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1

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division Home Reactor Projects Celebrating DOE's Cleanup Accomplishments (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) HFBR Overview HFBR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision HFBR Complex Cleanup Actions HFBR Documents HFBR Science & Accomplishments Groundwater Protection Group Environmental Protection Division Contact > See also: HFBR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor Under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) underwent stabilization and partial decommissioning to prepare the HFBR confinement for long-term safe

2

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports HFBR Waste Loading Area, Soil Remediation (PDF) - July 2009 HFBR Decommissioning Project, Removal of the Control Rod Blades and Beam Plugs (PDF) - January 2010...

3

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? HFBR The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is being decommissioned because the Department of Energy (DOE) decided in 1999 that it would be permanently closed. The reactor was shut down in 1997 after tritium from a leak in the spent-fuel pool was found in the groundwater. The HFBR, which had operated from 1965 to 1996, was used solely for scientific research, providing neutrons for materials science, chemistry, biology, and physics experiments. The reactor was shut down for routine maintenance in November of 1996. In January 1997, tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen and a by-product of reactor operations, was found in groundwater monitoring wells immediately south of the HFBR. The tritium

4

Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world`s premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR`s value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory`s scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor`s research capabilities.

Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

PRELIMINARY HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BROOKHAVEN HIGH FLUX BEAM RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Beam Reactor, HFBR, is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water and designed to produce 40 Mw with a total epithermal flux of ~1.6 X 10/sup 15/cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ and a flector thermal maximum flux of 7 X 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, using a core formed by ETR plate-type fuel elements in a close-packed array. The hazards summary is given in terms of site description, reactor design, building design, plant operation, disposal of radioactive wastes and effluents, and safety analysis. (B.O.G.)

Hendrie, J.M.; Kouts, H.J.C.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

Pond, R. B.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

18

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT ľ INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT ľ INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident  

SciTech Connect

A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

27

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

28

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

30

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

35

Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After careful planning and input from regulatory agencies and the community, a decommissioning plan for the HFBR has been finalized. A Feasibility Study was completed and a...

36

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been taken to partially decommission and prepare the HFBR for safe storage. Final decommissioning of the HFBR building will be performed at the completion of the decay period. The...

37

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam-4004 Received 21 April 2006; accepted 6 July 2006; published 7 August 2006 The energy distribution and flux into fast neutrals. The neutral energy distribution was always shifted to lower energies compared

Economou, Demetre J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

FEDOTOV, A.V.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

45

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

46

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

48

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

49

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

50

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

51

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

52

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

53

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

54

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

55

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

56

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

57

Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

59

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007, A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Managment Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

60

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

62

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

63

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

64

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

65

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

66

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

67

Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 ┼ to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

Winn,B.L.; Robertson, J.L.; Iverson, E.B.; Selby, D.L.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

68

A VERY HIGH LEVEL NEUTRAL BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Neutial Beam Control System we have elucidated theseHigh Level Neutral Beam Control System 8!. References 1. V.High-Level Neutral-Beam Control System Victor Elischer Van

Elischer, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A brief History of Neutron Scattering at the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory dates back to 1945 when Ernest Wollan installed a modified x-ray diffractometer on a beam port of the original graphite reactor. Subsequently, Wollan and Clifford Shull pioneered neutron diffraction and laid the foundation for an active neutron scattering effort that continued through the 1950s, using the Oak Ridge Research reactor after 1958, and, starting in 1966, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, or HFIR.

Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Recent High Heat Flux Tests on W-Rod-Armored Mockups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the authors initial high heat flux tests on small mockups armored with W rods, done in the small electron beam facility (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, the mockups exhibited excellent thermal performance. However, to reach high heat fluxes, they reduced the heated area to only a portion ({approximately}25%) of the sample. They have now begun tests in their larger electron beam facility, EB 1200, where the available power (1.2 MW) is more than enough to heat the entire surface area of the small mockups. The initial results indicate that, at a given power, the surface temperatures of rods in the EB 1200 tests is somewhat higher than was observed in the EBTS tests. Also, it appears that one mockup (PW-10) has higher surface temperatures than other mockups with similar height (10mm) W rods, and that the previously reported values of absorbed heat flux on this mockup were too high. In the tests in EB 1200 of a second mockup, PW-4, absorbed heat fluxes of {approximately}22MW/m{sup 2} were reached but the corresponding surface temperatures were somewhat higher than in EBTS. A further conclusion is that the simple 1-D model initially used in evaluating some of the results from the EBTS testing was not adequate, and 3-D thermal modeling will be needed to interpret the results.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; MCDONALD,JIMMIE M.; LUTZ,THOMAS J.; MISZKIEL,MARK E.

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

High power linear pulsed beam annealer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

Strathman, Michael D. (Concord, CA); Sadana, Devendra K. (Berkeley, CA); True, Richard B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

76

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Remote high temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in high temperature environments. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet light. The luminescence emitted by the two thermographic-phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, B.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors  

SciTech Connect

Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complex Description Complex Description Current HFBR Complex The HFBR complex consists of multiple structures and systems that were necessary to operate and maintain the reactor. The most recognizable features of the complex are the domed reactor confinement building and the distinctive red-and-white stack. Portions of the complex building structures, systems, and components, some of which are underground, were contaminated with radionuclides and chemicals as a result of previous HFBR and Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) operations. A number of decommissioning and preparation for long-term safe storage actions have been taken including the removal of contaminated structures, hazardous materials, and contaminated equipment and components. The structures and systems, both current and former, are

85

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL> The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an approval in principal of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the US Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A 3D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. The present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on side during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Design of a high-gain flux-compression generator  

SciTech Connect

The current gain of a high-gain, high-explosive helical magnetic-flux-compression generator (HEG) is limited both by nonuniformities in stator expansion and by armature-stator misalignment. We set out to achieve three goals: first, an output current of at least 2 MA with a current gain greater than 1000 to drive a 150- to 300-nH load; second, a generator with an acceptably small volume and length; and finally, generator output of a reliable magnitude. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Pincosy, P.A.; Abe, D.K.; Chase, J.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

SciTech Connect

A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

Lasche, G.P.

1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ┬▒ 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

91

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Studies of Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Compact high precision adjustable beam defining aperture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides an adjustable aperture for limiting the dimension of a beam of energy. In an exemplary embodiment, the aperture includes (1) at least one piezoelectric bender, where a fixed end of the bender is attached to a common support structure via a first attachment and where a movable end of the bender is movable in response to an actuating voltage applied to the bender and (2) at least one blade attached to the movable end of the bender via a second attachment such that the blade is capable of impinging upon the beam. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is electromagnetic radiation. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is X-rays.

Morton, Simon A; Dickert, Jeffrey

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

High Flux Commercial Illumination Solution with Intelligent Controls  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0003241 for developing a high efficiency LED-based luminaire. A novel light engine module (two versions: standard and super), power supply and luminaire mechanical parts were designed and tested. At steady-state, the luminaire luminous flux is 3156 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy 97.4 LPW and CRI (Ra) 88 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3507K. When the luminaire is fitted with the super version of the light engine the efficacy reaches 130 LPW. In addition, the luminaire is provided with an intelligent control network capable of additional energy savings. The technology developed during the course of this project has been incorporated into a family of products. Recently, the first product in the family has been launched.

Camil Ghiu

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux-Scaling with stored energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E{sub 0}. The ion number fluence (ions m{sup -2}) and energy fluence (J m{sup -2}) computed as 2.4-7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} and 2.2-33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, respectively, are found to be independent of E{sub 0} from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E{sub 0} at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E{sub 0} for the high inductance INTI PF.

Lee, S. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

Compton, R.N.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High-Resolution Satellite Surface Latent Heat Fluxes in North Atlantic Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new high-resolution satellite-derived ocean surface flux product, XSeaFlux, which is evaluated for its potential use in hurricane studies. The XSeaFlux employs new satellite datasets using improved retrieval methods, and uses ...

Jiping Liu; Judith A. Curry; Carol Anne Clayson; Mark A. Bourassa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A New High Intensity Electron Beam for Wakefield Acceleration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGH INTENSITY ELECTRON BEAM FOR WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION STUDIES* M.E. Conde , W. Gai, C. Jing, R. Konecny, W. Liu, J.G. Power, H. Wang, Z. Yusof ANL, Argonne, IL 60439, USA...

108

HIGH INTENSITY BEAM OPERATION OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS  

SciTech Connect

For the last few years the Brookhaven AGS has operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the AGS Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. The intensity is presently limited by space charge effects at both Booster and AGS injection and transverse instabilities in the AGS.

ROSER,T.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

High intensity electron beam ion trap for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity electron beam ion trap under development at LLNL could be adapted for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams, enabling a substantial reduction in the size and cost of a post-accelerator. We report estimates of the acceptance, ionization time, charge state distribution, emittance, and beam intensity for charge state boosting of radioactive ions in this device. The estimates imply that, for tin isotopes, over 10{sup 10} ions/s can be ionized to q = 40+ with an absolute emittance of approximately 1 (pi) mm mrad at an energy of 30 x q.k.

Marrs, R.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Measurement of beam energy spectrum and impurity content in high-power neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and impurity content of a high-power neutral beam are measured by implanting the beam into high-purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles is then measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS); the penetration depth is a function of the incident particle energy. This is one of the few measurement techniques that can determine neutral beam energy components directly. From the results, percentages of atomic and molecular ions in the source plasma can be inferred. Use of deuterium as the source gas provides insight into the role of residual hydrogen in the ion source and accelerating grids and in the SIMS analysis. The principal impurities are carbon and oxygen. Preliminary data indicate that carbon can originate from both methane and carbon monoxide, while oxygen can come from molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water. Results are given and future plans are discussed.

Langley, R.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Menon, M.M.; Botnick, E.M.; Magee, C.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac  

SciTech Connect

A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

Pang, Xiaoying [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baily, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the asbestos, was volume reduced via a private contract mechanism established by BJC. After volume reduction, the waste was packaged for rail shipment. This large waste management project successfully met cost and schedule goals.

Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diagnostic detector head harp (23) used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires (21), typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit (25) formed on a ceramic substrate (26). A method to fabricate harps (23) to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit (25) disposed on the ceramic substrate (26) connects electrically between the detector wires (21) and diagnostic equipment (37) which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires (21) by the high energy particle beams.

Fritsche, Craig T. (Overland Park, KS); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee' s Summit, MO)

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Magnetically operated beam dump for dumping high power beams in a neutral beamline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide a beam dump system for a neutral beam generator which lowers the time-averaged power density of the beam dump impingement surface. Another object of this invention is to provide a beam dump system for a neutral particle beam based on reionization and subsequent magnetic beam position modulation of the beam onto a beam dump surface to lower the time-averaged power density of the beam dump ion impingement surface.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

A thermal analysis model for high power density beam stops  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is presently designing and building the 2.5 MeV injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The design includes various beam intercepting devices such as beam stops and slits. The target power densities can be as high as 500 kW/cm{sup 2} with a beam stopping range of 25 to 30 microns, producing stresses well above yield in most materials. In order to analyze the induced temperatures and stresses, a finite element model has been developed. The model has been written parametrically to allow the beam characteristics, target material, dimensions, angle of incidence and mesh densities to be easily adjusted. The heat load is applied to the model through the use of a 3-dimensional table containing the calculated volumetric heat rates. The load is based on a bi-gaussian beam shape which is absorbed by the target according to a Bragg peak distribution. The results of several analyses using the SNS Front End beam are presented.

Virostek, S.; Oshatz, D.; Staples, J.

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

Oxide Target Designs for High Primary Beam Intensities for Future Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Oxide targets used nowadays in ISOL facilities can only accommodate up to a few kW incoming beam power because of the targets' moderate operation temperatures and their low thermal conductivities. A generic design to accommodate a 100 kW, 1 GeV proton beam, used as baseline parameters in the ongoing EURISOL-DS project, along with the numerical and experimental tools required for its validation, are reported here. We provide some details on these high-power composite oxide-refractory metal targets and on the proposed arrangement in several sub-units merging into a single ion source.

Stora, T.; Bouquerel, E.; Bruno, L.; Catherall, R.; Fernandes, S.; Kasprowicz, P.; Lettry, J.; Marzari, S.; Noah, E.; Penescu, L.; Wilfinger, R. [AB Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Singh, B. S. Nara [Department of Physics, University of York, York, Y10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Experimental Estimate of Beam Loading and Minimum rf Voltage for Acceleration of High Intensity Beam in the Fermilab Booster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Yang, X; Norem, J; Yang, Xi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Experimental estimate of beam loading and minimum rf voltage for acceleration of high intensity beam in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Xi Yang; Charles M Ankenbrandt and Jim Norem

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Band gap tunability of molecular beam epitaxy grown lateral composition modulated GaInP structures by controlling V/III flux ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lateral composition modulated (LCM) GaInP structures were grown on (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy with different V/III flux ratios. Band gap of LCM structures could be tuned from 1.93 eV to 1.83 eV by decreasing flux ratio while maintaining the same photoluminescence intensity, enhanced light absorption, and widened absorption spectrum. It is shown that for band gap tuning of LCM structures, flux ratio adjustment is a more viable method compared to growth temperature adjustment.

Park, K. W. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [Micro Systems Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. T. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Photonics and Applied Physics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - ├?┬?165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar regions have great sensitivity to climate forcing; however, understanding of the physical processes coupling the atmosphere and ocean in these regions is relatively poor. Improving our knowledge of high-latitude surface fluxes will require close ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Sarah T. Gille; Cecilia Bitz; David Carlson; Ivana Cerovecki; Carol Anne Clayson; Meghan F. Cronin; Will M. Drennan; Chris W. Fairall; Ross N. Hoffman; Gudrun Magnusdottir; Rachel T. Pinker; Ian A. Renfrew; Mark Serreze; Kevin Speer; Lynne D. Talley; Gary A. Wick

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15-year life, has no embrittlement, and produces 50 standard cubic feet per hour per square foot (scfhft 2 ) of ultra high purity hydrogen at P 200 pounds per square inch...

