Sample records for high flux beam

  1. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  2. Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

  3. EIS-0291: High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Transition Project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS evaluates the range of reasonable alternatives and their impacts regarding the future management of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  4. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  5. LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  6. TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  7. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  8. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  9. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) control rod follower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K{sub I}) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K{sub max} values of 24.8 {plus minus} 1.0 Ksi{radical}in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Y., E-mail: shibata.yoshihide@jaea.go.jp; Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ?4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  12. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  13. Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Neutron Scattering Science User Office, neutronusers@ornl.gov or (865) 574-4600. Proposals for beam Wildgruber, wildgrubercu@ornl.gov. VISION CallforProposals neutrons.ornl.gov Neutron Scattering Science - Oak time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Spallation Neutron Source

  14. Effect of flux addition on the microstructure and hardness of TiC-reinforced ferrous surface composite layers fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, S.H.; Lee, S.; Kwon, S.J.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface composites reinforced with TiC particulates were fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation. In order to investigate the effects of flux addition on the TiC dispersion in surface composite layers, four kinds of powder mixtures were made by mixing TiC with 5, 10, 20, and 40 wt% of the flux components (MgO-CaO). To fabricate TiC-reinforced surface composites, the TiC-flux mixtures were deposited evenly on a plain carbon steel substrate, which was subjected to electron-beam irradiation. Microstructural analysis was conducted using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of the surface composites was composed of a melted region, an interfacial region, a coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ), a fine-grained HAZ, and an unaltered original substrate region. TiC agglomerates and residual pores were found in the melted region of materials processed without flux, but the number of agglomerates and pores are significantly decreased in materials processed with a considerable amount of flux. As a result of irradiation, TiC particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the melted region of 2.5 mm in thickness, whose hardness was greatly increased. The optimum flux amount, which resulted in surface composites containing homogeneously dispersed TiC particles, was found to be in the range of 10 to 20% to obtain excellent surface composites.

  15. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  16. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  17. TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  18. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  19. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  20. Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

  1. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

  2. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  3. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  4. High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

  5. A low cost high flux solar simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel S.

    A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

  6. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  7. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

  8. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

  9. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

  10. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

  11. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A...

  12. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

  13. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

  14. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

  15. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    irradiation experiments with a variety of neutron energy spectra for neutron activation analysis, producing HISTORY #12;2 Erecting the dome in 1962. The building was designed as "confinement" to prevent leakage of radioactive materials into the environment. The interior of the building is maintained at a pressure slightly

  16. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  17. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  18. High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

  19. Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

  20. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  1. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

  2. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  3. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  5. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

  6. Anisotropic etching of polymer films by high energy ,,100s of eV... oxygen atom neutral beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Anisotropic etching of polymer films by high energy ,,Ă?100s of eV... oxygen atom neutral beams to generate an energetic 100s of eV , high flux equivalent of 10s mA/cm2 oxygen atom neutral beam. Positive of the boundary voltage which controls neutral beam energy , and was independent of substrate temperature

  7. High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E. [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

  8. High-energy electron beam technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

  9. High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Krafft

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

  10. Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

  11. High flux heat transfer in a target environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

  12. Numerical Optimization of Electron Beams for High Brightness x- and {gamma}-Ray Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, David J.; Anderson, Scott G.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; Siders, Craig W.; Tremaine, Aaron M.; Barty, Christopher P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of high-brightness x- and {gamma}-ray beams using Compton-scattering schemes requires high-brightness electron beams; to minimize the output photon bandwidth, the electron beam emittance must also be minimized. This emittance minimization is in conflict with the desire to increase the electron bunch charge and maximize the number of scatterers at the interaction point. We study here, using a combination of PARMELA and well-benchmarked, Compton-scattering codes, the impact of laser temporal and spatial profiles on the emittance produced in a photoinjector, and the trade-off between charge and emittance in scattered photon brightness and flux.

  13. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  14. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  15. CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  16. CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  17. CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  18. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  19. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

  20. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

  1. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

  2. The Dynamics of Flux Tubes in a High Beta Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Vishniac

    1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high $\\beta$ turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter the macroscopic properties of the fluid or the large scale magnetic field. In either case we show that the Sweet-Parker reconnection rate is much faster than an eddy turnover time. Realistic stellar plasmas are expected to either be in the ideal limit (e.g. the solar photosphere) or the resistive limit (most of the solar convection zone). All current numerical simulations of three dimensional MHD turbulence are in the viscous regime and are inapplicable to stars or accretion disks.

  3. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  4. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  5. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Sparks, Dennis O [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

  6. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes {Gamma}{sub p}10{sup 23} m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2}. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to {approx}0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in He and 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  7. Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

  9. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin...

  10. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, J. [Fermilab; Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, China; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois University; Fermilab; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois University; Prokop, C. R. [Northern Illinois University

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ?37??MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25???m (emittance ratio is ?400), 0.13????m, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41???m, 0.20???m, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2?nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  11. Temperture and composition dependence of the high flux plasma sputtering yield of Cu-Li binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Bohdansky, J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High flux deuterium plasma sputtering and ion beam experiments have been performed on Cu-Li alloys to determine if the reduction in copper erosion previously predicted and observed in low flux ion beam experiments occurs at particle fluxes representative of an RFP first wall or tokamak limiter. Partial sputtering yields of the copper and lithium components have been measured as a function of alloy composition and sample temperature using optical plasma emission spectroscopy, weight loss and catcher foil techniques. It is found that the lithium sputtering yield increases with increasing sample temperature while the copper yield decreases by as much as two orders of magnitude. The temperature required to obtain the reduction in copper erosion is found to be a function of bulk lithium concentration. Consequences of these experimental results for anticipated erosion/redeposition properties are calculated, and the Cu-Li alloy in found to compare favorably with conventional low-Z materials.

  12. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  13. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  14. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  15. Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoms, K.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

  16. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon| ArgonneHigh Flux

  17. Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators! Alexander Valishev! University/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!2! #12;The Olympic Motto for Accelerators! 12/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!3! ENERGY INTENSITY BRIGHTNESS

  18. Conversion feasibility studies for the Grenoble high flux reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, S.C.; Matos, J.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility studies for conversion of the High Flux Reactor (RHF) at Grenoble France have been performed at the Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The uranium densities required for conversion of the RHF to reduced enrichment fuels were computed to be 7.9 g/cm{sup 3} with 20% enrichment, 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 29% enrichment, and 2.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 45% enrichment. Thermal flux reductions at the peak in the heavy water reflector were computed to be 3% with 45% enriched fuel and 7% with 20% enriched fuel. In each case, the reactor's 44 day cycle length was preserved and no changes were made in the fuel element geometry. If the cladding thickness could be reduced from 0.38 mm to 0.30 mm, the required uranium density with 20% enrichment would be about 6.0 g/cm{sup 3} and the thermal flux reduction at the peak in the heavy water reflector would be about 7%. Significantly higher uranium densities are required in the RHF than in heavy water reactors with more conventional designs because the neutron spectrum is much harder in the RHF. Reduced enrichment fuels with the uranium densities required for use in the RHF are either not available or are not licensable at the present time. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Structural design criteria for high heat flux components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperature design rules of the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC), are applied to first wall designs with high heat flux. The maximum coolant pressure and surface heat flux capabilities are shown to be determined not only by the mechanical properties of the first wall material but also by the details of the blanket design. In a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket, the maximum primary stress in the first wall is controlled by many of the geometrical parameters of the blanket, such as, first wall span, first wall curvature, first wall thickness, side wall thickness, and second wall thickness. The creep ratcheting lifetime of the first wall is also shown to be controlled by many of the same geometrical parameters as well as the coolant temperature. According to most high temperature design codes, the time-dependent primary membrane stress allowable are based on the average temperature (ignoring thermal stress). Such a procedure may sometimes be unconservative, particularly for embrittled first walls with large temperature gradients. The effect of secondary (thermal) stresses on the accumulation of creep deformation is illustrated with a vanadium alloy flat plate first wall design.

  20. High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

  2. Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Detailed images of deposits identified...

  3. Coherent beam combiner for a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase conjugate laser mirror employing Brillouin-enhanced four wave mixing allows multiple independent laser apertures to be phase locked producing an array of diffraction-limited beams with no piston phase errors. The beam combiner has application in laser and optical systems requiring high average power, high pulse energy, and low beam divergence. A broad range of applications exist in laser systems for industrial processing, especially in the field of metal surface treatment and laser shot peening.

  4. High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas I. Fundamental characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Mingmei [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Power deposition from electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) has components from stochastic heating, Joule heating, and from the acceleration of secondary electrons through sheaths produced by ion, electron, or photon bombardment of electrodes. The sheath accelerated electrons can produce high energy beams which, in addition to producing excitation and ionization in the gas can penetrate through the plasma and be incident on the opposite electrode. In the use of CCPs for microelectronics fabrication, there may be an advantage to having these high energy electrons interact with the wafer. To control the energy and increase the flux of the high energy electrons, a dc bias can be externally imposed on the electrode opposite the wafer, thereby producing a dc-augmented CCP (dc-CCP). In this paper, the characteristics of dc-CCPs will be discussed using results from a computational study. We found that for a given rf bias power, beams of high energy electrons having a narrow angular spread (<1 deg. ) can be produced incident on the wafer. The maximum energy in the high energy electron flux scales as {epsilon}{sub max}=-V{sub dc}+V{sub rf}+V{sub rf0}, for a voltage on the dc electrode of V{sub dc}, rf voltage of V{sub rf}, and dc bias on the rf electrode of V{sub rf0}. The dc current from the biased electrode must return to ground through surfaces other than the rf electrode and so seeks out a ground plane, typically the side walls. If the side wall is coated with a poorly conducting polymer, the surface will charge to drive the dc current through.

  5. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  6. High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camil Ghiu

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

  7. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  8. Self-pinched transport of a high ?/? electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, M. C.; Wolford, M. F.; Sethian, J. D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States)] [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Rose, D. V. [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Hegeler, F. [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)] [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-pinched transport of a 0.5 MeV, 18 kA cylindrical electron beam has been studied experimentally and computationally. The relatively low voltage and high current required for materials surface modification applications leads to complicated beam dynamics as the Alfven limit is approached. Transport and focusing of the high ?/? beam was done in a sub-Torr, neutral gas-filled, conducting tube in the ion-focused regime. In this regime, beam space charge forces are progressively neutralized to allow focusing of the beam by its self-magnetic field. The beam exhibits stable envelope oscillations as it is efficiently and reproducibly propagated for distances greater than a betatron wavelength. Experimental results follow the trends seen in 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. Results show that the input electron beam can be periodically focused to a peaked profile with the beam half-current radius decreased by a factor of 2.84. This results in an increase of a factor of 8 in beam current density. This focusing is sufficient to produce desired effects in the surface layers of metallic materials.

  9. Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Beryllium High Heat Flux Testing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system, controls, and blast gun) is now used for electron beam test system vacuum vessel beryllium decontamination and has shortened the beryllium clean-up procedure from...

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

  12. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  13. EXTRACTION COMPRESSION AND ACCELERATION OF HIGH LINE CHARGE DENSITY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on compression of heavy ion beams for creating high energyet al, “Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy DensityPulsed Solenoid for Intense Ion Beam Transport,” these Proc:

  14. High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas. II. Effects on twisting in high aspect ratio etching of dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Mingmei [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In high aspect ratio (HAR) plasma etching of holes and trenches in dielectrics, sporadic twisting is often observed. Twisting is the randomly occurring divergence of a hole or trench from the vertical. Many causes have been proposed for twisting, one of which is stochastic charging. As feature sizes shrink, the fluxes of plasma particles, and ions in particular, into the feature become statistical. Randomly deposited charge by ions on the inside of a feature may be sufficient to produce lateral electric fields which divert incoming ions and initiate nonvertical etching or twisting. This is particularly problematic when etching with fluorocarbon gas mixtures where deposition of polymer in the feature may trap charge. dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas (dc-CCPs) have been investigated as a remedy for twisting. In these devices, high energy electron (HEE) beams having narrow angular spreads can be generated. HEEs incident onto the wafer which penetrate into HAR features can neutralize the positive charge and so reduce the incidence of twisting. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of plasma etching of SiO{sub 2} in a dc-CCP using Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} gas mixtures. We found that HEE beams incident onto the wafer are capable of penetrating into features and partially neutralizing positive charge buildup due to sporadic ion charging, thereby reducing the incidence of twisting. Increasing the rf bias power increases the HEE beam energy and flux with some indication of improvement of twisting, but there are also changes in the ion energy and fluxes, so this is not an unambiguous improvement. Increasing the dc bias voltage while keeping the rf bias voltage constant increases the maximum energy of the HEE and its flux while the ion characteristics remain nearly constant. For these conditions, the occurrence of twisting decreases with increasing HEE energy and flux.

  15. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Lujan Neutron Scattering...

  16. High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

  17. Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs.

  18. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  19. High energy electron beam joining of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately}1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of critical components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. Because of transient heating, higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, a pulsed high power beam can melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons as well as ceramic and glass tubes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF Linac accelerator at 10-13 MV. The repetition rate of the pulsed beam was varied between 8 and 120 Hz, the average beam current was varied between 8 and 120 microamps, and the power was varied up to 1.5 kW. These beam parameters gave a beam power density between 0.2 to 2 kW/cm{sup 2}. The duration of the joining runs varied from 5 to 600 sec. Joining experiments have provided high strength between alumina - alumina and alumina - cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals. A series of tests was conducted to determine the minimum beam power and exposure time for producing, a hermetic seal.

  20. INNOVATIVE DESIGN AND MATERIAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL CONTACT LAYERS FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX APPLICATIONS IN FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    INNOVATIVE DESIGN AND MATERIAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL CONTACT LAYERS FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX APPLICATIONS of sacrificial plasma facing components that have to handle the high heat and particle fluxes in ITER armour thermal and electrical contact with the cooled sub-structure while promoting remote, in

  1. High-intensity beam collimation and targetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles, design criteria and realization of reliable collimation systems for the high-power accelerators and hadron colliders are described. Functionality of collimators as the key elements of the machine protection system are discussed along with the substantial progress on the crystal collimation front. The key issues are considered in design of high-power target systems and achieving their best performance. Simulation code requirements are presented.

  2. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  3. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  4. Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggles, A.E.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Rapid thermal processing of steel using high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Newton, A.; Smith, C. Jr.

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy electron beams (HEEBs) with megavolt energies represent a new generation of charged particle beams that rapidly deposit up to several hundred joules/pulse over areas on the order of a few square millimeters to 100s of square centimeters. These pulsed beams have energies in the 1 to 10 MeV range, which enables the electrons to deposit large amounts of energy deeply into the material being processed, and these beams have short pulse durations (50 ns) that can heat materials at rates as high as 10{sup 10} {degrees}C/s for a 1000 {degree}C temperature rise in the material. Lower heating rates, on the order of 10{sup 4} {degrees}C/s, can be produced by reducing the energy per pulse and distributing the total required energy over a series of sub-ms pulses, at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) up to several kHz. This paper presents results from materials processing experiments performed on steel with a 6 MeV electron beam, analyzes these results using a Monte Carlo transport code, and presents a first-order predictive method for estimating the peak energy deposition, temperature, and heating rate for HEEB processed steel.

