematic when etching with fluorocarbon gas mixtures where deposition of polymer in the feature may trap charge. dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas (dc-CCPs) have been investigated as a remedy for twisting. In these devices, high energy electron (HEE) beams having narrow angular spreads can be generated. HEEs incident onto the wafer which penetrate into HAR features can neutralize the positive charge and so reduce the incidence of twisting. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of plasma etching of SiO{sub 2} in a dc-CCP using Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} gas mixtures. We found that HEE beams incident onto the wafer are capable of penetrating into features and partially neutralizing positive charge buildup due to sporadic ion charging, thereby reducing the incidence of twisting. Increasing the rf bias power increases the HEE beam energy and flux with some indication of improvement of twisting, but there are also changes in the ion energy and fluxes, so this is not an unambiguous improvement. Increasing the dc bias voltage while keeping the rf bias voltage constant increases the maximum energy of the HEE and its flux while the ion characteristics remain nearly constant. For these conditions, the occurrence of twisting decreases with increasing HEE energy and flux.

Wang Mingmei [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

Shanahan, K.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oak Ridge Isotope Products and Services - Current and Expected Supply and Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been a major center of isotope production research, development, and distribution for over 50 years. Currently, the major isotope production activities include (1) the production of transuranium element radioisotopes, including 252 Cf; (2) the production of medical and industrial radioisotopes; (3) maintenance and expansion of the capabilities for production of enriched stable isotopes; and, (4) preparation of a wide range of custom-order chemical and physical forms of isotope products, particularly in accelerator physics research. The recent supply of and demand for isotope products and services in these areas, research and development (R&D), and the capabilities for future supply are described in more detail below. The keys to continuing the supply of these important products and services are the maintenance, improvement, and potential expansion of specialized facilities, including (1) the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), (2) the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) and Radiochemical Development Laboratory (RDL) hot cell facilities, (3) the electromagnetic calutron mass separators and the plasma separation process equipment for isotope enrichment, and (4) the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) equipment for preparation of specialized chemical and physical forms of isotope products. The status and plans for these ORNL isotope production facilities are also described below.

Aaron, W.S.; Alexander, C.W.; Cline, R.L.; Collins, E.D.; Klein, J.A.; Knauer, J.B., Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

Time-series analysis of high-resolution ebullition fluxes from a stratified, freshwater lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Freshwater lakes can emit significant quantities of methane to the atmosphere by bubbling. The high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ebullition, combined with a lack of high-resolution field measurements, has made ...

Varadharajan, Charuleka

218

Data report: High-resolution stable isotope stratigraphy of the late Middle Eocene at Site 1051, Blake Nose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recrystallization on 18 O/ 16 O values of deep- sea sediments. Nature, 301:594?597. Norris, R.D., Kroon, D., Klaus, A., et al., 1998. Proc. ODP, Init. Repts., 171B: College Sta- tion, TX (Ocean Drilling Program). Pearson, P.N., and Shackleton, N.J., 1995. Neogene...Kroon, D., Norris, R.D., and Klaus, A. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 171B 5. DATA REPORT: HIGH-RESOLUTION STABLE ISOTOPE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE LATE MIDDLE EOCENE AT SITE 1051, BLAKE NOSE 1 Bridget S. Wade...

Wade, Bridget S.; Norris, Richard D.; Kroom, Dick

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on High-Luminous-Flux LED Lighting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LED technology performs well in a region with high ambient temperature and solar radiation, it can perform well in most outdoor environments. The full report and a report...

220

High-spin structures of $^{77,79,81,83}$As isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we report comprehensive set of shell model calculations for arsenic isotopes. We performed shell model calculations with two recent effective interactions JUN45 and jj44b. The overall results for the energy levels and magnetic moments are in rather good agreement with the available experimental data. We have also reported competition of proton- and neutron-pair breakings analysis to identify which nucleon pairs are broken to obtain the total angular momentum of the calculated states. Further theoretical development is needed by enlarging model space by including $\\pi 0f_{7/2}$ and $\

Kumar, Vikas; Morales, Irving O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Very high resolution saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes via c-w single-frequency laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss the use of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to perform isotopically selective saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes. Utilizing this technique, it is shown that accurate measurements of the relative frequencies of hyperfine (HF) components for different isotopes easily can be made without the need for an isotopically enriched sample. The precision with which the HF splitting constants can be determined is estimated to be approx.5 times greater than in previous work.

Fearey, B.L.; Parent, D.C.; Keller, R.A.; Miller, C.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessment of advanced coal-gasification processes. [AVCO high throughput gasification in process; Bell High Mass Flux process; CS-R process; and Exxon Gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents a technical assessment of the following advanced coal gasification processes: AVCO High Throughput Gasification (HTG) Process, Bell Single - Stage High Mass Flux (HMF) Process, Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Hydrogasification Process, and the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) Process. Each process is evaluated for its potential to produce SNG from a bituminous coal. In addition to identifying the new technology these processes represent, key similarities/differences, strengths/weaknesses, and potential improvements to each process are identified. The AVCO HTG and the Bell HMF gasifiers share similarities with respect to: short residence time (SRT), high throughput rate, slagging and syngas as the initial raw product gas. The CS/R Hydrogasifier is also SRT but is non-slagging and produces a raw gas high in methane content. The Exxon CCG gasifier is a long residence time, catalytic fluidbed reactor producing all of the raw product methane in the gasifier.

McCarthy, J.; Ferrall, J.; Charng, T.; Houseman, J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

In Situ Electrochemical X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis with High Oxygen Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the widespread application of fuel cells and air-cathode batteries in automotive and stationary power a progressive evolution of the electronic structure of the metal clusters that is both potential) and the large overpotential (300 mV) in fuel cell cathodes necessitate the use of high loadings of precious-metal

Frenkel, Anatoly

224

Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle length. Consequently, ANL and ILL have collaborated to investigate alternative designs. A promising candidate design has been selected and studied, increasing the total amount of fuel without changing the external plate dimensions by relocating the burnable poison. In this way, changes required in the fuel element are reasonably small. With this new design, neutronics analyses have shown that performance could be maintained at a high level: 2 day decrease of cycle length (to 47.5 days at 58.3 MW) and 1-2% decrease of brightness in the cold and hot sources in comparison to the current typical operation. In addition, studies have shown that the thermal-hydraulic and shutdown margins for the proposed LEU design would satisfy technical specifications.

Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n(e) >= 10(19)m(-3), T(e) = 4-10 eV, particle flux Gamma(p) > 10(23) m(-3) s(-1), and magnetic field strength |B| up to I T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10 - 26 MHz, and power levels up to similar to 100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Baity Jr, F Wallace [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n{sub e}{>=}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, T{sub e} = 4-10 eV, particle flux {gamma}{sub p}>10{sup 23}m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and magnetic field strength |B| up to 1 T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10-26 MHz, and power levels up to {approx}100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

Goulding, R. H.; Chen, G.; Meitner, S.; Baity, F. W.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Owen, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Llandovery (Early Silurian): Implications for tectonics and weathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Llandovery (Early Silurian): Implications online 2 June 2010 Keywords: Silurian Strontium isotopes Carbon isotopes Weathering K-bentonites A high

Saltzman, Matthew R.

232

Effect of flux addition on the microstructure and hardness of TiC-reinforced ferrous surface composite layers fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface composites reinforced with TiC particulates were fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation. In order to investigate the effects of flux addition on the TiC dispersion in surface composite layers, four kinds of powder mixtures were made by mixing TiC with 5, 10, 20, and 40 wt% of the flux components (MgO-CaO). To fabricate TiC-reinforced surface composites, the TiC-flux mixtures were deposited evenly on a plain carbon steel substrate, which was subjected to electron-beam irradiation. Microstructural analysis was conducted using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of the surface composites was composed of a melted region, an interfacial region, a coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ), a fine-grained HAZ, and an unaltered original substrate region. TiC agglomerates and residual pores were found in the melted region of materials processed without flux, but the number of agglomerates and pores are significantly decreased in materials processed with a considerable amount of flux. As a result of irradiation, TiC particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the melted region of 2.5 mm in thickness, whose hardness was greatly increased. The optimum flux amount, which resulted in surface composites containing homogeneously dispersed TiC particles, was found to be in the range of 10 to 20% to obtain excellent surface composites.