128

Understanding High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery High-Power Fiber-Optic Laser Beam Delivery The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. W- 31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. Boyd V. Hunter and Keng H. Leong Argonne National Laboratory Technology Development Division Laser Applications Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 207 Argonne, Illinois 60439 Carl B. Miller, James F. Golden, Robert D. Glesias and Patrick J. Laverty U. S. Laser Corporation 825 Windham Court North P. O. Box 609 Wyckoff, New Jersey 07481 March 25, 1996 Manuscript to be submitted to Journal of Laser Applications

129

Spacecraft Power Beaming Using High-Energy Lasers, Experimental Validation  

SciTech Connect

The lifetime of many spacecrafts are often limited by degradation of their electrical power subsystem, e.g. radiation-damaged solar arrays or failed batteries. Being able to beam power from terrestrial sites using high energy lasers, could alleviate this limitation, extending the lifetime of billions of dollars of satellite assets, as well as providing additional energy for electric propulsion that can be used for stationkeeping and orbital changes. In addition, extensive research at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has shown the potential for annealing damaged solar cells using lasers. This paper describes that research and a proposed experiment to demonstrate the relevant concepts of high energy laser power beaming to an NPS-built and operated satellite. Preliminary results of ground experiment of laser illuminations of some of the solar panels of one of the spacecrafts are also presented.

Michael, Sherif [Naval Postgraduate School ECE Dep./Space Systems Academic Group, Monterey, CA 93943 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels ~30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm2. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolantľhydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams.

Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Performance modeling and optimization of a high energy colliding beam simulation code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance ...

Hongzhang Shan; Erich Strohmaier; Ji Qiang; David H. Bailey; Kathy Yelick

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A high transmission analyzing magnet for intense high charge state beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low energy beam transport (LEBT) for VENUS will provide for extraction, mass analysis and transport to the axial injection line for the 88-Inch Cyclotron. The new LEBT was designed from the beginning to handle high intensity beams where space charge forces strongly affect the transmission. The magnet has a unique design with specially shaped poles to apply sextupole correction in both the horizontal and vertical plane.

Leitner, M.; Abbott, S.R.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

High-intensity, high-brightness polarized and unpolarized beam production in charge-exchange collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic limitations on the high-intensity H{sup -} ion beam production were experimentally studied in charge-exchange collisions of the neutral atomic hydrogen beam in the Na-vapour jet ionizer cell. These studies are the part of the polarized source upgrade (to 10 mA peak current and 85% polarization) project for RHIC. In the source the atomic hydrogen beam of a 5-10 keV energy and total (equivalent) current up to 5 A is produced by neutralization of proton beam in pulsed hydrogen gas target. Formation of the proton beam (from the surface of the plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature {approx}0.2 eV) is produced by four-electrode spherical multi-aperture ion-optical system with geometrical focusing. The hydrogen atomic beam intensity up to 1.0 A/cm{sup 2} (equivalent) was obtained in the Na-jet ionizer aperture of a 2.0 cm diameter. At the first stage of the experiment H-beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}1.0 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained using the flat grids and magnetic focusing.

Zelenski, A.; Ritter, J.; Zubets, V.; Steski, D.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Proposed Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a desire to implement a reliability-centered maintenance at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak-Centered Maintenance (RCM) structure is proposed for implementation at the HFIR. This proposed RCM structure is based on widely used and accepted industry practices. The HFIR primary cleanup system is used to provide specific

138

High-resolution clouds and radiative fluxes from satellites| Transferabilty of methods and application to monsoon issues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? High-resolution information on clouds and radiative fluxes is produced for the Indian and African monsoon regions of interest to the GEWEX Project as articulatedů (more)

Wonsick, Margaret M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compact high-flux two-stage solar collectors based on tailored edge-ray concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach permits the design of compact two-stage high-flux solar collectors, with a focusing primary reflector and a non-imaging TERC secondary reflector. We present a new primary reflector shape based on the TERC approach and a secondary TERC tailored to its particular flux map, such that more compact concentrators emerge at flux concentration levels in excess of 90% of the thermodynamic limit. Calculations and raytrace simulation results are also offered which demonstrate that V-cone approximations to a wide variety of TERCs attain the concentration of the TERC to within a few percent. These V-cones represent practical secondary concentrators that may be superior to corresponding compound parabolic concentrator or trumpet secondaries. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Friedman, R.P. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Gordon, J.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel)]|[Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of switch for modulation of the Q-factor of a multi-mode storage resonator in a high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described. The operating principle of the switch is based on a sharp increase in the TE{sub 02{yields}}TE{sub 01} coupling coefficient, when an electron beam is injected into the switch cavity. The switch was tested at low power level in a compressor operated at X-band. A power gain of 19-20 in the compressed pulse with pulse duration of 40-50 ns was achieved. The proposed switch shows good prospects for use in high-power active pulse compressors.

Ivanov, O. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Isaev, V. A.; Lobaev, M. A. [Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-beam high voltage switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360.degree./n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load.

Shimer, Daniel W. (Danville, CA); Lange, Arnold C. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

E-beam high voltage switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360{degree}/n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. 7 figs.

Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements.

Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial and atmospheric neutron flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under current conditions, the cosmic ray spectrum incident on the Earth is dominated by particles with energies solar flares, supernovae and gamma ray bursts produce high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) with drastically higher energies. The Earth is likely episodically exposed to a greatly increased HECR flux from such events, some of which lasting thousands to millions of years. The air showers produced by HECRs ionize the atmosphere and produce harmful secondary particles such as muons and neutrons. Neutrons currently contribute a significant radiation dose at commercial passenger airplane altitude. With higher cosmic ray energies, these effects will be propagated to ground level. This work shows the results of Monte Carlo simulations quantifying the neutron flux due to high energy cosmic rays at various primary energies and altitudes. We provide here lookup tables that can be used to determine neutron fluxes from primaries with total energies 1 GeV - 1 PeV. By convolution, one can compute the neutron flux for any arbitrary CR spectrum. Our results demonstrate that deducing the nature of primaries from ground level neutron enhancements would be very difficult.

Andrew Overholt; Adrian Melott; Dimitra Atri

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Growth of high Bi concentration GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incorporation of Bi is investigated in the molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x}. Bi content increases rapidly as the As{sub 2}:Ga flux ratio is lowered to 0.5 and then saturates for lower flux ratios. Growth under Ga and Bi rich conditions shows that Bi content increases strongly with decreasing temperature. A model is proposed where Bi from a wetting layer incorporates through attachment to Ga-terminated surface sites. The weak Ga-Bi bond can be broken thermally, ejecting Bi back into the wetting layer. Highly crystalline films with up to 22% Bi were grown at temperatures as low as 200 Degree-Sign C.

Lewis, R. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 Vancouver (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada); Masnadi-Shirazi, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z4 Vancouver (Canada); Tiedje, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three experimental Halls. In Hall A is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three

147

A CONTINUOUS HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP OF THE HOT-DOG-COOKER TYPE  

SciTech Connect

A beam dump with partially rotating water-cooled tube arrays is proposed and studied for the dump of continuous high power density unneutralized ion beams out of the neutral beam injectors. Analyses were made of both steady and transient heat transfer characteristics.

Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

149

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

150

Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-Up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Interaction of relativistic electron beams with high Z plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A set of relativistic multigroup diffusion equations was derived for the study of electron beam--target interactions. Included are transport, Coulomb collisions, electric and magnetic fields, bremsstrahlung, and hydrodynamic motion of the background plasma. LASNEX, the Laser-Fusion code, is being modified to include these equations and will be used for modeling electron beam fusion. (auth)

Kershaw, D.S.

1975-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

PRELIMINARY SOLUTION CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS FOR THE HIGH-FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was supported by a series of preliminary experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1960. The experiments yielded results describing directly some of the expected performance characteristics of the reactor and strengthened the calculational methods used in its design. The critical assembly, like the reactor, was of a flux-trap type in which a central 6-in.-dia column of H/sub 2/O was surrounded by an annulus of fissile material and, in turn, by an annular neutron reflector. The fuel region contained a solution of enriched uranyl nitrate in a mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and the reflector was a composite of two annuli, the inner one of D/sub 2/O surrounded by one of H/sub 2/O. In most experiments the ends of the assembly were reflected by H/sub 2/O. Important results evaluate the absolute thermal-neutron flux to be expected in the design reactor and describe the flux distributions within this type of assembly. It was also observed that the cadmium ratio along the axis of the assembly was about 100, showing that a highly thermal-neutron flux was truly developed in the trap. It was shown that reduction of the hydrogen density in the central water column to about 80% of its normal value increased the reactivity about 6% and that further hydrogen density reduction decreased the reactivity as the effect of the loss of neutron moderation dominated the effect of the increased coupling across the central column. These considerations are of importance to the safety of the reactor. Additional experiments gave values of the usual critical dimensions and explored the effects on both the dimensions and the flux distributions of changing the concentration of the uranyl nitrate solution, of changing the composition of the solvent, and of adding neutron-absorbing materials to the D/ sub 2/O reflector. These changes were made to alter the neutron properties of the fuel solution over a range including those expected in the reactor itself. (auth)

Fox, J.K.; Gilley, L.W.; Magnuson, D.W.

1963-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Response of aluminum and its alloys to exposure in the high flux isotope reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pure aluminum and some aluminum alloys were irradiated to very high neutron fluences in the cooling water at 328 K in the high flux region of HFIR. Displacement levels of 270 dpa and transmutation-produced silicon levels of 7.15 wt % were reached. Damage microstructures consisted of dislocations, cavities, and precipitates which caused substantial strengthening and associated loss in ductility. Formation of cavities and related swelling were considerably reduced by alloying elements and by the presence of fine Mg/sub 2/Si precipitate.

Farrell, K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

Petersen, Holly E. (Tracy, CA); Goward, William D. (Antioch, CA); Dijaili, Sol P. (Moraga, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A High-Flux, Flexible Membrane with Parylene-encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present fabrication and characterization of a membrane based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene. Carbon nanotubes have shown orders of magnitude enhancement in gas and water permeability compared to estimates generated by conventional theories [1, 2]. Large area membranes that exhibit flux enhancement characteristics of carbon nanotubes may provide an economical solution to a variety of technologies including water desalination [3] and gas sequestration [4]. We report a novel method of making carbon nanotube-based, robust membranes with large areas. A vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube array is infiltrated with parylene. Parylene polymer creates a pinhole free transparent film by exhibiting high surface conformity and excellent crevice penetration. Using this moisture-, chemical- and solvent-resistant polymer creates carbon nanotube membranes that promise to exhibit high stability and biocompatibility. CNT membranes are formed by releasing a free-standing film that consists of parylene-infiltrated CNTs, followed by CNT uncapping on both sides of the composite material. Thus fabricated membranes show flexibility and ductility due to the parylene matrix material, as well as high permeability attributed to embedded carbon nanotubes. These membranes have a potential for applications that may require high flux, flexibility and durability.

Park, H G; In, J; Kim, S; Fornasiero, F; Holt, J K; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Determination of the beam quality index of high-energy photon beams under nonstandard reference conditions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: At some modern radiotherapy machines it is not possible to achieve reference conditions for the measurement of beam quality indices used in dosimetry codes of practice, such as IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51. This work aims at providing self-consistent and simpler expressions and more accurate fits for a limited range of beams of interest than have been proposed previously for deriving these beam quality indices from measurements. Methods: The starting point is a formula proposed by Sauer [Med. Phys. 36, 4168-4172 (2009)] for deriving the beam quality index used in IAEA TRS-398, TPR{sub 20,10}, from a measurement of the tissue phantom ratio at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water for an s Multiplication-Sign s cm{sup 2} (equivalent) square field, TPR{sub 20,10}(s). First, a self-consistent version of this formula is established followed by a simpler version by making a linear approximation. A similar approach is proposed to derive the beam quality index used in AAPM TG-51, %dd(10){sub X}, from a measurement of PDD{sub 10}(s), the percentage depth dose at 10 cm for a square field with size s. All models were fitted to subsets of relevant data from BJR supplement 25. Results: The linear models for TPR{sub 20,10}(s) and exponential models for PDD{sub 10}(s) as a function of the (equivalent) square field size can reproduce the beam quality within 0.3% and beam quality correction factors within 0.05% for square field sizes ranging from 4 cm to 12 cm and nominal photon energies from 4 MV to 12 MV. For higher energy beams the errors are only slightly worse but for %dd(10){sub X}, an additional uncertainty component has to be considered for the electron contamination correction. Conclusions: The models proposed here can be used in practical recommendations for the dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields.

Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle length. Consequently, ANL and ILL have collaborated to investigate alternative designs. A promising candidate design has been selected and studied, increasing the total amount of fuel without changing the external plate dimensions by relocating the burnable poison. In this way, changes required in the fuel element are reasonably small. With this new design, neutronics analyses have shown that performance could be maintained at a high level: 2 day decrease of cycle length (to 47.5 days at 58.3 MW) and 1-2% decrease of brightness in the cold and hot sources in comparison to the current typical operation. In addition, studies have shown that the thermal-hydraulic and shutdown margins for the proposed LEU design would satisfy technical specifications.

Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Flux Pinning and AC Loss in Second Generation High Temperature Superconductor Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major advances have been made in the last 18 years in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) reserach and development, resulting in increased use of HTS materials in commerical and pre-commercial electric-power applications. This new and important book addresses the issues related to flux pinning, AC losses and thick YBCO film growth. Written by top most scientists in the world, it presents the current status and issues related to YBCO coated conductors and the need for further fundamental materials science work in YBCO coated conductor. It will be a useful handbook for years to come.

Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Coherent Doppler Profiler for High-Resolution Particle Velocimetry in the Ocean: Laboratory Measurements of Turbulence and Particle Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler has been developed for high-resolution particle velocimetry in the ocean, in particular for remote measurements of suspended sediment flux and turbulence in the nearshore and continental shelf ...