  6. MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    /mechanical property changes experiment for baseline materials Carbon-Carbon composite This low-Z composite gives;PHASE I: Graphite & Carbon-Carbon Targets #12;E951 Results: ATJ Graphite vs. Carbon-Carbon CompositePLAN MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS Nicholas Simos, Harold Kirk

  7. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa... I. D. Kaganovich beams,13 the physics of solar flares,14 high-intensity high- energy particle beam propagation Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range

  8. Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatiev, A. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number_sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

  9. Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatiev, A [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

  10. Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempf, Stephanie Anne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

  11. New developments for high power electron beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melde, C.; Jaesch, G.; Maedler, E. [Von Ardenne Anlagentechnnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High power electron guns for industrial use work in the range of power of more than 10 kW up to 1200 kW. The only suitable principle for this purpose is that used in axial guns. Elements necessary for these EB guns and their design are described. The outstanding properties required for applications in production and R & D can only be achieved if the equipment is supplemented by a high voltage supply, beam guidance supply, vacuum generator and the various devices for observation, measurement and control. Standard rules for both the technical demands in application and dimensioning of some of the necessary components are explained. Special developments, such as high speed deflection, observation by BSE-camera and arc-free electron beam systems are also presented.

  12. Apparatus for high flux photocatalytic pollution control using a rotating fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus based on optimizing photoprocess energetics by decoupling of the process energy efficiency from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to both low- and high-flux photoreactor design and scale-up. An apparatus for high-flux photocatalytic pollution control is based on the implementation of multifunctional metal oxide aerogels and other media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

  13. Performance of ALICE pixel prototypes in high energy beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Elia

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracking system are instrumented with silicon pixel detectors. Single chip assembly prototypes of the ALICE pixels have been tested in high energy particle beams at the CERN SPS. Detection efficiency and spatial precision have been studied as a function of the threshold and the track incidence angle. The experimental method, data analysis and main results are presented.

  14. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

  15. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 2–3 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  16. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. [City College of New York, New York (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B. [Bonner Nuclear Lab., Houston, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  17. OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS SINGLE-PHASE FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂĽller, Norbert

    forced convection micro-channel heat sinks for minimum pump power at high heat fluxes. Results gained orders of magnitude, especially for high heat flux devices. Using water and air as coolants, designs for heat fluxes of >10 kW/cm2 and >100 W/cm2 respectively with pump/fan power expenses less than 1

  18. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

  19. High Flux Isotope Reactor | Neutron Science at ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home| Visitors|Upcoming EventsFriday, May 1, 2015High

  20. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency|Fuel

  1. Dynamic Motor Parameter Identification for High Speed Flux Weakening Operation of Brushless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szabados, Barna

    performance torque control. Advanced high speed salient-pole synchronous machine drives use vector control Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines Abstract: An experimental investigation is conducted to determine the behaviour of brushless PM synchronous machine parameters in the high speed flux weakening operating range

  2. High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

  3. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, and Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Energy Department, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); STFC, ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, and Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  4. Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinto, Katsuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko [Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

  5. Eulerian Gaussian beams for high-frequency wave propagation Shingyu Leung1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jianliang

    Eulerian Gaussian beams for high-frequency wave propagation Shingyu Leung1 , Jianliang Qian2 , and Robert Burridge3 ABSTRACT We design an Eulerian Gaussian beam summation method for solving Helmholtz equations in the high-frequency re- gime. The traditional Gaussian beam summation method is based

  6. BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint Re-direct Destination: BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of...

  7. High speed two-dimensional optical beam position detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutten, Paul Edmond [Maypa B.V., Bijsters 2, 5131 NW, Alphen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is the design of a high speed two-dimensional optical beam position detector which outputs the X and Y displacement and total intensity linearly. The experimental detector measures the displacement from DC to 123 MHz and the intensity of an optical spot in a similar way as a conventional quadrant photodiode detector. The design uses four discrete photodiodes and simple dedicated optics for the position decomposition which enables higher spatial accuracy and faster electronic processing than conventional detectors. Measurements of the frequency response and the spatial sensitivity demonstrate high suitability for atomic force microscopy, scanning probe data storage applications, and wideband wavefront sensing. The operation principle allows for position measurements up to 20 GHz and more in bandwidth.

  8. Chemical beam epitaxy for high efficiency photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bensaoula, A.; Freundlich, A.; Vilela, M. F.; Medelci, N.; Renaud, P.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InP-based multijunction tandem solar cells show great promise for the conversion efficiency (eta) and high radiation resistance. InP and its related ternary and quanternary compound semiconductors such as InGaAs and InGaAsP offer desirable combinations for energy bandgap values which are very suitable for multijunction tandem solar cell applications. The monolithically integrated InP/In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As tandem solar cells are expected to reach efficiencies above 30 percent. Wanlass, et.al., have reported AMO efficiencies as high as 20.1% for two terminal cells fabricated using atmospheric-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (APMOVPE). The main limitations in their technique are first related to the degradation of the intercell ohmic contact (IOC), in this case the In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As tunnel junction during the growth of the top InP subcell structure, and second to the current matching, often limited by the In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As bottom subcell. Chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) has been shown to allow the growth of high quality materials with reproducible complex compositional and doping profiles. The main advantage of CBE compared to metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the most popular technique for InP-based photovoltaic device fabrication, is the ability to grow high purity epilayers at much lower temperatures (450 C - 530 C). In a recent report it was shown that cost-wise CBE is a breakthrough technology for photovoltaic (PV) solar energy progress in the energy conversion efficiency of InP-based solar cells fabricated using chemical beam epitaxy. This communication summarizes recent results on PV devices and demonstrates the strength of this new technology.

  9. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360{degree}/n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. 7 figs.

  10. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimer, Daniel W. (Danville, CA); Lange, Arnold C. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360.degree./n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load.

  11. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    its promise as an attractive, environmentally acceptable energy source[2]. Carbon based materials have-mechanical response o f graphite and carbon fiber composite (CFC) to very high heat flux includes sublimation, heating of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR inner limiter and have a surface layer

  12. High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    ,. 1. * . High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak Erosion of Carbon Fibre composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak H. Bolt, T. Scholz, J. Boedo*, KH. The materials tested were carbon fibre reinforced materials w"th and without Si-addition. The probe w

  13. Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil Kristen R of Colorado, Campus Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Summary Soil-dominated ecosystems, with little-elevation, subnival zone soil (i.e. elevations higher than the zone of continuous vegetation), the structure

  14. CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  15. MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications A Abstract Fusion power plant studies have found helium to be an attractive coolant based on its safety tend to provide modest heat transfer performance due to their inherently low heat capacity and heat

  16. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  17. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  18. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  19. CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  20. CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  1. CRAD, Environmental Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  2. CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  3. CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  4. CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  5. CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  6. CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  7. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  8. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  9. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  10. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  11. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  12. Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Csoto

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

  13. CRAD, Quality Assurance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Quality Assurance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  14. A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonen, Fredric A.

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

  15. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  16. Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements.

  17. The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Raj; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it lead...

  18. HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three experimental Halls. In Hall A is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three

  19. High-throughput analysis of thin-film stresses using arrays of micromachined cantilever beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-throughput analysis of thin-film stresses using arrays of micromachined cantilever beams Hyun-throughput residual stress measurements on thin films by means of micromachined cantilever beams and an array of parallel laser beams. In this technique, the film of interest is deposited onto a silicon substrate

  20. Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams F. Courvoisier,* A Month X, XXXX; posted Month X, XXXX (Doc. ID XXXXX); published Month X, XXXX We use caustic beam shaping on 100 fs pulses to experimentally generate non-paraxial accelerating beams along a 60 degree circular

  1. PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda J.S.T. Ng, P. Chen, W, for the first time, positron beams. We also discuss measure­ ments on plasma lens­induced synchrotron radiation and laser­ and beam­plasma interactions. 1 INTRODUCTION The plasma lens was proposed as a final focusing

  2. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing, and fracture toughness master curve issues.

  3. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stranak, Vitezslav, E-mail: stranak@prf.jcu.cz [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin [Institute of Physics v. v. i., Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Tichy, Milan [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ?. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  4. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  5. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P., E-mail: pradipr@barc.gov.in; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, ?2 to ?4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup ?3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  6. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  7. Microstructure of TiB{sub 2}/carbon steel surface-alloyed materials fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euh, K. Lee, S.; Shin, K.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The processing and the microstructural analysis of TiB{sub 2}/carbon steel surface-alloyed materials using the irradiation of a high-energy electron beam were investigated in this study. The mixtures of TiB{sub 2} powders and flux were deposited on a plain carbon steel substrate, and then electron beam was irradiated on these mixtures using an electron beam accelerator. The microstructure of the irradiated surface layer was composed of a melted region, an interfacial region, a coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ), and a fine-grained HAZ. A few residual micropores were found in the melted region of the specimen processed without flux because of irregular thermal transfer, but their number was decreased in the specimens processed with a considerable amount of flux. As a result of irradiation, the Ti content was homogeneously maintained throughout the melted region, whose hardness was greatly improved. This was associated with the microstructural modification including the segregation of Ti and B along solidification cell boundaries and the formation of fine Ti(C, N) particles. The proper flux mix ratio was 15 to 30% to obtain excellent surface alloying and a homogeneous microstructure.

  8. RRR Degradation and Gas Absorption in the Electron Beam Welding Area of High Purity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RRR Degradation and Gas Absorption in the Electron Beam Welding Area of High Purity Niobium W degradation and gas absorption of high purity niobium welded at different electron beam (EB) facilities are summarized. The oxygen and nitrogen content is increased as a rule at the welding seam. The absorption

  9. Chapter 19. High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 19. High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions 19-1 High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions 1. DC Properties of Modern Filled Epoxy Insulation Academic and Research Staff Dr. Chathan Cooke Sponsor

  10. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    , the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

  11. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    ), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

  12. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    ), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

  13. Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle length. Consequently, ANL and ILL have collaborated to investigate alternative designs. A promising candidate design has been selected and studied, increasing the total amount of fuel without changing the external plate dimensions by relocating the burnable poison. In this way, changes required in the fuel element are reasonably small. With this new design, neutronics analyses have shown that performance could be maintained at a high level: 2 day decrease of cycle length (to 47.5 days at 58.3 MW) and 1-2% decrease of brightness in the cold and hot sources in comparison to the current typical operation. In addition, studies have shown that the thermal-hydraulic and shutdown margins for the proposed LEU design would satisfy technical specifications.

  14. Lessons Learned in the Update of a Safety Limit for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent unreviewed safety question (USQ) regarding a portion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) transient decay heat removal analysis focused on applicability of a heat transfer correlation at the low flow end of reactor operations. During resolution of this issue, review of the correlations used to establish the safety limit (SL) on reactor flux-to-flow ratio revealed the need to change the magnitude of the SL at the low flow end of reactor operations and the need to update the hot spot fuel damage criteria to incorporate current knowledge involving parallel channel flow stability. Because of the original safety design strategy for the reactor, resolution of the issues for the flux-to-flow ratio involved reevaluation of all key process variable SLs and limiting control settings (LCSs) using the current version of the heat transfer analysis code for the reactor. Goals of the work involved updating and upgrading the SL analysis where necessary, while preserving the safety design strategy for the reactor. Changes made include revisions to the safety design criteria at low flows to address the USQ, update of the process- and analysis input-variable uncertainty considerations, and upgrade of the safety design criteria at high flow. The challenges faced during update/upgrade of this SL and LCS are typical of the problems found in the integration of safety into the design process for a complex facility. In particular, the problems addressed in the area of instrument uncertainties provide valuable lessons learned for establishment and configuration control of SLs for large facilities.

  15. NEUTRALIZED TRANSPORT OF HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS E. Henestroza #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    for specific degrees of neutralization. PLASMA NEUTRALIZATION Neutralization is essential for focusing heavy (~ 10-3 Torr). Final focus magnet Target Volumetric plasma Converging ion beam Chamber Wall at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus

  16. Nanotube diameter optimal for channeling of high-energy particle beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Biryukov; S. Bellucci

    2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Channeling of particle beam in straight and bent single-wall nanotubes has been studied in computer simulations. We have found that the nanotubes should be sufficiently narrow in order to steer efficiently the particle beams, with preferred diameter in the order of 0.5-2 nm. Wider nanotubes, e.g. 10-50 nm, appear rather useless for channeling purpose because of high sensitivity of channeling to nanotube curvature. We have compared bent nanotubes with bent crystals as elements of beam steering technique, and found that narrow nanotubes have an efficiency of beam bending similar to that of crystals.

  17. HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha, Université Blaise Pascal IN2P3-CNRS Abstract CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams for measuring accurately the linearity is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous

  18. Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser18, deliver an intense uranium beam that deposit about 1 kJ0g specific energy in solid matter. Using 2004! Abstract Intense heavy ion beams from the Gesellschaft fĂĽr Schwerionenforschung ~GSI, Darmstadt

  19. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions to the fast ion emission process. The interest in laser plasmas and interaction phenomena of heavy ion beams!. Thus there is a tradition to investigate accelerator related issues like beam transport phenomena

  20. Nanofluid-based receivers for high-temperature, high-flux direct solar collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar power plants with surface receivers have low overall energy conversion efficiencies due to large emissive losses at high temperatures. Alternatively, volumetric receivers promise increased performance because solar ...

  1. Modified floor response spectra for the Brookhaven National Laboratory High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morante, R.J.; Skonieczny, J.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the modified floor response spectra that will be used for future seismic evaluations of structures, systems, and components (SSC`s) within the HFBR and the technical basis for the modified floor response spectra. When used within this report, the term ``current spectra`` refers to the 1978 spectra developed in BNL Informal Report BNL-26019.

  2. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  3. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  4. High order beam features and fitting quadrupole scan data to particle code model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, W. P. (Walter P.); Garnett, R. W. (Robert W.); Gilpatrick, J. D. (John Douglas); Qiang, J. (Ji); Rybarcyk, L. J. (Lawrence J.); Ryne, Robert; Schneider, J. D. (J. David); Smith, H. V. (Horace V.); Young, L. M. (Lloyd M.); Schulze, M. E. (Martin E.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quadrupole scans in the HEBT of the 6.7 MeV LEDA RFQ were analyzed to characterize the RFQ output beam. In previous work, profiles measured by the wire scanner were fit to models (beam parameterizations and HEBT simulations) to determine the transverse Courant-Snyder parameters {alpha}, {beta}, and {epsilon} at the RFQ exit. Unfortunately, at the larger quadrupole settings, the measured profiles showed features that were not present in any of our simulations. Here we describe our latest analysis, which resulted in very good fits by using an improved model for the RFQ output beam. The model beam was generated by the RFQ simulation code TOUTATIS. In our fitting code, this beam was distorted by linear transformations that changed the Courant-Snyder parameters to whatever values were required by the nonlinear optimizer while preserving the high-order features of the phase-space distribution. No new physics in the HEBT was required to explain our quad-scan results, just an improved initial beam. High-order features in the RFQ output beam apparently make a significant difference in behavior downstream of the RFQ. While this result gives us increased confidence in our codes, we still have a mystery: exactly what high-order features in the beam are responsible for the the strange behavior downstream. Understanding this phenomenon may be helpful to understanding our halo-experiment data. We have begun to study this by comparing higher-order moments of the TOUTATIS distribution with other distributions.

  5. Control of a highly flexible rotating beam: theory and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Pei-Ming

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) The development of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates both the longitudinal and the transverse deformations of the beam and its reduction to a linear model suitable for controller synthesis, (2) The synthesis of controllers based on several... state of art control methodologies that include (i) classical proportional plus derivative (PD) control (ii) Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) (iii) servomechanism theory (iv) Lyapunov theory and (v) quantitative feedback theory (QFT), (3...

  6. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  7. High beta studies with neutral beam injection in ISX-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlap, J.L.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.; Swain, D.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Details of experimental results will be discussed, including empirical scaling of beta with beam power, analysis of the fast ion distribution and MHD behavior, and confinement in high beta plasmas.