Choo, S.H.; Lee, S.; Kwon, S.J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An investigation into high temperature superconducting flux pump technology with the circular type magnetic flux pump devices and YBaCuO films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid development of second generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in the last decade has made it possible to wind high quality 2G HTS coils. These 2G HTS coils show promise for future applications such as magnetic...

Wang, Wei

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Strontium isotopic variations of Neoproterozoic seawater: Implications for crustal evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report high precision Sr isotopic data on carbonates from the Neoproterozoic Shaler Group, Victoria Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples with low {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratios (<0.01) were selected for Sr isotopic analysis. {delta}{sup 18}O, Mn, Ca, Mg, and Sr data were used to recognize altered samples. The altered samples are characterized by high Mn/Sr ({ge}2) and variable {delta}{sup 18}O; most are dolomites. The data indicate that between ca. 790-850 Ma the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of seawater varied between 0.70676 and 0.70561. The samples show smooth and systematic variation, with the lowest {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr value of 0.70561 at ca. 830 Ma. The low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of carbonates from the lower parts of the section is similar to a value reported for one sample from the Adrar of Mauritania ({approx}900 Ma), West African Craton. Isotopic ratios from the upper part of the Shaler section are identical to values from the lower part of the Neoproterozoic Akademikerbreen Group, Spitsbergen. Although a paucity of absolute age determinations hinders attempts at the precise correlation of Neoproterozoic successions, it is possible to draw a broad outline of the Sr isotopic composition of seawater for this period. Data from this study and the literature are used to construct a curve of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of Neoproterozoic seawater. The Sr isotope composition of seawater reflects primarily the balance between continental Sr input through river input and mantle input via hydrothermal circulation of seawater through mid-ocean ridges. Coupling of Nd and Sr isotopic systems allows the authors to model changes in seafloor spreading rates (or hydrothermal flux) and continental erosion. The Sr hydrothermal flux and the erosion rate (relative to present-day value) are modeled for the period 500-900 Ma.

Asmerom, Y.; Jacobsen, S.B.; Knoll, A.H.; Butterfield, N.J. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Swett, K. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Plasma-Materials Interactions (PMI) and High-Heat-Flux (HHF) component research and development in the US Fusion Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma particle and high heat fluxes to in-vessel components such as divertors, limiters, RF launchers, halo plasma scrapers, direct converters, and wall armor, and to the vacuum chamber itself, represent central technical issues for fusion experiments and reactors. This is well recognized and accepted. It is also well recognized that the conditions at the plasma boundary can directly influence core plasma confinement. This has been seen most dramatically, on the positive side, in the discovery of the H-mode using divertors in tokamaks. It is also reflected in the attention devoted worldwide to the problems of impurity control. Nowadays, impurities are controlled by wall conditioning, special discharge cleaning techniques, special coatings such as carbonization, the use of low-Z materials for limiters and armor, a careful tailoring of heat loads, and in some machines, through the use of divertors. All programs, all experiments, and all designers are now keenly aware that PMI and HHF issues are key to the successful performance of their machines. In this brief report we present general issues in Section 2, critical issues in Section 3, existing US PMI/HHF experiments and facilities in Section 4, US International Cooperative PMI/HHF activities in Section 5, and conclude with a discussion on major tasks in PMI/HHF in Section 6.

Conn, R.W.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Transportation of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

Nielsen, D.L.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE TARGETS AND ION SOURCES FOR ONLINE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCTION V.N.Panteleev, A.E.Barzakh, D.V.Fedorov, V.S.Ivanov, F.V.Moroz, S.Yu.Orlov, A.G.Polyakov, M.D.Seliverstov, Yu.M.Volkov 1. Introduction At the IRIS facility a high temperature target for effective production of a tungsten foil as a target container material allows to maintain the working temperature for refractory foil

Titov, Anatoly

242

Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ?4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

Shibata, Y., E-mail: shibata.yoshihide@jaea.go.jp; Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of airsea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related physical processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice of the Earth's climate. HigH-LatitudE OcEan and SEa icE SurfacE fLuxES: cHaLLEngES fOr cLimatE rESEarcH by Mark change can manifest itself in astonishing ways. Arctic sea ice extent at the end of the melt season

Renfrew, Ian

245

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparative study of high-spin isomers in semi-magic $Z$=50 isotopic and $N$=82 isotonic chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative study of high spin nuclear isomers observed in the semi-magic $Z$=50 isotopic and $N$=82 isotonic chains has been carried out. The ${11/2}^-$, ${10}^+$ and ${27/2}^-$ isomers, which occur commonly in both the chains, display nearly identical systematics in excitation energy and half-life. An energy gap of ${\\sim 4}$ MeV between the ${0^+}$ ground states and ${10}^+$ isomers and, the ${11/2}^-$ and ${27/2}^-$ isomers exists before the mid-shell, which becomes a constant ${\\sim 3}$ MeV after the mid-shell region. The large scale shell model calculations are able to reproduce the observed energy systematics for both the chains reasonably well. The shell model occupancies and the basic seniority rules have been used to fix the seniority quantum number. The seniority of all the isomeric states as well as those involved in the decay from$/$to the isomers have been assigned and the alignment properties are also discussed. The seniorities of the ${10}^+$ and ${27/2}^-$ isomeric states before the mid-shell are higher, which become lower after the mid-shell, due to the dominant role played by the $h_{11/2}$ orbital. The empirical systematics and the calculated results suggest that the change in the energy gap around the mid-shell, may be interpreted in terms of a change in the seniority of the isomeric states. However, the seniority of the ${11/2}^-$ state remains conserved throughout both the chains. The systematics of the half-lives in both the chains have been understood on the basis of seniority and decay modes. Predictions for new isomers have also been made based on these systematics.

Bhoomika Maheshwari; Ashok Kumar Jain; P. C. Srivastava

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal field. This paper reports results from accumulation-chamber measurements of soil CO2 flux from locations in the dead zone and stable isotope and chemical data on fluids...

248

Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

249

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

250

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Isotope separation by laser means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Multi-Channel Auto-Dilution System for Remote Continuous Monitoring of High Soil-CO2 Fluxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has the potential capacity and longevity to significantly decrease the amount of anthropogenic CO2 introduced into the atmosphere by combustion of fossil fuels such as coal. Effective sequestration, however, requires the ability to verify the integrity of the reservoir and ensure that potential leakage rates are kept to a minimum. Moreover, understanding the pathways by which CO2 migrates to the surface is critical to assessing the risks and developing remediation approaches. Field experiments, such as those conducted at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project test site in Bozeman, Montana, require a flexible CO2 monitoring system that can accurately and continuously measure soil-surface CO2 fluxes for multiple sampling points at concentrations ranging from background levels to several tens of percent. To meet this need, PNNL is developing a multi-port battery-operated system capable of both spatial and temporal monitoring of CO2 at concentrations from ambient to at least 150,000 ppmv. This report describes the system components (sampling chambers, measurement and control system, and power supply) and the results of a field test at the ZERT site during the late summer and fall of 2008. While the system performed well overall during the field test, several improvements to the system are suggested for implementation in FY2009.

Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

minerals in geothermal systems (feldspars, epidote, and calcite) often control fracture permeability changes. Measurements of Ca and Sr isotopic fractionation at high...

255

Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Neutron Irradiated Tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the effects of neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten, disk-type specimens of pure tungsten were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor in Oak Ridge National Laboratory followed by exposure to high flux deuterium (D) plasma in Idaho National Laboratory. The results obtained for low dose n-irradiated specimens (0.025 dpa for tungsten) are reviewed in this paper. Irradiation at coolant temperature of the reactor (around 50 degrees C) resulted in the formation of strong trapping sites for D atoms. The concentrations of D in n-irradiated specimens were ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 mol% after exposure to D plasma at 200 and 500 degrees C and significantly higher than those in non-irradiated specimens because of D-trapping by radiation defects. Deep penetration of D up to a depth of 50-100 µm was observed at 500 degrees C. Release of D in subsequent thermal desorption measurements continued up to 900 degrees C. These results were compared with the behaviour of D in ion-irradiated tungsten, and distinctive features of n-irradiation were discussed.