Len Zedel; Alex E. Hay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams  

SciTech Connect

The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Operation of a large GEM-MSGC detector in a high intensity hadronic test beam using fully pipelined readout electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

98-060 In a recent test beam experiment at PSI a new tracking device for very high particle fluxes consisting of a low gain micro strip gas chamber (MSGC) combined with a gas electron multiplier (GEM) foil has been run under beam conditions similar to those foreseen in the HERA-B experiment [1], where such devices are being installed for the inner tracker. They are also being evaluated for the LHCb experiment [2]. In both detectors very high, mainly hadronic particle densities (up to 10 4 mm -2 sec -1) are expected, while the momentum resolution of the magnetic spectrometers foreseen in the two experiments is limited by multiple scattering. Also photon conversions represent a significant background source and therefore a minimal thickness in terms of radiation length is important, while position resolution requirements are moderate (typically 300 mu m pitch is sufficient). This paper describes the detailed construction of this novel detector, the test beam configuration and some of the data taken using the fu...

Eisele, F; Straumann, U; Straumann, Ulrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The upgraded rf system for the AGS and high intensity proton beams  

SciTech Connect

The AGS has been upgraded over the past three years to produce a record beam intensity of 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse for the fixed-target physics program. The major elements of the upgrade are: the new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron, the main magnet power supply, a high frequency longitudinal dilution cavity, a feedback damper for transverse instabilities, a fast gamma transition jump system, and a new high-power rf system. The new rf system and its role in achieving the high intensity goal are the subjects of this report. The rf system is heavily beam loaded, with 7 Amps of rf current in the beam and a peak power of 0.75 MW delivered to the beam by ten cavities. As an example of the scale of beam loading, at one point in the acceleration cycle the cavities are operated at 1.5 kV/gap; whereas, were it not for the new power amplifiers, the beam-induced voltage on the cavities would be over 25 kV/gap. The upgraded rf system, comprising: new power amplifiers, wide band rf feedback, improved cavities, and new low-level beam control electronics, is described. Results of measurements with beam, which characterize the system`s performance, are presented. A typical high intensity acceleration cycle is described with emphasis on the key challenges of beam loading.

Brennan, J.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). AGS Dept.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mechanical beam isolator for high-power laser systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mechanical beam isolator uses rod-shaped elements having a Gaussian configuration to interrupt the path of a beam of photons or particles when the time-scale of the needed interruption is of the order of a microsecond or less. One or more of these rods is mounted transversely to, and penetrates through, a rotating shaft supported by bearings. Owing to the Gaussian geometry of the rods, they are able to withstand much higher rotation speeds, without tensile failure, than rods having any other geometrical shape.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA); Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining  

SciTech Connect

The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with improvements to the focusability of the individual beams, the maximum peak intensity can be increased further to {approx} 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Lastly, an important feature of the CAPE architecture is the ability to coherently combine beams to produce complex spatio-temporal intensity distributions for laser-based accelerators (e.g. all-optical electron injection and acceleration) and high energy density science applications such as fast ignition.

Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary investigation of actinide and xenon reactivity effects in accelerator transmutation of waste high-flux systems  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of an unstable positive reactivity growth in an accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW)-type high-flux system is investigated. While it has always been clear that xenon is an important actor in the reactivity response of a system to flux changes, it has been suggested that in very high thermal flux transuranic burning systems, a positive, unstable reactivity growth could be caused by the actinides alone. Initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change caused by the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or startup. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response caused by the actinides. The capabilities and applications of both the current actinide model and the xenon model are discussed. Finally, the need for a complete dynamic model for the high-flux fluid-fueled ATW system is addressed.

Olson, K.R.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics; Woosley, M.L. Jr. [Univ. of virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering; Sailor, W.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nanofluid-based receivers for high-temperature, high-flux direct solar collectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar power plants with surface receivers have low overall energy conversion efficiencies due to large emissive losses at high temperatures. Alternatively, volumetric receivers promise increased performance because solar ...

Lenert, Andrej

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interdecadal Variability of the Thermohaline Circulation and High-Latitude Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized North Atlantic Ocean model is forced by climatological wind stress, restoring temperature, and a diagnosed salinity flux. Both centennial and interdecadal oscillations are sustained in the model if the diagnosed salinity flux is ...

Fei Chen; Michael Ghil

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Estimations of Mass Fluxes for Cumulus Parameterizations from High-Resolution Spatial Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core of the mass flux formulation, on which the majority of the current cumulus parameterizations are based, is to transport physical variables by the so-called mass flux for individual physical components, such as convective updrafts, ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Francoise Guichard; Jean-Philippe Lafore; Jean-Luc Redelsperger; Peter Bechtold

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Recent Studies Related to Past Operations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were reviewed in response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Currently, studies are being conducted to determine if HFIR can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU). While the basis for conversion is the current performance of the reactor, redesign studies revealed an apparent slight degradation in performance of the reactor over its 40 year lifetime. A second program requiring data from HFIR staff is the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). The IFDP is a program that integrates environmental cleanup with modernization and site revitalization plans and projects. Before a path of disposal can be established for discharged HFIR beryllium reflector regions, the reflector components must be classified as to type of waste and specifically, determine if they are transuranic waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Validation of KENO V.a Code for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is composed of two concentric annular elements, inner and outer, each containing highly enriched uranium fuel as a mixture of triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and aluminum encapsulated within aluminum alloy plates. The fuel plates are of involute shape and the fuel within the plates has a distribution across the plate width. Previous KENO code validation efforts have used a relatively simple single region homogeneous fuel model for each of the two annular regions by assuming that the materials in each were homogenized within the total volume of the fueled region. The computed results have tended to be about 2 to 3% greater than experimentally measured results. To improve computed results, a multi-zone fuel model was developed and used to validate the KENO code.

Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha, Universit├ę Blaise Pascal IN2P3-CNRS Abstract CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams for measuring accurately the linearity is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

183

Self?aligned high electron mobility transistor gate fabrication using focused ion beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new gate fabrication technique has been developed based on focused ion beam exposure and reactive ion etching of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/Ge/PMMA multilevel resist structure. The focused ion beam exposes the thin PMMA imaging layer that is transferred directly to the germanium layer using reactive ion etching (RIE). The underlying resist is etched first in oxygen at high pressure

G. M. Atkinson; R. L. Kubena; L. E. Larson; L. D. Nguyen; F. P. Stratton; L. M. Jelloian; M. V. Le; H. McNulty

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Spray-Mediated Enthalpy Flux to the Atmosphere and Salt Flux to the Ocean in High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts for the intensity and intensity changes of tropical cyclones have not improved as much as track forecasts. In high winds, two routes exist by which air and sea exchange heat and momentum: by spray-mediated processes and by interfacial ...

Edgar L. Andreas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Preliminary Notice of Violation - High Flux Isotope Reactor, November 18, 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 18, 2003 Dr. Jeffrey Wadsworth [ ] UT-Battelle P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6255 EA 2003-10 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $151,250 Dear Dr. Wadsworth: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as

187

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

SciTech Connect

We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN'S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN'S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN'S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN'S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN'S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN'S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN'S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN'S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN'S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN'S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN'S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN'S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN'S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

New high-flux two-stage optical designs for parabolic solar concentrators  

SciTech Connect

We present a new two-stage optical design for parabolic dish concentrators that can realistically attain close to 90% of the thermodynamic limit to concentration with practical, compact designs (e.g., at parabola rim half-angles of around 45[degrees]). For comparison, the parabolic dish-plus-compound parabolic concentrator secondary design, at this rim angle, achieves no more than 50% of the thermodynamic limit. Our new secondary concentrator is tailored to accept edge rays from the parabolic primary, and incurs less than one reflection on average. It necessitates displacing the absorber from the parabola's focal plane, along the concentrator's optic axis, toward the primary reflector, and constructing the secondary between the absorber and the primary. The secondary tailored edge-ray concentrators described here create new possibilities for building compact, extremely high flux solar furnaces and/or commercial parabolic dish systems.

Friedman, R.P.; Gordon, J.M. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer (Israel) Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel)); Ries, H. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

COMSOL Simulations for Steady State Thermal Hydraulics Analyses of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Simulation models for steady state thermal hydraulics analyses of Oak Ridge National Laboratory s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software. A single fuel plate and coolant channel of each type of HFIR fuel element was modeled in three dimensions; coupling to adjacent plates and channels was accounted for by using periodic boundary conditions. The standard k- turbulence model was used in simulating turbulent flow with conjugate heat transfer. The COMSOL models were developed to be fully parameterized to allow assessing impacts of fuel fabrication tolerances and uncertainties related to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design and reactor operating parameters. Heat source input for the simulations was obtained from separate Monte Carlo N Particle calculations for the axially non-contoured LEU fuel designs at the beginning of the reactor cycle. Mesh refinement studies have been performed to calibrate the models against the pressure drop measured across the HFIR core.

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

193

Beam energy tracking system on Optima XEx high energy ion implanter  

SciTech Connect

The Axcelis Optima XEx high energy implanter is an RF linac-based implanter with 12 RF resonators for beam acceleration. Even though each acceleration field is an alternating, sinusoidal RF field, the well known phase-focusing principle produces a beam with a sharp quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum. A magnetic energy filter after the linac further attenuates the low energy continuum in the energy spectrum often associated with RF acceleration. The final beam energy is a function of the phase and amplitude of the 12 resonators in the linac. When tuning a beam, the magnetic energy filter is set to the desired energy, and each linac parameter is tuned to maximize the transmission through the filter. Once a beam is set up, all the parameters are stored in a recipe, which can be easily tuned and has proven to be quite repeatable. The magnetic field setting of the energy filter selects the beam energy from the RF Linac accelerator, and in-situ verification of beam energy in addition to the magnetic energy filter setting has long been desired. An independent energy tracking system was developed for this purpose, using the existing electrostatic beam scanner as a deflector to construct an in-situ electrostatic energy analyzer. This paper will describe the system and performance of the beam energy tracking system.

David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu; Wu Xiangyang; Geary, Cindy; Deluca, James [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Dr, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS  

SciTech Connect

The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

High temperature step-flow growth of gallium phosphide by molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-growth surface morphologies of high-temperature homoepitaxial GaP films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been studied. Smooth, stepped surface morphologies of MBE-grown layers, measured by atomic force microscopy, were found for a wide range of substrate temperatures and P{sub 2}:Ga flux ratios. A MOCVD-based growth study performed under similar conditions to MBE-grown samples shows a nearly identical smooth, step-flow surface morphology, presenting a convergence of growth conditions for the two different methods. The additional understanding of GaP epitaxy gained from this study will impact its use in applications that include GaP-based device technologies, III-V metamorphic buffers, and III-V materials integration with silicon.

Ratcliff, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Grassman, T. J.; Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carlin, J. A. [Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

High resolution and high density ion beam lithography employing HSQ resist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early stages of focused ion beam (FIB) development, ion beam lithography (IBL) employing organic resists showed potential advantages over electron beam lithography (EBL) (most notably less proximity effects and higher sensitivity [1,2]). However, ... Keywords: FIB, HSQ, IBL, LMIS, Nano patterning, Resist

L. Bruchhaus; S. Bauerdick; L. Peto; U. Barth; A. Rudzinski; J. Mussmann; J. Klingfus; J. Gierak; H. H÷Vel

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

HIGH-INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE LONGITUDINAL MOTION OF STORED PARTICLE BEAMS  

SciTech Connect

A brief review is given of the various self-field phenomena associated with the longitudinal motion of particles in storage rings. Although there are some high-intensity phenomena for which the coupling of longitudinal and transverse motion is essential, such as, for example, the headtail effect; the great majority of high-intensity phenomena primarily involve either longitudinal or transverse degrees of freedom. In this review, we restrict our attention to phenomena which are essentially longitudinal in nature. It is convenient to consider separately the behavior of unbunched (coasting) and bunched (external RF system in operation) beams. Detailed experimental information on coasting beams has been obtained on the ISR, on the (old) CERN electron model CESAR, and on electron ring accelerators. All high-energy electron storage rings have bunched beams and, of course, so do synchrotrons, so that there are a large number of sources of experimental information about the longitudinal motion of bunched beams.

Sessler, Andrew M.

1973-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Bulk Turbulent AirľSea Flux Algorithm for High-Wind, Spray Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible and latent heat can cross the airľsea interface by two routes: as interfacial fluxes controlled by molecular processes right at the interface, and as spray fluxes from the surface of sea spray droplets. Once the 10-m wind speed over the ...

Edgar L. Andreas; P. Ola G. Persson; Jeffrey E. Hare

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events.

Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SELECTED STUDIES OF PAST OPERATIONS AT THE ORNL HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are being reviewed and include determining whether HFIR fuel can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) and determining whether HFIR beryllium reflectors are discharged as transuranic (TRU) waste. The LEU conversion and TRU waste studies are being performed in accordance with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and the Integrated Facility Disposition Project, respectively. While assessing data/analysis needs for LEU conversion such as the fuel cycle length and power needed to maintain the current level of reactor performance, a reduction of about 8% (~200 MWD) in the end-of-cycle exposure for HFIR fuel was observed over the lifetime of the reactor (43 years). The SCALE 6.0 computational system was used to evaluate discharged beryllium reflectors and it was discovered if the reflectors are procured according to the current HFIR standard, discharged reflectors would not be TRU waste, but the removable reflector (closest to core) would become TRU waste approximately 40 years after discharge. However, beryllium reflectors have been fabricated with a greater uranium content than that stipulated in the standard and these reflectors would be discharged as TRU waste.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding luminosity and redshift to permit estimates of the neutrino flux.

D. Besson; S. Razzaque; J. Adams; P. Harris

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Controlled self-modulation of high energy beams in a plasma  

SciTech Connect

A high energy particle beam propagating in a uniform plasma is subject to the transverse two-stream instability that first transforms the beam into the train of microbunches and then quickly destroys that train by transverse wakefields. By the proper longitudinal inhomogeneity of the plasma density, it is possible to stop the instability action at the stage of microbunches and form the bunch train that can resonantly excite plasma wakefields over a long distance. The latter feature is vital for proton beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration that was recently proposed as a way to bring electrons to TeV energy range in a single plasma section.

Lotov, K. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen targetr constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, cosntruction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

High-order-harmonic generation in gas with a flat-top laser beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present experimental and numerical results on high-order-harmonic generation with a flat-top laser beam. We show that a simple binary tunable phase plate, made of two concentric glass plates, can produce a flat-top profile at the focus of a Gaussian infrared beam. Both experiments and numerical calculations show that there is a scaling law between the harmonic generation efficiency and the increase of the generation volume.