  8. OPERATION STATUS OF HIGH INTENSITY ION BEAMS AT GANIL F. Chautard, G. Sncal, GANIL, Caen, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . · A high-energy experiment. · An auxiliary experiments sharing the CSS2 beam · Additionally, the cyclotron, Venice, Italy 54 Circular Accelerators in2p3-00396700,version1-29Jul2010 Author manuscript, published

  9. Simulation of the Beam Dump for a High Intensity Electron Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Pepitone, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLIC Drive Beam is a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. A test facility for the Drive Beam electron gun will soon be commissioned at CERN. In this contribution we outline the design of a beam dump / Faraday cup capable of resisting the beam’s thermal load. The test facility will operate initially up to 140 keV. At such low energies, the electrons are absorbed very close to the surface of the dump, leading to a large energy deposition density in this thin layer. In order not to damage the dump, the beam must be spread over a large surface. For this reason, a small-angled cone has been chosen. Simulations using Geant4 have been performed to estimate the distribution of energy deposition in the dump. The heat transport both within the electron pulse and between pulses has been modelled using finite element methods to check the resistance of the dump at high repetition rates. In addition, the possibility of using a moveable dump to measure the beam profile and emittance is discussed.

  10. Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

  11. Large break loss-of-coolant accident analyses for the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was analyzed to evaluate it's response to a spectrum of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) with potential for leading to core damage. The MELCOR severe accident analysis code (version 1.7.1) was used to evaluate the overall dynamic response of HFIR. Before conducting LOCA analyses, the steady-state thermal-hydraulic parameters evaluated by MELCOR for various loop sections were verified against steady-state operating data. Thereafter, HFIR depressurization tests were simulated to evaluate the system pressure change for a given depletion in coolant inventory. Interesting and important safety-related phenomena were observed. The current analyses (which should be considered preliminary) that occur over a period from 1 to 3 seconds do not lead to core wide fuel melting. Core fluid flashing during the initial rapid depressurization does cause fuel temperature excursions due to adiabatic-like heatup. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, S. C.

    1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

  13. Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

  14. Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

  15. Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

  16. Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

  17. A focusable, convergent fast-electron beam from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, R H H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel scheme for the creation of a convergent, or focussing, fast-electron beam generated from ultra-high-intensity laser-solid interactions is described. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of this scheme in two dimensions. It is shown that a beam of fast-electrons of energy 500 keV - 3 MeV propagates within a solid-density plasma, focussing at depth. The depth of focus of the fast-electron beam is controlled via the target dimensions and focussing optics.

  18. Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, M.S.; Beg, F.N.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clark, E.L.; Evans, R.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ledingham, K.W.D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Norreys, P.A. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Department of Physics, The Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Filamented electron beams have been observed to be emitted from the rear of thin solid targets irradiated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser when there is low-density plasma present at the back of the target. These observations are consistent with a laser-generated beam of relativistic electrons propagating through the target, which is subsequently fragmented by a Weibel-like instability in the low-density plasma at the rear. These measurements are in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations and theory, since the filamentation instability is predicted to be dramatically enhanced when the electron beam density approaches that of the background plasma.

  19. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  20. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  1. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  2. Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohring, M.W.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

  3. External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

  4. High-heat-flux removal by phase-change fluid and particulate flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept based on particulate flow in which either or both the particulates and the fluid could undergo phase changes is proposed. The presence of particulates provides not only a mechanism for additional heat removal through phase change but also the potential for increasing the rate of heat transfer by enhancing convection through surface region/bulk [open quotes]mixing[close quotes], by enhancing radiation, particularly for high-temperature cases; and for the case of multiphase fluid, by enhancing the boiling process. One particularly interesting coolant system based on this concept is [open quotes]subcooled boiling water-ice particulate[close quotes] flow. A preliminary analysis of this coolant system is presented, the results of which indicate that such a coolant system is better applied for cooling of relatively small surface areas with high local heat fluxes, where a conventional cooling system would come short of providing the required heat removal at acceptable coolant pressure levels. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Besson; S. Razzaque; J. Adams; P. Harris

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding luminosity and redshift to permit estimates of the neutrino flux.

  6. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

  7. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to inject plasma into the final focus region right inplasma flow is slowed down once entering the high field region of the final focus

  8. Reactor physics input to the safety analysis report for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R.T. III.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HFIR specific, few group neutron and coupled neutron-gamma libraries have been prepared. These are based on data from ENDF/B-V and beginning-of-life (BOL) conditions. The neutron library includes actinide data for curium target rods. Six critical experiments, collectively designated HFIR critical experiment 4, were analyzed. Calculated k-effective was 2% high at BOL-typical conditions but was 1.0 at end-of-life-typical conditions. The local power density distributions were calculated for each of the critical experiments. The axially averaged values at a given radius were frequently within experimental error. However at individual points, the calculated local power densities were significantly different from the experimentally derived values (several times greater than experimental uncertainty). A reassessment of the foil activation data with transport theory techniques seems desirable. Using the results of the critical experiments study, a model of current HFIR configuration was prepared. As with the critical experiments, BOL k-effective was high (3%). However, end-of-life k-effective was high (2%). The end-of-life concentrations of fission products were compared to those generated using the ORIGEN code. Agreement was generally good through differences in the inventories of some important nuclides, Xe and I, need to be understood. End-of-cycle curium target isotopics based on measured, discharged target rods were compared to calculated values and agreement was good. Axial flux plots at various irradiation positions were generated. Time-dependent power distributions based on two-dimensional calculations were provided.

  9. Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

  10. Demonstration of Cathode Emittance Dominated High Bunch Charge Beams in a DC gun-based Photoinjector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (greater than or equal to 100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittance measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs).

  11. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  12. On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freels, J.D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as the code''). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

  13. On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freels, J.D.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as ``the code``). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed.

  14. A system analysis computer model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIRSYS Version 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sozer, M.C.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system transient analysis computer model (HFIRSYS) has been developed for analysis of small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and operational transients. The computer model is based on the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) that produces the FORTRAN code automatically and that provides integration routines such as the Gear`s stiff algorithm as well as enabling users with numerous practical tools for generating Eigen values, and providing debug outputs and graphics capabilities, etc. The HFIRSYS computer code is structured in the form of the Modular Modeling System (MMS) code. Component modules from MMS and in-house developed modules were both used to configure HFIRSYS. A description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, theoretical bases for the modeled components of the system, and the verification and validation efforts are reported. The computer model performs satisfactorily including cases in which effects of structural elasticity on the system pressure is significant; however, its capabilities are limited to single phase flow. Because of the modular structure, the new component models from the Modular Modeling System can easily be added to HFIRSYS for analyzing their effects on system`s behavior. The computer model is a versatile tool for studying various system transients. The intent of this report is not to be a users manual, but to provide theoretical bases and basic information about the computer model and the reactor.

  15. Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL] [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL] [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

  16. Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

  17. Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

  18. Collective Thomson scattering of a high power electron cyclotron resonance heating beam in LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahash, H.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Tamura, N. [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of FIR Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Notake, T. [Tera-Photonics Lab., RIKEN, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Korsholm, S. B.; Meo, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M. [Association EURATOM-Risoe DTU, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) system has been constructed at LHD making use of the high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system in Large Helical Device (LHD). The necessary features for CTS, high power probing beams and receiving beams, both with well defined Gaussian profile and with the fine controllability, are endowed in the ECRH system. The 32 channel radiometer with sharp notch filter at the front end is attached to the ECRH system transmission line as a CTS receiver. The validation of the CTS signal is performed by scanning the scattering volume. A new method to separate the CTS signal from background electron cyclotron emission is developed and applied to derive the bulk and high energy ion components for several combinations of neutral beam heated plasmas.

  19. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimer, Daniel W. (Danville, CA); Lange, Arnold C. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  20. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

  1. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)] [ed.; Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  2. High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

  3. Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

  4. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambhir Ranjit; David P. Atherton; Jordan H. Stutz; Mark Cunningham; Andrew A. Geraci

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum opto-mechanics.

  5. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Stutz, Jordan H; Cunningham, Mark; Geraci, Andrew A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum opto-mechanics.

  6. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambhir Ranjit; David P. Atherton; Jordan H. Stutz; Mark Cunningham; Andrew A. Geraci

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum opto-mechanics.

  7. A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, C B

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

  8. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  9. Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, W.L.; Gaines, E.E.; McGlennon, J.P. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)] [and others] [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States); and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of >1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes >0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Spin rotation of polarized beams in high energy storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations for spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are obtained considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle along with the contributions from spin rotation and birefringence effect in polarized matter of an internal target. % Study of the spin rotation and birefringence effects for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement both the spin-dependent real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude and tensor electric (magnetic) polarizabilities.

  11. Laser-Energy Transfer and Enhancement of Plasma Waves and Electron Beams by Interfering High-Intensity Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Laser-Energy Transfer and Enhancement of Plasma Waves and Electron Beams by Interfering High-Intensity) The effects of interference due to crossed laser beams were studied experimentally in the high- intensity regime. Two ultrashort (400 fs), high-intensity (4 1017 and 1:6 1018 W=cm2) and 1 m wavelength laser

  12. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  13. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  14. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams , H. Ludewig1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , an intensive search has been under way for both "smart" target designs and target materials that exhibit and "smart" materials have recently become available to serve the needs of special industries and someTarget Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams N. Simos1* , H. Kirk1 , H

  15. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

  16. Interaction of a High-Power Laser Beam with Metal Sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments with a high-power laser beam directed onto thin aluminum sheets, with a large spot size, demonstrate that airflow produces a strong enhancement of the interaction. The enhancement is explained in terms of aerodynamic effects. As laser heating softens the material, the airflow-induced pressure difference between front and rear faces causes the metal to bulge into the beam. The resulting shear stresses rupture the material and remove it at temperatures well below the melting point. The material heating is shown to conform to an elementary model. We present an analytic model of elastic bulging. Scaling with respect to spot size, wind speed, and material parameters is determined.

  17. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  18. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  19. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J. S., E-mail: james.green@stfc.ac.uk; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dance, R. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, C. D. [SUPA, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30?MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ?10{sup 21} W cm{sup ?2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for ?m-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500?nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  1. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  2. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  3. High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)] [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

  4. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Harris, J. [Colorado State U.; Martinez, J. [Colorado State U.; Milton, S. V. [Colorado State U.; Van Keuren, J. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Steve V. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

  5. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  6. Generation of high-current electron beam in a wide-aperture open discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Gugin, P. P. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrent'eva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, it was examined generation of nanosecond-duration electron-beam (EB) pulses by a wide-aperture open discharge burning in helium or in a mixture of helium with nitrogen and water vapor. In the experiments, a discharge cell with coaxial electrode geometry, permitting radial injection of the electron beam into operating lasing medium, was used, with the cathode having radius 2.5 cm and length 12 cm. It was shown possible to achieve an efficient generation of a high-intensity electron beam (EB pulse power {approx}250 MW and EB pulse energy up to 4 J) in the kiloampere range of discharge currents (up to 26 kA at {approx}12 kV discharge voltage). The current-voltage characteristics of the discharge proved to be independent of the working-gas pressure. The existence of an unstable dynamic state of EB, conditioned by the presence of an uncompensated space charge accumulated in the discharge cell due to the exponential growth of the current in time during discharge initiation and the hyperbolic growth of current density in the direction towards the tube axis, was revealed. The obtained pulsed electron beam was used to excite the self-terminated laser on He 2{sup 1}P{sub 1}{sup 0}-2{sup 1}S{sub 0} transition. The oscillations developing in the discharge cell at high discharge currents put limit to the pumping energy and emissive power of the laser excited with the radially converging electron beam.

  7. Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

  8. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  9. A limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from lunar observations with the Parkes radio telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.

  10. Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoeberling, R.F.

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment. 8 figs.

  11. Performance Modeling and Optimization of a High Energy CollidingBeam Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Qiang, Ji; Bailey, David H.; Yelick, Kathy

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance computing platforms. Various all-to-all personalized communication (AAPC) algorithms dominate its communication patterns, for which we developed a sequence of performance models using a series of micro-benchmarks. We find that for SMP based systems the most important performance constraint is node-adapter contention, while for 3D-Torus topologies good performance models are not possible without considering link contention. The best average model prediction error is very low on SMP based systems with of 3% to 7%. On torus based systems errors of 29% are higher but optimized performance can again be predicted within 8% in some cases. These excellent results across five different systems indicate that this methodology for performance modeling can be applied to a large class of algorithms.

  12. MATERIAL R&D FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM PROGRESS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MATERIAL R&D FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS PROGRESS REPORT Nick Simos, BNL May 5, 2006 #12-weaved Carbon-Carbon Composite · Toyota "Gum Metal" · Graphite (IG-43) · AlBeMet · Beryllium · Ti Alloy (6Al-4V of it put together in 6 weeks · 3D-weaved Carbon-Carbon Composite · 2D-weaved Carbon-Carbon · Toyota "Gum

  13. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

  14. Molecular Beam Epitaxy, Multi-source | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beam epitaxy, is examined using a combination... Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy. A...

  15. Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups: Report on the joint meeting, July 9, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, R.D. (ed.)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains a collection of viewgraphs from a joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups. A list of contributing topics is: PPPL update, ATF update, Los Alamos RFP program update, status of DIII-D, PMI graphite studies at ORNL, PMI studies for low atomic number materials, high heat flux materials issues, high heat flux testing program, particle confinement in tokamaks, helium self pumping, self-regenerating coatings technical planning activity and international collaboration update. (LSP)

  16. Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

  17. Manufacturing capabilities of high power electron beam furnaces for melting ignots to 40 tons in weight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boiko, Ju.P.; Braim, V.P.; Kormitch, A.T.; Zorin, G.V.; Kostenuk, Ju.V.; Nikitin, V.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A tendency to using special technologies of melting steels and alloys to get large ingots free of macrodefects and shrinking shells used to provide defectless products, ensuring an increase of ingot-to-product yield is well known. The electron beam furnace process improves the economical efficiency of production of large ingots, slabs for rolling mills, where high quality of special purpose steels and alloys is required. Metals, made by means of electron beam melting can be used for power, nuclear and chemical machine-buildings, aircraft and automotive, instrument and bearing productions, injection moulds and moulds for cold rollings, magnetic and titanium alloys, ship shafts, propellers and high speed power turbine parts. Melting technologies, which is one of the most important stages in production of steels and alloys, predetermines a required quality of metals and alloys to get the following characteristics of remelted metals: impact strength; isotropy of properties in central and surface zones of ingots; fatigue strength and resistance under mechanical and heat loads; corrosion resistance to attack by aggressive media; and polishing properties. The furnace is equipped with five electron beam guns, type EH-1200/50 and pumps for pumping out cavities of technological equipments: melting and ingot chambers, charging devices.

  18. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  19. Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

  20. Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

  1. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  2. Time-series analysis of high-resolution ebullition fluxes from a stratified, freshwater lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, Charuleka

    [1] Freshwater lakes can emit significant quantities of methane to the atmosphere by bubbling. The high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ebullition, combined with a lack of high-resolution field measurements, has made ...

  3. Liquid scintillator for 2D dosimetry for high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenisch, Falk; Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina Marie; Sahoo, Narayan; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard., Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex radiation therapy techniques require dosimetric verification of treatment planning and delivery. The authors investigated a liquid scintillator (LS) system for application for real-time high-energy photon beam dosimetry. The system was comprised of a transparent acrylic tank filled with liquid scintillating material, an opaque outer tank, and a CCD camera. A series of images was acquired when the tank with liquid scintillator was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam, and the light data measured with the CCD camera were filtered to correct for scattering of the optical light inside the liquid scintillator. Depth-dose and lateral profiles as well as two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions were found to agree with results from the treatment planning system. Further, the corrected light output was found to be linear with dose, dose rate independent, and is robust for single or multiple acquisitions. The short time needed for image acquisition and processing could make this system ideal for fast verification of the beam characteristics of the treatment machine. This new detector system shows a potential usefulness of the LS for 2D QA.