Yuji Hatano; Masashi Shimada; Yasuhisa Oya; Guoping Cao; Makoto Kobayashi; Masanori Hara; Brad J. Merrill; Kenji Okuno; Mikhail A. Sokolov; Yutai Katoh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

Evan Harpenau

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

Downing, J.N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

isotopic ratio | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic ratio isotopic ratio Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

265

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Isotope Science and Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy National Isotope Program http://www.nuclear.energy.gov/isotopes/nelsotopes2a.html Isotopes for Environmental Science Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used as environmental tracers change and its effects. Los Alamos National Laboratory can produce Si-32 needed for oceanographic tracing

267

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

California at Berkeley, University of

271

High-spin level structure of {sup 115}Rh: Evolution of triaxiality in odd-even Rh isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spin excited states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 115}Rh have been identified for the first time by studying prompt {gamma} rays from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with the Gammasphere detector array. A new yrast band and a sideband are built in {sup 115}Rh. This level scheme is proposed to be built on the 7/2{sup +} ground state. The existence of a large signature splitting and an yrare band in {sup 115}Rh shows typical features of a triaxially deformed nucleus. The rigid triaxial rotor plus particle model is used to interpret the level structure of {sup 115}Rh. The level energies, the {gamma} branching ratios, the large signature splitting in the yrast band, and the inverted signature splitting in the yrare band in {sup 115}Rh are reproduced very well. Strong K mixing occurs in {sup 115}Rh at high spin.

Liu, S. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); UNIRIB/Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Hwang, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Gelberg, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Gu, L.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Zhu, S. J. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Y. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rasmussen, J. O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ma, W. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Daniel, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Ter-Akopian, G. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrographic analysis of the americium samples. It is a48 J'---_I" THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.Elements THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM K. Street, Jr. , A.

Street, K.; Ghiroso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modern stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition and its implications of climatic change from a high-elevation cave in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau over the past 50 years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yuan D X, Qin J M, et al. Oxygen and carbon isotopic charac-R L, Wang X F, et al. Oxygen isotopic records of stalagmitesVerlag Modern stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition and its

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

VOLUME 83, NUMBER 10 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 SEPTEMBER 1999 Kinetic Roughening of Penetrating Flux Fronts in High-Tc Thin Film Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Penetrating Flux Fronts in High-Tc Thin Film Superconductors R. Surdeanu, R. J. Wijngaarden, E. Visser, J. M) Kinetic roughening of flux fronts penetrating in superconducting thin films are studied by means of a high proposed that the gradual thermal depinning of a single vortex line in a superconductor with randomly

Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

279

Comprehensive analysis of metabolic pathways through the combined use of multiple isotopic tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) has emerged as a tool of great significance for metabolic engineering and the analysis of human metabolic diseases. An important limitation of MFA, as carried out via stable isotope labeling ...

Antoniewicz, Maciek Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. For the nuclides with a very high capture microscopic cross section, such as iridium, rhenium, and samarium, their specific activities are reduced by a factor of 30 when the self-shielding effect is included. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to maximize the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shield effect reduces the specific activity values and changes the irradiation location for obtaining the maximum possible specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the specific activity were used to define the irradiation sample size for producing each isotope.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Magnesium Isotopes in Halo Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have determined Mg isotope ratios in halo field dwarfs and giants in the globular cluster M71 based on high S/N high spectral resolution (R = 10$^5$) Keck HIRES spectra. Unlike previous claims of an important contribution from intermediate-mass AGB stars to the Galactic halo, we find that our $^{26}$Mg/$^{24}$Mg ratios can be explained by massive stars.

Jorge Melendez; Judith G. Cohen

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water (high TDS, > 5000 mgl). Deviations from the meteoric water line are the result of rock-water isotopic exchange, mixing or evaporation. Fluid source regions and residence...

283

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Abstract Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as...

284

Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2 3 Romain and lithium concentrations found in the dissolved load of the Mackenzie rivers suggests31 that precipitation fluxes in the Mackenzie River Basin.40 41 Keywords: lithium isotopes, river waters, silicate weathering

285

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Local transport in Joint European Tokamak edge-localized, high-confinement mode plasmas with H, D, DT, and T isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mode and the scaling of the global thermal energy confinement time, E .4 Large extrapolations of the energy confinement- mated using the total electron number, Ne and the total ther- mal energy, Wth , i.e., * AWth /(NeB), Wth and plasma current varied together in H, D, DT, and T isotopes. The local energy transport in more than fifty

Budny, Robert

287

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

Theory of the helium isotope shift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of the isotope shift of the centroid energies of light few-electron atoms is reviewed. Numerical results are presented for the isotope shift of the $2^3P$-$2^3S$ and $2^1S$-$2^3S$ transition energies of $^3$He and $^4$He. By comparing theoretical predictions for the isotope shift with the experimental results, the difference of the squares of the nuclear charge radii of $^3$He and $^4$He, $\\delta R^2$, is determined with high accuracy.

Yerokhin, Vladimir A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Stable isotope enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

Egle, Brian

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

EMSL - isotopic ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isotopic-ratio en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-def...

293

Stable isotope enrichment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

Egle, Brian

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Schuh; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Discovery of the Tin Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-eight tin isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Discovery of the tungsten isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fritsch, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Shore, A; Thoennessen, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Experimental investigations of two-phase mixture level swell and axial void fraction distribution under high pressure, low heat flux conditions in rod bundle geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data is reported from a series of quasi-steady-state two-phase mixture level swell and void fraction distribution tests. Testing was performed at ORNL in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility - a large electrically heated test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those expected in a small break loss of coolant accident. Pressure was varied from 2.7 to 8.2 MPa and linear power ranged from 0.33 to 1.95 kW/m. Mixture swell was observed to vary linearly with the total volumetric vapor generation rate over the power range of primary interest in small break analysis. Void fraction data was fit by a drift-flux model and both the drift-velocity and concentration parameter were observed to decrease with increasing pressure.

Anklam, T.M.; White, M.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

Wulff, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry . Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion...

303

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

304

Radiative Flux Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

305

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Isotopically selective, Doppler-free, saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes via resonance ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique utilizing RIMS to obtain very high resolution atomic spectra with isotopic selectivity has been demonstrated. This technique allows the precise determination of HF splitting constants, limited only by the transition's natural linewidth. In addition, it is also feasible with this technique to accurately determine atomic isotope shifts. The exact determination of HF component line positions provides data for isotopically selective ionization which, in turn, will increase RIMS' dynamic range. Future work includes the incorporation of a /open quotes/vibrating/close quotes/ mirror and the study of rarer isotopes, i.e., /sup 174/Lu, /sup 173/Lu, /sup 172/Lu, /sup 171/Lu, and possibly, /sup 170/Lu. 13 refs., 3 figs.

Fearey, B.L.; Parent, D.C.; Keller, R.A.; Miller, C.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energy’s tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

WJ Apley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity continuous light, e.g., in the High Arctic summer, on plant carbon and hydrogen isotope Introduction Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations under low intensity 24-h continuous light were unknownPHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous

309

A direct and rapid leaf water extraction method for isotopic analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel for isotopic analysis via pyrolysis gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (PYR/GC/IRMS). The new-scale studies that require high-throughput leaf water isotopic analysis. Copyright # 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Yakir, Dan

310

Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

Sugrue, Rosemary M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

NONE

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

318

HIGS Flux Performance Projection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux performance table

319

Development of Computational Tools for Metabolic Model Curation, Flux Elucidation and Strain Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overarching goal of the Department of EnergyÂ? mission is the efficient deployment and engineering of microbial and plant systems to enable biomass conversion in pursuit of high energy density liquid biofuels. This has spurred the pace at which new organisms are sequenced and annotated. This torrent of genomic information has opened the door to understanding metabolism in not just skeletal pathways and a handful of microorganisms but for truly genome-scale reconstructions derived for hundreds of microbes and plants. Understanding and redirecting metabolism is crucial because metabolic fluxes are unique descriptors of cellular physiology that directly assess the current cellular state and quantify the effect of genetic engineering interventions. At the same time, however, trying to keep pace with the rate of genomic data generation has ushered in a number of modeling and computational challenges related to (i) the automated assembly, testing and correction of genome-scale metabolic models, (ii) metabolic flux elucidation using labeled isotopes, and (iii) comprehensive identification of engineering interventions leading to the desired metabolism redirection.

Maranas, Costas D

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

NONE

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February...

323

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide isotopes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

successfully reproduce both the stable solar system isotopic distribution and the stable heavy element... and those predicted by our model. For stars with anomalously high ThEu...