Boutu, W.; Auguste, T.; Binazon, L.; Gobert, O.; Carre, B. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boyko, O.; Valentin, C. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Sola, I.; Constant, E.; Mevel, E. [Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Balcou, Ph. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Merdji, H. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redirecting Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum Yu Deng a,c , Daniel G. Olson a,c , Jilai Zhou a,c , Christopher D. Herring a,b,c , A. Joe Shaw d , Lee R. Lynd a,b,c,n a Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA b Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA d Novogy, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02138, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 August 2012 Received in revised form 6 November 2012 Accepted 16 November 2012 Available online 29 November 2012 Keywords: Clostridium thermocellum Ethanol yield Pyruvate kinase Malate shunt a b s t r a c t In Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium able to rapidly ferment cellulose to ethanol, pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) is absent based on both the genome sequence and enzymatic

210

Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development  

SciTech Connect

Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

Rei, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

HIGH-VACUUM ELECTRON-BEAM FUSION WELDING  

SciTech Connect

A newly developed welding process is described for welding in a high vacuum without introducing contaminating material into the system as a part of the welding operation. (J.E.D.)

Wyman, W.L.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H-beam formation and transport  

SciTech Connect

This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as d. c. discharge- and rf-driven multicusp sources. Penning-type and ECR-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber-. and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed. ionization mechanism, beam formation and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

Keller, Roderich [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-beam high voltage switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

Shimer, Daniel W. (Danville, CA); Lange, Arnold C. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

E-beam high voltage switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Precision Neutrino Oscillation Measurements using Simultaneous High-Power, Low-Energy Project-X Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first phase of the long-baseline neutrino experiment, LBNE10, will use a broadband, high-energy neutrino beam with a 10-kt liquid argon TPC at 1300 km to study neutrino oscillation. In this paper, we describe potential upgrades to LBNE10 that use Project X to produce high-intensity, low-energy neutrino beams. Simultaneous, high-power operation of 8- and 60-GeV beams with a 200-kt water Cerenkov detector would provide sensitivity to nu_mu to nu_e oscillations at the second oscillation maximum. We find that with ten years of data, it would be possible to measure sin2(2theta_13) with precision comparable to that expected from reactor antineutrino disappearance and to measure the value of the CP phase, delta_CP, with an uncertainty of (5-10) degrees. This document is submitted for inclusion in Snowmass 2013.

M. Bishai; M. Diwan; S. Kettell; J. Stewart; R. Tschirhart; B. Viren; L. Whitehead; E. Worcester

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux approx. = 1 x 10/sup 18/ ions s/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ to a fluence of the order of 10/sup 21/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and at temperatures around 800/sup 0/C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480/sup 0/C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10/sup 17/ H/cm/sup 2/. The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs.

Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Design of Phosphor Thermometry System for Transient High Heat Flux Surface Thermometry  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: A transformative calibration methodology is presented for predicting transient surface temperatures in a thermally conducting medium from in-depth, time-varying temperature measurements. The surface temperature is resolved using two experimental runs and a newly devised first-kind Volterra integral equation. The first experimental run involves calibration with known surface temperature while the second run involves resolving the surface temperature of interest through the ill-posed integral equation. This paper presents the concept genesis and numerically demonstrates the concept for feasibility, robustness, stability and accuracy. From this demonstration, we propose to implement surface placed thermographic phosphors in the calibration stage of the inverse method for estimating the required surface temperature. As a preliminary study, we consider transient, constant property, onedimensional heat conduction in a semi-infinite medium. It is mathematically demonstrated that a Volterra integral equation of the first kind is developed for estimating the surface temperature using a calibrated system (host material and sensor). Sensor characterization, explicit sensor positioning and thermophysical properties are implicitly contained in the new calibration integral equation. The calibration integral equation displays only four terms; namely, the measured front surface temperature and corresponding measured in-depth temperature response associated with the calibration run; and, the unknown surface temperature and its measured in-depth temperature response associated with the second run. Preliminary numerical results indicate the merit of the concept. This paper suggests using thermographic phosphors for estimating the surface temperature in the calibration portion of the process owing to their rapid thermal response, good surface thermal contact characteristics and lack of capacitance for assuring minimal delay. Though the present paper describes the theoretical basis for resolving such problems, it is intended for near-term application using the UTK s high-heat flux laser facility which is presently under development

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Frankel, Jay I [ORNL; Beshears, David L [EMCO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design of a 400 kV deep underground, high detector efficiency, high target density, high beam intensity accelerator facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dent solid and gas-jet target stations are under design forenvelopes through the gas-jet target station beam line. Thethrough the gas-jet target station beam line. Between the

Lemut, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Device for providing high-intensity ion or electron beam  

SciTech Connect

A thin film of a low-thermionic-work-function material is maintained on the cathode of a device for producing a high-current, low-pressure gas discharge by means of sputter deposition from an auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode includes a surface with a low-work-function material, such as thorium, uranium, plutonium or one of the rare earth elements, facing the cathode but at a disposition and electrical potential so as to extract ions from the gas discharge and sputter the low-work-function material onto the cathode. By continuously replenishing the cathode film, high thermionic emissions and ion plasmas can be realized and maintained over extended operating periods.

McClanahan, Edwin D. (Richland, WA); Moss, Ronald W. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ultra high-gradient energy loss by a pulsed electron beam in a plasma  

SciTech Connect

The plasma wake-field mechanism can be used to couple energy at a high rate from a bunched electron beam into a plasma wave. We will present results from the Fermilab A0 facility where a beam with an initial energy of 14 MeV passes through the plasma to emerge with a much broader energy spread, spanning from a low of 3 MeV to a high of over 20 MeV. Over the 8 cm length of the 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} plasma, this implies a 140 MeV/m deceleration and 72 MeV/m acceleration gradient.

Nikolai Barov et al.

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Spin rotation of polarized beams in high energy storage ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equations for spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are obtained considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle along with the contributions from spin rotation and birefringence effect in polarized matter of an internal target. % Study of the spin rotation and birefringence effects for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement both the spin-dependent real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude and tensor electric (magnetic) polarizabilities.

V. G. Baryshevsky

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Production of intense highly charged ion beams with SERSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The source SERSE is operational at LNS since June 1998 and many improvements have been carried out in this period. The frequency has been increased from 14.5 GHz to 18 GHz and the use of two frequency heating has given positive results. Metallic ion production has been tested by means of a high temperature oven and the preliminary results are described. Tests of magnetic field scaling and frequency scaling have confirmed the results of previous tests with SC-ECRIS at lower frequency and seems to suggest that the upgrading of the source to higher frequency may be considered.

Gammino, S; Ciavola, G; Castro, M; Chines, F; Marletta, S; Melin, G; Briand, P; Girard, A; Ludwig, P; Seyfert, P; Guillaume, D

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gold charge state distributions in highly ionized, low-density beam plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of Au charge state distributions (CSDs) from low density, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and EBIT-II). X-ray emission from Ni-like to Kr-like Au ions has been recorded from monoenergetic electron beam plasmas having E{sub beam}=2.66, 2.92, 3.53, and 4.54 keV, and the CSDs of the beam plasmas have been inferred by fitting the collisionally excited line transitions and radiative recombination emission features with synthetic spectra. We have modeled the beam plasmas using a collisional-radiative code with various treatments of the atomic structure for the complex M- and N-shell ions and find that only models with extensive doubly excited states can properly account for the dielectronic recombination (DR) channels that control the CSDs. This finding would be unremarkable for plasmas with thermal electron distributions, where many such states are sampled, and the importance of DR is well established. But in an EBIT source, the beam is resonant with only a subset of such states having spectator electrons in orbitals with high principal quantum number n (8{<=}n{<=}20). The inclusion of such states in the model was also necessary to obtain agreement with observed stabilizing transitions in the x-ray spectra.

May, M. J.; Scofield, J.; Schneider, M.; Wong, K.; Beiersdorfer, P. [PO Box 808 L260, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94551 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, ICF Target Design, Albuquerque New Mexico, 87185-1186 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Influence of V/III growth flux ratio on trap states in m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) were utilized to investigate the behavior of deep states in m-plane, n-type GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) as a function of systematically varied V/III growth flux ratios. Levels were detected at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV, E{sub C} - 0.21 eV, E{sub C} - 0.26 eV, E{sub C} - 0.62 eV, E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, E{sub C} - 2.65 eV, and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV, with the concentrations of several traps exhibiting systematic dependencies on V/III ratio. The DLTS spectra are dominated by traps at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV and E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, whose concentrations decreased monotonically with increasing V/III ratio and decreasing oxygen impurity concentration, and by a trap at E{sub C} - 0.21 eV that revealed no dependence of its concentration on growth conditions, suggestive of different physical origins. Higher concentrations of deeper trap states detected by DLOS with activation energies of E{sub C} - 2.65 eV and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV in each sample did not display measureable sensitivity to the intentionally varied V/III ratio, necessitating further study on reducing these deep traps through growth optimization for maximizing material quality of NH{sub 3}-MBE grown m-plane GaN.

Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Hurni, C. A.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High resolution e-beam lithography using a thin titanium layer to promote resist adhesion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes improvements in high resolution large area e-beam lithography when a thin titanium layer is applied to substrates prior to the application of resist. The technique is particularly useful when there is a requirement to pattern long ... Keywords: Lithography, Resist adhesi

D. S. Macintyre; I. Young; A. Glidle; X. Cao; J. M. R. Weaver; S. Thoms

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications  

SciTech Connect

The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

Mikhail A. Dorf, Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev and Ronald C. Davidson

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment.

Hoeberling, Robert F. (502 Hamlin Ct., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a new Berkeley Lab accelerator March 19, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. Gallery: Interior views of a plasma-source module. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Interior views of a plasma-source module. Technician aligns plasma source with NDCX-II accelerator in background. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Technician aligns plasma source with NDCX-II accelerator in background. Plainsboro, New Jersey - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's

239

A Six-Beam-Switched Array Antenna for 5.2 GHz High-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-beam-switched array antenna with a flat profile was designed for the application of high-speed wireless local-area networks in the range of 5ľ6 GHz. This six-beam-switched array antenna is composed of an analog beamformer and a microstrip-slot ... Keywords: beamformer, single-pole double-throw switch, slot antenna, switched-beam antenna

Sheng-Fuh Chang; Jia-Liang Chen; Chin-San Lin; Jing-Jang Luo

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Study of second harmonic generation by high power laser beam in magneto plasma  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the problem of nonlinear generation of second harmonic of a high power laser pulse propagating in magnetized plasma. The propagation of strong laser beam is proposed in the direction perpendicular to a relatively weak static magnetic field. The laser pulse is taken to be linearly polarized, with the orientation of its electric field that corresponds to an ordinary electromagnetic wave. Besides the standard ponderomotive nonlinearity, the appropriate wave equation also contains the nonlinearity that arises from the relativistic electron jitter velocities. During its propagation, the laser beam gets filamented on account of relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities present in the plasma. The generated plasma wave gets coupled into the filamentary structures of the pump beam. Due to the expected presence of the beam filamentation, the work has been carried out by considering modified paraxial approximation (i.e., beyond the standard paraxial approximation of a very broad beam). It is found that the power of the plasma wave is significantly affected by the magnetic field strength in the presence of both relativistic and pondermotive nonlinearities. It is investigated that the second harmonic generation is also considerably modified by altering the strength of magnetic field. To see the effect of static magnetic field on the harmonic generation, a key parameter, i.e., the ratio of the cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=eB{sub 0}/mc over the laser frequency {omega}{sub 0} has been used, where c is the velocity of light, m and e are the mass and charge of the electron and B{sub 0} is the externally applied magnetic field.

Sharma, Prerana [Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh 465010 (India); Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on simulations of CO2 concentrations, the model could be used for other atmospheric compounds with known estimated emissions.

Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Class Of Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Solutions And Associated Envelope Equations For High-intensity Charged Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect

A class of generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solutions of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations and the associated envelope equations for high-intensity beams in a periodic lattice is derived. It includes the classical Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solution as a special case. For a given lattice, the distribution functions and the envelope equations are specified by eight free parameters. The class of solutions derived captures a wider range of dynamical envelope behavior for high-intensity beams, and thus provides a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams.

Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Beam Dynamics in the SNS Linac," Nuclear Instruments andto study beam dynamics in the SNS linac, the J-PARC linac

Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR (abstract)[sup a  

SciTech Connect

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Influence of Intense Beam in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of an intense beam in a high-pressure gas filled RF cavity has been measured by using a 400 MeV proton beam in the Mucool Test Area at Fermilab. The ionization process generates dense plasma in the cavity and the resultant power loss to the plasma is determined by measuring the cavity voltage on a sampling oscilloscope. The energy loss has been observed with various peak RF field gradients (E), gas pressures (p), and beam intensities in nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Observed RF energy dissipation in single electron (dw) in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases was 2 10{sup -17} and 3 10{sup -17} Joules/RF cycle at E/p = 8 V/cm/Torr, respectively. More detailed dw measurement have been done in H{sub 2} gas at three different gas pressures. There is a clear discrepancy between the observed dw and analytical one. The discrepancy may be due to the gas density effect that has already been observed in various experiments.

Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Collura, M.G.; Jana, M.R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; /Fermilab; Johnson, R.P.; Franagan, G.; /Muons, Inc. /IIT

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Energy confinement experiments on Doublet III with high power neutral beam heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy confinement experiments with up to 8 MW of both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beam power were performed in deuterium plasmas with limiter and expanded boundary divertor configurations. The results of NBI-dominated experiments indicated that total stored energy W/sub T/ and energy confinement time tau/sub E/ had little or no variation with electron density anti n/sub e/ and toroidal field B/sub T/ and scaled linearly with plasma current I/sub p/. Previous studies in limiter discharges indicated a weak dependence on plasma elongation kappa. The confinement time dependence on elongation was not determined for divertor discharges, but assuming a dependence similar to that for limiter discharges both limiter and divertor data were consistent with W/sub T/ and tau/sub E/ proportional to I/sub p/..sqrt..kappa. The variation of plasma stored energy with neutral beam power was consistent with a linear relationship. The linear equation describing this relationship had a non-zero intercept which illustrated the fact that energy confinement time deteriorated with neutral beam power. The energy confinement time appears to be approaching an asymptotic value at high power, consistent with a linear functional form for stored energy. However, a power law functional form for stored energy and energy confinement time can not be ruled out.