  4. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; /SLAC; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  5. Forward production of high-energy electrons from megavoltage photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The forward production of high-energy electrons from materials with various atomic numbers from carbon to lead has been measured for megavoltage photon beams from 4- to 25-MV peak bremsstrahlung energy by placing a thin-window parallel-plate ionization chamber directly behind foils of the various materials. The relative forward production of electrons decreases with atomic number for energies less than or equal to10 MV until about Z = 50, after which it rises. For photon energies greater than or equal to15 MV, forward production increases with atomic number with a break point at Z--50, beyond which the curve becomes steeper.

  6. Status of compact-toroid research using high energy particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop on the use of high-energy particle beams to generate compact-toroid plasma geometries was held at the Department of Energy (Germantown) on June 26-27, 1980, for the purpose of assisting the Division of Applied Plasma Physics in formulating program plans for this work, and assessing its importance relative to the rest of the compact toroid (CT) program. The scope of the workshop is given in Appendix A, and the charge to the panel of advisors responsible for writing this report is given in Appendix B.

  7. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on High-Luminous-Flux LED Lighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LED technology performs well in a region with high ambient temperature and solar radiation, it can perform well in most outdoor environments. The full report and a report...

  8. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  9. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  10. Assessment of advanced coal-gasification processes. [AVCO high throughput gasification in process; Bell High Mass Flux process; CS-R process; and Exxon Gasification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.; Ferrall, J.; Charng, T.; Houseman, J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a technical assessment of the following advanced coal gasification processes: AVCO High Throughput Gasification (HTG) Process, Bell Single - Stage High Mass Flux (HMF) Process, Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Hydrogasification Process, and the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) Process. Each process is evaluated for its potential to produce SNG from a bituminous coal. In addition to identifying the new technology these processes represent, key similarities/differences, strengths/weaknesses, and potential improvements to each process are identified. The AVCO HTG and the Bell HMF gasifiers share similarities with respect to: short residence time (SRT), high throughput rate, slagging and syngas as the initial raw product gas. The CS/R Hydrogasifier is also SRT but is non-slagging and produces a raw gas high in methane content. The Exxon CCG gasifier is a long residence time, catalytic fluidbed reactor producing all of the raw product methane in the gasifier.

  11. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  12. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S. [comp.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

  13. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S., E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  14. Direct atomic flux measurement of electron-beam evaporated yttrium with a diode-laser-based atomic absorption monitor at 668 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejer, Martin M.

    with a diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA monitor at 668 nm. Atomic number density and velocity were measured through absorption and Doppler shift measurements to provide the atomic flux. The AA previously developed diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA monitors for atomic density measurements

  15. The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  16. BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

  17. High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon| ArgonneHigh

  18. Highly bent (110) Ge crystals for efficient steering of ultrarelativistic beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Salvador, D.; Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Bazzan, M.; Argiolas, N.; Carnera, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Universitŕ 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitŕ di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)] [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Universitŕ 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitŕ di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Della Mea, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Universitŕ 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universitŕ di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38050 Trento (Italy)] [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale Universitŕ 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universitŕ di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38050 Trento (Italy); Bagli, E.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Guidi, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Ferrara Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Ferrara Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Lietti, D.; Berra, A.; Guffanti, G.; Prest, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Universitŕ dell'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como and INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milan (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Universitŕ dell'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como and INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milan (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to the effective electrostatic potential generated by the ordered atomic structure, bent crystals can efficiently deflect ultra relativistic charged beams by means of planar and axial channeling phenomena as well as of the recently discovered volume reflection effect. Most of the experimental knowledge about these phenomena has been gathered with Si crystals, but it has been recently demonstrated that the steering performance can be improved by using high quality Ge materials which have a larger atomic number. In this paper, we investigate channeling and volume reflection of 400 GeV protons from (110) lattice planes in highly bent Ge strips crystals. Both production and characterization of the strips are presented. Herein, the experimental results on deflection are compared with theoretical predictions, with previous published data and with the expected performances of Si crystals in similar experimental conditions.

  19. In Situ Electrochemical X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis with High Oxygen Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    to the widespread application of fuel cells and air-cathode batteries in automotive and stationary power a progressive evolution of the electronic structure of the metal clusters that is both potential) and the large overpotential (300 mV) in fuel cell cathodes necessitate the use of high loadings of precious-metal

  20. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, R. J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, J. C. [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, K. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, K. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Moses, D. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  1. High Resolution Particle Beam Monitoring and Ionization Counters with the Help of Single Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Ispirian; R. K. Ispiryan; A. T. Margarian

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    After a short review of modern beam monitors, ionization and proportional counters and discussion on the necessity to have thinner wires, we propose and consider construction and parameters of nanotube particle beam monitors and counters

  2. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor.

  3. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The ?rst part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  4. MODEL AND BEAM BASED SETUP PROCEDURES FOR A HIGH POWER HADRON SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will review methods for experimental determination of optimal operational set points in a multi-cavity superconducting high power hadron linac. A typical tuning process is based on comparison between measured data and the results of simulations from envelope and single-particle models. Presence of significant space charge effects requires simulation and measurement of bunch dynamics in 3 dimensions to ensure low loss beam transport. This is especially difficult in a superconducting linac where use of interceptive diagnostics is usually restricted because of the risk of SRF cavity surface contamination. The procedures discussed here are based on non-interceptive diagnostics such as beam position monitors and laser wires, and conventional diagnostics devices such as wire scanners and bunch shape monitors installed outside the superconducting linac. The longitudinal Twiss analysis based on the BPM signals will be described. The superconducting SNS linac tuning experience will be used to demonstrate problems and their solution for real world linac tune-up procedures

  5. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  6. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios High EnergyEliane

  7. PERFORMING DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE VISION BEAM LINE TO ELIMINATE HIGH VIBRATION LEVELS AND PROVIDE A SUSTAINABLE OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoy, Blake W [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides variable energy neutrons for a variety of experiments. The neutrons proceed down beam lines to the experiment hall, which houses a variety of experiments and test articles. Each beam line has one or more neutron choppers which filter the neutron beam based on the neutron energy by using a rotating neutron absorbing material passing through the neutron beam. Excessive vibration of the Vision beam line, believed to be caused by the T0 chopper, prevented the Vision beam line from operating at full capacity. This problem had been addressed several times by rebalancing/reworking the T0 beam chopper but the problem stubbornly persisted. To determine the cause of the high vibration, dynamic testing was performed. Twenty-seven accelerometer and motor current channels of data were collected during drive up, drive down, coast down, and steady-state conditions; resonance testing and motor current signature analysis were also performed. The data was analyzed for traditional mechanical/machinery issues such as misalignment and imbalance using time series analysis, frequency domain analysis, and operating deflection shape analysis. The analysis showed that the chopper base plate was experiencing an amplified response to the excitation provided by the T0 beam chopper. The amplified response was diagnosed to be caused by higher than expected base plate flexibility, possibly due to improper grouting or loose floor anchors. Based on this diagnosis, a decision was made to dismantle the beam line chopper and remount the base plate. Neutron activation of the beam line components make modifications to the beam line especially expensive and time consuming due to the radiation handling requirements, so this decision had significant financial and schedule implications. It was found that the base plate was indeed loose because of improper grouting during its initial installation. The base plate was modified by splitting it into multiple sections, isolating the T0 chopper from the rest of the beam line, and each section was then reinstalled and re-grouted. After these modifications, the vibration levels were reduced by a factor of 30. The reduction in vibration level was sufficient to allow the Vision beam line to operate at full capacity for the first time since its completed construction date.

  8. Multi-dimensional collective effects in high-current relativistic beams relevant to High Density Laboratory Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvets, Gennady

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In summary, an analytical model describing the self-pinching of a relativistic charge-neutralized electron beam undergoing the collisionless Weibel instability in an overdense plasma has been developed. The model accurately predicts the final temperature and size of the self-focused filament. It is found that the final temperature is primarily defined by the total beam’s current, while the filament’s radius is shown to be smaller than the collisionless skin depth in the plasma and primarily determined by the beam’s initial size. The model also accurately predicts the repartitioning ratio of the initial energy of the beam’s forward motion into the magnetic field energy and the kinetic energy of the surrounding plasma. The density profile of the final filament is shown to be a superposition of the standard Bennett pinch profile and a wide halo surrounding the pinch, which contains a significant fraction of the beam’s electrons. PIC simulations confirm the key assumption of the analytic theory: the collisionless merger of multiple current filaments in the course of the Weibel Instability provides the mechanism for Maxwellization of the beam’s distribution function. Deviations from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution are explained by incomplete thermalization of the deeply trapped and halo electrons. It is conjectured that the simple expression derived here can be used for understanding collsionless shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification in astrophysical plasmas.

  9. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  10. Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.E.; Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes.

  11. Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

  12. Micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams. In one embodiment, the micro-cone target includes a substantially cone-shaped body including an outer surface, an inner surface, a generally flat and round, open-ended base, and a tip defining an apex. The cone-shaped body tapers along its length from the generally flat and round, open-ended base to the tip defining the apex. In addition, the outer surface and the inner surface connect the base to the tip, and the tip curves inwardly to define an outer surface that is concave, which is bounded by a rim formed at a juncture where the outer surface meets the tip.

  13. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

  14. Large break loss of coolant severe accident sequences at the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, D.B.; Greene, S.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of many potential HFIR severe accident phenomena was conducted during the HFIR design effort, and many severe accident mitigating features were designed into the plant. These evaluation typically incorporated a bounding'' or highly conservative analysis approach and employed tools and techniques representative of the state of knowledge in the mid-1960s. Recently, programs to address severe accident issues were initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and equipment qualification and accident management studies. This paper presents the results of environment condition calculations conducted to evaluate a response of HFIR's heat exchanger cell environment to a double-ended rupture of a 0.25 m diameter coolant loop downstream of the circulating pump and check valve. The confinement calculations were performed using an atmospheric fission product source for the heat exchanger cell consistent with, but more conservative than that stipulated in Regulatory Guide 1.89. The results of the calculations indicate that the heat exchanger cell atmospheric temperature peaks at 377 K 225 seconds into the transient and then begins decreasing at approximately 1.7 K per minute. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

  16. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  17. High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

  18. VHF Free-Free Beam High-Q Micromechanical Resonators Kun Wang, Yinglei Yu, Ark-Chew Wong, and Clark T.-C. Nguyen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Clark T.-C.

    VHF Free-Free Beam High-Q Micromechanical Resonators Kun Wang, Yinglei Yu, Ark-Chew Wong, and Clark Science University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 ABSTRACT Free-free beam, flexural and their associated losses are virtually eliminated from the design. Using this approach, free-free beam µmechanical

  19. Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

  20. The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Baity Jr, F Wallace [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n(e) >= 10(19)m(-3), T(e) = 4-10 eV, particle flux Gamma(p) > 10(23) m(-3) s(-1), and magnetic field strength |B| up to I T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10 - 26 MHz, and power levels up to similar to 100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  2. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, R. H.; Chen, G.; Meitner, S.; Baity, F. W.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Owen, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n{sub e}{>=}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, T{sub e} = 4-10 eV, particle flux {gamma}{sub p}>10{sup 23}m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and magnetic field strength |B| up to 1 T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10-26 MHz, and power levels up to {approx}100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  3. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  4. Power combination of two phase-locked high power microwave beams from a new coaxial microwave source based on dual beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yangmei; Zhang, Xiaoping, E-mail: plinafly@163.com; Zhang, Jiande; Dang, Fangchao; Yan, Xiaolu [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The new coaxial high power microwave source based on dual beams has demonstrated two phase-locked output microwave beams generated by its two sub-sources. In order to achieve a single higher output power, we present a three-port waveguide-based power combiner to combine the two microwave beams. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that when the diode voltage is 675?kV and the guiding magnetic field is 0.8?T, a combined microwave with an average power of about 4.0?GW and a frequency of 9.74 GHz is generated; the corresponding power conversion efficiency is 29%. The combination effect of the combiner is further validated in the diode voltage range from 675?kV to 755?kV as well as in the pulse regime. The simulations indicate that the maximum surface axial electric field strength of the electrodynamic structure is 720?kV/cm, which is relatively low corresponding to an output power of 4.0?GW. The stable combined output suggests the probability of long-pulse operation for the combined source.

  5. Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam DynamicsSimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code was first developed under Computational Grand Challenge project in the mid 1990s [1]. It started as a three-dimensional (3D) data parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code written in High Performance Fortran. The code used a split-operator based method to solve the Hamiltonian equations of motion. It contained linear transfer maps for drifts, quadrupole magnets and rf cavities. The space-charge forces were calculated using an FFT-based method with 3D open boundary conditions and longitudinal periodic boundary conditions. This code was completely rewritten in the late 1990s based on a message passing parallel programming paradigm using Fortran 90 and MPI following an object-oriented software design. This improved the code's scalability on large parallel computer systems and also gave the code better software maintainability and extensibility [2]. In the following years, under the SciDAC-1 accelerator project, the code was extended to include more accelerating and focusing elements such as DTL, CCL, superconducting linac, solenoid, dipole, multipoles, and others. Besides the original split-operator based integrator, a direct integration of Lorentz equations of motion using a leap-frog algorithm was also added to the IMPACT code to handle arbitrary external nonlinear fields. This integrator can read in 3D electromagnetic fields in a Cartesian grid or in a cylindrical coordinate system. Using the Lorentz integrator, we also extended the original code to handle multiple charge-state beams. The space-charge solvers were also extended to include conducting wall effects for round and rectangular pipes with longitudinal open and periodic boundary conditions. Recently, it has also been extended to handle short-range wake fields (longitudinal monopole and transverse dipole) and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation wake fields. Besides the parallel macroparticle tracking code, an rf linac lattice design code, an envelope matching and analysis code, and a number of pre- and post-processing codes were also developed to form the IMPACT code suite. The IMPACT code suite has been used to study beam dynamics in the SNS linac, the J-PARC linac commissioning, the CERN superconducting linac design, the Los Alamos Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) halo experiment, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac design, and the FERMI{at}Elettra FEL linac design [3-8]. It has also been used to study space-charge resonance in anisotropic beams [9-11].

  6. An investigation into high temperature superconducting flux pump technology with the circular type magnetic flux pump devices and YBaCuO films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of second generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in the last decade has made it possible to wind high quality 2G HTS coils. These 2G HTS coils show promise for future applications such as magnetic...

  7. High and low frequency instabilities driven by a single electron beam in two-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mbuli, L. N. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa) [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa)] [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535, Republic of South Africa (South Africa)] [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535, Republic of South Africa (South Africa)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to understand the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise, beam-generated electrostatic instabilities are investigated using kinetic theory in a four-component magnetised plasma model composed of beam electrons (magnetic field-aligned), background hot and cool electrons and ions. All species are fully magnetised and considered to be Maxwellian. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, particle densities and temperatures, magnetic field strength, wave propagation angle, and temperature anisotropy of the beam are examined. In this study we have found that the electron-acoustic, electron beam-resonant and ion-acoustic instabilities are excited. Our studies have focused on three velocity regimes, namely, the low (v{sub dbz}high velocity (v{sub dbz}>2 C{sub h}) regimes, where v{sub dbz} (C{sub h}) is the electron beam drift speed (thermal speed of the hot electrons). Plasma parameters from satellite measurements are used where applicable to provide realistic predictions.