325

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irradiation experiments with a variety of neutron energy spectra for neutron activation analysis, producing HISTORY #12;2 Erecting the dome in 1962. The building was designed as "confinement" to prevent leakage of radioactive materials into the environment. The interior of the building is maintained at a pressure slightly

Ohta, Shigemi

326

PORE-WATER ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION AND UNSATURATED-ZONE FLOW, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site characterization at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository, has included studies of recharge, flow paths, percolation flux, perched water bodies, and chemical compositions of the water in the thick unsaturated zone (UZ). Samples of pore water from cores of two recently drilled boreholes, USW SD-6 near the ridge top of Yucca Mountain and USW WT-24 north of Yucca mountain, were analyzed for isotopic compositions as part of a study by the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033. The purpose of this report is to interpret {sup 14}C, {delta}{sup 13}C, {sup 3}H, {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O isotopic compositions of pore water from the core of boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 in relation to sources of recharge and flow paths in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. Borehole designation USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 subsequently will be referred to as SD-6 and WT-24. The sources of recharge and flow paths are important parameters that can be used in a UZ flow model, total system performance assessment (TSPA), and the license application (LA) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

C. Yang

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Isotopic Composition of Solar Wind Calcium: First in Situ Measurement by CELIAS/MTOF on Board SOHO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first results on the Ca isotopic abundances derived from the high resolution Mass Time-of-Flight (MTOF) spectrometer of the charge, element, and isotope analysis system (CELIAS) experiment on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We obtain isotopic ratios 40Ca/42Ca = (128+-47) and 40Ca/44Ca = (50+-8), consistent with terrestrial values. This is the first in situ determination of the solar wind calcium isotopic composition and is important for studies of stellar modeling and solar system formation since the present-day solar Ca isotopic abundances are unchanged from their original isotopic composition in the solar nebula.

R. Kallenbach; F. M. Ipavich; P. Bochsler; S. Hefti; P. Wurz; M. R. Aellig; A. B. Galvin; J. Geiss; F. Gliem; G. Gloeckler; H. Grunwaldt; M. Hilchenbach; D. Hovestadt; B. Klecker

1998-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

PHELIX for flux compression studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddropletgovMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM

331

Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of .sup.167 Er. The hyperfine structure of .sup.167 Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level.

Haynam, Christopher A. (3035 Ferdale Ct., Pleasanton, CA 94566); Worden, Earl F. (117 Vereda del Ciervo, Diablo, CA 94528)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

Marino, Bruno

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Water isotopes and the general circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is depleted. #12;Distillation: vapor and condensate Isotopic fractionation -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 0 0 of idealized isotopic fractionation Expression of isotopic fractionation in nature Attributing signals" 18 = (R/Rstandard-1)x1000 R = moles of H2 18O/moles of H2 16O #12;Isotopic fractionation Isotopic

Noone, David

336

The determination of neutron flux in the Texas A & M triga reactor during pulse and steady-state operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state operation. Neutron flux measurement during a pulse presents an additional problem in that the flux levels vary during the rapid rise and fall in reactor power. The power level transient of the reactor was followed, using the current output of a boron-10... as a flux monitor only at low power. levels or neutron fluxes. The antimony flux monitor in the steady-state flux measurement showed the same type of increase in flux magni- tude as that of the pulse measurement. The high flux values at steady...

O'Donnell, John Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

affecting carbon fluxes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(IFN) (2 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 43 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

339

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097, Paper 10 (1965). V.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097 Paper 12 (1965). K.M.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R-5097 Paper 11 (1965). M.

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Isotopic Trends in Production of Superheavies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic trends are discussed for cold and hot fusion reactions leading to superheavies. The possibilities of production of new isotopes in incomplete fusion reactions are treated.

Antonenko, N.V. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Adamian, G.G.; Zubov, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Direct measurements of neutron capture on radioactive isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulated the response of a 4p calorimetric g-detector array to decays of radioactive isotopes on the s-process path. The GEANT 3.21 simulation package was used. The main table contains estimates on the maximum sample size and required neutron flux based on the latest available neutron capture cross section at 30 keV. The results are intended to be used to estimate the feasibility of neutron capture measurements with 4p arrays using the time of flight technique.

A. Couture; R. Reifarth

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Method for laser induced isotope enrichment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results showing a large lithium isotope separation due to electrodeposition. The fractionation is tunable lithium were plated from solutions of 1 M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate (PC) on planar nickel electrodes

Mcdonough, William F.

349

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means. 3 figures.

Maya, J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

Haller, E. E., E-mail: eehaller@lbl.gov [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ca isotopes in carbonate sediment and pore fluid from ODP Site 807A: The Ca2+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca isotopes in carbonate sediment and pore fluid from ODP Site 807A: The Ca2+ (aq, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767, USA b Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2007 Abstract The calcium isotopic compositions (d44 Ca) of 30 high-purity nannofossil ooze and chalk

Fantle, Matthew

355

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddropletgovMeasurementsIsotope ratio

356

Special Application Thermoelectric Micro Isotope Power Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Promising design concepts for milliwatt (mW) size micro isotope power sources (MIPS) are being sought for use in various space and terrestrial applications, including a multitude of future NASA scientific missions and a range of military applications. To date, the radioisotope power sources (RPS) used on various space and terrestrial programs have provided power levels ranging from one-half to several hundred watts. In recent years, the increased use of smaller spacecraft and planned new scientific space missions by NASA, special terrestrial and military applications suggest the need for lower power, including mW level, radioisotope power sources. These power sources have the potential to enable such applications as long-lived meteorological or seismological stations distributed across planetary surfaces, surface probes, deep space micro-spacecraft and sub-satellites, terrestrial sensors, transmitters, and micro-electromechanical systems. The power requirements are in the range of 1 mW to several hundred mW. The primary technical requirements for space applications are long life, high reliability, high specific power, and high power density, and those for some special military uses are very high power density, specific power, reliability, low radiological induced degradation, and very low radiation leakage. Thermoelectric conversion is of particular interest because of its technological maturity and proven reliability. This paper summarizes the thermoelectric, thermal, and radioisotope heat source designs and presents the corresponding performance for a number of mW size thermoelectric micro isotope power sources.

Heshmatpour, Ben; Lieberman, Al; Khayat, Mo; Leanna, Andrew; Dobry, Ted [Teledyne Energy Systems, Incorporated, 10707 Gilroy Road, Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

359

Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April 2006 that further funding for the project would be suspended. Remaining funds have been used to prepare and irradiate mini-plates of the proposed booster fuel. The current baseline design is for a set of three test positions inside an in-pile tube with a thermal neutron absorber and heat sink made of aluminum mixed with hafnium. Operating the ATR at power levels needed to achieve the required fast flux will result in an estimated increase in ATR fuel consumption between 15 and 20% above present rates and a reduction in the time between fuel replacements. Preliminary safety analyses conducted have indicted safe operation of the ATR with the GTL under normal, abnormal, and postulated accident conditions. More comprehensive analyses are needed.

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical studies shown here indicate that the best bands to measure and derive the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression are (1) the band between 800 and 1,200 cm{sup {minus}1} for OLR, (2) the band between 500 and 660 cm{sup {minus}1} or 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for SDF, and (3) the band between 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for CRs. These results are obtained from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. The advanced very high resolution radiometer OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR, which is derived from the broadband, narrow field of view ERB instrument, owing to its use of only one narrow band (centered around the 11-{mu}m window region) measurement.

Man-Li C. Wu (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

1990-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Analysis of Fluxes by Duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M-theory on K3xK3 with non-supersymmetry-breaking G-flux is dual to M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold times a 2-torus without flux. This allows for a thorough analysis of the effects of flux without relying on supergravity approximations. We discuss several dual pairs showing that the usual rules of G-flux compactifications work well in detail. We discuss how a transition can convert M2-branes into G-flux. We see how new effects can arise at short distances allowing fluxes to obstruct more moduli than one expects from the supergravity analysis.

Paul S. Aspinwall

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

Detecting gravity modes in the solar $^8B$ neutrino flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of gravity modes produced in the solar radiative zone has been a challenge in modern astrophysics for more than 30 yr and their amplitude in the core is not yet determined. In this Letter, we develop a new strategy to look for standing gravity modes through solar neutrino fluxes. We note that due to a resonance effect, the gravity modes of low degree and low order have the largest impact on the $^{8}B$ neutrino flux. The strongest effect is expected to occur for the dipole mode with radial order $2$, corresponding to periods of about 1.5 hr. These standing gravity waves produce temperature fluctuations that are amplified by a factor of 170 in the boron neutrino flux for the corresponding period, in consonance with the gravity modes. From current neutrino observations, we determine that the maximum temperature variation due to the gravity modes in the Sun's core is smaller than $5.8\\times 10^{-4}$. This study clearly shows that due to their high sensitivity to the temperature, the $^8B$ neutrino flux time series is an excellent tool to determine the properties of gravity modes in the solar core. Moreover, if gravity mode footprints are discovered in the $^{8}B$ neutrino flux, this opens a new line of research to probe the physics of the solar core as non-standing gravity waves of higher periods cannot be directly detected by helioseismology but could leave their signature on boron neutrino or on other neutrino fluxes.

Ilídio Lopes; Sylvaine Turck-Chièze

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in 15 N, leading to average bulk N isotopic of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These particles typically also contain

365

Spinelolivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic composition of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spinel­olivine magnesium isotope thermometry in the mantle and implications for the Mg isotopic: magnesium isotopes mantle geochemistry meteorites MC-ICPMS The magnesium isotopic composition of Earth., 2004; Poitrasson et al., 2005; Georg et al., 2007; Poitrasson, 2007; Weyer et al., 2007). Magnesium

Manning, Craig

366

Isotope Specific Remediation Media and Systems - 13614  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, now two years ago, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. While, of course, most of the outcome of this unprecedented natural and manmade disaster was a negative, both in Japan and worldwide, there have been some extremely invaluable lessons learned and new emergency recovery technologies and systems developed. As always, the mother of invention is necessity. Among these developments has been the development and full-scale implementation of proven isotope specific media (ISMs) with the intent of surgically removing specific hazardous isotopes for the purpose of minimizing dose to workers and the environment. The first such ISMs to be deployed at the Fukushima site were those removing cesium (Cs-137) and iodine (I-129). Since deployment on June 17, 2011, along with treated cooling water recycle, some 70% of the curies in the building liquid wastes have been removed by the Kurion system alone. The current levels of cesium are now only 2% of the original levels. Such an unprecedented, 'external cooling system' not only allowed the eventual cold shut down of the reactors in mid-December, 2011, but has allowed workers to concentrate on the cleanup of other areas of the site. Water treatment will continue for quite some time due to continued leakage into the buildings and the eventual goal of cleaning up the reactors and fuel pools themselves. With the cesium removal now in routine operation, other isotopes of concern are likely to become priorities. One such isotope is that of strontium, and yttrium (Sr-90 and Y-90), which is still at original levels causing further dose issues as well as impediments to discharge of the treated waste waters. For over a year now, a new synthetic strontium specific media has been under development and testing both in our licensed facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, but also in confirmatory tests by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan for Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The tests have proven quite successful, even in high salt conditions, and, with loading and dose calculations being completed, will be proposed to add to the existing cesium system. There is no doubt, as high gamma isotopes are removed, other recalcitrant isotopes such as this will require innovative removal media, systems and techniques. Also coming out of this international effort are other ISM media and systems that can be applied more broadly to both Commercial Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) as well as in Department of Energy (DOE) applications. This cesium and strontium specific media has further been successfully tested in 2012 at a Magnox station in the UK. The resulting proposed mitigation systems for pond and vault cleanup look quite promising. An extremely unusual ISM for carbon 14 (C-14), nickel (Ni-63) and cesium (Cs-137) has been developed for Diablo Canyon NPP for dose reduction testing in their fuel pool. These media will be deployed in Submersible Media Filter (SMF) and Submersible Columns (SC) systems adapted to standard Tri-Nuclear{sup R} housings common in the U.S. and UK. External Vessel Systems (mini-Fukushima) have also been developed as a second mitigation system for D and D and outages. Finally, technetium (Tc- 99) specific media developed for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) recycle or condensate (secondary) waste streams (WM 2011) are being further perfected and tested for At-Tank Tc-99 removal, as well as At Tank Cs media. In addition to the on-going media development, systems for deploying such media have developed over the last year and are in laboratory- and full-scale testing. These systems include the fore mentioned Submersible Media Filters (SMF), Submersible Columns (SC) and external pilot- and full-scale, lead-lag, canister systems. This paper will include the media development and testing, as well as that of the deployment systems themselves. (authors)

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Morita, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

An algorithm for U-Pb isotope dilution data reduction and uncertainty propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-precision U-Pb geochronology by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry is integral to a variety of Earth science disciplines, but its ultimate resolving power is quantified by the uncertainties of ...

McLean, Noah Morgan

369

Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

Deldar, Sedigheh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Today's Material Gauss' Law and Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the contents of the box, the box must contain zero net electric charge. Slide 27-31 #12;Gauss' Law and Flux: · The Concept of Flux · Calculating Electric Flux · Symmetry · Gauss's Law · Using Gauss's Law · Conductors that the box must contain net positive electric charge. Slide 27-29 #12;© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc

Ashlock, Dan

372

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling...

376

Hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

Bartlit, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Denton, William H. (Abingdon, GB3); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A World without Sample Preparation: Developing Rapid Uranium Isotope Measurement Capabilities by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing highly sensitive, highly discriminating laser-based techniques for rapid determination of isotopic compositions. Rapid command of such information is critical to assessment of the origin and history of nuclear materials, particularly in post-detonation scenarios.

Knight, K B; Hutcheon, I D; Isselhardt, B H; Savina, M R; Prussin, S G

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

Nimz, G. J., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Primary Cosmic Ray Proton Flux Measured by AMS-02  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a high energy particle detector designed to study origin and nature of cosmic rays up to a few TV from space. It was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011. During the first two years of operation AMS-02 performed precise measurements of the proton flux. In the low rigidity range, from 1 GV to 20 GV, the proton flux was daily measured with a statistical error less than 1%. In the same rigidity range a gradual decrease due to Solar modulation effect and transit variations due to Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejection were also observed. In the rigidity range from 20 GV up to 100 GV instead, AMS-02 data show no drastic variation and the results are consistent with other experiments. Above 100 GV, AMS-02 proton flux exhibits a single power low behavior with no fine structures nor brakes.

C. Consolandi; on Behalf of the AMS-02 Collaboration

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes.

Zisman, M.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ZIRCONIUM—HAFNIUM ISOTOPE EVIDENCE FROM METEORITES FOR THE DECOUPLED SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work based on analyses of meteorite and terrestrial whole-rock samples showed that the r- and s- process isotopes of Hf were homogeneously distributed throughout the inner solar system. We report new Hf isotope data for Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) of the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende, and novel high-precision Zr isotope data for these CAIs and three carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CK). Our Zr data reveal enrichments in the neutron-rich isotope {sup 96}Zr (?1? in {sup 96}Zr/{sup 90}Zr) for bulk chondrites and CAIs (?2?). Potential isotope effects due to incomplete sample dissolution, galactic and cosmic ray spallation, and the nuclear field shift are assessed and excluded, leading to the conclusion that the {sup 96}Zr isotope variations are of nucleosynthetic origin. The {sup 96}Zr enrichments are coupled with {sup 50}Ti excesses suggesting that both nuclides were produced in the same astrophysical environment. The same CAIs also exhibit deficits in r-process Hf isotopes, which provides strong evidence for a decoupling between the nucleosynthetic processes that produce the light (A ? 130) and heavy (A > 130) neutron-rich isotopes. We propose that the light neutron-capture isotopes largely formed in Type II supernovae (SNeII) with higher mass progenitors than the supernovae that produced the heavy r-process isotopes. In the context of our model, the light isotopes (e.g. {sup 96}Zr) are predominantly synthesized via charged-particle reactions in a high entropy wind environment, in which Hf isotopes are not produced. Collectively, our data indicates that CAIs sampled an excess of materials produced in a normal mass (12-25 M{sub ?}) SNII.

Akram, W.; Schönbächler, M. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sprung, P. [Institut für Planetologie, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Vogel, N. [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan that the fluxes are very high in offshore southwestern Taiwan. The depths of the SMI are different at sites GH6

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

383

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

384

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

385

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Draayer, Jerry P [Louisiana State University

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Renewed experimentation with Ranchero flux compression genereators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, Los Alamos pursued a coaxial flux compression generator (FCG) concept that was described in several publications under the name 'Ranchero.' These FCGs were designed to be cost effective high current generators, and a variety of configurations were tested. The Ranchero armature is a 152 mm diameter aluminum cylinder with a 6 mm thick wall. The high explosive (HE) is detonated simultaneously on axis, and as the armature expands a factor of two, the wall thins to {approx}3 mm. At the final 300 mm diameter, the circumference is over 900 mm, and this should allow currents to be generated in the 90 MA range. No tests significantly over 50 MA have been performed but an experiment is planned. We have recently begun using Ranchero devices for a new application and we continue to improve the design. In this paper we describe recent tests of Ranchero and its subsystems. The load for our new application is an imploding aluminum liner that would deform due to the magnetic pressure applied during the initial flux loading. It will, however, implode properly when powered only during the {approx}29 {micro}s Ranchero flux compression time. This gives rise to a new system with explOSively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches and an integral closing switch that isolates the load. A capacitor bank delivers 2.8 MA to the Ranchero circuit in {approx}85 {micro}s. During this time, four parallel 63.5 mm wide EFFs, external to the coaxial system, complete the circuit. After armature motion begins, insulation which initially isolates the load is severed, connecting the load to the FCG in parallel with the EFFs. External HE charges are initiated on each of the EFFs to produce a resistance rise timed to not precede closure of the load isolation switch. The EFFs achieve significant resistance, and the flux remaining in the 191 nH generator and 3 nH transmission line is compressed to generate 30.85 MA in a {approx}12.5 nH static load. On three tests, the EFF system has operated flawlessly, and only {approx}100kA is driven back into the EFFs during peak voltage of the generator output. A test incorporating a 19.5 nH dual liner dynamic load has also been completed, and these results are also presented. Ranchero generators have been operated with armatures from 43 cm to 1.4 m long, corresponding to initial inductances from 56 to 191 nH. MHD code modeling gives better agreement with experiments using modules 43 cm long than the 1.4 m modules, and these results will also be presented.

Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riesman, D. B. [LLNL

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other transition elements which invoked variable contributions of a neutron-rich component. We have examined different nucleosynthetic environments to determine the possible source of the anomalous material responsible for the isotopic variations observed in Ni and other transition elements within bulk samples. We find that the Ni isotopic variability of the solar system cannot be explained by mixing with a component of bulk stellar ejecta from either SN II, Wolf-Rayet or, an asymptotic giant branch source and is unlikely to result from bulk mixing of material from an SN Ia. However, variable admixture of material from the Si/S zone of an SN II can create all the characteristics of Ni isotope variations in solar system materials. Moreover, these characteristics can also be provided by an SN II with a range of masses from 15 to 40 M{sub Sun }, showing that input from SN II is a robust source for Ni isotope variations in the solar system. Correlations of Ni isotope anomalies with O, Cr, and Ti isotope ratios and Pb/Yb in bulk meteorites suggest that the heterogeneous distribution of isotopic anomalies in the early solar system likely resulted from nebular sorting of chemically or physically different materials bearing different amounts of isotopes synthesized proximally to the collapse of the protosolar nebula.

Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Russell, Sara, E-mail: r.steele@uclmail.net [Meteoritics and Cosmic mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing ~24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Details analysis indicates that the design offers a substantial improvement in specific power over the present generator of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There are three copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1981-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

Stable Isotope Analysis of a Middle Woodland Population from North Central Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Kortschak et al. 1965; Thomas 1951) and their corresponding stable isotope value ranges (Craig 1953; Sackett and Thompson 1963; Wickman 1952). Following this discovery, Hall (1967) first recognized that high carbon isotope values in maize and other grasses... would have been around -5‰ to -6‰; slightly higher without the contribution of carbon from fossil fuels. Today’s value is approximately -7‰ (Keeling 1961; Bada et al 1990; Marino and McElroy 1991; Schoeninger and Moore 1992). Malainey (2011:178) places...

Kauffman, Greg

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

An informatics based analysis of the impact of isotope substitution on phonon modes in graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown by informatics that the high frequency short ranged modes exert a significant influence in impeding thermal transport through isotope substituted graphene nanoribbons. Using eigenvalue decomposition methods, we have extracted features in the phonon density of states spectra that reveal correlations between isotope substitution and phonon modes. This study also provides a data driven computational framework for the linking of materials chemistry and transport properties in 2D systems.

Broderick, Scott; Srinivasan, Srikant; Rajan, Krishna [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ray, Upamanyu; Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fluxing agent for metal cast joining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Stable Isotope Protocols: Sampling and Sample Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, benthic microalgae [BMI], benthic macroalgae) andin a dessicator, prior to analysis. A.2 Benthic microalgaeBenthic microalgae (BMI) can be collected for isotope

Levin, Lisa A; Currin, Carolyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of EGS For Exploration, Evaluation of Water-Rock Interaction, and Impacts of Water Chemistry on Reservoir Sustainability Integration of Nontraditional Isotopic Systems Into...

398

Gamma Spectrum from Neutron Capture on Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROM NEUTRON CAPTURE ON TUNGSTEN ISOTOPES A. M. HURST ?1,2 ,capture on the stable tungsten isotopes is presented, withknown decay schemes of the tungsten isotopes from neutron

Hurst, Aaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric neutrino flux Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a prediction of a measurable flux of extragalactic high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs... used the result from the SuperKamiokande ... Source: Bahcall, John -...

400

Spatial periphery of lithium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial structure of lithium isotopes is studied with the aid of the charge-exchange and (t, p) reactions on lithium nuclei. It is shown that an excited isobaric-analog state of {sup 6}Li (0{sup +}, 3.56MeV) has a halo structure formed by a proton and a neutron, that, in the {sup 9}Li nucleus, there is virtually no neutron halo, and that {sup 11}Li is a Borromean nucleus formed by a {sup 9}Li core and a two-neutron halo manifesting itself in cigar-like and dineutron configurations.

Galanina, L. I., E-mail: galan_lidiya@mail.ru; Zelenskaja, N. S. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Successful application of lead isotopes in source apportionment, legal proceedings, remediation and monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 2006, the seaside community in Esperance Western Australia was alerted to thousands of native bird species dying. The source of the lead (Pb) was determined by Pb isotopes to derive from the handling of Pb carbonate concentrate through the Port, which began in July 2005. Concern was expressed for the impact of this on the community. Our objectives were to employ Pb isotope ratios to evaluate the source of Pb in environmental samples for use in legal proceedings, and for use in remediation and monitoring. Isotope measurements were undertaken of bird livers, plants, drinking water, soil, harbour sediments, air, bulk ceiling dust, gutter sludge, surface swabs and blood. The unique lead isotopic signature of the contaminating Pb carbonate enabled diagnostic apportionment of lead in samples. Apart from some soil and water samples, the proportion of contaminating Pb was >95% in the environmental samples. Lead isotopes were critical in resolving legal proceedings, are being used in the remediation of premises, were used in monitoring of workers involved in the decontamination of the storage facility, and monitoring transport of the concentrate through another port facility. Air samples show the continued presence of contaminant Pb, more than one year after shipping of concentrate ceased, probably arising from dust resuspension. Brief details of the comprehensive testing and cleanup of the Esperance community are provided along with the role of the Community. Lead isotopic analyses can provide significant benefits to regulatory agencies, interested parties, and the community where the signature is able to be characterised with a high degree of certainty. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Lead carbonate concentrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Successful use of Pb isotopes in identifying sources of Pb arising from transport and shipping. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Use of Pb isotopes in legal proceedings and their use in cleanup of residences. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Use of Pb isotopes in cleanup of a residual 9000 tonnes of Pb carbonate and in ongoing monitoring.

Gulson, Brian, E-mail: brian.gulson@mq.edu.au [Graduate School of the Environment, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia) [Graduate School of the Environment, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Korsch, Michael [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)] [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Winchester, Wayne; Devenish, Matthew; Hobbs, Thad [Esperance Cleanup and Recovery Project, Western Australia (WA) Department of Transport, Esperance 6450 (Australia)] [Esperance Cleanup and Recovery Project, Western Australia (WA) Department of Transport, Esperance 6450 (Australia); Main, Cleve; Smith, Gerard [Animal Health Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Food, Perth 6151, WA (Australia)] [Animal Health Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Food, Perth 6151, WA (Australia); Rosman, Kevin; Howearth, Lynette; Burn-Nunes, Laurie [Curtin University, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Bentley 6102, WA (Australia)] [Curtin University, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Bentley 6102, WA (Australia); Seow, Jimmy; Oxford, Cameron [Department of Environment and Conservation, Booragoon 6154, WA (Australia)] [Department of Environment and Conservation, Booragoon 6154, WA (Australia); Yun, Gracie; Gillam, Lindsay [Department of Health, East Perth 6004, WA (Australia)] [Department of Health, East Perth 6004, WA (Australia); Crisp, Michelle [LED (Locals for Esperance Development), Esperance 6450, WA (Australia)] [LED (Locals for Esperance Development), Esperance 6450, WA (Australia)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

403

Flux, Vol. 1, Issue 2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

projects are underway; two are profiled here: albany High-temperature Superconducting cable project: On July 20, 2006, the world's first in-grid superconducting power cable,...

404

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permeable fluid flow pathways and the helium Isotopic composition of the surface fluids. The authors suggest that helium isotopes are the best and possibly the only...

405

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

406

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides....

407

applied isotope techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M. 22 Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001) 707713 Bronchial dosimeter for radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001)...

408

The Quest for the Heaviest Uranium Isotope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Uranium isotopes and surrounding elements at very large neutron number excess. Relativistic mean field and Skyrme-type approaches with different parametrizations are used in the study. Most models show clear indications for isotopes that are stable with respect to neutron emission far beyond N=184 up to the range of around N=258.

S. Schramm; D. Gridnev; D. V. Tarasov; V. N. Tarasov; W. Greiner

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Positive and inverse isotope effect on superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article improves the BCS theory to include the inverse isotope effect on superconductivity. An affective model can be deduced from the model including electron-phonon interactions, and the phonon-induced attraction is simply and clearly explained on the electron Green function. The focus of this work is on how the positive or inverse isotope effect occurs in superconductors.

Tian De Cao

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Isotope separation by selective photodissociation of glyoxal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dissociation products, mainly formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, enriched in a desired isotope of carbon, oxygen, or hydrogen are obtained by the selective photodissociation of glyoxal wherein glyoxal is subjected to electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength such that photon absorption excites and induces dissociation of only those molecules of glyoxal containing the desired isotope.

Marling, John B. (Pleasanton, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct graduate students (OSU and UW) as well as DOE staff from the NETL lab in Albany on the use of Crunch Flow for geochemical applications.

Torres, Marta

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Strontium-82 produced at Los Alamos is used in hospitals nation- and world-wide for critical...

414

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1955). Production of Heavy water, 37. G.M. Keyser, D.B.Economy of Production of Heavy Water, Turin, Italy (1970),world production of heavy water to ~1ay, 1977. From data

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed to enrich liquid UF6 slightly as feed for thej) b. Optimum a. s: .X. UF6 feed, (kg per year) XBL 7912 -

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-Testing Sign

417

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5-7. 1975, British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975). 87.London, March British Nuclear Engineering Society (1975).T.H. Pigford, Nuclear Chemical Engineering (1St edition),

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nanostructured light-absorbing crystalline CuIn{sub (1–x)}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films grown through high flux, low energy ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hybrid effusion/sputtering vacuum system was modified with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) coil enabling ion assisted physical vapor deposition of CuIn{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films on GaAs single crystals and stainless steel foils. With <80 W rf power to the ICP coil at 620–740 °C, film morphologies were unchanged compared to those grown without the ICP. At low temperature (600–670 °C) and high rf power (80–400 W), a light absorbing nanostructured highly anisotropic platelet morphology was produced with surface planes dominated by (112){sub T} facets. At 80–400 W rf power and 640–740 °C, both interconnected void and small platelet morphologies were observed while at >270 W and above >715 °C nanostructured pillars with large inter-pillar voids were produced. The latter appeared black and exhibited a strong (112){sub T} texture with interpillar twist angles of ±8°. Application of a negative dc bias of 0–50 V to the film during growth was not found to alter the film morphology or stoichiometry. The results are interpreted as resulting from the plasma causing strong etching favoring formation of (112){sub T} planes and preferential nucleation of new grains, balanced against conventional thermal diffusion and normal growth mechanisms at higher temperatures. The absence of effects due to applied substrate bias suggests that physical sputtering or ion bombardment effects were minimal. The nanostructured platelet and pillar films were found to exhibit less than one percent reflectivity at angles up to 75° from the surface normal.

Hall, Allen J.; Hebert, Damon; Rockett, Angus A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shah, Amish B. [Center for Microanalysis of Materials, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 South Goodwin Ave, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Center for Microanalysis of Materials, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 South Goodwin Ave, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Bettge, Martin [Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60438 (United States)] [Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60438 (United States)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Production and test of isotopically modified Ge detectors for GERDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viability of producing BEGe-type detectors from isotopically modified germanium for the GERDA experiment is demonstrated by a complete test of the supply chain. GERDA is built to search for neutrinoless double beta (0v{beta}{beta}) decay of Ge using high-purity germanium detectors made of material enriched in {sup 76}Ge. To reach a sensitivity for 0v{beta}{beta} decay of <1.4 x 10{sup 26} years, new active background suppression techniques are necessary. BEGe detectors enable a capability to efficiently identify and reject background events, while keeping large acceptance of 0v{beta}{beta} decay signal, by using novel pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques. The PSD as well as spectroscopic performance of prototype BEGe detectors from isotopically modified Ge was verified by comprehensive testing. (authors)

Budjas, D. [Physik-Dept. E15, Technishe Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse 1, Garching bei Muenchen, D-85748 (Germany)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Haynam, Christopher A. (Pleasanton, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Worden, Earl F. (Diablo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nonlocal fluxes at a plasma sheath  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The particle and energy fluxes of electrons at the boundary of a plasma in contact with a perfectly absorbing plate are considered. In general, the fluxes are shown not to be determined by the plasma temperature and density at the plate but rather by a convolution of the plasma profiles in the vicinity of the plate. A simple empirical expression is proposed for the nonlocal fluxes, which approximately reproduces the results of a full kinetic calculation. The implications of this, to divertor plasmas near the neutralizer plate, are discussed.

Marchand, R.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P. (INRS-Energie, C. P. 1020, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2, Canada (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

The use of isotopically tailored boron for advanced neutron shielding and moderating applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cm. The incident neutron flux was measured first without any shielding slab between the source and the detector. The first slab of shielding material was then placed nearest to the source and the transmitted intensity was measured by the detector... effects of nuclear radiation. This analysis examined the use of isotopically tailored boron for the purpose of moderating, reflecting and shielding neutrons. The source of neutrons in this study varied in energy from 0. 2 keV to 14 MeV. The material...

Deere, Laura Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Soft pion emission from fat flux tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of pions from multiquark flux tubes is examined as an explanation of the soft pion puzzle. Although the soft pion spectra from the decay of fat flux tubes can account for some low {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}} enhancement, the dependence on the number of involved quarks is too weak to provide a plausible explanation of the observed enhancement in the pion spectrum at low transverse momenta.

Kusnezov, D.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

FLUXCAP: A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance.

Gopman, Daniel B; Kent, Andrew D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Budgets and behaviors of uranium and thorium series isotopes in the Santa Monica Basin off the California Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples from three time-series sediment traps deployed in the Santa Monica Basin off the California coast were analyzed to study the flux and scavenging of uranium and thorium series isotopes. Variations of uranium and thorium series isotopes fluxes in the water column were obtained by integrating these time-series deployment results. Mass and radionuclide fluxes measured from bottom sediment traps compare favorably with fluxed determined from sediment core data. This agreement suggests that the near-bottom sediment traps are capable of collecting settling particles representative of the surface sediment. The phase distributions of {sup 234}Th in the water column were calculated by an inverse method using sediment trap data, which help to study the variations of {sup 234}Th scavenging in the water column. Scavenging and radioactive decay of {sup 234}Th are the two principal processes for balancing {sup 234}Th budget in the water column. The residence times of dissolved and particulate {sup 234}Th were determined by a {sup 234}Th scavenging model.

Yu, Lei

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Experimental Validation of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in conjunction with personnel from The Ohio State University, are working to develop a system for monitoring spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities on-line, non-destructively, and in near-real-time. This method, known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, is based upon the measurement of distribution patterns of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within particular process streams. Distribution patterns, monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry, are then compared in near-real-time to patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. By targeting gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout the facility. In addition, utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, increases the likelihood that attempts to divert material via process manipulation would be detected. Proof-of-principle modeling exercises simulating changes in acid strength have been completed and the results are promising. Laboratory validation is currently under way and significant results are available. The latest experimental results, along with an overview of the method will be presented.

Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Douglas, Matthew; Christensen, Richard

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Magnesium Isotope Ratios in omega Centauri Red Giants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used high resolution observations obtained at the AAT with UHRF (R ~ 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R ~ 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven omega Centauri red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = --1.78 to --0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The omega Centauri stars sample both the "primordial" (i.e., O-rich, Na and Al-poor) and the "extreme" (O-depleted, Na and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both omega Centauri and M4 show (25Mg, 26Mg)/24 Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the omega Centauri extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the 26Mg/24Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < --1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values....

Da Costa, G S; Yong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Method for correcting for isotope burn-in effects in fission neutron dosimeters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for correcting for effect of isotope burn-in in fission neutron dosimeters. Two quantities are measured in order to quantify the "burn-in" contribution, namely P.sub.Z',A', the amount of (Z', A') isotope that is burned-in, and F.sub.Z', A', the fissions per unit volume produced in the (Z', A') isotope. To measure P.sub.Z', A', two solid state track recorder fission deposits are prepared from the very same material that comprises the fission neutron dosimeter, and the mass and mass density are measured. One of these deposits is exposed along with the fission neutron dosimeter, whereas the second deposit is subsequently used for observation of background. P.sub.Z', A' is then determined by conducting a second irradiation, wherein both the irradiated and unirradiated fission deposits are used in solid state track recorder dosimeters for observation of the absolute number of fissions per unit volume. The difference between the latter determines P.sub.Z', A' since the thermal neutron cross section is known. F.sub.Z', A' is obtained by using a fission neutron dosimeter for this specific isotope, which is exposed along with the original threshold fission neutron dosimeter to experience the same neutron flux-time history at the same location. In order to determine the fissions per unit volume produced in the isotope (Z', A') as it ingrows during the irradiation, B.sub.Z', A', from these observations, the neutron field must generally be either time independent or a separable function of time t and neutron energy E.

Gold, Raymond (Richland, WA); McElroy, William N. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

439

Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its ...

Wang, David T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

O'Donnell, Tom

442

Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the aforementioned anomalies at depth. Moreover, high CO{sub 2} concentrations associated with coals in the vadose zone suggest a strong affinity for adsorbing CO{sub 2}. Overall, the low permeability of reclaimed mine lands and coals and CO2 adsorption by the latter is likely to reduce the ability of surface geochemistry tools to detect a microseepage signal.

Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Oxygen core inside the Magnesium isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the ground state bulk properties of magnesium isotopes using axially symmetric relativistic mean field formalism. The BCS pairing approach is employed to take care of the pairing correlation for the open shell nuclei. The contour plot of the nucleons distribution are analyzed at various parts of the nucleus, where clusters are located. The presence of an $^{16}$O core along bubble like $\\alpha$-particle(s) and few {\\it nucleons} are found in the Mg isotopes.

Bhuyan, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mechanistic studies using kinetic isotope effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMFIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1999 Major Subject: Chemistry MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMEIER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Schulmeier, Brian E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon State University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

447

Sandia National Laboratories: Beryllium High Heat Flux Testing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

system, controls, and blast gun) is now used for electron beam test system vacuum vessel beryllium decontamination and has shortened the beryllium clean-up procedure from...

448

Project Profile: High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309DepartmentDepartment ofCycles | Department ofEnergy

449

Sandia National Laboratories: Beryllium High Heat Flux Testing at PMTF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced NuclearBASF latent curing epoxyBPU

450

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Counting 2.4.3 High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry 2.5coincidence counting and gamma spectrometry system (CANEGA)High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry Isotopic correlation

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A. Gershunov R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Gershunov Ã? R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large Abstract Coupled variability of the greenhouse effect (GH) and latent heat flux (LHF) over the tropical of convection) form regions of strong greenhouse effect in tropical convergence zones while subtropical high

452

Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to "propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science." Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relvant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

Robert D. Woolley

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultravioletmeasurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition ofwavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in

Chakraborty, Subrata

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Super-radiance and flux conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as super-radiance still continues to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that super-radiance in a quantum field theory [QFT] context is not the same as super-radiance (super-fluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation, (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux non-conservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of super-radiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both super-radiance and damping.

Petarpa Boonserm; Tritos Ngampitipan; Matt Visser

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS Summary This method is used to separate Al and Be for AMS analysis from pure quartz samples. After adding Be carrier, quartz is dissolved in HF. The solution is sub-sampled for determination of total Al content, then dried

Stone, John

456

Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

High pressure counterflow CHF.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a report of the experimental results of a program in countercurrent flow critical heat flux. These experiments were performed with Freon 113 at 200 psia in order to model a high pressure water system. An internally ...

Walkush, Joseph Patrick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ?}?{sub i}?>?1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

Singh, Rameswar, E-mail: rameswar.singh@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Brunner, S. [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Diffuse neutrinos from extragalactic supernova remnants: Dominating the 100 TeV IceCube flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube has measured a diffuse astrophysical flux of TeV-PeV neutrinos. The most plausible sources are unique high energy cosmic ray accelerators like hypernova remnants (HNRs) and remnants from gamma ray bursts in star-burst galaxies, which can produce primary cosmic rays with the required energies and abundance. In this case, however, ordinary supernova remnants (SNRs), which are far more abundant than HNRs, produce a comparable or larger neutrino flux in the ranges up to 100-150 TeV energies, implying a spectral break in the IceCube signal around these energies. The SNRs contribution in the diffuse flux up to these hundred TeV energies provides a natural baseline and then constrains the expected PeV flux.

Chakraborty, Sovan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux isotope" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

6, 52515268, 2006 Turbulent fluxes over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´exico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico Received: 24 March 2006 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2006 ­ Published: 26 June 2006 wind speed conditions (up to 25 ms -1 ). The estimates of total momentum flux and turbulent kinetic energy can be represented very5 accurately (r2 =0.99, when data are binned every 1 ms-1 ) by empirical

Boyer, Edmond

464

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste Management Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission#12;#12;Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual'nat the average annual l'elease of radon-222 from the disposal sites to t.he atmosp~1er0 by residuai radioactive

465

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

466

Determination of Mercury in Coal by Isotope Dilution Cold-Vapor Generation Inductively  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Articles Determination of Mercury in Coal by Isotope Dilution Cold-Vapor Generation Inductively. Approximately 93% of U.S. coal consumption is used to generate electricity, and the U.S. EPA has estimated2 developed for high-accuracy determinations of mer- cury in bituminous and sub-bituminous coals. A closed

467

The Fast Flux Test Facility built on safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

No other high-tech industry has grown as fast as the nuclear industry. The information available to the general public has not kept pace with the rapid growth of nuclear data---its growth has outpaced its media image and the safety of nuclear facilities has become a highly debated issue. This book is an attempt to bridge the gap between the high-tech information of the nuclear industry and its understanding by the general public. It explains the three levels of defense at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and why these levels provide an acceptable margin to protect the general public and on-site personnel, while achieving FFTF's mission to provide research and development for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four long-lived neutron-deficient Th isotopes with atomic mass numbers 211 to 218 and abundances of (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th have been found in a study of naturally-occurring Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. It is deduced that long-lived isomeric states exist in these isotopes. The hypothesis that they might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.

Marinov, A.; Kashiv, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rodushkin, I. [Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Luleaa (Sweden); Halicz, L.; Segal, I. [Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhei Israel St., Jerusalem 95501 (Israel); Pape, A. [IPHC-UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS/ULP, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); Gentry, R. V. [Earth Science Associates, P.O. Box 12067, Knoxville, Tennessee 37912-0067 (United States); Miller, H. W. [P. O. Box 1092, Boulder, Colorado 80306-1092 (United States); Kolb, D. [Department of Physics, University GH Kassel, D-34109 Kassel (Germany); Brandt, R. [Kernchemie, Philipps University, D-35041 Marburg (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

469