DeBoo, J.C.; Groebner, R.J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams  

SciTech Connect

The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; /SLAC; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Envelope Equation for High-intensity Beams in a Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice  

SciTech Connect

In an uncoupled lattice, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution function first analyzed in 1959 is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high- intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized here to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder invariant for coupled transverse dynamics. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space, determined by the generalized matrix envelope equation.

Hong Qin, Moses Chung, and Ronald C. Davidson

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

First experiment on fission transients in highly fissile spherical nuclei produced by fragmentation of radioactive beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a novel experimental approach for studying the dissipative spreading of collective motion in a meta-stable nuclear system, using, for the first time, highly fissile nuclei with spherical shape. This was achieved by fragmentation of 45 radioactive heavy-ion beams at GSI, Darmstadt. The use of inverse kinematics and a dedicated experimental set-up allowed for the identification in atomic number of both fission fragments. From the width of their charge distributions, a transient time of (3.3 +/- 0.7) 10-21 s is deduced for initially spherical nuclei.

C. Schmitt; P. N. Nadtochy; A. Heinz; B. Jurado; A. Kelic; K. -H. Schmidt

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

High Temperature Superconducting Magnets for Efficient Low Energy Beam Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern ion accelerators and ion implantation systems need very short, highly versatile, Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) systems. The need for reliable and continuous operation requires LEBT designs to be simple and robust. The energy efficiency of available high temperature superconductors (HTS), with efficient and simple cryocooler refrigeration, is an additional attraction. Innovative, compact LEBT systems based on solenoids designed and built with high-temperature superconductor will be developed using computer models and prototyped. The parameters will be chosen to make this type of LEBT useful in a variety of ion accelerators, ion implantation systems, cancer therapy synchrotrons, and research accelerators, including the ORNL SNS. The benefits of solenoids made with HTS will be evaluated with analytical and numerical calculations for a two-solenoid configuration, as will be used in the SNS prototype LEBT that will replace the electrostatic one at SNS, and a single solenoid configuration, as was proposed...

Popovic, M; Johnson, R P; Nipper, J H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Inagaki, Makoto [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

A high order kinetic flux-vector splitting method for the reduced five-equation model of compressible two-fluid flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a high order kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) scheme for the numerical solution of a conservative interface-capturing five-equation model of compressible two-fluid flows. This model was initially introduced by Wackers and Koren (2004) ... Keywords: 35L45, 35L65, 35L67, 65M99, 65Y99, 76T99, Central schemes, Conservation laws, Five-equation model, Hyperbolic systems, Kinetic flux-vector splitting schemes, Shock solutions

Shamsul Qamar; Munshoor Ahmed

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The effect of high-energy electron-beam irradiation on microstructural modification of a high-speed steel roll  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to investigate the microstructural modification in a high-speed steel (HSS) roll irradiated with an accelerated high-energy electron beam. The HSS roll samples were irradiated at the beam travel speeds of 2.5 to 25 mm/s using an electron accelerator (1.4 MeV). The microstructure was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) capable of in situ fracture testing and simultaneous measurement of the apparent fracture toughness. Irradiation changed the matrix phase from tempered martensite to a mixture of retained austenite and martensite. Coarse primary carbides were partially or completely dissolved, depending on the heat input. Irradiation greatly improved the fracture properties because of the presence of retained austenite, which could retard crack propagation, although hardness was decreased. Occasional interior quench cracks were found in the heat-affected region. Appropriate processing methods, such as pre- or postirradiation, were suggested. A heat transfer analysis of the irradiated surface layer was also carried out to elucidate the influence of the irradiation parameters on the microstructure.

Suh, D.; Lee, S.; Koo, Y. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.C. [Kangwon Industries, Ltd., Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Roll Technology Dept.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Constraints on the Extremely-high Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux with the IceCube 2008-2009 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for extremely-high energy neutrinos with energies greater than $10^6$ GeV using the data taken with the IceCube detector at the South Pole. The data was collected between April 2008 and May 2009 with the half completed IceCube array. The absence of signal candidate events in the sample of 333.5 days of livetime significantly improves model independent limit from previous searches and allows to place a limit on the diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos with an $E^{-2}$ spectrum in the energy range $2.0 \\times 10^{6}$ $-$ $6.3 \\times 10^{9}$ GeV to a level of $E^2 \\phi \\leq 3.6 \\times 10^{-8}$ ${\\rm GeV cm^{-2} sec^{-1}sr^{-1}}$.

IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. B÷ser; O. Botner; J. Braun; A. M. Brown; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demir÷rs; T. Denger; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. DÝaz-VÚlez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegňrd; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. GlŘsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Gro▀; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. HŘl▀; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. K÷hne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. K÷pke; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; J. LŘnemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. MÚszßros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nie▀en; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. PÚrez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; T. Schmidt; A. Sch÷nwald; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. St÷ssl; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; M. StŘr; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

High beta studies on ISX-B with neutral beam injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Injection of H/sup 0/ into D/sup +/ plasmas with beam power P/sub b/ of up to 1.7 MW has produced rms betas of approx. 4%, volume-averaged betas of approx. 3%, and central betas of approx. 10% in the ISX-B tokamak. Although theoretical calculations indicate that the observed equilibria may be unstable to ballooning modes, no catastrophic loss of confinement has been observed, and beta continues to increase with injection power. In these beam-dominated high-beta discharges the electron and ion energy confinement times are still similar to those obtained with ohmic heating: ion energy confinement is neoclassical within a factor of approx. 2, and electron energy confinement follows the usual Alcator scaling. In high-power injection discharges the character of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior changes, the particle confinement time decreases, and the inward impurity transport appears to be inhibited. These effects, however, may not be linked directly to beta.

Sheffield, J.; Bates, S.C.; Bush, C.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions  

SciTech Connect

The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

Knapp, D.

1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management OBJECTIVE MG-1: Line management has established programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit awareness of public and worker safety, health, and environmental protection requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 2) Criteria * Line management has integrated programs within its existing ISMS and implementing mechanisms that appropriately address the major changes implemented during this outage, notably the CS, in order to continue to assure safe accomplishment of work. * Senior management and RRD management exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation, with emphasis on the

266

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) OBJECTIVE QA-1: The RRD QA program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, and sufficient numbers of qualified QA personnel are provided to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation. The QA functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. QA personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of QA personnel related to reactor

267

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Engineering personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and with CS operations and hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment

268

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (EW) OBJECTIVE EW-1: UT-Battelle line management has established environmental protection and waste management programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work (or is adequately applying an existing, approved program). Personnel exhibit an awareness of environmental protection and waste management requirements, and through their actions, they demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirements 1 and 14) Criteria * All environment compliance and waste management matrix support functions are identified for HFIR's operations. * Appropriate environmental protection/waste management plans and procedures for HFIR have been issued. * Adequate staffing is available to support the environmental protection and

269

PREPARING THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR FOR CONVERSION TO LOW ENRICHED URANIUM FUEL ? EXTENDING CYCLE BURNUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor performance studies have been completed for conceptual plate designs and show that maintaining reactor performance while converting HFIR from high enriched to low enriched uranium (20 wt % 235U) fuel requires extending the end-of-life burnup value for HFIR fuel from the current nominal value of 2200 MWD to 2600 MWD. The current fuel fabrication procedure is discussed and changes that would be required to this procedure are identified. Design and safety related analyses that are required for the certification of a new fuel are identified. Qualification tests and comments regarding the regulatory approval process are provided along with a conceptual schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Stark spectroscopy of a probe lithium beam excited with two dye lasers as a technique to study a high-power ion-beam diode  

SciTech Connect

A non-disturbing measurement of electric field distributions is a subject of special interest in plasma physics and high-voltage devices. In this paper we describe a diagnostic technique for remote sensing of electric fields via injection of a probe beam of lithium atoms and cascade excitation of resonance fluorescence with two broadband dye lasers. The fluorescence spectrum was recorded using a monochromator equipped with an optical multi-channel analyser. The magnitude of the local electric field was retrieved from the Stark-shifted components of the 3d-2plithium spectral line. The technique was applied to measurements of the electric field in the applied-B-field high-voltage diode of the 1 TW KALIF ion-beam accelerator.

Knyazev, B. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); An, W.; Bluhm, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) OBJECTIVE IS&H-1: The RRD industrial safety and hygiene (IS&H) program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified IS&H staff and management are provided, and adequate IS&H facilities and equipment are available to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation with the CS. The IS&H functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. IS&H staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-

272

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS OPERATIONS OBJECTIVE OP-1: Operations staff and management exhibit awareness of applicable requirements pertaining to CS operation, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of reactor operations and CS system operations managers and staff related to CS operations, hazards, and reactor operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS is adequate based on interviews. Sufficient numbers of qualified reactor operations and CS system operations staff and management are available to conduct and support safe operations with the hydrogen-moderated CS. (CR - 1, CR - 4, CR - 6) Criteria * Minimum staffing requirements have been established for operations and support

273

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Occupational Safety & Health OBJECTIVE ESH-1: Personnel exhibit an awareness of public and worker safety and health requirements and, through their actions, demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Should also be coordinated with OP-1, MT-1, AB-2, EP-1, and ES-2) (CR-1) Criteria Personnel understand their right and responsibility to identify safety issues and invoke work suspension and stop work authority when necessary. Personnel anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and appropriately respond to hazards that may be present in the work place. Approach Record Review: Review the site policies and procedures which promote the identification and promulgation of safety concerns and work suspension and stop work

274

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High-speed Imaging of the Electron-beam Based Additive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the Arcam electron beam melting (EBM) technology to additively manufactureá...

278

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO{sub 2} emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of about 100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Kevin R. Gurney; Daniel L. Mendoza; Yuyu Zhou; Marc L. Fischer; Chris C. Miller; Sarath Geethakumar; Stephane de la Rue du Can [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences/Department of Agronomy

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventional linacs. Improvements have been made to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac in order to produce and characterize high-brightness beams. Specifically, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL in support of fourth-generation light source research. The enhancements to the linac technical and diagnostic capabilities that allowed for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm are described. Recent results, includi...

Travish, G; Borland, M; Hahne, M; Harkay, K C; Lewellen, J W; Lumpkin, Alex H; Milton, S V; Sereno, N S

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of the OSO-6 high-energy neutron detector and correlation of measured solar neutron fluxes to solar flares  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. The development of a directional high energy (20 to 160 MeV) neutron detector which was flown to satellite altitudes (500 km; circular equatorial orbit) in the NASA Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-6) in August 1969 is described. Both the angle of incidence and the energy of the neutron are determined by a proton-recoil telescope (Pilot B scintillation plastic) which provides the source for proton-recoils and defines the dE/dX versus E method for particle identification and energy determination. The telescope is embedded in a scintillation plastic guard counter envelope which eliminates the unwanted charged particle background as well as recoil protons (electrons) whose energies and direction do not satisfy neutron (gamma-ray) detection requirements, respectively. Results from a Monte Carlo calculation indicate that the overall average efficiency within an average angular acceptance of about 29 deg (FWHM) is approximately (2.25 plus or minus 0.113) x 10/sup -4/. The inflight calibration procedure, the main frame data bit error analysis, and the method for determining the orientation of the detector axis in the spacecraft spin plane are described. Results indicate a discrepancy in the measured (0.461 x 10/sup -2/ plus or minus 0.254 x 10/sup -2/ n/cm/sup 2/sec) and theoretical (2 to 70 n/cm/ sup 2/sec) neutron flux es which suggests a lack of basic underatanding of mechanisms leading to high energy neutron production at the sun. (auth)

Young, F.

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The use of PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) in the management of safety issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988, a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 138% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by wind initiators. The PRA has provided a basis for the management of a wide range of safety and operation issues at the HFIR. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Flanagan, G.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams. In one embodiment, the micro-cone target includes a substantially cone-shaped body including an outer surface, an inner surface, a generally flat and round, open-ended base, and a tip defining an apex. The cone-shaped body tapers along its length from the generally flat and round, open-ended base to the tip defining the apex. In addition, the outer surface and the inner surface connect the base to the tip, and the tip curves inwardly to define an outer surface that is concave, which is bounded by a rim formed at a juncture where the outer surface meets the tip.

Le Galloudec, Nathalie

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

VHF Free-Free Beam High-Q Micromechanical Resonators Kun Wang, Yinglei Yu, Ark-Chew Wong, and Clark T.-C. Nguyen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VHF Free-Free Beam High-Q Micromechanical Resonators Kun Wang, Yinglei Yu, Ark-Chew Wong, and Clark Science University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 ABSTRACT Free-free beam, flexural and their associated losses are virtually eliminated from the design. Using this approach, free-free beam ┬Ámechanical

Nguyen, Clark T.-C.

288

Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Conservative Transport Schemes for Spherical Geodesic Grids: High-Order Flux Operators for ODE-Based Time Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher-order finite-volume flux operators for transport algorithms used within RungeľKutta time integration schemes on irregular Voronoi (hexagonal) meshes are proposed and tested. These operators are generalizations of third- and fourth-order ...

William C. Skamarock; Almut Gassmann

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

HEXOSŚHumidity Exchange Over the Sea A Program for Research on Water-Vapor and Droplet Fluxes from Sea of Air at Moderate to High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEXOS is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray-droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field at moderate-to-high wind speeds, wind-tunnel studies, instrument development, boundary-layer ...

Kristina B. Katsaros; Stuart D. Smith; Wiebe A. Oost

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Relative Humidity Effect on the High-Frequency Attenuation of Water Vapor Flux Measured by a Closed-Path Eddy Covariance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the high-frequency loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) fluxes, measured by a closed-path eddy covariance system, were studied, and the related correction factors through the cospectral transfer function method were ...