  8. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  9. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [ODU, JLAB; Deitrick, Kirsten E. [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  10. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX) with a High Intensity Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compression; plasma; neutralization; diagnostics; inductioncolumn with plasma plug, and beam diagnostics. Figure 2(a)the plasma column. 3. Experiment setup and diagnostics The

  11. Determination of the theoretical feasibility for the transmutation of europium isotopes from high flux isotope reactor control cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a 100 MWth light-water research reactor designed and built in the 1960s primarily for the production of transuranic isotopes. The HFIR is equipped with two concentric cylindrical blade assemblies, known as control cylinders, that are used to control reactor power. These control cylinders, which become highly radioactive from neutron exposure, are periodically replaced as part of the normal operation of the reactor. The highly radioactive region of the control cylinders is composed of europium oxide in an aluminum matrix. The spent HFIR control cylinders have historically been emplaced in the ORNL Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The control cylinders pose a potential radiological hazard due to the long lived radiotoxic europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 155}Eu. In a 1991 health evaluation of WAG 6 (ERD 1991) it was shown that these cylinders were a major component of the total radioactivity in WAG 6 and posed a potential exposure hazard to the public in some of the postulated assessment scenarios. These health evaluations, though preliminary and conservative in nature, illustrate the incentive to investigate methods for permanent destruction of the europium radionuclides. When the cost of removing the control cylinders from WAG 6, performing chemical separations and irradiating the material in HFIR are factored in, the option of leaving the control cylinders in place for decay must be considered. Other options, such as construction of an engineered barrier around the disposal silos to reduce the chance of migration, should also be analyzed.

  12. Synchronization of high speed framing camera and intense electron-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Xinbing; Liu Jinliang; Hong Zhiqiang; Qian Baoliang [College of Opto-electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new trigger program is proposed to realize the synchronization of high speed framing camera (HSFC) and intense electron-beam accelerator (IEBA). The trigger program which include light signal acquisition radiated from main switch of IEBA and signal processing circuit could provide a trigger signal with rise time of 17 ns and amplitude of about 5 V. First, the light signal was collected by an avalanche photodiode (APD) module, and the delay time between the output voltage of APD and load voltage of IEBA was tested, it was about 35 ns. Subsequently, the output voltage of APD was processed further by the signal processing circuit to obtain the trigger signal. At last, by combining the trigger program with an IEBA, the trigger program operated stably, and a delay time of 30 ns between the trigger signal of HSFC and output voltage of IEBA was obtained. Meanwhile, when surface flashover occurred at the high density polyethylene sample, the delay time between the trigger signal of HSFC and flashover current was up to 150 ns, which satisfied the need of synchronization of HSFC and IEBA. So the experiment results proved that the trigger program could compensate the time (called compensated time) of the trigger signal processing time and the inherent delay time of the HSFC.

  13. Oxide vapor distribution from a high-frequency sweep e-beam system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Tassano, P.L.; Tsujimoto, N.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide vapor distributions have been determined as a function of operating parameters of a high frequency sweep e-beam source combined with a programmable sweep controller. We will show which parameters are significant, the parameters that yield the broadest oxide deposition distribution, and the procedure used to arrive at these conclusions. A design-of-experimental strategy was used with five operating parameters: evaporation rate, sweep speed, sweep pattern (pre-programmed), phase speed (azimuthal rotation of the pattern), profile (dwell time as a function of radial position). A design was chosen that would show which of the parameters and parameter pairs have a statistically significant effect on the vapor distribution. Witness flats were placed symmetrically across a 25 inches diameter platen. The stationary platen was centered 24 inches above the e-gun crucible. An oxide material was evaporated under 27 different conditions. Thickness measurements were made with a stylus profilometer. The information will enable users of the high frequency e-gun systems to optimally locate the source in a vacuum system and understand which parameters have a major effect on the vapor distribution.

  14. Plasma-Materials Interactions (PMI) and High-Heat-Flux (HHF) component research and development in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, R.W.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma particle and high heat fluxes to in-vessel components such as divertors, limiters, RF launchers, halo plasma scrapers, direct converters, and wall armor, and to the vacuum chamber itself, represent central technical issues for fusion experiments and reactors. This is well recognized and accepted. It is also well recognized that the conditions at the plasma boundary can directly influence core plasma confinement. This has been seen most dramatically, on the positive side, in the discovery of the H-mode using divertors in tokamaks. It is also reflected in the attention devoted worldwide to the problems of impurity control. Nowadays, impurities are controlled by wall conditioning, special discharge cleaning techniques, special coatings such as carbonization, the use of low-Z materials for limiters and armor, a careful tailoring of heat loads, and in some machines, through the use of divertors. All programs, all experiments, and all designers are now keenly aware that PMI and HHF issues are key to the successful performance of their machines. In this brief report we present general issues in Section 2, critical issues in Section 3, existing US PMI/HHF experiments and facilities in Section 4, US International Cooperative PMI/HHF activities in Section 5, and conclude with a discussion on major tasks in PMI/HHF in Section 6.

  15. High-Efficiency Resonant RF Spin Rotator with Broad Phase Space Acceptance for Pulsed Polarized Cold Neutron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -N. Seo; L. Barron-Palos; J. D. Bowman; T. E. Chupp; C. Crawford; M. Dabaghyan; M. Dawkins; S. J. Freedman; T. Gentile; M. T. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; F. W. Hersman; G. L. Jones; M. Kandes; S. Lamoreaux; B. Lauss; M. B. Leuschner; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; J. Mei; G. S. Mitchell; H. Nann; S. A. Page; S. I. Penttila; W. D. Ramsay; A. Salas Bacci; S. Santra; M. Sharma; T. B. Smith; W. M. Snow; W. S. Wilburn; H. Zhu

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a radio-frequency resonant spin rotator to reverse the neutron polarization in a 9.5 cm x 9.5 cm pulsed cold neutron beam with high efficiency over a broad cold neutron energy range. The effect of the spin reversal by the rotator on the neutron beam phase space is compared qualitatively to RF neutron spin flippers based on adiabatic fast passage. The spin rotator does not change the kinetic energy of the neutrons and leaves the neutron beam phase space unchanged to high precision. We discuss the design of the spin rotator and describe two types of transmission-based neutron spin-flip efficiency measurements where the neutron beam was both polarized and analyzed by optically-polarized 3He neutron spin filters. The efficiency of the spin rotator was measured to be 98.0+/-0.8% on resonance for neutron energies from 3.3 to 18.4 meV over the full phase space of the beam. As an example of the application of this device to an experiment we describe the integration of the RF spin rotator into an apparatus to search for the small parity-violating asymmetry A_gamma in polarized cold neutron capture on para-hydrogen by the NPDGamma collaboration at LANSCE.

  16. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  17. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam.

  18. Area X-ray or UV camera system for high-intensity beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Bajt, Sasa (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA), Marchesini, Stefano (Oakland, CA)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system in one embodiment includes a source for directing a beam of radiation at a sample; a multilayer mirror having a face oriented at an angle of less than 90 degrees from an axis of the beam from the source, the mirror reflecting at least a portion of the radiation after the beam encounters a sample; and a pixellated detector for detecting radiation reflected by the mirror. A method in a further embodiment includes directing a beam of radiation at a sample; reflecting at least some of the radiation diffracted by the sample; not reflecting at least a majority of the radiation that is not diffracted by the sample; and detecting at least some of the reflected radiation. A method in yet another embodiment includes directing a beam of radiation at a sample; reflecting at least some of the radiation diffracted by the sample using a multilayer mirror; and detecting at least some of the reflected radiation.

  19. Generation of high-quality mega-electron volt proton beams with intense-laser-driven nanotube accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [Department of Engineering, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Engineering, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion acceleration scheme using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed, in which embedded fragments of low-Z materials are irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser to eject substantial numbers of electrons. Due to the resultant characteristic electrostatic field, the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of the barrel and bullets of a gun, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic ion beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic MeV-order proton beams using nanometer-size CNT under a super-intense electrostatic field {approx}10{sup 14} V m{sup -1}.

  20. Silicon dioxide and hafnium dioxide evaporation characteristics from a high-frequency sweep e-beam system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Tsujimoto, N. [MDC Vacuum Products Corporation, Hayward, California 94545 (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive oxygen evaporation characteristics were determined as a function of the front-panel control parameters provided by a programmable, high-frequency sweep e-beam system. An experimental design strategy used deposition rate, beam speed, pattern, azimuthal rotation speed, and dwell time as the variables. The optimal settings for obtaining a broad thickness distribution, efficient silicon dioxide boule consumption, and minimal hafnium dioxide defect density were generated. The experimental design analysis showed the compromises involved with evaporating these oxides. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  1. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  2. Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R.T., III

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

  3. STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  4. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  5. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  6. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  7. Use of Crystals for High Energy Photon Beam Linear Polarization Conversion into Circular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Z. Akopov; A. B. Apyan; S. M. Darbinyan

    2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility to convert the photon beam linear polarization into circular one at photon energies of hundreds GeV with the use of crystals is considered. The energy and orientation dependencies of refractive indexes are investigated in case of diamond, silicon and germanium crystal targets. To maximize the values for figure of merit, the corresponding crystal optimal orientation angles and thickness are found. The degree of circular polarization and intensity of photon beam are estimated and possibility of experimental realization is discussed.

  8. Use of Crystals for High Energy Photon Beam Linear Polarization Conversion into Circular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N Z; Darbinian, S M

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility to convert the photon beam linear polarization into circularone at photon energies of hundreds GeV with the use of crystals is considered.The energy and orientation dependencies of refractive indexes are investigatedin case of diamond, silicon and germanium crystal targets. To maximize thevalues for figure of merit, the corresponding crystal optimal orientationangles and thickness are found. The degree of circular polarization andintensity of photon beam are estimated and possibility of experimentalrealization is discussed.

  9. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  10. Electron beam melting at high pressures with a vacuum separator/plasma lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface or separation between vacua regions as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully demonstrated and a 175 keV electron beam was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. This plasma device also functions as an effective plasma tens. Such a device can be adopted for use in electron beam melting.

  11. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Ĺ to above 300 Ĺ. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Ĺ above 100 Ĺ, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  12. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  13. Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

    2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  14. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  15. SIPHORE: Conceptual Study of a High Efficiency Neutral Beam Injector Based on Photo-detachment for Future Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonin, A.; Christin, L.; Esch, H. de; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Villecroze, F. [IRFM, CEA Cadarache, IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Blondel, C.; Delsart, C.; Drag, C.; Vandevraye, M. [LAC :Aime-Cotton Laboratory, Univ. Paris-sud, Orsay (France); Brillet, A.; Chaibi, W. [ARTEMIS Laboratory, Cote-d'azur Observatory, Nice (France)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative high efficiency neutral beam injector concept for future fusion reactors is under investigation (simulation and R and D) between several laboratories in France, the goal being to perform a feasibility study for the neutralization of intense high energy (1 MeV) negative ion (NI) beams by photo-detachment.The objective of the proposed project is to put together the expertise of three leading groups in negative ion quantum physics, high power stabilized lasers and neutral beam injectors to perform studies of a new injector concept called SIPHORE (SIngle gap PHOto-neutralizer energy REcovery injector), based on the photo-detachment of negative ions and energy recovery of unneutralised ions; the main feature of SIPHORE being the relevance for the future Fusion reactors (DEMO), where high injector efficiency (up to 70-80%), technological simplicity and cost reduction are key issues to be addressed.The paper presents the on-going developments and simulations around this project, such as, a new concept of ion source which would fit with this injector topology and which could solve the remaining uniformity issue of the large size ion source, and, finally, the presentation of the R and D program in the laboratories (LAC, ARTEMIS) around the photo-neutralization for Siphore.

  16. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  17. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  18. High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of airsea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related physical processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrew, Ian

    High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice of the Earth's climate. HigH-LatitudE OcEan and SEa icE SurfacE fLuxES: cHaLLEngES fOr cLimatE rESEarcH by Mark change can manifest itself in astonishing ways. Arctic sea ice extent at the end of the melt season

  19. Neutron Halo Isomers in Stable Nuclei and their Possible Application for the Production of Low Energy, Pulsed, Polarized Neutron Beams of High Intensity and High Brilliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Habs; M. Gross; P. G. Thirolf; P. Böni

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to search for neutron halo isomers populated via $\\gamma$-capture in stable nuclei with mass numbers of about A=140-180 or A=40-60, where the $4s_{1/2}$ or $3s_{1/2}$ neutron shell model state reaches zero binding energy. These halo nuclei can be produced for the first time with new $\\gamma$-beams of high intensity and small band width ($\\le$ 0.1%) achievable via Compton back-scattering off brilliant electron beams thus offering a promising perspective to selectively populate these isomers with small separation energies of 1 eV to a few keV. Similar to single-neutron halo states for very light, extremely neutron-rich, radioactive nuclei \\cite{hansen95,tanihata96,aumann00}, the low neutron separation energy and short-range nuclear force allows the neutron to tunnel far out into free space much beyond the nuclear core radius. This results in prolonged half lives of the isomers for the $\\gamma$-decay back to the ground state in the 100 ps-$\\mu$s range. Similar to the treatment of photodisintegration of the deuteron, the neutron release from the neutron halo isomer via a second, low-energy, intense photon beam has a known much larger cross section with a typical energy threshold behavior. In the second step, the neutrons can be released as a low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beam of high intensity and high brilliance, possibly being much superior to presently existing beams from reactors or spallation neutron sources.

  20. Generation of high-power tunable terahertz-radiation by nonrelativistic beam-echo harmonic effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Huarong; Xu Jin; Wei Yanyu; Gong Yubin [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Vacuum Electronics, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Travish, Gil [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Feng Jinjun [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, Vacuum Electronics research Institute, Beijing 100016 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of terahertz radiation source based on the nonrelativistic electron beam-wave interaction is proposed. Here, the beam echo harmonic effect is applied to a traveling wave tube like device. The scheme is configured as a combination of a frequency multiplier and amplifier with, for instance, W-band (millimeter wave) input signals and terahertz output power. A one-dimensional model of this device shows that a 10th order harmonic-wave can be generated while other harmonic waves are suppressed. The device only requires a readily available input source (W-band), and the output frequency can be tuned continuously over a wide band.

  1. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

  2. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  3. High and low frequency instabilities driven by counter-streaming electron beams in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mbuli, L. N. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535, Republic of South Africa (South Africa)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A four-component plasma composed of a drifting (parallel to ambient magnetic field) population of warm electrons, drifting (anti-parallel to ambient magnetic field) cool electrons, stationary hot electrons, and thermal ions is studied in an attempt to further our understanding of the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) in the Earth's magnetospheric regions such as the magnetosheath, plasmasphere, and plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Using kinetic theory, beam-driven electrostatic instabilities such as the ion-acoustic, electron-acoustic instabilities are found to be supported in our multi-component model. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, number density, temperature, and temperature anisotropy of the counter-streaming (relative to ambient magnetic field) cool electron beam are investigated. It is found that the number density of the anti-field aligned cool electron beam and drift speed play a central role in determining which instability is excited. Using plasma parameters which are closely correlated with the measurements made by the Cluster satellites in the PSBL region, we find that the electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic instabilities could account for the generation of BEN in this region.

  4. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  5. High aspect ratio x-ray waveguide channels fabricated by e-beam lithography and wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, H.; Hoffmann, S.; Kanbach, M.; Haber, J.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Krüger, S. P.; Salditt, T., E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.de [Institut für Röntgenphysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of hard x-ray waveguide channels manufactured by e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching and wafer bonding. The guiding layer consists of air or vacuum and the cladding material of silicon, which is favorable in view of minimizing absorption losses. The specifications for waveguide channels which have to be met in the hard x-ray range to achieve a suitable beam confinement in two orthogonal directions are extremely demanding. First, high aspect ratios up to 10{sup 6} have to be achieved between lateral structure size and length of the guides. Second, the channels have to be deeply embedded in material to warrant the guiding of the desired modes while absorbing all other (radiative) modes in the cladding material. We give a detailed report on device fabrication with the respective protocols and parameter optimization, the inspection and the optical characterization.

  6. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J., E-mail: cjkliew@sandia.gov [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  7. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J., E-mail: gsimpson@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  8. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  9. Electron beam melting at high pressures with a vacuum separator/plasma lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface or separation between vacua regions as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. This plasma device also functions as an effective plasma lens. Such a device can be adopted for use in electron beam melting.

  10. Highly coherent electron beam from a laser-triggered tungsten needle tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehberger, Dominik; Eisele, Max; Krüger, Michael; Noe, Jonathan; Högele, Alexander; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a quantitative measurement of the spatial coherence of electrons emitted from a sharp metal needle tip. We investigate the coherence in photoemission using near-ultraviolet laser triggering with a photon energy of 3.1 eV and compare it to DC-field emission. A carbon-nanotube is brought in close proximity to the emitter tip to act as an electrostatic biprism. From the resulting electron matter wave interference fringes we deduce an upper limit of the effective source radius both in laser-triggered and DC-field emission mode, which quantifies the spatial coherence of the emitted electron beam. We obtain $(0.80\\pm 0.05)\\,$nm in laser-triggered and $(0.55\\pm 0.02)\\,$nm in DC-field emission mode, revealing that the outstanding coherence properties of electron beams from needle tip field emitters are largely maintained in laser-induced emission. In addition, the relative coherence width of 0.36 of the photoemitted electron beam is the largest observed so far. The preservation of electronic coherence du...

  11. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  12. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 {times} 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. SU?C?105?05: Reference Dosimetry of High?Energy Electron Beams with a Farmer?Type Ionization Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B; Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate gradient effects and provide Monte Carlo calculated beam quality conversion factors to characterize the Farmer?type NE2571 ion chamber for high?energy reference dosimetry of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose to water and to the gas in a fully modeled NE2571 chamber as a function of depth in a water phantom. Electron beams incident on the surface of the phantom are modeled using realistic BEAMnrc accelerator simulations and electron beam spectra. Beam quality conversion factors are determined using calculated doses to water and to air in the chamber in high?energy electron beams and in a cobalt?60 reference field. Calculated water?to?air stopping power ratios are employed for investigation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor. Results: An upstream shift of 0.3–0.4 multiplied by the chamber radius, r-cav, both minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor with depth and reduces the difference between the beam quality specifier (R{sub 5} {sub 0}) calculated using ion chamber simulations and that obtained with simulations of dose?to?water in the phantom. Beam quality conversion factors are obtained at the reference depth and gradient effects are optimized using a shift of 0.2r-cav. The photon?electron conversion factor, k-ecal, amounts to 0.906 when gradient effects are minimized using the shift established here and 0.903 if no shift of the data is used. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are investigated and amount to between 0.4 to 1.1% depending on assumptions used. Conclusion: The calculations obtained in this work characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of high?energy electron beams. These results will be useful as the AAPM continues to review their reference dosimetry protocols.

  14. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  15. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  16. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

  17. System using a megawatt class millimeter wave source and a high-power rectenna to beam power to a suspended platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caplan, Malcolm; Friedman, Herbert W.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for beaming power to a high altitude platform is based upon a high power millimeter gyrotron source, optical transmission components, and a high-power receiving antenna (i.e., a rectenna) capable of rectifying received millimeter energy and converting such energy into useable electrical power.

  18. Preparation of high purity niobium by electron beam melting and external gettering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.; Ono, Katsutoshi [Kyoto Univ., Yoshida-Honmachi (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical properties of niobium are deteriorated by interstitial impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen. The removal of these gaseous impurities was studied by electron beam (EB) melting and solid state external gettering with Ti, Y and Zr. The buttons and ingots were repeatedly remelted and refined by the EB furnace (max.; l4OkW). Subsequently, the external gettering for oxygen and nitrogen in niobium was carried out by wrapping samples with active metal foils and annealing in evacuated quartz ampoules over 1273K. The purity of refined niobium was characterized by its hardness, specific resistivity, internal friction and residual resistivity ratio (RRR={rho}{sub 273}/{rho}{sub 4.2}). The results of these measurements were compared with conventional gas analysis. Niobium was purified to the RRR of 100 through EB melting and 700 through external gettering.

  19. Multi-Channel Auto-Dilution System for Remote Continuous Monitoring of High Soil-CO2 Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has the potential capacity and longevity to significantly decrease the amount of anthropogenic CO2 introduced into the atmosphere by combustion of fossil fuels such as coal. Effective sequestration, however, requires the ability to verify the integrity of the reservoir and ensure that potential leakage rates are kept to a minimum. Moreover, understanding the pathways by which CO2 migrates to the surface is critical to assessing the risks and developing remediation approaches. Field experiments, such as those conducted at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project test site in Bozeman, Montana, require a flexible CO2 monitoring system that can accurately and continuously measure soil-surface CO2 fluxes for multiple sampling points at concentrations ranging from background levels to several tens of percent. To meet this need, PNNL is developing a multi-port battery-operated system capable of both spatial and temporal monitoring of CO2 at concentrations from ambient to at least 150,000 ppmv. This report describes the system components (sampling chambers, measurement and control system, and power supply) and the results of a field test at the ZERT site during the late summer and fall of 2008. While the system performed well overall during the field test, several improvements to the system are suggested for implementation in FY2009.

  20. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  1. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  2. A comparison of the heat transfer capabilities of two manufacturing methods for high heat flux water-cooled devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was undertaken to compare the heat transfer characteristics of water-cooled copper devices manufactured via conventional drilled passage construction and via a technique whereby molten copper is cast over a network of preformed cooling tubes. Two similar test blocks were constructed; one using the drilled passage technique, the other via casting copper over Monel pipe. Each test block was mounted in a vacuum system and heated uniformly on the top surface using a swept electron beam. From the measured absorbed powers and resultant temperatures, an overall heat transfer coefficient was calculated. The maximum heat transfer coefficient calculated for the case of the drilled passage test block was 2534 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F. This corresponded to an absorbed power density of 320 w/cm/sup 2/ and resulted in a maximum recorded copper temperature of 346/sup 0/C. Corresponding figures for the cast test block were 363 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F, 91 w/cm/sup 2/, and 453/sup 0/C.

  3. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  4. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  5. Generation of circularly polarized multiple high-order harmonic emission from two-color crossed laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    laser beams Xiao-Min Tong and Shih-I Chu Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas and Kansas Center field and a linearly polarized second-harmonic laser field, in crossed-beam con- figuration second-harmonic field, in crossed-beam configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of such a scheme

  6. Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

  7. High voltage power supply systems for electron beam and plasma technologies. Its new element base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermengi, P.G.; Kureghan, A.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.; Tchvanov, V.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming technique and high voltage technique supplementing each other more and more unite in indivisible constructions of modern apparatuses and systems and applicated in modern technologies providing its high efficiency. Specially worked out, ecologically clean, inertial, inflammable perfluororganic liquid is used in elements and electronic apparatuses simultaneously as insulating and cooling media. This liquid is highly fluid, fills tiny cavities in construction elements and in the places of high concentration of losses, where maximum local overheating of active parts or apparatus constructions takes place, it transforms to boiling state with highly intensive taking off of heat energy from cooled surface point. For instance, being cooled by mentioned perfluororganic liquid, copper wire can conduct current to 50 A/mm{sup 2} density, but in ordinary conditions of transformers, reactors and busses, current density can reach only few Amperes. Possibility of considerable increasing of current density, that is reached by means of intensive cooling, provided by worked out liquid, and taking into account its incredibly high insulating features (liquid has electric strength to 50 KV/mm) allows to provide optimum heat regime of active parts of transformers. reactors, condenser, semiconductor devices, resistors, construction elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general. Particularly high effect of decreasing of weight and dimensions characteristics of elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general can be reached under working out of special constructions of each element and apparatus details, adapted to use of mentioned liquid as insulating and cooling media.

  8. A PARALLEL-PROPAGATING ALFVENIC ION-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE HIGH-BETA SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A., E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu, E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves are driven unstable by an isotropic (T{sub {alpha}} = T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}) population of alpha particles drifting parallel to the magnetic field at an average speed U{sub {alpha}} with respect to the protons. We derive an approximate analytic condition for the minimum value of U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability and refine this result using numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion relation. When the alpha-particle number density is {approx_equal} 5% of the proton number density and the two species have similar thermal speeds, the instability requires that {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 1, where {beta}{sub p} is the ratio of the proton pressure to the magnetic pressure. For 1 {approx}< {beta}{sub p} {approx}< 12, the minimum U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability ranges from 0.7v{sub A} to 0.9v{sub A}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. This threshold is smaller than the threshold of {approx_equal} 1.2v{sub A} for the parallel magnetosonic instability, which was previously thought to have the lowest threshold of the alpha-particle beam instabilities at {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 0.5. We discuss the role of the parallel Alfvenic drift instability for the evolution of the alpha-particle drift speed in the solar wind. We also analyze measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups and show that the U{sub {alpha}} values measured in solar-wind streams with T{sub {alpha}} Almost-Equal-To T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} are approximately bounded from above by the threshold of the parallel Alfvenic instability.

  9. DAWOOD, MINA MAGDY RIAD. Fundamental Behavior of Steel-Concrete Composite Beams Strengthened with High Modulus Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -CONCRETE COMPOSITE BEAMS STRENGTHENED WITH HIGH MODULUS CARBON FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER (CFRP) MATERIALS by MINA Strengthened with High Modulus Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Materials. (Under the direction of Dr to kindly acknowledge the generous financial support and donation of the carbon fiber materials provided

  10. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  11. BETA BEAMS: AN ACCELERATOR BASED FACILITY TO EXPLORE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    them decay in a race-track shaped stor- age ring. EURO Beta Beams are based on CERNs infras- tructure to get high neutrino flux at a gamma boost of 100. INTRODUCTION Production of (anti-)neutrinos from beta facility, using the isotope pair 6 He/18 Ne and detector in the Fr´ejus tunnel (France) has been studied

  12. Practical limitations of single-span ultra-high performance concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Daniel Scott

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its development in the early 1970's, researchers have continued to push the limits of concrete mixtures through the creation of ultra-high performance concretes. The use of this class of materials has allowed designers ...

  13. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  14. High performance double pulse doped pseudomorphic AlGaAs/InGaAs transistors grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, W.E.; Lyman, P.S.; Labossier, W.H.; Brierley, S.K.; Hendriks, H.T.; Shanfield, S.R.; Aucoin, L.M.; Kazior, T.E. [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)] [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double pulse doped AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Hall mobilities in excess of 7100 cm{sup 2}/V s at 300 K and 25000 cm{sup 2}/V s at 77 K are obtained with a sheet density of 3 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2}. Photoluminescence measurements indicate that two electronic subbands are occupied, and the subband energies are determined. The doping pulses are resolved in secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. Using a double recess process, transistors have been fabricated that have produced state of the art microwave performance. At 10 GHz a 1.2 mm device has simultaneously achieved a power added efficiency of 70%, output power of 0.97 W, and gain of 10 dB. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  16. High-pressure arcs as vacuum-atmosphere interface and plasma lens for nonvacuum electron beam welding machines, electron beam melting, and nonvacuum ion material modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully demonstrated and a 175 keV electron beam was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Nuclear {gamma}-ray coincidence experiments in high-intensity photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savran, D.; Loeher, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Devision, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy photons are an important experimental probe in nuclear structure physics and have been used in the past decades for the investigation of low-spin structures of atomic nuclei. A topic of particular interest in recent years in this field is the Pygmy Dipole Resonance, an electric dipole (E1) excitation mode located well below the E1 giant resonance. Even though the PDR has been investigated systematically using high energy photons its decay properties were not accessible up to now. New experiments using the method of {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences will allow to study this important quantity in detail.

  18. Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Research Reactors Div.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

  19. Beam monitoring and Near detector requirements for a Neutrino factory or long baseline beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen Matev; Roumen Tsenov

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factory is a facility for future precision studies of neutrino oscillations. A so called near detector is essential for reaching the aimed precision of neutrino oscillation analysis. Main task of the near detector is to measure the flux of the neutrino beam. Such brilliant neutrino source like Neutrino Factory provides also opportunity for precision studies of various neutrino interaction processes in the near detector. We discuss design concepts of such a detector. Results of simulations of a high resolution scintillating fiber tracker show that it is capable to measure the neutrino flux through pure leptonic interactions with an uncertainty of the order of 1%. A full set-up of the near detector consisting of high granularity vertex detector, high resolution tracker and muon catcher is also presented.

  20. Quasi-phase matching and quantum control of high harmonic generation in waveguides using counterpropagating beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoshi (Superior, CO); Lytle, Amy L. (Boulder, CO); Cohen, Oren (Boulder, CO); Kapteyn, Henry C. (Boulder, CO); Murnane, Margaret M. (Boulder, CO)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    All-optical quasi-phase matching (QPM) uses a train of counterpropagating pulses to enhance high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a hollow waveguide. A pump pulse enters one end of the waveguide, and causes HHG in the waveguide. The counterpropagation pulses enter the other end of the waveguide and interact with the pump pulses to cause QPM within the waveguide, enhancing the HHG.

  1. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki [Dept. of Electron. Sci. Eng., Kyoto Univ. Kyotodaigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Dept. of Electron. Information Eng., Chubu Univ., 1200, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  2. Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, J.N.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

  3. Spectroscopy at the high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The following progress report presents some of the x-ray measurements performed during the last year on the Livermore SuperEBIT facility. The measurements include: direct observation of the spontaneous emission of the hyperfine transition in ground state hydrogenlike holmium, {sup 165}Ho{sup 66{plus}}; measurements of the n {equals} 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies in neonlike thorium, Th{sup 80{plus}}, through lithiumlike thorium, Th{sup 87{plus}}, testing the predictions of quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions up to the 0.4{percent} level; measurements of the isotope shift of the n= 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies between lithiumlike through carbonize uranium, {sup 233}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}} and {sup 238}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}}, inferring the variation of the mean- square nuclear charge radius; and high-resolution measurements of the K{alpha} radiation of heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52 {plus}}, using a transmission-type crystal spectrometer, resolving for the first time the ls2p{sup 3}P{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and ls2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transitions individually. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

  5. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

  6. Much simplified ion-beam assisted deposition-TiN template for high-performance coated conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, J. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Matias, V.; Zhai, J. Y.; Maiorov, B.; Trugman, D.; Jia, Q. X. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Tao, B. W.; Li, Y. R. [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A much simplified template, i.e., two nonsuperconducting layers between the superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) and the polycrystalline metal substrate, has been developed for high-performance coated conductors by using biaxially aligned TiN as a seed layer. A combination of a thin TiN ({approx}10 nm by ion-beam assisted deposition) layer and an epitaxial buffer LaMnO{sub 3} layer ({approx}120 nm) allows us to grow epitaxial YBCO films with values of full width at half-maximum around 3.5 deg. and 1.7 deg. for the {phi}-scan of (103) and rocking curve of (005) YBCO, respectively. The YBCO films grown on electropolished polycrystalline Hastelloy using this two-layer template exhibited a superconducting transition temperature of 89.5 K, a critical current density of 1.2 MA/cm{sup 2} at 75.5 K, and an {alpha} value (proportional factor of critical current density J{sub c}{approx}H{sup -}{alpha}) of around 0.33, indicating a high density of pinning centers and an absence of weak links.

  7. Fast flux locked loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  8. Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 1, Search for new phenomena at colliding-beam facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J. [ed.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers and viewgraphs on high energy topics like: supersymmetry; new gauge bosons; and new high energy colliders.

  9. Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

  10. High-aperture binary axicons for the formation of the longitudinal electric field component on the optical axis for linear and circular polarizations of the illuminating beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khonina, S. N., E-mail: khonina@smr.ru; Savelyev, D. A., E-mail: dmitrey.savelyev@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Image Processing Systems (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction of uniformly polarized laser beams with vortex phase singularity is theoretically analyzed using the plane wave expansion. It is shown that for a high numerical aperture, an intense longitudinal electric field component is formed on the optical axis in this case. It is numerically demonstrated that an analogous effect is ensured for diffraction of a conventional Gaussian beam from asymmetric binary axicons. The field intensity on the optical axis can be varied either by rotating the optical element or by changing the direction of polarization of radiation.

  11. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpeneau

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  12. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  13. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M., E-mail: habibi.physics@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  14. Solution to the transverse-phase-space time-dependence problem with LAMPF's high-intensity H/sup +/ beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, J.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 750 keV H/sup +/ beam at LAMPF has a transverse phase-space time-dependent transient during the first 200 ..mu..s of each 750-..mu..s-long macro-pulse. The time dependence is documented in an earlier report. Further studies indicate that the time dependence is due to space-charge neutralization resulting from secondary emission of electrons produced by collisions of the H/sup +/ and H/sub 2//sup +/ beams on the transport walls. One of several possible solutions has been tested and has proven successful in eliminating the time dependence of the beam entering the linac.

  15. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  16. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  17. Pulse flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  18. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  19. January 1983 / Vol. 8, No. 1 / OPTICS LETTERS 21 Dichroic beam splitter for extreme-ultraviolet and visible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey

    and UV laser beamsis demonstrated. The devicehas high XUV reflection efficiency(R - 44%)and highdam- age the generatedharmonic inthe XUV. This intense fundamental beam can destroy a sample or saturate detectors of absorbing largeenergy fluxes from pulsed lasers used to generate the XLUV radiation. A typical damage limit

  20. Design of the channel for irradiation of materials with highly charged ion beams obtained from the mVINIS ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siljegovic, M.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Draganic, I.; Cizmic, B.; Jelic, G. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy part of the TESLA Accelerator Installation comprises an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (the mVINIS ion source) and the channel for modification of materials (L3A). The L3A channel is long and has low beam transmission (30%-50%), so it is not suitable for high fluence implantations (over 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}). Therefore, we are planning to introduce an experimental channel (L4), close to the mVINIS Ion Source, where we shall be able to achieve high beam currents on the target and, consequently, irradiation of materials to high fluences. During the ion implantation, we shall be able to measure fluence rate, achieve uniform fluence distribution by a mechanism for x and y sample movements, and control the sample temperature in the range of 0-200 deg. C.

  1. Design of CCD camera system for use inside electron beam furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, J.S.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a wide dynamic range camera system for use inside Electron Beam furnaces is presented. The camera system is designed for used in high vacuum and in a high radiant heat flux environment looking directly into a high metallic vapor flux. In addition, the camera is designed to have a dynamic range that can provide a good image in both low light level conditions as well as in high brightness situations as when the electron beam impinging on the melt surface. An analysis is given for estimating the dynamic range of the camera imaging system and the camera cooling requirements. Techniques for capturing and recording video images are also presented. The application of various optical filters and liquid crystal variable attenuators for the camera imaging system is discussed.

  2. Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

  3. The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  4. Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarised positron beams at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Rautenberg

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The first measurements of the cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with longitudinally polarised positron beams are presented. The total cross section for e+p charged current deep inelastic scattering is presented at positive and negative values of positron beam longitudinal polarisation for an integrated luminosity of 37.0 pb^-1 H1 data and 30.5 pb^-1 ZEUS data collected in 2003 and 2004 at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. In addition, the ZEUS collaboration measured the single differential cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in the kinematic region Q^2>200 GeV^2. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The H1 collaboration extrapolate the cross section to a fully left handed positron beam and find it to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

  5. Generation of a quasi-monoenergetic high energy proton beam from a vacuum-sandwiched double layer target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Kim, Kyung; Lee, Kitae, E-mail: klee@kaeri.re.kr; Hee Park, Seong; Young Lee, Ji; Uk Jeong, Young; Vinokurov, Nikolay [Center for Quantum-Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Quantum-Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Gi Kim, Yong [Department of Physics, Kongju National University, Kongju (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Kongju National University, Kongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An acceleration mechanism to generate a high energy proton beam with a narrow energy spread in the laser-induced plasma acceleration of a proton beam is proposed; this mechanism employs two thin foils separated by a narrow vacuum gap. Instead of a thin sheath field at the plasma surfaces, it utilizes an electrostatic field formed in the bulk of the plasma. From a one-dimensional fluid analysis, it has been found that with an appropriate target thickness, protons on the front surface of the second layer can be fed into the plasma, in which the protons are accelerated by an electrostatic field built into the bulk of the plasma. This leads to a proton beam with higher energy and a narrower energy spread than those accelerated at the rear surface of the second layer. The acceleration mechanism is also verified by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. With a 27-fs long and 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intense laser pulse, a proton beam with an 18-MeV peak energy and a 35% energy spread is generated. The peak energy is higher than that from the rear surface of the second layer by a factor of 3.

  6. A PC-PCL-based control system for the high-voltage pulsed-power operation of the Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam (IDNB) Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gribble, R.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stand-alone, semiautomated control system for the high-voltage pulsed-power energy sources on the Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory using personal computer (PC) and programmable logic controller (PLC) technology has been developed and implemented. The control system, consisting of a PC with the graphic operator interface, the network connecting the PC to the PLC, the PLC, the PLC I/O modules, fiber-optic interfaces and software, is described.

  7. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  8. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  9. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  10. VOLUME 83, NUMBER 10 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 SEPTEMBER 1999 Kinetic Roughening of Penetrating Flux Fronts in High-Tc Thin Film Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    of Penetrating Flux Fronts in High-Tc Thin Film Superconductors R. Surdeanu, R. J. Wijngaarden, E. Visser, J. M) Kinetic roughening of flux fronts penetrating in superconducting thin films are studied by means of a high proposed that the gradual thermal depinning of a single vortex line in a superconductor with randomly

  11. Adaptive phase measurements for narrowband squeezed beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominic W. Berry; Howard M. Wiseman

    2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043803 (2002)] analyzed adaptive measurements for estimating the continuously varying phase of a coherent beam, and a broadband squeezed beam. A real squeezed beam must have finite photon flux N and hence can be significantly squeezed only over a limited frequency range. In this paper we analyze adaptive phase measurements of this type for a realistic model of a squeezed beam. We show that, provided it is possible to suitably choose the parameters of the beam, a mean-square phase uncertainty scaling as (N/kappa)^{-5/8} is possible, where kappa is the linewidth of the beam resulting from the fluctuating phase. This is an improvement over the (N/kappa)^{-1/2} scaling found previously for coherent beams. In the experimentally realistic case where there is a limit on the maximum squeezing possible, the variance will be reduced below that for coherent beams, though the scaling is unchanged.

  12. Photodiode-Based X-Ray Beam-Position Monitor With High Spatial-Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, P.S.; Siddons, D. P.

    2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a photodiode-based monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high spatial resolution for the project beamlines of the NSLS-II. A ring array of 32 Si PIN-junction photodiodes were designed for use as a position sensor, and a low-noise HERMES4 ASIC chip was integrated into the electronic readout system. A series of precision measurements to characterize electrically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise is sufficiently below tolerance levels. Following up modeling of detector's performance, including geometrical optimization using a Gaussian beam, we fabricated and assembled a first prototype. In this paper, we describe the development of this new state-of-the-art X-ray BPM along the beamline, in particular, downstream from the monochromator.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline graphene reduce beam-induced movements in high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy of ice-embedded biological samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Rhinow; Nils-Eike Weber; Andrey Turchanin; Armin Gölzhäuser; Werner Kühlbrandt

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), contrast loss due to beam-induced charging and specimen movement is a serious problem, as the thin films of vitreous ice spanning the holes of a holey carbon film are particularly susceptible to beam-induced movement. We demonstrate that the problem is at least partially solved by carbon nanotechnology. Doping ice-embedded samples with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in aqueous suspension or adding nanocrystalline graphene supports, obtained by thermal conversion of cross-linked self-assembled biphenyl precursors, significantly reduces contrast loss in high-resolution cryoEM due to the excellent electrical and mechanical properties of SWNTs and graphene.

  14. Laser damage study of nodules in electron-beam-evaporated HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Xinbin; Shen Zhengxiang; Jiao Hongfei; Zhang Jinlong; Ma Bin; Ding Tao; Lu Jiangtao; Wang Xiaodong; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive electron beam evaporation process was used to fabricate 1.064 {mu}mHfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors. The deposition process was optimized to reduce the nodular density. Cross-sectioning of nodular defects by a focused ion-beam milling instrument showed that the nodule seeds were the residual particles on the substrate and the particulates from the silica source ''splitting.'' After optimizing the substrate preparation procedure and the evaporation process, a low nodular density of 2.7/mm{sup 2} was achieved. The laser damage test revealed that the ejection fluences and damage growth behaviors of nodules created from deep or shallow seeds were totally different. A mechanism based on directional plasma scald was proposed to interpret observed damage growth phenomenon.

  15. Advanced Neutrino Sources (Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Neutrino Sources (Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams) · Design · R&D Status · Remaining R Meeting February, 2008 page 1 #12;· The stored beam properties & decay kinematics are well known uncertainties on neutrino flux & spectra are small PRECISION · Initial beams are flavor "pure" (BB) or "tagged

  16. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  17. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  18. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  19. Rabi Waves and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves - has been experimentally identified for the first time. Raman spectra in perfect quasi-1D carbon nanotubes are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D carbon nanotubes of larger diameter. They characterized by vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice and its revival part in frequency representation, which is the consequence of Rabi wave packet formation.

  20. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  1. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the grant entitled, ���¢��������Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.���¢������� The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  2. Addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, Malcolm, E-mail: malcolm.mcewen@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [National Research Council, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DeWerd, Larry [University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Followill, David [IROC Houston QA Center, Radiological Physics Center, 8060 El Rio Street, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States)] [IROC Houston QA Center, Radiological Physics Center, 8060 El Rio Street, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States); Rogers, David W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Seltzer, Stephen [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Québec (Canada)] [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Québec (Canada)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for the determination of absorbed dose to water in megavoltage photon beams is presented. This addendum continues the procedure laid out in TG-51 but new k{sub Q} data for photon beams, based on Monte Carlo simulations, are presented and recommendations are given to improve the accuracy and consistency of the protocol's implementation. The components of the uncertainty budget in determining absorbed dose to water at the reference point are introduced and the magnitude of each component discussed. Finally, the consistency of experimental determination of N{sub D,w} coefficients is discussed. It is expected that the implementation of this addendum will be straightforward, assuming that the user is already familiar with TG-51. The changes introduced by this report are generally minor, although new recommendations could result in procedural changes for individual users. It is expected that the effort on the medical physicist's part to implement this addendum will not be significant and could be done as part of the annual linac calibration.

  3. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, J. Warren (Castro Valley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Pyle, Robert V. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, L. Wilmer (Madison, WI); Ruby, Lawrence (Berkeley, CA); Schlachter, Alfred S. (Oakland, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  4. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator electron beam Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: radiation facilities for biology and material sciences. Beam physics--study of beams in accelerators... high-brightness x-ray beams in synchrotron radiation facilities and...

  6. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

  7. Experimental investigations of two-phase mixture level swell and axial void fraction distribution under high pressure, low heat flux conditions in rod bundle geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T.M.; White, M.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data is reported from a series of quasi-steady-state two-phase mixture level swell and void fraction distribution tests. Testing was performed at ORNL in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility - a large electrically heated test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those expected in a small break loss of coolant accident. Pressure was varied from 2.7 to 8.2 MPa and linear power ranged from 0.33 to 1.95 kW/m. Mixture swell was observed to vary linearly with the total volumetric vapor generation rate over the power range of primary interest in small break analysis. Void fraction data was fit by a drift-flux model and both the drift-velocity and concentration parameter were observed to decrease with increasing pressure.

  8. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  9. Fluorescence-type Monochromatic X-ray Beam-position Monitor with High-spatial Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S. [Experimental Facility Division, NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D. Peter [Experimental Systems, NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a fluorescence-type monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high-spatial resolution for end-station experiments at the initial project beamlines of the NSLS-II. We designed a ring array of multi-segmented Si PIN-junction photodiodes to use as a position sensor. Further, we integrated a low-noise charge-preamplification HERMES4 ASIC chip into an electronic readout system for photon-counting application. A series of precision measurements to characterize electronically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise from the detector system is sufficiently low to meet our stringent requirements. Using a Gaussian beam, we parametrically modeled the optimum working distance to ensure the detector's best performance. Based upon the results from the parametric modeling, prototypes of the next versions of the X-BPM are being developed. In this paper, we describe the methodology for developing the new compact monochromatic X-ray BPM, including its instrumentation, detector modeling, and future plan.

  10. Investigation of the spatiotemporal characteristics of the electric field in the Ne-H{sub 2} plasma of a beam-type high-voltage pulsed discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Bardin, S. S. [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the electric field E(x, t) of plasma produced by a beam-type high-voltage pulsed discharge is investigated. The electric field strength E(x, t) in an accelerating gap and in a plasma flare was determined from the measured Stark splitting of the H{sub ?} hydrogen line. The obtained dependence E(x, t) was used to calculate the electron distribution function and the spectral line intensities in the accelerating gap and in the plasma flare by the method of statistical modeling. The calculated population of He atomic states excited by electron impact and their comparison with the measured spectral line intensities I(?, x, t) demonstrate that a reverse electric field retarding the electron motion and leading to electron beam degradation must be present in the plasma flare near the grid. Measurement of the field strength from the Stark splitting of the H{sub ?} line demonstrates that it can reach considerable values.

  11. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  12. Interference of a pair of symmetric partially coherent beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garc?a-Guerrero, E. E.; Mendez, E. R.; Gu, Zu-Han; Leskova, T. A.; Maradudin, A. A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optical effects; (140.3300) Laser beam shaping; (350.5500)of symmetric Collett-Wolf beams,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1605–1607 (of highly directional light beams? ”, Opt. Lett. 2, 27–29 (

  13. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

  14. Evaluation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters for passive dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron beams in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yukihara, E. G.; Mardirossian, G.; Mirzasadeghi, M.; Guduru, S.; Ahmad, S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami Beach, Florida 33140 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 Northeast 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States); Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 Northeast 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates the performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) for application in radiotherapy. Central-axis depth dose curves and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) responses were obtained in a water phantom for 6 and 18 MV photons, and for 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams from a Varian 21EX linear accelerator. Single OSL measurements could be repeated with a precision of 0.7% (one standard deviation) and the differences between absorbed doses measured with OSLDs and an ionization chamber were within {+-}1% for photon beams. Similar results were obtained for electron beams in the low-gradient region after correction for a 1.9% photon-to-electron bias. The distance-to-agreement values were of the order of 0.5-1.0 mm for electrons in high dose gradient regions. Additional investigations also demonstrated that the OSL response dependence on dose rate, field size, and irradiation temperature is less than 1% in the conditions of the present study. Regarding the beam energy/quality dependence, the relative response of the OSLD for 18 MV was (0.51{+-}0.48)% of the response for the 6 MV photon beam. The OSLD response for the electron beams relative to the 6 MV photon beam. The OSLD response for the electron beams relative to the 6 MV photon beam was in average 1.9% higher, but this result requires further confirmation. The relative response did not seem to vary with electron energy at d{sub max} within the experimental uncertainties (0.5% in average) and, therefore, a fixed correction factor of 1.9% eliminated the energy dependence in our experimental conditions.

  15. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  16. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History PrintBeam History

  17. Experimental and numerical study of e-beam evaporation of titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M.A.; Westerberg, K.W.; Meier, T.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and numerical study is performed for the electron-beam evaporation of pure titanium from a bottom fed vapor source. In the experiments, an electron beam operating in the nominal range of 30-40 [kW] was used to evaporate metal from the top of a 3 [in] diameter rod. Variations were made in the e-beam power, sweep pattern, and sweep frequency, and the total evaporation rate was measured from feed consumption and laser absorption. The solid-pool interface was obtained from metallographic cross sections of the metal rod. A two-dimensional finite element model was developed for the melt which includes the effect of fluid flow and energy transport in the pool and conduction in the solid. The deformation of the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces are tracked using a mesh which stretches along spines parallel to the axis of the rod. For the cases considered, high evaporative fluxes and vapor pressures generate significant depressions in the top surface of the pool. Predicted and measured evaporation rates are in good agreement for moderate evaporation fluxes, but discrepancies are larger for the case involving the highest flux and deepest depression.

  18. Experimental and numerical study of E-beam evaporation of titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M.A.; Westerberg, K.W.; Meier, T.C.; Braun, D.G.; Berrins, L.V.; Anklam, T.M. Storer, J.

    1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and numerical study is performed for the electron- beam evaporation of pure titanium from a bottom fed vapor source. In the experiments, an electron beam operating in the nominal range of 30-40 [kW] was used to evaporate metal from the top of a 3 inch diameter rod. Variations were made in the e-beam power, sweep pattern, and sweep frequency, and the total evaporation rate was measured from feed consumption and laser absorption. The solid-pool interface was obtained from metallographic cross sections of the metal rod. A two-dimensional finite element model was developed for the melt which includes the effect of fluid flow and energy transport in the pool and conduction in the solid. The deformation of the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces are tracked using a mesh which stretches along spines parallel to the axis of the rod. For the cases considered, high evaporative fluxes and vapor pressures generate significant depressions in the top surface of the pool. Predicted and measured evaporation rates are in good agreement for moderate evaporation fluxes, but discrepancies are larger for the case involving the highest flux and deepest depression.

  19. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  20. Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cerv; P. Sarin; H. Pernegger; P. Vageesvaran; E. Griesmayer

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

  2. Beam foil spectroscopy of N = 3 to N = 2 transitions in highly stripped heavy ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Egan, P.O.; Ziock, K.P.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectroscopy of very highly ionized atoms provides an important testing ground for multi-electron atomic theory. We report preliminary experimental results on the n = 3 ..-->.. 2 spectra of Bi/sup +73/ and A/sup +69/ obtained at the GSI UNILAC accelerator. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300şC and 1100şC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  4. Distribution of electric field and energy flux around the cracks on the surfaces of Nd-doped phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Huang Li; Fan Sijun; Bai Gongxun; Li Kefeng; Chen Wei; Hu Lili

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate and calculate numerically the electromagnetic field and energy flux around a surface crack of an Nd-doped phosphate laser glass by using the finite-difference time-domain method. Because of a strong interference between the incident wave and the total internal reflections from the crack and the glass surface, the electric field is redistributed and enhanced. The results show that the electric-field distribution and corresponding energy flux component depend sensitively on the light polarization and crack geometry, such as orientation and depth. The polarization of the incident laser beam relative to the crack surfaces will determine the profile of the electric field around the crack. Under TE wave incidence, the energy flux peak is always inside the glass. But under TM wave incidence, the energy flux peak will be located inside the glass or inside the air gap. For both incident modes, the light intensification factor increases with the crack depth, especially for energy flux along the surface. Because cracks on the polished surfaces are the same as the roots extending down, the probability for much larger intensification occurring is high. The results suggest that the surface laser-damage threshold of Nd-doped phosphate may decrease dramatically with subsurface damage.

  5. Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

  6. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  7. The use the a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baussan, E; Ekelof, T; Martinez, E Fernandez; Ohman, H; Vassilopoulos, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

  8. The use of a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Baussan; M. Dracos; T. Ekelof; E. Fernandez Martinez; H. Ohman; N. Vassilopoulos

    2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

  9. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  10. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  11. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  12. Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures Vlastislav Cerven´y 1 ) and Ivan@ig.cas.cz. Summary Gaussian beams concentrated close to rays of high-frequency seismic body waves prop- agating in an inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structure are studied. The amplitude profiles of the Gaussian beam along

  13. Optimal beam pattern to maximize inclusion residence time in an electron beam melting hearth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Pal, U. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Avyle, J. van den [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximate probabilities of inclusion survival through an electron beam melting hearth are computed from nitride dissolution rates, flotation velocities, and residence times. Dissolution rates were determined by measuring shrinkage rates of pure TiN and nitrided sponge in small pools of molten titanium in an electron beam melting hearth. Flotation velocities were calculated using correlations for fluid flow around spheres, and show that particles sink or float unless their densities are extremely close to that of molten titanium. Flow field characteristics which lead to effective inclusion removal are discussed in terms of heat flux pattern required to produce them, based on the electron beam`s unique ability to impart a nearly arbitrary heat flux pattern to the melt surface.

  14. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  15. Accelerator beam profile analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

  16. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  17. Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

  18. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  19. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  20. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  1. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  2. Direct 2-Arm Comparison Shows Benefit of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost vs External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khor, Richard [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia) [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Tai, Keen-Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Chander, Sarat; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Garth, Margaret [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott, E-mail: Scott.Williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer with a single schedule of either external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost or EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: From 2001-2006, 344 patients received EBRT with HDRB boost for definitive treatment of intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. The prescribed EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 23 fractions, with a HDR boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions. This cohort was compared to a contemporaneously treated cohort who received EBRT to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, using a matched pair analysis. Three-dimensional conformal EBRT was used. Matching was performed using a propensity score matching technique. High-risk patients constituted 41% of the matched cohorts. Five-year clinical and biochemical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Initial significant differences in prognostic indicators between the unmatched treatment cohorts were rendered negligible after matching, providing a total of 688 patients. Median biochemical follow-up was 60.5 months. The 5-year freedom from biochemical failure was 79.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.3%-85.0%) and 70.9% (95% CI, 65.4%-76.0%) for the HDRB and EBRT groups, respectively, equating to a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.43-0.81, P=.0011). Interaction analyses showed no alteration in HDR efficacy when planned androgen deprivation therapy was administered (P=.95), but a strong trend toward reduced efficacy was shown compared to EBRT in high-risk cases (P=.06). Rates of grade 3 urethral stricture were 0.3% (95% CI, 0%-0.9%) and 11.8% (95% CI, 8.1%-16.5%) for EBRT and HDRB, respectively (P<.0001). No differences in clinical outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This comparison of 2 individual contemporaneously treated HDRB and EBRT approaches showed improved freedom from biochemical progression with the HDR approach. The benefit was more pronounced in intermediate- risk patients but needs to be weighed against an increased risk of urethral toxicity.

  3. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunai, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Sarkoezi, J. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Field, A. R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements ({approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  4. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History Print Beamline

  5. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History Print

  6. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam History

  7. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperimentBasicBeam Status Print mA

  8. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  9. Axion beams at HERA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Piotrzkowski

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    If the recently observed anomaly in the PVLAS experiment is due to the axion, then the powerful beams of synchrotron photons, propagating through high magnetic field of the HERA beamline, become strong axion sources. This gives a unique opportunity of detection of the axion-photon interactions by installing a small detector in the HERA tunnel, and to corroborate the axion hypothesis within a few days of running.

  10. Monoenergetic proton backlighter for measuring E and B fields and for radiographing implosions and high-energy density plasmas ,,invited...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 A novel monoenergetic proton backlighter source and matched imaging detector have been utilized by Mackinnon et al.6 demonstrated that high-resolution im- ages containing deflection information could laser beam duration of 300 fs with inten- sity of 1 1019 W/cm2 ; the result was a large proton flux

  11. Extraction of highly charged ions from the electron beam ion trap at LBNL for applications in surface analysis and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Ion Trap at LBNL for Applications in Surfacetransferred from LLNL to LBNL, and is now operating with+ . The research program at LBNL is focused on the following

  12. Monte-Carlo Simulation of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of Neutral Beam Ions and Effects on MHD Stability: Validation With Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V. S.; Turnbull, A. D.; Choi, M.; Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally, during fast wave (FW) radio frequency (rf) heating in DIII-D L-mode discharges, strong acceleration of neutral beam (NB) deuterium beam ions has been observed. Significant effects on the n/m = 1/1 sawtooth stability are also seen. Simulations using the Monte-Carlo Hamiltonian code ORBIT-RF, coupled to the TORIC full wave code, predict beam ion tails up to a few hundred keV, in agreement with the experiment. The simulations and experiment both clearly show a much greater efficiency for 4th harmonic FW heating than for 8th harmonic heating. Simple analyses of the kinetic contribution to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) potential energy from energetic beam ions generated by FW heating yields reasonable consistency with the observations. A more detailed analysis shows a more complicated picture, however. Other physics effects such as geometry, plasma rotation, and the presence of a free boundary, play a significant role.

  13. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, John C. (Clinton, TN); Wilgen, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  14. HIGS Flux Performance Projection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux performance table

  15. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  16. Production of fullerenes using concentrated solar flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fields, Clark L. (Greeley, CO); Pitts, John Roland (Lakewood, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Hale, Mary Jane (Golden, CO); Bingham, Carl E. (Denver, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing soot containing high amounts of fullerenes comprising: providing a primary concentrator capable of impingement of a concentrated beam of sunlight onto a carbon source to cause vaporization of carbon and subsequent formation of fullerenes, or providing a solar furnace having a primary concentrator with a focal point that concentrates a solar beam of sunlight; providing a reflective secondary concentrator having an entrance aperture and an exit aperture at the focal point of the solar furnace; providing a carbon source at the exit aperture of the secondary concentrator; supplying an inert gas over the carbon source to keep the secondary concentrator free from vaporized carbon; and impinging a concentrated beam of sunlight from the secondary concentrator on the carbon source to vaporize the carbon source into a soot containing high amounts of fullerenes.

  17. Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Hui Li, Doctor Engineering The transport of intense beams for advanced accelerator applications with high-intensity beams of beam characteristics over long distances. The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), which uses

  18. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  19. Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in {sup 249}Cm by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, T. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, M. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makishima, A. [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo 154-8525 (Japan); Shizuma, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Toume, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Hossain, I. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured de-excitation {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a {sup 248}Cm target and 162-MeV {sup 16}O, 162-MeV {sup 18}O, and 120-MeV {sup 13}C beams. {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the ({sup 16}O, {sup 15}O) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2{sup +}[620], 1/2{sup -}[750], and 7/2{sup +}[613] bands were extended up to 19/2{sup +}, 19/2{sup -}, and 13/2{sup +} states, respectively. We have established the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[604] state with a short life of T{sub 1/2}<<2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/2 11/2{sup -}[725] state with T{sub 1/2}=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/2 1/2{sup +}[880] state, having a large component of the k{sub 17/2} spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

  20. Rabi Wave Packets and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of quasi-1D carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes (CZSNTs), produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. Multichain coupled qubit system represents itself Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice, formed in CZSNTs plus quantized external electromagnetic (EM) field. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves, predicted in \\cite{Slepyan_Yerchak} has experimentally been identified for the first time. It is shown, that Raman spectra in quasi-1D CZSNTs are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D those ones. They characterized by semiclassical consideration by the only one vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice instead of longitudinal and transverse optical phonon $G^+$ and $G^-$modes and the out-of-plane radial breathing mode, which are observed in Raman spectra of 2D single wall nanotubes. It is consequence of 2D - 1D transition in all physical properties of nanotubes. It is shown, that strong electron-photon coupling takes place in CZSNTs by interaction with EM-field and quantum nature of EM-field has to be taken into account. It has been done for the first time in stationary spectroscopy at all. All optical spectra, in particular, Raman spectra are registered by usual stationary measurement technique in nonequilibrium conditions, which are the consequence of Rabi wave packets' formation. It leads in its turn to appearance of additional lines, corresponding to revival part of inversion dependence of joint EM-field + matter system in frequency representation.

  1. Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10{sup 9} electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE`s evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc.

  2. Studies on beam propagation pertaining to beamed microwave power transmission and open resonator quasi-optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleary, James Carlton

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the space shuttle. A near-field program is used to compare the collection efficiencies obtainable with a parabolic dish and a resonant Gaussian beam antenna. The second application of the computer programs is the analysis of a reference system for beaming... characteristics of the maximum tapers in Table 4. . 81 45 Collection efficiency characteristics of the high efficiency tapers. 84 46 Proposed shuttle beamed power demonstration using an 8 ft. parabolic dish as the transmitter antenna. 89 47 Gaussian beam...

  3. Simulations of the LHC high luminosity monitors at beam energies from 3.5 TeV to 7.0 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matis, H.S.; Miyamoto, R.; Humphreys, P.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C.; Stiller, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed two pairs of fast ionization chambers (BRAN) for measurement and optimization of luminosity at IR1 and IR5 of the LHC. These devices are capable of monitoring the performance of the LHC at low luminosity 10{sup 28} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} during beam commissioning all the way up to the expected full luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 7.0 TeV. The ionization chambers measure the intensity of hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward neutral particles of LHC collisions. To predict and improve the understanding of the BRAN performance, we created a detailed FLUKA model of the detector and its surroundings. In this paper, we describe the model and the results of our simulations including the detector's estimated response to pp collisions at beam energies of 3.5, 5.0, and 7.0 TeV per beam. In addition, these simulations show the sensitivity of the BRAN to the crossing angle of the two LHC beams. It is shown that the BRAN sensitivity to the crossing angle is proportional to the measurement of crossing angle by the LHC beam position monitors.

  4. HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulf of Mexico Fact SheetHFIR User

  5. Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  7. Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

  8. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

  9. The determination of neutron flux in the Texas A & M triga reactor during pulse and steady-state operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, John Joseph

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    -state operation. Neutron flux measurement during a pulse presents an additional problem in that the flux levels vary during the rapid rise and fall in reactor power. The power level transient of the reactor was followed, using the current output of a boron-10... as a flux monitor only at low power. levels or neutron fluxes. The antimony flux monitor in the steady-state flux measurement showed the same type of increase in flux magni- tude as that of the pulse measurement. The high flux values at steady...

  10. Sub-50 nm high aspect-ratio silicon pillars, ridges, and trenches fabricated using ultrahigh resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching P. B. Fischer and S. Y. Chou University of Minnesota Department of Electrical Engineering, Minneapolis, Minnesota 554~3 (Received 29 July 1992 and chlorine based reactive ion etching. These nanoscale Si features can be further reduced to 10 nm using

  11. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    to the presence of the generated neutrons. The worst contributors were the spallation products created by proton bombardment of iron, and the worst component was the beam pipe, which consists mostly of iron. No definitive conclusions about the feasibility of hands-on...

  12. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  13. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

  14. affecting carbon fluxes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IFN) (2 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 43 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

  15. Gaussian Beams For the Wave Equation Nicolay M. Tanushev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Gaussian Beams For the Wave Equation Nicolay M. Tanushev September 20, 2007 Abstract High frequency rely on approximate solution methods to describe the wave field in this regime. Gaussian beams can form integral superpositions of such Gaussian beams to generate more general high frequency

  16. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  17. PHYSICS WITH AND PHYSICS OF COLLIDING ELECTRON BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contributed so much to the physics of colliding beams, theyto reap so little from the physics with colliding beams.Conference on High-Energy Physics, Vienna" September 1968 (

  18. Single-band and Dual-band Beam Switching Systems and Offset-fed Beam Scanning Reflectarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jungkyu

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflectarray has been considered as a suitable candidate to replace the conventional parabolic reflectors because of its high-gain, low profile, and beam reconfiguration capability. Beam scanning capability and multi-band operation...

  19. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  20. Low-noise macroscopic twin beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timur Sh. Iskhakov; Vladyslav C. Usenko; Radim Filip; Maria V. Chekhova; Gerd Leuchs

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying a multiphoton-subtraction technique to two-color macroscopic squeezed vacuum state of light generated via high-gain parametric down conversion we conditionally prepare a new state of light: bright multi-mode low-noise twin beams. The obtained results demonstrate up to 8-fold suppression of noise in each beam while preserving and even moderately improving the nonclassical photon number correlations between the beams. The prepared low-noise macroscopic state, containing up to 2000 photons per mode, is not among the states achievable through nonlinear optical processes. The proposed technique substantially improves the usefulness of twin beams for quantum technologies.