Ivan Mammarella; Samuli Launiainen; Tiia Gronholm; Petri Keronen; Jukka Pumpanen; ▄llar Rannik; Timo Vesala

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Multiphysics Simulations of the Complex 3D Geometry of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel Elements Using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research and development project is ongoing to convert the currently operating High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from highly-enriched Uranium (HEU U3O8) fuel to low-enriched Uranium (LEU U-10Mo) fuel. Because LEU HFIR-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL is chosen to provide the needed multiphysics simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and calculations, and predict the performance of the LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. The focus of this paper is on the unique issues associated with COMSOL modeling of the 3D geometry, meshing, and solution of the HFIR fuel plate and assembled fuel elements. Two parallel paths of 3D model development are underway. The first path follows the traditional route through examination of all flow and heat transfer details using the Low-Reynolds number k-e turbulence model provided by COMSOL v4.2. The second path simplifies the fluid channel modeling by taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge provided by decades of design and safety analyses, data from experiments and tests, and HFIR operation. By simplifying the fluid channel, a significant level of complexity and computer resource requirements are reduced, while also expanding the level and type of analysis that can be performed with COMSOL. Comparison and confirmation of validity of the first (detailed) and second (simplified) 3D modeling paths with each other, and with available data, will enable an expanded level of analysis. The detailed model will be used to analyze hot-spots and other micro fuel behavior events. The simplified model will be used to analyze events such as routine heat-up and expansion of the entire fuel element, and flow blockage. Preliminary, coarse-mesh model results of the detailed individual fuel plate are presented. Examples of the solution for an entire fuel element consisting of multiple individual fuel plates produced by the simplified model are also presented.

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector  

SciTech Connect

Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

High Quality Single Shot Diffraction Patterns Using Ultrashort Megaelectron Volt Electron Beams from a Radio Frequency Photoinjector  

SciTech Connect

Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250 fs long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the RF photoinjector off a 100 nm thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction

P. Musumeci, J. T. Moody, C. M. Scoby, M. S. Gutierrez, H. A. Bender, N. S. Wilcox

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

High-efficiency Resonant rf Spin Rotator with Broad Phase Space Acceptance for Pulsed Polarized Cold Neutron Beams  

SciTech Connect

High precision fundamental neutron physics experiments have been proposed for the intense pulsed spallation neutron beams at JSNS, LANSCE, and SNS to test the standard model and search for new physics. Certain systematic effects in some of these experiments have to be controlled at the few ppb level. The NPD Gamma experiment, a search for the small parity-violating {gamma}-ray asymmetry A{sub Y} in polarized cold neutron capture on parahydrogen, is one example. For the NPD Gamma experiment we developed a radio-frequency resonant spin rotator to reverse the neutron polarization in a 9.5 cm x 9.5 cm pulsed cold neutron beam with high efficiency over a broad cold neutron energy range. The effect of the spin reversal by the rotator on the neutron beam phase space is compared qualitatively to rf neutron spin flippers based on adiabatic fast passage. We discuss the design of the spin rotator and describe two types of transmission-based neutron spin-flip efficiency measurements where the neutron beam was both polarized and analyzed by optically polarized {sup 3}He neutron spin filters. The efficiency of the spin rotator was measured at LANSCE to be 98.8 {+-} 0.5% for neutron energies from 3 to 20 meV over the full phase space of the beam. Systematic effects that the rf spin rotator introduces to the NPD Gamma experiment are considered.

Seo, P. -N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Barron-Palos, L. [Arizona State University; Bowman, J. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chupp, T. E. [University of Michigan; Crawford, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabaghyan, M. [University of New Hampshire; Dawkins, M. [Indiana University; Freedman, S. J. [University of California; Gentile, T. R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Gericke, M. T. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Gillis, R. C. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Greene, G. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hersman, F. W. [University of New Hampshire; Jones, G. L. [Hamilton College, New York; Kandes, M. [University of Michigan; Lamoreaux, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lauss, B. [University of California, Berkeley; Leuschner, M. B. [Indiana University; Mahurin, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mason, M. [University of New Hampshire; Mei, J. [Indiana University; Mitchell, G. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nann, H. [Indiana University; Page, S. A. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Penttila, S. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ramsay, W. D. [University of Manitoba & TRIUMF, Canada; Salas Bacci, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Santra, S. [Indiana University; Sharma, M. [University of Michigan; Smith, T. B. [University of Dayton, Ohio; Snow, W. [Indiana University; Wilburn, W. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhu, H. [University of New Hampshire

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DENSE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED MONITORING OF CTA 102 DURING HIGH STATE IN 2012 WITH OISTER: DETECTION OF INTRA-NIGHT ''ORPHAN POLARIZED FLUX FLARE''  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CTA 102, classified as a flat spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.037, produced an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2012 September. Following the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of enhanced {gamma}-ray activity, we closely monitored this source in the optical and near-infrared bands for the 10 subsequent nights using 12 telescopes in Japan and South Africa. On MJD 56197 (2012 September 27, four to five days after the peak of bright {gamma}-ray flare), polarized flux showed a transient increase, while total flux and polarization angle (PA) remained almost constant during the ''orphan polarized-flux flare.'' We also detected an intra-night and prominent flare on MJD 56202. The total and polarized fluxes showed quite similar temporal variations, but the PA again remained constant during the flare. Interestingly, the PAs during the two flares were significantly different from the jet direction. The emergence of a new emission component with a high polarization degree (PD) up to 40% would be responsible for the observed two flares, and such a high PD indicates the presence of a highly ordered magnetic field at the emission site. We argue that the well-ordered magnetic field and even the observed directions of the PA, which is grossly perpendicular to the jet, are reasonably accounted for by transverse shock(s) propagating down the jet.

Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Abe, Yuhei [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Arai, Akira [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Hayashi, Masahiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-2, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hori, Takafumi; Nakata, Chikako [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Isogai, Mizuki [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto-City 603-8555 (Japan); Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Honjo 3037-5, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Miyanoshita, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nakamoto, Jumpei [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Oasa, Yumiko, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Education, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

Primm, R.T., III

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1991-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor. 4 figs.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

302

Analytic fluid theory of beam spiraling in high-intensity cyclotrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a two-dimensional fluid description, we investigate the nonlinear radial-longitudinal dynamics of intense beams in isochronous cyclotrons in the nonrelativistic limit. With a multiscale analysis separating the time ...

Cerfon, A. J.

303

Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B. Grant

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

Henestroza, Enrique

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ultra-high precision scanning beam interference lithography and its application : spatial frequency multiplication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning beam interference lithography (SBIL) is a technique developed at MIT in 2003. The SBIL system, referred to as the Nanoruler, could fabricate grating patterns with around ten-nanometer phase repeatability. There ...

Zhao, Yong, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Experience with high-energy electron beam therapy at the University of Chicago  

SciTech Connect

Current utilization of the linear accelerator as well as 5-year cumulative experience in radiotherapy is presented. Cutaneous lymphomas and mammary gland carcinomas were the prime experience region; however, cancers at other locations were treated with mixed-beam therapy; employing fast neutrons and photon beams. The technique appears promising for abdominal tumors and deep-seated malignancies. Carcinoma of the pancreas responds favorably to this technique. (PCS)

Griem, M L; Kuchnir, F T; Lanzl, L H; Skaggs, L S; Sutton, H G; Tokars, R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the bounds of known technology and are adaptable to the high-volume production required to process {approx} 2.5 to 4 tons of U/Mo and produce {approx}16,000 flat plates for U.S. reactors annually ({approx}10,000 of which are needed for HFIR operations). The reference flow sheet is not intended to necessarily represent the best or the most economical way to manufacture a LEU foil fuel for HFIR but simply represents a 'snapshot' in time of technology and is intended to identify the process steps that will likely be required to manufacture a foil fuel. Changes in some of the process steps selected for the reference flow sheet are inevitable; however, no one step or series of steps dominates the overall flow sheet requirements. A result of conceptualizing a reference flow sheet was the identification of the greater number of steps required for a foil process when compared to the dispersion fuel process. Additionally, in most of the foil processing steps, bare uranium must be handled, increasing the complexity of these processing areas relative to current operations. Based on a likely total cost of a few hundred million dollars for a new facility, it is apparent that line item funding will be necessary and could take as much as 8 to 10 years to complete. The infrastructure cost could exceed $100M.

Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam  

SciTech Connect

The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Annealing effects in hydrogenated silicon nitride films during high energy ion beam irradiation  

SciTech Connect

The annealing effects during energy recoil detection (ERD) analysis on the structure of hydrogenated silicon nitride film have been investigated by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Hydrogenated silicon nitride films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with various substrate temperatures. A 2.5 MeV {sup 4}He{sup ++} ion beam was irradiated onto the film in a vacuum chamber at room temperature. The ERD signal was measured after various ion doses in order to determine the loss of hydrogen counts induced by the ion beam. The IR absorption spectrum was obtained in order to follow the film structural change which occurred due to the ion beam. The films deposited at 200 and 300 C show a significant decrease in the ERD count with increasing ion beam dose, while the film deposited at 400 C, shows no significant changes. The IR absorption peak position for Si-N stretching (830 cm{sup {minus}1}) shifted to smaller wave numbers after ion beam irradiation, while the Si-H stretching (2,160 cm{sup {minus}1}) shifted to the opposite direction. The peak position for N-H (3,360 cm{sup {minus}1}) shows no noticeable changes. Normalized peak area for the Si-N stretching increased after ion beam irradiation. The Si-H peak area decreased slightly. The N-H peak area decreased significantly. A recombination mechanism of the N and H radicals with excess Si radical coming from Si-Si bonds in Si-rich silicon nitride films has been suggested to explain the IR absorption spectral changes which have occurred due to ion beam irradiation.

Lee, J.W. [ETRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)]|[KAIST, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.H.; Yoo, H.J. [ETRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jhon, M.S.; Ryoo, R. [KAIST, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Molecular beam epitaxial growth of metamorphic AlInSb/GaInSb high-electron-mobility-transistor structures on GaAs substrates for low power and high frequency applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlInSb/GaInSb metamorphic high-electron-mobility-transistor structures for low power, high frequency applications on 4 in. GaAs substrates. The structures consist of a Ga{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb channel embedded in Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb barrier layers which are grown on top of an insulating metamorphic buffer, which is based on the linear exchange of Ga versus In and a subsequent exchange of As versus Sb. Precise control of group V fluxes and substrate temperature in the Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}As{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} buffer is essential to achieve high quality device structures. Good morphological properties were achieved demonstrated by the appearance of crosshatching and root mean square roughness values of 2.0 nm. Buffer isolation is found to be >100 k{Omega}/{open_square} for optimized growth conditions. Hall measurements at room temperature reveal electron densities of 2.8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} in the channel at mobility values of 21.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for single-sided Te volume doping and 5.4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and 17.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for double-sided Te {delta}-doping, respectively.

Loesch, R.; Aidam, R.; Kirste, L.; Leuther, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid-State Physics (IAF), Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Generalized Courant-Snyder Theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution For High-intensity Beams In A Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice  

SciTech Connect

The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in a uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are non-commutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation, and reduces beam pulsation.

Hong QIn, Ronald Davidson

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

NSLS-II Beam Diagnostics Overview  

SciTech Connect

A new 3rd generation light source (NSLS-II) is in the early stages of construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux with exceptional beam stability. It presents several challenges for diagnostics and instrumentation, related to the extremely small emittance. In this paper, we present an overview of all planned instrumentation systems, results from research and development activities; and then focus on other challenging aspects.

Singh,O.; Alforque, R.; Bacha, B.; Blednykh, A.; Cameron, P.; Cheng, W.; Dalesio, L. B.; Della Penna, A. J.; doom, L.; Fliller, R. P.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H-C.; Johnson, E. D.; Kosciuk, b. N.; Kramer, S. L.; Krinsky, S.; Mead, J.; Ozaki, S.; Padrazo, D.; Pinayev, I.; Ravindranath, R. V.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.; Skaritka, J.; Tanabe, T.; Tian, Y.; Willeke, F. J.; Yu, L-H.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

EXTRACTION OF HIGHLY CHARGED AU IONS FROM A MULTIAMPHERE ELECTRON BEAM EBIS AT BNL.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Excellent progress has been made in the operation of the BNL Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), which is a prototype for an EBIS that could meet requirements for a RHIC preinjector. We have achieved very stable operation of the electron beam at 10 A through the EBIS trap. Ion injection of low charge gold ions from a LEVA [1] ion source and subsequent extraction of these ions with most probable charge state AU{sup 34+} has been demonstrated with electron beams up to 8A. The total ion charge for gold measured on current transformer at the EBIS exit was 55nC after a 30ms confinement period. This corresponds to {approx}85% of the theoretical ion trap capacity and exceeds our goal of 50% neutralization. The collected ion charge is proportional to the electron current and the gold charge state scales with the electron current density. Details of the EBIS configuration, total charge measurements, and TOF spectra are given.

BEEBE,E.N.; ALESSI,J.G.; GOULD,O.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; RITTER,J.

2001-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); McCall, Benjamin J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Emittance measurements of high charge state argon beams from a pig source  

SciTech Connect

The emittances of beams of Ar$sup 4+$ to Ar$sup 8+$ were measured in the axial and radial planes. The extraction voltage was 10 kV and the magnetic field was varied from about 0.5 to 0.6 Tesla. The anode slit was varied in distance from the arc, which was run both dc and pulsed. The emittance was nearly independent of charge state, but increased with total beam current. A small bowing of the arc column, which made evaluation of mirror field effects difficult, was discovered. (auth)

Bex, L.; Clark, D.J.; Ellsworth, C.E.; Estrella, R.M.; Gough, R.A.; Holley, W.R.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

Qiang, Ji

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Status Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and...

323

Cross section generation and physics modeling in a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study has been initiated at ORNL to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The current study is limited to steady-state, nominal operation and are focused on the determination of the fuel requirements, primarily density, that are required to maintain the performance of the reactor. Reactor physics analyses are reported for a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. An LEU core design has been obtained and requires an increase in {sup 235}U loading of a factor of 1.9 over the current HEU fuel. These initial results indicate that the conversion from HEU to LEU results in a reduction of the thermal fluxes in the central flux trap region of approximately 9 % and in the outer beryllium reflector region of approximately 15%. Ongoing work is being performed to improve upon this initial design to further minimize the impact of conversion to LEU fuel. (authors)

Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

High-current electron beam generation by a pulsed hollow cathode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the parameters of a hollow-cathode electron source and the generatedelectron beam are presented. A gas puff valve is used to provide a sharp pressure gradient between the cathode cavity and the accelerating gap. To produce the plasma inside the hollow cathode we used a pulse forming network (10 kV

J. Z. Gleizer; A. Krokhmal; Ya. E. Krasik; J. Felsteiner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

Ratner, Daniel; /Stanford U. /SLAC

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

326

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electron beam lithography at 10keV using an epoxy based high resolution negative resist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of a new epoxy based resist (mr-EBL 6000.1 XP) as a negative resist for e-beam lithography is presented. We demonstrate that it is possible to define sub-100nm patterns when irradiating thin (120nm) layers of resist with a 10keV electron ... Keywords: EBL, Nanopatterning, Negative resist, Polymer technology

C. Martin; G. Rius; A. Llobera; A. Voigt; G. Gruetzner; F. PÚrez-Murano

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Assumptions and criteria for performing a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the operating power for the High Flux Isotope Reactor when fuelled with low enriched uranium (LEU). Uncertainties in the fuel fabrication and inspection processes are reviewed for the current fuel cycle [highly enriched uranium (HEU)] and the impact of these uncertainties on the proposed LEU fuel cycle operating power is discussed. These studies indicate that for the power distribution presented in a companion paper in these proceedings, the operating power for an LEU cycle would be close to the current operating power. (authors)

Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6399 (United States); Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Moses, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6050 (United States); Binder, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6162 (United States); Xoubi, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, Rhodes Hall, ML 72, PO Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High intensity uranium beams from the superHILAC and the bevatron: final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two injectors formerly used at the SuperHILAC were a 750-kV air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton (EVE) and a 2.5-MV pressurized HV multiplier (ADAM). The EVE injector can deliver adequate intensities of ions up to mass 40 (argon). The ADAM injector can accelerate ions with lower charge-to-mass ratios, and they can produce beams of heavier ions. The intensity of these beams decreases as the mass number increases, with the lowest practical intensity being achieved with lead beams. Experience with the two existing injectors provided substantial help in defining the general requirements for a new injector which would provide ample beams above mass 40. The requirements for acceptance by the first tank of the SuperHILAC are a particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.0154 (corresponding to an energy of 113 keV/amu) and a charge-to-mass ratio of 0.046 or larger. Present ion source performance dictates an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton as a pre-accelerator because of its easy accessibility and its good overall reliability. The low charge state ions then receive further acceleration and, if necessary, subsequent stripping to the required charge state before injection into the SuperHILAC. A low-beta linac of the Widereoe type has been built to perform this acceleration. The injector system described consists of a Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector, injection beam lines and isotope analysis, a low-velocity linear accelerator, and SuperHILAC control center modifications.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

Bucholz, J.A.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An Energy-Stabilized Varied-Line-Space-Monochromator UndulatorBeam Line for PEEM Illumination and Magnetic Circular Dichroism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new undulator beam line has been built and commissioned at the Advanced Light Source for illumination of the PEEM3 microscope. The beam line delivers high flux beams over an energy range from C1s through the transition metals to include the M edges of the magnetic rare earth elements. We present details of the optical design, and data on the performance of the zero-order tracking of the photon energy.

Warwick, Tony; McKinney, Wayne; Domning, Ed; Doran, Andrew; Padmore, Howard

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Power Beamed Photon Sails: New Capabilities Resulting From Recent Maturation Of Key Solar Sail And High Power Laser Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This paper revisits some content in the First International Symposium on Beamed Energy Propulsion in 2002 related to the concept of propellantless in-space propulsion utilizing an external high energy laser to provide momentum to an ultralightweight (gossamer) spacecraft. The design and construction of the NanoSail-D solar sail demonstration spacecraft has demonstrated in space flight hardware the concept of small, very light--yet capable--spacecraft. The results of the Joint High Power Solid State Laser (JHPSSL) have also increased the effectiveness and reduced the cost of an entry level laser source. This paper identifies the impact from improved system parameters on current mission applications.

Montgomery, Edward E. IV [United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Yelundur, V. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A single diffractive optical element for implementing spectrum-splitting and beam-concentration functions simultaneously with high diffraction efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel method is proposed, and employed to design a single diffractive optical element (DOE) for implementing spectrum-splitting and beam-concentration (SSBC) functions simultaneously. We develop an optimization algorithm, through which the SSBC DOE can be optimized within an arbitrary thickness range, according to the limitations of modern photolithography technology. Theoretical simulation results reveal that the designed SSBC DOE has a high optical focusing efficiency. It is expected that the designed SSBC DOE should have practical applications in high-efficiency solar cell systems.

Ye, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Qing-Li; Dong, Bi-Zhen; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Guo-Zhen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Observation of threshold energy and hysteresis in high current ion beam guiding and transmission through a micro-glass-capillary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy dependent guiding of high current density (0.1-3 A/m{sup 2}) argon ion beams through a micro-glass-capillary is studied. It is observed that ion transmission through the capillary takes place only if its energy is greater than the retarding potential barrier, which depends upon the amount of charge deposited on the capillary inner wall. Foremost evidence of the observation that the transmitted current exhibits hysteresis with ion energy is presented. Particle in cell simulations carried out by solving Poisson's and Newton's force equation self-consistently, agree reasonably well with the experimental results.

Paul, Samit; Jayakiran, A.; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh 208016 (India)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Insights in High-Temperature Superconductivity from the Study of Films and Heterostructures Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesize atomically smooth thin films, multilayers and superlattices of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Such heterostructures enable novel experiments that probe the basicphysics of HTS. For example, we have established that HTS and antiferromagnetic phases separate on ┼ngstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with HTS over an anomalously large length scale ('Giant Proximity Effect'). Here, we briefly review our most recent experiments on such films and superlattices. The new results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations and the discovery of interface HTS.

Bozovic,I.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

High-quality epitaxial CoFe/Si(111) heterostructures fabricated by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate atomically controlled heterojunctions consisting of ferromagnetic CoFe alloys and silicon (Si) using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy with a good atomic matching at the (111) plane. The saturation magnetization of the CoFe layers grown reaches {approx}85% of the value of bulk samples reported so far, and can be systematically controlled by tuning the ratio of Co to Fe, indicating that the silicidation reactions between CoFe and Si are suppressed and the heterojunctions are very high quality. We find that the Schottky barrier height of the high-quality CoFe/Si(111) junctions is unexpectedly low compared to the previous data for other metal/Si ones, implying the reduction in the Fermi-level-pinning effect. We can expand the available high-quality ferromagnet/Si heterostructures in the field of Si-based spintronics.

Maeda, Y.; Yamada, S.; Ando, Y.; Yamane, K.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hamaya, K. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K. [OI Analytical/CMS Field Products, 2148 Pelham Parkway, Bldg. 400, Pelham, Alabama 35124 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

ION BEAM COLLIMATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

1957-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Control of the radiant flux of high-temperature solar-energy installations with respect to two parameters  

SciTech Connect

The simultaneous control of both the power level and energy density level at the center of the focal plane of a high-temperature solar-energy installation with a paraboloid concentrator is considered.

Afyan, V.V.; Vartanyan, A.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

High-resolution data of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion from ODP sites 1063 and 983: Existence of intense flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution data of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion from ODP sites 1063 and 983-resolution records of the 185 kyr Iceland Basin (IB) geomagnetic excursion from Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site reserved. Keywords: Geomagnetic excursions; Iceland Basin excursion; Preferred VGP longitudes; Patches

Niocaill, Conall Mac

353

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electron and laser beam welding  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Laser welding of chandelles to the plates of the sommier employed in the nuclear power plant core; Electron beam welding of hobbing cutters; Sealing welds in electron beam welding of thick metals; Development and application of high power electron beam welding; Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals (niobium, molybdenum, porous tungsten-molybdenum); Status of electron beam welding in the United States of America; and Electron and laser beam welding in Japan.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High-T{sub c} and high-J{sub c} SmFeAs(O,F) films on fluoride substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting thin films of SmFeAs(O,F) were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates. In our process, F-free SmFeAsO films were grown first, and F was subsequently introduced to the films by diffusion from an overlayer of SmF{sub 3}. By this simple process, record high T{sub c}, namely, T{sub c}{sup on} (T{sub c}{sup end}) = 57.8 K (56.4 K) was obtained in a film on CaF{sub 2}. Furthermore, the films on CaF{sub 2} showed high critical current density over 1 MA/cm{sup 2} in the self-field at 5 K. The correlation between superconductivity and epitaxial strain in SmFeAs(O,F) films is discussed.

Ueda, Shinya; Takeda, Soichiro; Takano, Shiro; Naito, Michio [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); TRIP, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akiyasu [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

357

Verification of dosimetric accuracy on the TrueBeam STx: Rounded leaf effect of the high definition MLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system is determined during commissioning and is used to model the effect of the rounded leaf-end of the multileaf collimator (MLC). This parameter attempts to model the physical difference between the radiation and light field and account for inherent leakage between leaf tips. With the increased use of single fraction high dose treatments requiring larger monitor units comes an enhanced concern in the accuracy of leakage calculations, as it accounts for much of the patient dose. This study serves to verify the dosimetric accuracy of the algorithm used to model the rounded leaf effect for the TrueBeam STx, and describes a methodology for determining best-practice parameter values, given the novel capabilities of the linear accelerator such as flattening filter free (FFF) treatments and a high definition MLC (HDMLC). Methods: During commissioning, the nominal MLC position was verified and the DLG parameter was determined using MLC-defined field sizes and moving gap tests, as is common in clinical testing. Treatment plans were created, and the DLG was optimized to achieve less than 1% difference between measured and calculated dose. The DLG value found was tested on treatment plans for all energies (6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV FFF) and modalities (3D conventional, IMRT, conformal arc, VMAT) available on the TrueBeam STx. Results: The DLG parameter found during the initial MLC testing did not match the leaf gap modeling parameter that provided the most accurate dose delivery in clinical treatment plans. Using the physical leaf gap size as the DLG for the HDMLC can lead to 5% differences in measured and calculated doses. Conclusions: Separate optimization of the DLG parameter using end-to-end tests must be performed to ensure dosimetric accuracy in the modeling of the rounded leaf ends for the Eclipse treatment planning system. The difference in leaf gap modeling versus physical leaf gap dimensions is more pronounced in the more recent versions of Eclipse for both the HDMLC and the Millennium MLC. Once properly commissioned and tested using a methodology based on treatment plan verification, Eclipse is able to accurately model radiation dose delivered for SBRT treatments using the TrueBeam STx.

Kielar, Kayla N.; Mok, Ed; Hsu, Annie; Wang Lei; Luxton, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

Muto, Hideshi [Center of General Education, Tokyo University of Science, Suwa, 5000-1 Toyohira, Chino Nagano 391-0292 (Japan); Ohshiro, Yukimitsu [Center for Nuclear Study, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Riken Campus, Wako Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, Katsunori [Van de Graaff Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Oyaizu, Michihiro [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki [Heavy Ion Cancer Therapy Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage Chiba 263-855 (Japan)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

Montag C.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Low-speckle holographic beam shaping of high-coherence EUV sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method to arbitrarily shape and homogenize high-coherence extreme ultraviolet sources using time-varying holographic optical elements and a scanning subsystem to mitigate speckle. In systems with integration times longer than 100 ms, a speckle contrast below 1% can be achieved.

Anderson, Christopher N.; Miyakawa, Ryan H.; Naulleau, Patrick

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Use of a cryogenic sampler to measure radioactive gas concentrations in the main off-gas system at a high-flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for measuring gamma-emitting radioactive gases in air has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This method combines a cryogenic air-sample collector with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy system. This methodology was developed to overcome the inherently difficult collection and detection of radioactive noble gases. The cryogenic air-sampling system and associated HPGe detector has been used to measure the concentration of radioactive gases in the primary coolant main off-gas system at ONRL's High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper provides: (1) a description of the cryogenic sampler, the radionuclide detection technique, and a discussion of the effectiveness of sampling and detection of gamma-emitting noble gases; (2) a brief description of HFIR and its associated closed high off-gas system; and (3) quantification of gamma-emitting gases present in the off-gas of the HFIR primary core coolant (e.g. radioisotopes of argon, xenon, and krypton).

Berven, B.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Kark, J.B.; Gibson, M.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

BNL VERY LONG BASELINE EXPERIMENT WITH A SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM.  

SciTech Connect

An upgrade to the BNL AGS could produce a very intense proton source at a relatively low cost. This proton source could produce a conventional neutrino beam with a very significant flux at large distances from the laboratory. In this paper we examine the possibility of using this neutrino beam for a very long baseline oscillation experiment where a 500 kiloton water Cherenkov detector is situated at the Homestake mine in South Dakota. We study the physics potential of a high intensity neutrino oscillation experiment with a 2540 km baseline and a peak neutrino energy of {approx}1 GeV.

KAHN,S.A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

High-resolution laser and rf spectroscopy of atomic and molecular beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the effort during the past year has been applied to continuing our systematic study of the hyperfine (hfs) and spin-rotation interactions in the calcium monohalide family of radicals. The work is now about 75% complete. The systematic, high-precision measurements will ultimately enable theorists to test the quality of wave functions obtained in ab initio calculations of the structure of these small molecules. Progress is described. (WHK)

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quasi-phase matching and quantum control of high harmonic generation in waveguides using counterpropagating beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All-optical quasi-phase matching (QPM) uses a train of counterpropagating pulses to enhance high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a hollow waveguide. A pump pulse enters one end of the waveguide, and causes HHG in the waveguide. The counterpropagation pulses enter the other end of the waveguide and interact with the pump pulses to cause QPM within the waveguide, enhancing the HHG.

Zhang, Xiaoshi (Superior, CO); Lytle, Amy L. (Boulder, CO); Cohen, Oren (Boulder, CO); Kapteyn, Henry C. (Boulder, CO); Murnane, Margaret M. (Boulder, CO)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coherent terahertz radiation from high-harmonic component of modulated free-electron beam in a tapered two-asymmetric grating structure  

SciTech Connect

Based on the mechanism of incoherent diffraction radiation excited by an electron bunch in a waveguide with periodic structure, this paper presents the concept of coherent terahertz (THz) radiation from the high-harmonic component of a modulated free-electron beam in a tapered two-asymmetric grating structure. The results show that in this mechanism 0.43 THz radiation can be generated with 10 A/cm{sup 2} current density, and the efficiency can reach 0.5%. Because of the low required current density and relative high efficiency, this concept shows the application potential for electron-beam-driven terahertz sources.

Zhang Yaxin; Zhou Yucong; Dong Liang; Liu Shenggang [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 1, Search for new phenomena at colliding-beam facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report contains brief papers and viewgraphs on high energy topics like: supersymmetry; new gauge bosons; and new high energy colliders.

Rogers, J. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

In-beam studies of high-spin states of actinide nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spin states in the actinides have been studied using Coulomb- excitation, inelastic excitation reactions, and one-neutron transfer reactions. Experimental data are presented for states in {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu from a variety of reactions. Energy levels, moments-of-inertia, aligned angular momentum, Routhians, gamma-ray intensities, and cross-sections are presented for most cases. Additional spectroscopic information (magnetic moments, M{sub 1}/E{sub 2} mixing ratios, and g-factors) is presented for {sup 233}U. One- and two-neutron transfer reaction mechanisms and the possibility of band crossings (backbending) are discussed. A discussion of odd-A band fitting and Cranking calculations is presented to aid in the interpretation of rotational energy levels and alignment. In addition, several theoretical calculations of rotational populations for inelastic excitation and neutron transfer are compared to the data. Intratheory comparisons between the Sudden Approximation, Semi-Classical, and Alder-Winther-DeBoer methods are made. In connection with the theory development, the possible signature for the nuclear SQUID effect is discussed. 98 refs., 61 figs., 21 tabs.

Stoyer, M.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div. California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1990-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Withdrawal of Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (11/30/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

904 904 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 30, 1999 / Notices Anyone who wishes to comment, provide technical information or data may do so in writing, either in lieu of, or in addition to, making an oral presentation. Documents will be accepted at the meeting or may be sent to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Washington, DC, office. The Board reserves its right to further schedule and otherwise regulate the course of the meeting, to recess, reconvene, postpone or adjourn the meeting, conduct further reviews, and otherwise exercise its power under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Dated: November 26, 1999. A.J. Eggenberger, Vice-Chairman. [FR Doc. 99-31182 Filed 11-26-99; 11:20 am] BILLING CODE 3670-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Submission for OMB Review;

377

High flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [2] University of Utah. [3] ORNL. TLCCR - HFBS specific - TLCCR-HFBS. Terrence Udovic. Wed 06/26/2013 10:00, 1, Instrument Calibration, ...

378

High flux compact neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory andThis Work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory and

Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

High flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... note that a larger dynamic range will result in a proportionately longer measuring time (to achieve the same counting statistics, same energy bin size ...

380

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam  

SciTech Connect

Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tunable resonant sensing means to sense a particular frequency in a high energy charged particle beam and generate a frequency-domain signal in response  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency domain sensing system is disclosed for sensing the position of a high energy beam of charged particles traveling within a housing which comprises a plurality of sensing means positioned in the wall of the housing radially around the axis of the beam. Each of the sensing means further comprising a first electrode means of predetermined shape received in a bore in the housing to define a fixed capacitance and inductance means attached to the electrode to provide an inductance for the sensing means which will provide an LC circuit which will resonate at a predetermined frequency known to exist in the beam of charged particles. The sensing means are further provided with tuning means to vary the amount of said inductance to tune the sensing means to the predetermined frequency prior to transmission of the signal to signal detection circuitry.

Nakamura, Michiyuki; Nolan, M.L.

1986-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources  

SciTech Connect

A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small Ĺchemical factoryĺ, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the Ĺalchemistsĺ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities ┬╗ Facilities ┬╗ Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

387

Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muhrer, Guenter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daemen, Luke L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelsey, Charles T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duran, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

389

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development of bellows and gate valves with a comb-type rf shield for high-current accelerators: Four-year beam test at KEK B-Factory  

SciTech Connect

Since a comb-type rf shield was proposed in 2003 as a rf shield for future high-intensity accelerators, various types of bellow chambers and gate valves with this rf shield have been installed in the KEK B-Factory rings in series and tested with beams. Through beam tests to check the performance, a structural simplification has been tried in parallel. The temperatures of the bellow corrugations decreased by a factor of 3-6 compared to those with a conventional finger-type rf shield in most cases. The temperatures of the body of the gate valves also decreased by a factor of 2-5. These results demonstrated the availability of the comb-type rf shield. Although a discharge was observed in one simplified model, the latest model has shown no problem up to a stored beam current of 1.8 A (1.3 mA/bunch, 6 mm bunch length). Experiences with the comb-type rf shield in these four-year beam tests are reviewed here.

Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Shibata, Kyo; Shirai, Mitsuru; Bondar, Aleksander E.; Kuzminykh, Victor S.; Gorbovsky, Aleksander I.; Sonderegger, Kurt; Morii, Minoru; Kawada, Kakuyu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); VAT Vakuumventile AG, Haag CH-9469 (Switzerland); VAT SKK Vacuum Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-0023 (Japan)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Laser beam alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

Kasner, William H. (11686 Althea Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15235); Racki, Daniel J. (712 Union Cemetery Rd., Greensburg, PA 15601); Swenson, Clark E. (228 Scott Dr., Monroeville, PA 15146)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Experimental investigation of random noise-induced beam degradation in high-intensity accelerators using a linear Paul trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which are emulated by adding small random noise on the voltage waveform of the quadrupole electrodes description of the PTSX device is given in Sec. II of this paper. The amplitude of the oscillating voltage of the noise-induced beam degradation is de- scribed in Sec. III. Experimental results with uniform white noise

Gilson, Erik

394

Energy distribution measurement of narrow-band ultrashort x-ray beams via K-edge filters subtraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of novel x-ray sources includes the measurement of the photon flux and the energy distribution of the produced beam. The aim of BEATS2 experiment at the SPARC-LAB facility of the INFN National Laboratories of Frascati (Rome, Italy) is to investigate possible medical applications of an x-ray source based on Thomson relativistic back-scattering. This source is expected to produce a pulsed quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an instantaneous flux of 10{sup 20} ph/s in pulses 10 ps long and with an average energy of about 20 keV. A direct measurement of energy distribution of this beam is very difficult with traditional detectors because of the extremely high photon flux. In this paper, we present a method for the evaluation of the energy distribution of quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams based on beam filtration with K-edge absorbing foils in the energy range of interest (16-22 keV). The technique was tested measuring the energy distribution of an x-ray beam having a spectrum similar to the expected one (SPARC-LAB Thomson source) by using a tungsten anode x-ray tube properly filtered and powered. The energy distribution obtained has been compared with the one measured with a HPGe detector showing very good agreement.

Cardarelli, Paolo; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Marziani, Michele; Mucollari, Irena; Pupillo, Gaia; Sisini, Francesco; Taibi, Angelo; Gambaccini, Mauro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and INFN - Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Use of Coherent Transition Radiation to Set Up the APS RF Thermionic Gun to Produce High-Brightness Beams for SASE FEL Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe use of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) rf thermionic gun, alpha magnet beamline, and linac to produce a stable high-brightness beam in excess of 100 amperes peak current with normalized emittance of 10 pi mm-mrad. To obtain peak currents greater than 100 amperes, the rf gun system must be tuned to produce a FWHM bunch length on the order of 350 fs. Bunch lengths this short are measured using coherent transition radiation (CTR) produced when the rf gun beam, accelerated to 40 MeV, strikes a metal foil. The CTR is detected using a Golay detector attached to one arm of a Michelson interferometer. The alpha magnet current and gun rf phase are adjusted so as to maximize the CTR signal at the Golay detector, which corresponds to the minimum bunch length. The interferometer is used to measure the autocorrelation of the CTR radiation. The minimum phase approximation is used to derive the bunch profile from the autocorrelation. The high-brightness beam is accelerated to 217 MeV and used to produce SASE in...

Sereno, N S; Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, Nicholas; Borland, Michael; Lumpkin, Alex

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

USE OF COHERENT TRANSITION RADIATION TO SET UP THE APS RF THERMIONIC GUN TO PRODUCE HIGH-BRIGHTNESS BEAMS FOR SASE FEL EXPERIMENTS ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe use of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) rf thermionic gun [1], alpha-magnet beamline, and linac [2] to produce a stable high-brightness beam in excess of 100 amperes peak current with normalized emittance of 10 ? mm-mrad. To obtain peak currents greater than 100 amperes, the rf gun system must be tuned to produce a FWHM bunch length on the order of 350 fs. Bunch lengths this short are measured using coherent transition radiation (CTR) produced when the rf gun beam, accelerated to 40 MeV, strikes a metal foil. The CTR is detected using a Golay detector attached to one arm of a Michelson interferometer. The alpha-magnet current and gun rf phase are adjusted so as to maximize the CTR signal at the Golay detector, which corresponds to the minimum bunch length. The interferometer is used to measure the autocorrelation of the CTR. The minimum phase approximation [3] is used to derive the bunch profile from the autocorrelation. The high-brightness beam is accelerated to 217 MeV and used to produce self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in five APS undulators installed in the Low- Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) experiment hall [4]. Initial optical measurements showed a gain length of 1.3 m at 530 nm. 1

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Electron-beam-controlled gas lasers: discussion from the engineering viewpoint. Part II. Problems in the electrical design of very high energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Some problem areas in the design of very-high-energy electronbeam- controlled short-pulse gas lasers are discussed. One of the prime areas of interest is the high-voltage pulse generators for driving the electron gun and gas pumping. The use of pulse-forming networks for improving energy-transfer efficiency is discussed. The use of thermionic cathode devices will require a large ac power installation. The properties of alternate electron sources (cold cathode and plasma cathode devices) are reviewed. The impact of laser beam energy density limitations on system geometry and electrical design are discussed last. (auth)

Riepe, K.B.; Stapleton, R.E.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full ôrecipeö that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ultra-low resistance ohmic contacts to GaN with high Si doping concentrations grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti/Al/Ni/Au ohmic contacts were formed on heavily doped n{sup +} metal-polar GaN samples with various Si doping concentrations grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The contact resistivity (R{sub C}) and sheet resistance (R{sub sh}) as a function of corresponding GaN free carrier concentration (n) were measured. Very low R{sub C} values (electron mobility transistors.

Afroz Faria, Faiza; Guo Jia; Zhao Pei; Li Guowang; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Wistey, Mark; Xing Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high flux beam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

LHCb Beam-Gas Imaging Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector makes it possible to perform precise measurements of vertices of beam-gas and beam-beam interactions and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. Using the directly measured beam properties the novel beam-gas imaging method is applied in LHCb for absolute luminosity determination. In this contribution we briefly describe the method and the preliminary results obtained with May 2010 data.

P. Hopchev

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

Schechter, D.E.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

BOOSTER GOLD BEAM INJECTION EFFICIENCY AND BEAM LOSS  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide Gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam. A close look at the effect of the lost gold ion at the Booster injection leads to the prediction that the lost gold ion creates large number of positive ions, and even larger number of electrons. The lost gold beam is also expected to create large numbers of neutral particles. In 1998 heavy ion run, the production of positive ions and electrons due to the lost gold beam has been observed. Also the high vacuum pressure due to the beam loss, presumably because of the neutral particles it created, has been measured. These results will be reported elsewhere.

ZHANG,S.Y.; AHRENS,L.A.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

Space charge effect of the high intensity proton beam during the resonance extraction for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Mu2e experiment to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab plans slow, resonant extraction of a beam with 3 x 10{sup 12} protons from the Debuncher ring. Space charge of this high intensity beam is a critical factor, since it induces significant betatron tune spread and consequently affects resonance extraction processes, such as spill uniformity and beam losses. This study shows the multi-particle simulation results in the early stages of resonance extraction and spill uniformity in the presence of 2D and 3D space charge effects. We have presented the results of the third-integer resonance extraction in early stage for the Mu2e experiment in the presence of space charge effects. In order to track particles and to calculate self-consistent space charge effects, Synergia2 was used, which is capable of parallel computing. The space charge tune shift was computed and was reasonable value compared with the analytical calculation. Locations of the septum and Lambertson were chosen so that particles are kicked and extracted efficiently. The spill rates for with and without space charge effects were uniform, but should be improved for the early stage after the sextupole field ramping.

Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Johnstone, John; Michelotti, Leo; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

New Concept for a Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Search using a Pulsed Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A concept to search for a neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is presented, which employs a pulsed neutron beam instead of the nowadays established use of storable ultracold neutrons (UCN). The technique takes advantage of the high peak flux and the time structure of a next-generation pulsed spallation source like the planned European Spallation Source. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity for a nEDM can be improved by several orders of magnitude compared to the best beam experiments performed in the 1970's and can compete with the sensitivity of UCN experiments.

F. M. Piegsa

2013-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Beam Purification by Photodetachment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Andersson, P. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Lindahl, A. O. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Hanstorp, D. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Forstner, Dr. Oliver [University of Vienna, Austria; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions  

SciTech Connect

We present results from the grant entitled, ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬Ł The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

Mori, Warren, B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect

Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24░C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors  

SciTech Connect

For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately.

McBee, M.R. (ed.); Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

INTRA - BEAM SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

RHIC in gold operation shows significant intra-beam scattering due to the high charge state of the stored ions. Intra-beam scattering leads to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth. The longitudinal emittance growth causes debunching in operation; the transverse emittance growth contributes to the reduction of the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The longitudinal and transverse beam growth was measured. Beam growth measurement are compared with computations.

FISCHER,W.; CONNOLLY,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; ZENO,K.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron