National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high entropy alloy

  1. Progress in High-Entropy Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Michael C

    2013-12-01

    Strictly speaking, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) refer to single-phase, solid-solution alloys with multiprincipal elements in an equal or a near-equal molar ratio whose configurational entropy is tremendously high. This special topic was organized to reflect the focus and diversity of HEA research topics in the community.

  2. Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2014-09-14

    High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

  3. Experiments and Model for Serration Statistics in Low-Entropy, Medium-Entropy, and High-Entropy Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Robert; Lee, Chi; Tsai, Che-Wei; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Antonaglia, James; Brinkman, Braden A.W.; LeBlanc, Michael; Xie, Xie; Chen, Shuying; Liaw, Peter K; Dahmen, Karin A

    2015-11-23

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are new alloys that contain five or more elements in roughly equal proportion. We present new experiments and theory on the deformation behavior of HEAs under slow stretching (straining), and observe differences, compared to conventional alloys with fewer elements. For a specific range of temperatures and strain-rates, HEAs deform in a jerky way, with sudden slips that make it difficult to precisely control the deformation. An analytic model explains these slips as avalanches of slipping weak spots and predicts the observed slip statistics, stress-strain curves, and their dependence on temperature, strain-rate, and material composition. The ratio of the weak spots’ healing rate to the strain-rate is the main tuning parameter, reminiscent of the Portevin-LeChatellier effect and time-temperature superposition in polymers. Our model predictions agree with the experimental results. The proposed widely-applicable deformation mechanism is useful for deformation control and alloys design.

  4. Experiments and Model for Serration Statistics in Low-Entropy, Medium-Entropy, and High-Entropy Alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carroll, Robert; Lee, Chi; Tsai, Che-Wei; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Antonaglia, James; Brinkman, Braden A.W.; LeBlanc, Michael; Xie, Xie; Chen, Shuying; Liaw, Peter K; et al

    2015-11-23

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are new alloys that contain five or more elements in roughly equal proportion. We present new experiments and theory on the deformation behavior of HEAs under slow stretching (straining), and observe differences, compared to conventional alloys with fewer elements. For a specific range of temperatures and strain-rates, HEAs deform in a jerky way, with sudden slips that make it difficult to precisely control the deformation. An analytic model explains these slips as avalanches of slipping weak spots and predicts the observed slip statistics, stress-strain curves, and their dependence on temperature, strain-rate, and material composition. The ratio ofmore » the weak spots’ healing rate to the strain-rate is the main tuning parameter, reminiscent of the Portevin-LeChatellier effect and time-temperature superposition in polymers. Our model predictions agree with the experimental results. The proposed widely-applicable deformation mechanism is useful for deformation control and alloys design.« less

  5. Multi-component solid solution alloys having high mixing entropy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-06

    A multi-component high-entropy alloy includes a composition selected from the following group: VNbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaTiWRe, VNbTaMoWRe, VNbTiMoWRe, VTaTiMoWRe, NbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMo, VNbTaTiW, VNbTaMoW, VNbTiMoW, VTaTiMoW, NbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiRe, VNbTaMoRe, VNbTiMoRe, VTaTiMoRe, NbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaWRe, VNbTiWRe, VTaTiWRe, NbTaTiWRe, VNbMoWRe, VTaMoWRe, NbTaMoWRe, VTiMoWRe, NbTiMoWRe, TaTiMoWRe, wherein relative amounts of each element vary by no more than .+-.15 atomic %.

  6. Local structures of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) on atomic scales: An overview

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Diao, Haoyan; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tang, Zhi; Egami, Takeshi; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-08-29

    The high-entropy alloys, containing several elements mixed in equimolar or near-equimolar ratios, have shown exceptional engineering properties. Local structures on the atomic level are essential to understand the mechanical behaviors and related mechanisms. This article covers the local structure and stress on the atomic level are reviewed by the pair-distribution function of neutron-diffraction data, ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations, and the atomic probe microscopy.

  7. Local electronic effects and irradiation resistance in high-entropy alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egami, Takeshi; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nicholson, Don; Khorgolkhuu, Od; Ojha, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloys are multicomponent solid solutions in which various elements with different chemistries and sizes occupy the same crystallographic lattice sites. Thus, none of the atoms perfectly fit the lattice site, giving rise to considerable local lattice distortions and atomic-level stresses. These characteristics can be beneficial for performance under both radiation and in a high-temperature environment, making them attractive candidates as nuclear materials. We discuss electronic origin of the atomic-level stresses based upon first-principles calculations using a density functional theory approach.

  8. Solid-solution CrCoCuFeNi high-entropy alloy thin films synthesized by sputter deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Zhinan; Jia, Haoling; Wu, Yueying; Rack, Philip D.; Patchen, Allan D.; Liu, Yuzi; Ren, Yang; Li, Nan; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-05-04

    The concept of high configurational entropy requires that the high-entropy alloys (HEAs) yield single-phase solid solutions. However, phase separations are quite common in bulk HEAs. A five-element alloy, CrCoCuFeNi, was deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering and confirmed to be a single-phase solid solution through the high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the solid-solution phase is presumed to be due to the high cooling rate of the sputter-deposition process.

  9. Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santodonato, Louis J.; Zhang, Yang; Feygenson, Mikhail; Parish, Chad M.; Gao, Michael C.; Weber, Richard J. K.; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Tang, Zhi; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-20

    The alloy-design strategy of combining multiple elements in near-equimolar ratios has shown great potential for producing exceptional engineering materials, often known as “high-entropy alloys”. Understanding the elemental distribution, and, thus, the evolution of the configurational entropy during solidification, is undertaken in the present study using the Al1.3CoCrCuFeNi model alloy. Here we show that even when the material undergoes elemental segregation, precipitation, chemical ordering, and spinodal decomposition, a significant amount of disorder remains, due to the distributions of multiple elements in the major phases. In addition, the results suggest that the high-entropy-alloy-design strategy may be applied to a wide range ofmore » complex materials, and should not be limited to the goal of creating single-phase solid solutions.« less

  10. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Gao, M. C.; Uhl, J. T.; Liaw, P. K.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress drops and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.

  11. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; et al

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress dropsmore » and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.« less

  12. Radiation behavior of high-entropy alloys for advanced reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaw, Peter K.; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-04-30

    In the first task, we have demonstrated the radiation damage and the recrystallization behaviors in multicomponent alloys through molecular-dynamics simulations. It is found that by alloying with atoms of different sizes, the atomic-level strain increases, and the propensity of the radiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition increases as the defects cluster in the cascade body. Recrystallization of the radiation induced supercooled or glass regions show that by tuning the composition and the equilibrium temperature, the multicomponent alloys can be healed. The crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transitions predict the potential high radiation resistance in multicomponent alloys. In the second task, three types of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were fabricated from AlCoCrFeNi and AlCuCrFeNi quinary alloys. Hardness and reduced contact modulus were measured using nanoindentation tests. Heavy ion irradiation were performed using 10 MeV gold and 5 MeV nickel to study radiation effects. Al0.5CrCuFeNi2 shows phase separation upon the presence of copper. Both hardness and contact modulus exhibit the same trend as increasing the applied load, and it indicates that excessive free volume may alter the growth rate of the plastic zone. The as-cast Al0.1CoCrFeNi specimen undergone the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process and steady cooling rate which mitigate the quenching effect. The swelling behavior was characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the swelling rate is approximately 0.02% dpa. Selected area diffraction (SAD) patters show irradiation-induced amorphization throughout the ion projected range. Within the peak damage region, an amorpous ring is observed, and a mixture of amorphous/ crystalline structure at deeper depth is found. The Al0.3CoCrFeNi HEAs shows good radiation resistance up to 60 peak dpa. No voids or dislocations are observed. The crystal structures remain face-centered-cubic (FCC) before and after 5 MeV Ni irradiation. Higher dpa might be required to study defects formation mechanisms. In the third task, all the constituent binary and ternary systems of the Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni system were thermodynamically modeled within the whole composition range. Comparisons between the calculated phase diagrams and literature data are in good agreement. The multi-component thermodynamic database of the Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni system was then obtained via extrapolation. The current Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni thermodynamic database enables us to carry out the calculations of phase diagrams, which can be used as useful guidelines to identify the Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni HEAs with desirable microstructures. In the fourth task, we discuss how as-cast and homogenized phases can be identified, what phases are usually found in the as-cast and homogenized conditions, and what the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations are in the AlCoCrFeNi HEA. The microstructure and phase composition were studied in as-cast and homogenized conditions. It showed the dendritrical structure in the as-cast condition consisting primarily of a nano-lamellar mixture of A2 [disorder body-centered-cubic (BCC)] and B2 (ordered BCC) phases, in addition to a very small amount of A1 [disorder face-centered-cubic (FCC)] phases. The homogenization heat treatment resulted in an increase in the volume fraction of the A1 phase and formation of a Sigma phase. Tensile properties in as-cast and homogenized conditions are reported at 700 °C. Thermodynamic modeling of non-equilibrium and equilibrium phase diagrams for the AlCoCrFeNi HEA gave good agreement with the experimental observations of the phase contents. The reasons for the improvement of ductility after the heat treatment are discussed.

  13. Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deviation from high-entropy ...

  14. A Successful Synthesis of the CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} Single-Crystal, High-Entropy Alloy by Bridgman Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, S. G.; Zhang, S. F.; Gao, M. C.; Liaw, P. K.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, a face-centered-cubic, single-crystal CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} (designated as Al0.3), high-entropy alloy (HEA) was successfully synthesized by the Bridgman solidification (BS) method, at an extremely low withdrawal velocity through a constant temperature gradient, for which it underwent two BS steps. Specially, at the first BS step, the alloy sample underwent several morphological transitions accompanying the crystal growth from the melt. This microstructure evolves from as-cast dendrites, to equiaxed grains, and then to columnar crystals, and last to the single crystal. In particular, at the equiaxed-grain region, some visible annealing twins were observed, which indicates a low stacking fault energy of the Al0.3 alloy. Although a body-centered- cubic CoCrFeNiAl (Al1) HEA was also prepared under the same conditions, only a single columnar-crystal structure with instinctively preferential crystallographic orientations was obtained by the same procedure. A similar morphological transition from dendrites to equiaxed grains occurred at the equiaxed-grain region in Al1 alloy, but the annealing twins were not observed probably because a higher Al addition leads to a higher stacking fault energy for this alloy.

  15. The influences of temperature and microstructure on the tensile properties of a CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otto, Frederik; Dlouhy, A.; Somsen, Ch.; Bei, Hongbin; Eggeler, G.; George, Easo P

    2013-01-01

    An equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy, which crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal structure, was produced by arc melting and drop casting. The drop-cast ingots were homogenized, cold rolled, and recrystallized to obtain single-phase microstructures with three different grain sizes in the range 4~160 m. Quasi-static tensile tests were then performed at temperatures between 77 and 1073 K. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and ductility all increased with decreasing temperature. During the initial stages of plasticity (up to ~2% strain), deformation occurs by planar dislocation glide on the normal FCC slip system {111} 110 at all temperatures and grain sizes investigated. Undissociated 1/2 110 dislocations were observed, as were numerous stacking faults, which imply the dissociation of several of these dislocations into 1/6 112 Shockley partials. At later stages ( 20% strain), nanoscale deformation twins were observed after interrupted tests at 77 K, but not in specimens tested at room temperature where plasticity occurred exclusively by dislocations which organized into cells. Deformation twinning, by continually decreasing the mean free path of dislocations during tensile testing, produces a high degree of work hardening and a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength. This increased work hardening prevents the early onset of necking instability and is a reason for the enhanced ductility observed at 77 K. A second way in which twinning can contribute to ductility is by providing an additional deformation mode to accommodate plasticity. However, it cannot explain the increase in yield strength with decreasing temperature in our high-entropy alloy since twinning was not observed in the early stages of plastic deformation. Since strong temperature dependencies of yield strength are also seen in binary FCC solid solution alloys, it may be an inherent solute effect, which needs further study.

  16. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy NiCoCr at cryogenic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperatures (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy NiCoCr at cryogenic temperatures Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2017 Title: Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy NiCoCr at cryogenic temperatures High-entropy alloys1 3 are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties not from a single dominant constituent, such as iron in steels,

  17. Effects of temperature on serrated flows of Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shuying; Xie, Xie; Chen, Bilin; Qiao, Junwei; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Yang; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-08-14

    Compression behavior of the Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied at different temperatures from 673K to 873K at a low strain rate of 5 x 10-5/s to investigate the temperature effect on the mechanical properties and serration behavior. The face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is confirmed at the lower temperature of 673 K and 773 K, and a structure of mixed FCC and body-centered cubic (BCC) is identified at a higher temperature of 873 K after compression tests using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. As a result, by comparing the stress-strain curves at different temperatures, two opposite directions of serrations types were found, named upward serrations appearing at 673 K and 773 K and downward serrations at 873 K, which may be due to dynamic strain aging.

  18. Effects of temperature on serrated flows of Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Shuying; Xie, Xie; Chen, Bilin; Qiao, Junwei; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Yang; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-08-14

    Compression behavior of the Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied at different temperatures from 673K to 873K at a low strain rate of 5 x 10-5/s to investigate the temperature effect on the mechanical properties and serration behavior. The face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is confirmed at the lower temperature of 673 K and 773 K, and a structure of mixed FCC and body-centered cubic (BCC) is identified at a higher temperature of 873 K after compression tests using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. As a result, by comparing the stress-strain curves at different temperatures, two opposite directions of serrations types weremore » found, named upward serrations appearing at 673 K and 773 K and downward serrations at 873 K, which may be due to dynamic strain aging.« less

  19. Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy This content will become publicly available on October 7, 2016 Title: Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy Magnetocaloric (MC) materials present an avenue for chemical-free, solid state refrigeration through cooling via adiabatic demagnetization. We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the lattice dynamics in the MC material

  20. Deviation from high-entropy configurations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy Louis J. Santodonato1,2 * (8ls@ornl.gov) Yang Zhang3 * (zhyang@illinois.edu) Mikhail Feygenson4 Chad M. Parish5 Michael C. Gao6,7 Richard J.K. Weber8,9 Joerg C. Neuefeind4 ZhiTang2 Peter K. Liaw2 * (pliaw@utk.edu) 1. Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 2. Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 3.

  1. Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-principal-element alloy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy The alloy-design strategy of combining multiple elements in near-equimolar ratios has shown great potential for producing exceptional engineering materials, often known as

  2. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy CrCoNi at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Thurston, Keli V. S.; Bei, Hongbin; Wu, Zhenggang; George, Easo P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-02-02

    The high-entropy alloys are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties not from a single dominant constituent, such as iron in steels, nor from the presence of a second phase, such as in nickel-base superalloys, but rather comprise multi-element systems that crystallize as a single phase, despite containing high concentrations (~20 at.%) of five or more elements with different crystal structures. Indeed, we have recently reported on one such single-phase high-entropy alloy, NiCoCrFeMn, which displays exceptional strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here which displays unprecedented strength-toughness properties that exceed those of all high-entropy alloys andmore » most multi-phase alloys. With roomtemperature tensile strengths of almost 1 GPa and KJIc fracture-toughness values above 200 MPa.m 1/2 (with crack-growth toughnesses exceeding 300 MPa.m 1/2), the strength, ductility and toughness of the NiCoCr alloy actually improve at cryogenic temperatures to unprecedented levels of strengths above 1.3 GPa, failure strains up to 90% and KJIc values of 275 MPa.m 1/2 (with crackgrowth toughnesses above 400 MPa.m 1/2). These properties appear to result from continuous steady strain hardening, which acts to suppress plastic instability, resulting from pronounced dislocation activity and deformation-induced nano-twinning.« less

  3. High strength alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  4. High strength alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  5. Influence of Bridgman solidification on microstructures and magnetic behaviors of a non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi high-entropy alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zuo, Tingting; Yang, Xiao; Liaw, Peter K.; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-07

    The non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi alloy is prepared by the Bridgman solidification (BS) technique at different withdrawal velocities (V = 30, 100, and 200 μm/s). Various characterization techniques have been used to study the microstructure and crystal orientation. The morphological evolutions accompanying the crystal growth of the alloy prepared at different withdrawal velocities are nearly the same, from equiaxed grains to columnar crystals. The transition of coercivity is closely related to the local microstructure, while the saturation magnetization changes little at different sites. The coercivity can be significantly reduced from the equiaxed grain area to the columnar crystal area when the appliedmore » magnetic field direction is parallel to the crystal growth direction, no matter what is the withdrawal velocity. As a result, the alloy possesses magnetic anisotropy when the applied magnetic field is in different directions.« less

  6. Influence of Bridgman solidification on microstructures and magnetic behaviors of a non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi high-entropy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Tingting; Yang, Xiao; Liaw, Peter K.; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-07

    The non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi alloy is prepared by the Bridgman solidification (BS) technique at different withdrawal velocities (V = 30, 100, and 200 μm/s). Various characterization techniques have been used to study the microstructure and crystal orientation. The morphological evolutions accompanying the crystal growth of the alloy prepared at different withdrawal velocities are nearly the same, from equiaxed grains to columnar crystals. The transition of coercivity is closely related to the local microstructure, while the saturation magnetization changes little at different sites. The coercivity can be significantly reduced from the equiaxed grain area to the columnar crystal area when the applied magnetic field direction is parallel to the crystal growth direction, no matter what is the withdrawal velocity. As a result, the alloy possesses magnetic anisotropy when the applied magnetic field is in different directions.

  7. Exceptional damage-tolerance of a medium-entropy alloy NiCoCr at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Thurston, Keli; Bei, Hongbin; Wu, Zhenggang; George, Easo

    2016-01-01

    High-entropy alloys1 3 are an intriguing new class of metallic materials that derive their properties not from a single dominant constituent, such as iron in steels, nor from the presence of a second phase, such as in nickel-base superalloys, but rather comprise multi-element systems that crystallize as a single phase4 7, despite containing high concentrations (~20 at.%) of five or more elements with different crystal structures5 7. Indeed, we have recently reported on one such single-phase high-entropy alloy, NiCoCrFeMn, which displays exceptional strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures8. Here which displays unprecedented strength-toughness properties that exceed those of all high-entropymore »alloys and most multi-phase alloys. With roomtemperature tensile strengths of almost 1 GPa and KJIc fracture-toughness values above 200 MPa.m1/2 (with crack-growth toughnesses exceeding 300 MPa.m1/2), the strength, ductility and toughness of the NiCoCr alloy actually improve at cryogenic temperatures to unprecedented levels of strengths above 1.3 GPa, failure strains up to 90% and KJIc values of 275 MPa.m1/2 (with crackgrowth toughnesses above 400 MPa.m1/2). Such properties appear to result from continuous steady strain hardening, which acts to suppress plastic instability, resulting from pronounced dislocation activity and deformation-induced nano-twinning.« less

  8. Researchers create first entropy-stabilized complex oxide alloys...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1156762. Schematic illustration of an entropy stabilized oxide at the atomic scale. The grey spheres represent the oxygen sub lattice in the rock salt-structured crystal while the...

  9. Lattice Vibrations Boost Demagnetization Entropy in Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stonaha, Paul J.; Manley, Michael E.; Bruno, Nick; Karaman, Ibrahim; Arroyave, Raymundo; Singh, Navdeep; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Chi, Songxue

    2015-10-07

    Magnetocaloric (MC) materials present an avenue for chemical-free, solid state refrigeration through cooling via adiabatic demagnetization. We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the lattice dynamics in the MC material Ni45Co5Mn36.6In13.4. Upon heating across TC, the material exhibits an anomalous increase in phonon entropy of 0.17 0.04 k_B/atom, which is nine times larger than expected from conventional thermal expansion. We find that the phonon softening is focused in a transverse optic phonon, and we present the results of first-principle calculations which predict a strong coupling between lattice distortions and magnetic excitations.

  10. ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program PDF icon lehighfs.pdf More Documents & ...

  11. An Integrated Study of a Novel Thermal Coating for Nb-Based High Temperature Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shizhong

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the interfaces between niobium substrate and coatings at atomic level. Potential oxidation barrier bond coat, Nb₂AlC and high entropy alloys, and top coat candidates were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in our labs. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  12. High-Temperature Aluminum Alloys | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Alloys High-Temperature Aluminum Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon pm044_smith_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Temperature Aluminum Alloys Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Aluminum Alloys (Agreement ID:24034) Project ID:18518 Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Rapidly Solidified High Temperature Aluminum Alloys

  13. High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon es131_choi_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced High

  14. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  15. ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program PDF icon lehigh_fs.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Phase Transformation Kinetics and Alloy Microsegregation in High Pressure Die Cast Magnesium Alloys FY 2008 Progress Report

  16. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Applications (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications This "Blue Sky" project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A

  17. High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm075_hovanski_2013_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks Vehicle Technologies Office

  18. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  19. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  20. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stiegler, James O. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1986-01-01

    Improved Ni.sub.3 Al alloys are provided by inclusion of boron, hafnium or zirconium, and in some species, iron.

  1. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1983-12-21

    Improved Ni/sub 3/Al alloys are provided by inclusion of boron, hafnium or zirconium, and in some species, iron.

  2. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Kock, C.C.

    1983-08-03

    Heat- and corrosion-resistant alloys are described which contain nickel, aluminum, boron, iron and in some instances manganese, niobium and titanium.

  3. Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on alloy cathode catalysts, was given by T. D. Jarvi of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

  4. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar Mejía, C. Nayak, A. K.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Skourski, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  5. High Strength, Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Merit Review High Strength, Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks YURI HOVANSKI This Presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project ID #LM099 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 12, 2015 Project Overview Automotive OEM GM Tier I Supplier TWB Company LLC Material Provider Alcoa 2 2 Start: FY2015 Finish: FY2017 15% complete Capacity to rapidly join dissimilar alloy Al sheet is not developed for high volume production.

  6. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    11-3251 Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Dr. J a m e s Stubbing University o f Illinois-Urbana Champaign In c o ll a b o r a tio n with: International Institute fo r Carbon Neutral Energy Research Sue Lesica, Federal ROC Lizhen Tan, Technical ROC Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications Final Report 22 April 2015 Authors Dr. Yinbin Miao (main author) with

  7. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 13, 2016 Title: A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over

  8. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  9. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  10. High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks YURI HOVANSKI This Presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project ID #LM075 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 18, 2014 Project Overview OEM GM Tier I Supplier TWB Company LLC Material Provider Alcoa 2 2 Start: FY2012 Finish: FY2014 85% complete Capacity to rapidly join Al sheet in dissimilar thicknesses and alloys is not developed. Supply chain

  11. High Strain-Rate Characterization of Magnesium Alloys | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Strain-Rate Characterization of Magnesium Alloys High Strain-Rate Characterization of Magnesium Alloys 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm032_warren_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials

  12. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  13. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Swindeman, Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  14. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maiya, P.S.; Picciolo, J.J.; Emerson, J.E.; Dusek, J.T.; Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-10

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo{sub 0.50}O{sub x} is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  15. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maiya, P. Subraya (Darien, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL); Emerson, James E. (Plainfield, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

    1998-01-01

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo.sub.0.5 O.sub.x and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo.sub.0.50 O.sub.x is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed.

  16. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys unsuitable for application as hydrogen separation membranes in coal fire systems.

  17. Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 3_utc.pdf More Documents & Publications Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability Breakout Group 1: Catalysts and Supports Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-002

  18. Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm056_lavender_2012_o-revised.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Vehicle Technologies Office:

  19. High strength nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, Robert C. (Ringwood, NJ); Korenko, Michael K. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its strength at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield strength of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 513 MPa and a rupture strength of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.

  20. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek S. Murthi , Elise Izzo, Wu Bi, Sandra Guerrero and Lesia Protsailo

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE?¢????s stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  1. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  2. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, Steven C. (Richland, WA); Davis, Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  3. High-Performance Computing for Alloy Development | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Performance Computing for Alloy Development alloy-development.jpg Tomorrow's fossil-fuel based power plants will achieve higher efficiencies by operating at higher pressures and temperatures and under harsher and more corrosive conditions. Unfortunately, conventional metals simply cannot withstand these extreme environments, so advanced alloys must be designed and fabricated to meet the needs of these advanced systems. The properties of metal alloys, which are mixtures of metallic elements,

  4. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  5. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  6. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  7. Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; George, Easo P.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2006-01-03

    An alloy composition includes, in atomic percent: about 1 to about 10% of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf, balance Ir.

  8. ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices … High Alloy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    alloys within a single laboratory. The results of the test method are often used as material acceptance criteria. However, the tests were not originally developed for ...

  9. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  10. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  11. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750C and ~1030C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  12. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  13. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  14. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  15. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  16. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy novel cathode / alloy...

  18. Au-Ag Alloy Static High Pressure EOS measurements: FY09 summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Static high-pressure measurements of the equation of state of a Gold-Silver alloy (23.5 ... EOS curves of silver and gold, taken from the literature, are shown for comparison. We fit ...

  19. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Improved Processing of High Alloy Steels for Wear Components in Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generation Systems, Transportation and Manufacturing Systems (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Improved Processing of High Alloy Steels for Wear Components in Energy Generation Systems, Transportation and Manufacturing Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved Processing of High Alloy Steels for Wear Components in Energy Generation Systems, Transportation and Manufacturing Systems Authors: Peter, William H [1] ; Liby, Alan L [1] ; Chen, Wei [1] ; Yamamoto, Yukinori [1] ;

  1. Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure Authors: Yusenko, Kirill V. [1] ; Bykova, Elena [2] ; Bykov, Maxim [2] ; Gromilov, Sergey A. [3] ; Kurnosov, Alexander V. [2] ; Prescher, Clemens [4] ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. [4] ; Hanfland, Michael [5] ; van Smaalen, Sander [2] ; Margadonna, Serena [1] ; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S. [2] + Show Author Affiliations Univ. of Oslo, Oslo

  2. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  3. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  4. Candidate alloys for cost-effective, high-efficiency, high-temperature compact/foil heat-exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Neal D; Maziasz, Philip J; Shingledecker, John P; Pint, Bruce A; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2007-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems operate at high temperatures (up to 1000 C and 650 C, respectively), which makes them especially attractive sources for combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration. However, improvements in the efficiency of heat exchange in these fuel cells require both development and careful processing of advanced cost-effective alloys for use in such high-temperature service conditions. The high-temperature properties of both sheet and foil forms of several alloys being considered for use in compact heat-exchangers (recuperators) have been characterized. Mechanical and creep-rupture testing, oxidation studies, and microstructural studies have been performed on commercially available sheet and foil forms of alloy 347, alloys 625, HR230, HR120, and the new AL20-25+Nb. These studies have led to a mechanistic understanding of the responses of these alloys to anticipated service conditions, and suggest that these alloys developed for gas- and micro-turbine recuperator applications are also suitable for use in fuel cell heat-exchangers. Additional work is still required to achieve foil forms with creep life comparable to thicker-section wrought product forms of the same alloys.

  5. High strength, thermally stable, oxidation resistant, nickel-based alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Vought, Joseph D. (Rockwood, TN); Howell, C. Randal (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A polycrystalline alloy is composed essentially of, by weight %: 15% to 30% Mo, 3% to 10% Al, up to 10% Cr, up to 10% Fe, up to 2% Si, 0.01% to 0.2% C, 0.01% to 0.04% B, balance Ni.

  6. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  7. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Iron-aluminum alloys having selectable room-temperature ductilities of greater than 20%, high resistance to oxidation and sulfidation, resistant pitting and corrosion in aqueous solutions, and possessing relatively high yield and ultimate tensile strengths are described. These alloys comprise 8 to 9.5% aluminum, up to 7% chromium, up to 4% molybdenum, up to 0.05% carbon, up to 0.5% of a carbide former such as zirconium, up to 0.1 yttrium, and the balance iron. These alloys in wrought form are annealed at a selected temperature in the range of 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. for providing the alloys with selected room-temperature ductilities in the range of 20 to about 29%.

  8. Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm061_harrison_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Vehicle Technologies

  9. High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianco, Robert (Finleyville, PA); Buckman, Jr., R. William (Pittsburgh, PA); Geller, Clint B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2-4% by volume (.about.1-4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T.sub.m of molybdenum.

  10. High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Geller, C.B.

    1999-02-09

    A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2--4% by volume (ca. 1--4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T{sub m} of molybdenum. 10 figs.

  11. Embrittlement and DBTT of High-Burnup PWR Fuel Cladding Alloys | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Embrittlement and DBTT of High-Burnup PWR Fuel Cladding Alloys Embrittlement and DBTT of High-Burnup PWR Fuel Cladding Alloys Structural analyses of high-burnup (HBU) fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior during long-term dry-cask storage and transportation. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation

  12. High permeance sulfur tolerant Pd/Cu alloy membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ma, Yi Hua; Pomerantz, Natalie

    2014-02-18

    A method of making a membrane permeable to hydrogen gas (H.sub.2.uparw.) is disclosed. The membrane is made by forming a palladium layer, depositing a layer of copper on the palladium layer, and galvanically displacing a portion of the copper with palladium. The membrane has improved resistance to poisoning by H.sub.2S compared to a palladium membrane. The membrane also has increased permeance of hydrogen gas compared to palladium-copper alloys. The membrane can be annealed at a lower temperature for a shorter amount of time.

  13. Ductile long range ordered alloys with high critical ordering temperature and wrought articles fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Malleable long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Fe, Co).sub.3 and V(Fe, Co, Ni).sub.3 systems. These alloys have the following compositions comprising by weight: 22-23% V, 14-30% Fe, and the remainder Co or Co and Ni with an electron density no more than 7.85. The maximum combination of high temperature strength, ductility and creep resistance are manifested in the alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 14-20% Fe and the remainder Co and having an atomic composition of V(Fe .sub.0.20-0.26 C Co.sub.0.74-0.80).sub.3. The alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 16-17% Fe and 60-62% Co has excellent high temperature properties. The alloys are fabricable into wrought articles by casting, deforming, and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure.

  14. Influences of directionally solidified techniques and hafnium content on a nickel base high temperature alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luobao, W.; Rongzhang, C.; Yuping, W.

    1984-03-01

    Two directionally solidified techniques, the power decrease (P.D.) and high rate solidification (H.R.S.) methods, are used to study the influences of the different Hf contents on the structures and properties of a nickel base high temperature alloy. When entering the alloy the Hf is mainly segregated in the interdentritic regions and gamma/gamma prime eutectic phases. After the alloy is added, there are noticeable changes in the microstructure. The amount of gamma/gamma prime eutectic phase noticeably increases. Its morphology also undergoes noticeable changes. The conditions of grain boundaries and interdentritic regions are improved. Several new types of Hf-rich microfacies also appeared. At 760 C, the endurance properties (especially the transverse properties) of the alloy noticeably rise with the increase of the Hf content. However, at 1040 C, the endurance life decreases with the increase of the Hf content. When the H.R.S. technique is used, the medium and high temperature performances of the alloy are both noticeably superior to the P.D. technique.

  15. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  16. Nanostructured Cu-Cr alloy with high strength and electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islamgaliev, R. K. Nesterov, K. M.; Bourgon, J.; Champion, Y.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2014-05-21

    The influence of nanostructuring by high pressure torsion (HPT) on strength and electrical conductivity in the Cu-Cr alloy has been investigated. Microstructure of HPT samples was studied by transmission electron microscopy with special attention on precipitation of small chromium particles after various treatments. Effect of dynamic precipitation leading to enhancement of strength and electrical conductivity was observed. It is shown that nanostructuring leads to combination of high ultimate tensile strength of 790840?MPa, enhanced electrical conductivity of 81%85% IACS and thermal stability up to 500?C. The contributions of grain refinement and precipitation to enhanced properties of nanostructured alloy are discussed.

  17. High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon alloying

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon alloying Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon alloying Authors: Prescher, C. ; Dubrovinsky, L. ; Bykova, E. ; Kupenko, I. ; Glazyrin, K. ; Kantor, A. ; McCammon, C. ; Mookherjee, M. ; Nakajima, Y. ; Miyajima, N. ; Sinmyo, R. ; Cerantola, V. ; Dubrovinskaia, N. ; Prakapenka, V. ; Rüffer, R. ; Chumakov, A. ; Hanfland , M. [1] ;

  18. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  19. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phasemore » space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.« less

  20. Microstructure evolution in solution treated Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane?ek, Milo; ?ek, Jakub; Strsk, Josef; Vclavov, Kristna; Hruka, Petr; Polyakova, Veronika; Gatina, Svetlana; Semenova, Irina

    2014-12-15

    Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion were investigated. High pressure torsion straining resulted in strong grain refinement as-observed by transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness and light microscopy showed two distinct regions (i) a central region with radial material flow and low microhardness (340 HV) and (ii) a peripheral region with rotational material flow and high microhardness (430 HV). Positron annihilation spectroscopy showed that the only detectable defects in the material are dislocations, whose density increases with the radial distance and the number of high pressure torsion revolutions. The local chemical environment around defects does not differ significantly from the average composition. - Highlights: Beta-Ti alloy Ti15Mo was processed by high pressure torsion (HPT). Lateral inhomogeneity of the microstructure and microhardness was found. Dislocations are the only lattice defects detectable by positron annihilation. Molybdenum is not preferentially segregated along dislocation cores.

  1. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. ...

  2. High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply chain doesn't exist for high volume joining of automotive aluminum sheet. ... Joining Comparison Evaluate the performance of best in class laser, laserhybrid ...

  3. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  4. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using themore » current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.« less

  5. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680%C2%B0C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680%C2%B0C were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680%C2%B0C, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400%C2%B0C. At 500%C2%B0C, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680%C2%B0C, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  6. Corrosion and Creep of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Helium and Steam Environments for the NGNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, Gary; Jones, J. W.

    2013-06-21

    This project aims to understand the processes by which candidate materials degrade in He and supercritical water/steam environments characteristic of the current NGNP design. We will focus on understanding the roles of temperature, and carbon and oxygen potential in the 750-850 degree C range on both uniform oxidation and selective internal oxidation along grain boundaries in alloys 617 and 800H in supercritical water in the temperature range 500-600 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature rang 750-850 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature range 750-850 degree C over a range of oxygen and carbon potentials in helium. Combined, these studies wil elucidate the potential high damage rate processes in environments and alloys relevant to the NGNP.

  7. High spin polarization in CoFeMnGe equiatomic quaternary Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bainsla, Lakhan; Suresh, K. G.; Nigam, A. K.; Manivel Raja, M.; Varaprasad, B. S. D. Ch. S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.

    2014-11-28

    We report the structure, magnetic property, and spin polarization of CoFeMnGe equiatomic quaternary Heusler alloy. The alloy was found to crystallize in the cubic Heusler structure (prototype LiMgPdSn) with considerable amount of DO{sub 3} disorder. Thermal analysis result indicated the Curie temperature is about 750 K without any other phase transformation up to melting temperature. The magnetization value was close to that predicted by the Slater-Pauling curve. Current spin polarization of P = 0.70 ± 0.01 was deduced using point contact andreev reflection measurements. The temperature dependence of electrical resistivity has been fitted in the temperature range of 5–300 K in order to check for the half metallic behavior. Considering the high spin polarization and Curie temperature, this material appears to be promising for spintronic applications.

  8. High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

  9. A high-entropy-wind r-process study based on nuclear-structure quantities from the new finite-range droplet model FRDM(2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Farouqi, Khalil; Mller, Peter E-mail: kfarouqi@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-09-01

    Attempts to explain the source of r-process elements in our solar system (S.S.) by particular astrophysical sites still face entwined uncertainties, stemming from the extrapolation of nuclear properties far from stability, inconsistent sources of different properties (e.g., nuclear masses and ?-decay properties), and the poor understanding of astrophysical conditions, which are hard to disentangle. In this paper we present results from the investigation of r-process in the high-entropy wind (HEW) of core-collapse supernovae (here chosen as one of the possible scenarios for this nucleosynthesis process), using new nuclear-data input calculated in a consistent approach, for masses and ?-decay properties from the new finite-range droplet model FRDM(2012). The accuracy of the new mass model is 0.56 MeV with respect to AME2003, to which it was adjusted. We compare the new HEW r-process abundance pattern to the latest S.S. r-process residuals and to our earlier calculations with the nuclear-structure quantities based on FRDM(1992). Substantial overall and specific local improvements in the calculated pattern of the r-process between A ? 110 and {sup 209}Bi, as well as remaining deficiencies, are discussed in terms of the underlying spherical and deformed shell structure far from stability.

  10. Highly mismatched crystalline and amorphous GaN(1-x)As(x) alloys in the whole composition range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. M.; Novikov, S. V.; Broesler, R.; Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Luckert, F.; Martin, R. W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2009-08-29

    Alloying is a commonly accepted method to tailor properties of semiconductor materials for specific applications. Only a limited number of semiconductor alloys can be easily synthesized in the full composition range. Such alloys are, in general, formed of component elements that are well matched in terms of ionicity, atom size, and electronegativity. In contrast there is a broad class of potential semiconductor alloys formed of component materials with distinctly different properties. In most instances these mismatched alloys are immiscible under standard growth conditions. Here we report on the properties of GaN1-xAsx, a highly mismatched, immiscible alloy system that was successfully synthesized in the whole composition range using a nonequilibrium low temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. The alloys are amorphous in the composition range of 0.17alloys with x>0.2, and to the upward movement of the valence band for alloys with x<0.2. The unique features of the band structure offer an opportunity of using GaN1-xAsx alloys for various types of solar power conversion devices.

  11. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  12. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  13. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  14. Calculations of the magnetic entropy change in amorphous through a microscopic anisotropic model: Applications to Dy{sub 70}Zr{sub 30} and DyCo{sub 3.4} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranke, P. J. von Nóbrega, E. P.; Ribeiro, P. O.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Lopes, P. H. O.; Sousa, V. S. R. de; Oliveira, N. A. de; Caldas, A.; Alho, B. P.; Carvalho, G.; Magnus, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report theoretical investigations on the magnetocaloric effect, described by the magnetic entropy change in rare earth—transition metal amorphous systems. The model includes the local anisotropy on the rare earth ions in Harris-Plischke-Zuckermann assumptions. The transition metals ions are treated in terms of itinerant electron ferromagnetism and the magnetic moment of rare earth ions is coupled to the polarized d-band by a local exchange interaction. The magnetocaloric effect was calculated in DyCo{sub 3.4} system, which presents amorphous sperimagnetic configuration. The calculations predict higher refrigerant capacity in the amorphous DyCo{sub 3.4} than in DyCo{sub 2} crystal, highlighting the importance of amorphous magnetocaloric materials. Our calculation of the magnetocaloric effect in Dy{sub 70}Zr{sub 30}, which presents amorphous asperomagnetic configuration, is in good agreement with the experimental result. Furthermore, magnetic entropy changes associated with crystal-amorphous configurations change are estimated.

  15. Experimental study of crack initiation and propagation in high- and gigacycle fatigue in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannikov, Mikhail E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Naimark, Oleg E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    Fatigue (high- and gigacycle) crack initiation and its propagation in titanium alloys with coarse and fine grain structure are studied by fractography analysis of fracture surface. Fractured specimens were analyzed by interferometer microscope and SEM to improve methods of monitoring of damage accumulation during fatigue test and to verify the models for fatigue crack kinetics. Fatigue strength was estimated for high cycle fatigue regime using the Luong method [1] by in-situ infrared scanning of the sample surface for the step-wise loading history for different grain size metals. Fine grain alloys demonstrated higher fatigue resistance for both high cycle fatigue and gigacycle fatigue regimes. Fracture surface analysis for plane and cylindrical samples was carried out using optical and electronic microscopy method. High resolution profilometry (interferometer-profiler New View 5010) data of fracture surface roughness allowed us to estimate scale invariance (the Hurst exponent) and to establish the existence of two characteristic areas of damage localization (different values of the Hurst exponent). Area 1 with diameter ?300 ?m has the pronounced roughness and is associated with damage localization hotspot. Area 2 shows less amplitude roughness, occupies the rest fracture surface and considered as the trace of the fatigue crack path corresponding to the Paris kinetics.

  16. Diffusive mixing and Tsallis entropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Cushman, John H.

    2015-04-29

    Brownian motion, the classical diffusive process, maximizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The Tsallis q-entropy, which is non-additive, was developed as an alternative to the classical entropy for systems which are non-ergodic. A generalization of Brownian motion is provided that maximizes the Tsallis entropy rather than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This process is driven by a Brownian measure with a random diffusion coefficient. In addition, the distribution of this coefficient is derived as a function of q for 1 < q < 3. Applications to transport in porous media are considered.

  17. Mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking for iron-based alloys in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.Y.; Congleton, J.; Bahraloloom, A.

    1998-11-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibilities of a series of iron-based alloys (IBA), including some high-purity irons, were evaluated in lithiated water at temperatures up to 300 C. Inclusion distributions in each material were established using quantitative metallography and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX). Electrochemical measurements were performed to investigate film formation kinetics. Results showed the minimum potential for SCC was a function of the inclusion content. Reducing the inclusion content in IBA moved the minimum potential for SCC in the anodic direction and/or increased the temperature for the onset of cracking but did not eliminate SCC.

  18. High efficiency multijunction amorphous silicon alloy-based solar cells and modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.; Banerjeee, A.; Glatfelter, T.; Hoffman, K.; Xu, X. )

    1994-06-30

    We have achieved initial efficiency of 11.4% as confirmed by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a multijunction amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module of one-square-foot-area. [bold This] [bold is] [bold the] [bold highest] [bold initial] [bold efficiency] [bold confirmed] [bold by] [bold NREL] [bold for] [bold any] [bold thin] [bold film] [bold photovoltaic] [bold module]. After light soaking for 1000 hours at 50 [degree]C under one-sun illumination, a module with initial efficiency of 11.1% shows a stabilized efficiency of 9.5%. Key factors that led to this high performance are discussed.

  19. High-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy forging at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Demura, Masahiko; Matsuoka, Saburo; Sunakawa, Hideo

    2014-01-27

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn Extra Low Interstitial (ELI) alloy forging were investigated at low temperatures. The high-cycle fatigue strength at low temperatures of this alloy was relatively low compared with that at ambient temperature. The crystallographic orientation of a facet formed at a fatigue crack initiation site was determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method in scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fatigue crack initiation mechanism and discuss on the low fatigue strength at low temperature. Furthermore, in terms of the practical use of this alloy, the effect of the stress ratio (or mean stress) on the high-cycle fatigue properties was evaluated using the modified Goodman diagram.

  20. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  1. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  2. Amorphous and nanocrystalline phase formation in highly-driven Al-based binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalay, Yunus Eren

    2008-10-15

    Remarkable advances have been made since rapid solidification was first introduced to the field of materials science and technology. New types of materials such as amorphous alloys and nanostructure materials have been developed as a result of rapid solidification techniques. While these advances are, in many respects, ground breaking, much remains to be discerned concerning the fundamental relationships that exist between a liquid and a rapidly solidified solid. The scope of the current dissertation involves an extensive set of experimental, analytical, and computational studies designed to increase the overall understanding of morphological selection, phase competition, and structural hierarchy that occurs under far-from equilibrium conditions. High pressure gas atomization and Cu-block melt-spinning are the two different rapid solidification techniques applied in this study. The research is mainly focused on Al-Si and Al-Sm alloy systems. Silicon and samarium produce different, yet favorable, systems for exploration when alloyed with aluminum under far-from equilibrium conditions. One of the main differences comes from the positions of their respective T{sub 0} curves, which makes Al-Si a good candidate for solubility extension while the plunging T{sub 0} line in Al-Sm promotes glass formation. The rapidly solidified gas-atomized Al-Si powders within a composition range of 15 to 50 wt% Si are examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The non-equilibrium partitioning and morphological selection observed by examining powders at different size classes are described via a microstructure map. The interface velocities and the amount of undercooling present in the powders are estimated from measured eutectic spacings based on Jackson-Hunt (JH) and Trivedi-Magnin-Kurz (TMK) models, which permit a direct comparison of theoretical predictions. For an average particle size of 10 {micro}m with a Peclet number of {approx}0.2, JH and TMK deviate from each other. This deviation indicates an adiabatic type solidification path where heat of fusion is reabsorbed. It is interesting that this particle size range is also consistent with the appearance of a microcellular growth. While no glass formation is observed within this system, the smallest size powders appear to consist of a mixture of nanocrystalline Si and Al. Al-Sm alloys have been investigated within a composition range of 34 to 42 wt% Sm. Gas atomized powders of Al-Sm are investigated to explore the morphological and structural hierarchy that correlates with different degrees of departure from full equilibrium conditions. The resultant powders show a variety of structural selection with respect to amount of undercooling, with an amorphous structure appearing at the highest cooling rates. Because of the chaotic nature of gas atomization, Cu-block melt-spinning is used to produce a homogeneous amorphous structure. The as-quenched structure within Al-34 to 42 wt% Sm consists of nanocrystalline fcc-Al (on the order of 5 nm) embedded in an amorphous matrix. The nucleation density of fcc-Al after initial crystallization is on the order of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, which is 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} orders of magnitude higher than what classical nucleation theory predicts. Detailed analysis of liquid and as-quenched structures using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, high energy transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography techniques revealed an Al-Sm network similar in appearance to a medium range order (MRO) structure. A model whereby these MRO clusters promote the observed high nucleation density of fcc-Al nanocrystals is proposed. The devitrification path was identified using high temperature, in-situ, high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques and the crystallization kinetics were described using an analytical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach.

  3. Cluster formula of Fe-containing Monel alloys with high corrosion-resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Baozeng; Gu Junjie [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Qing, E-mail: wangq@dlut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ji Chunjun [College of Energy Source and Power, Dalian University of Science and Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Wang Yingmin; Qiang Jianbing [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong Chuang, E-mail: dong@dlut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-06-15

    The cluster-plus-glue-atom model is applied in the composition interpretation of Monel alloys. This model considers ideal atomic nearest neighbor configurations among the constituent elements and has been used in understanding compositions of complex alloys like quasicrystals, amorphous alloys, and cupronickels. According to this model, any structure can be expressed by cluster formula [cluster](glue atom){sub x}, x denoting the number of glue atoms matching one cluster. According to this model, two groups of experimental composition series [Fe{sub 1}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub x} and [Fe{sub y}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub 5} were designed which fell close to conventional Fe-containing Monel alloys. The designed alloys after solution treatment plus water quenching, are monolithic FCC Ni-based solid solutions. Among them, the [Fe{sub 1}Ni{sub 12}]Cu{sub 5} alloy has the highest corrosion resistance in simulated sea water, and its performance is superior to that of industrial Monel 400 alloy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A stable solid solution model is proposed using our 'cluster-plus-glue-atom model'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model is used to develop Monel corrosion resistant alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single FCC structure is easily retained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloys show good corrosion properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work contributes to the general understanding of engineering alloys.

  4. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-08-24

    A wrought and annealed iron-aluminum alloy is described consisting essentially of 8 to 9.5% aluminum, an effective amount of chromium sufficient to promote resistance to aqueous corrosion of the alloy, and an alloying constituent selected from the group of elements consisting of an effective amount of molybdenum sufficient to promote solution hardening of the alloy and resistance of the alloy to pitting when exposed to solutions containing chloride, up to about 0.05% carbon with up to about 0.5% of a carbide former which combines with the carbon to form carbides for controlling grain growth at elevated temperatures, and mixtures thereof, and the balance iron, wherein said alloy has a single disordered [alpha] phase crystal structure, is substantially non-susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and has a room-temperature ductility of greater than 20%.

  5. Damage structure in Nimonic PE16 alloy ion bombarded to high doses and gas levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, K.; Packan, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Nimonic PE16 alloy in solution-treated-and-aged condition was bombarded simultaneously with nickel ions and ..cap alpha.. and deuteron beams at 625/sup 0/C to doses of 80 to 313 dpa at He/dpa = 10 and D/dpa = 25. Microstructural changes consisted of the introduction of dislocations and of cavities, and the redistribuion of ..gamma..' precipitates to these defects. Cavitational swelling remained below 1%. Cavities were represented by several distinct size classes, the smaller ones believed to be gas bubbles, and some larger ones associated with preferred growth of precipitate. Formation of bubbles at grain boundaries, and large cavities at incoherent twins intensified the possibility of mechanical separation of interfaces under high-gas irradiation conditions.

  6. Pt monolayer shell on nitrided alloy core — A path to highly stable oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Jue; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Yang, Tae -Hyun; Park, Gu -Gon; Zhang, Chengxu; Chen, Guangyu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-07-22

    The inadequate activity and stability of Pt as a cathode catalyst under the severe operation conditions are the critical problems facing the application of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Here we report on a novel route to synthesize highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts by depositing Pt monolayer on a nitrided alloy core. The prepared PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst retains 89% of the initial electrochemical surface area after 50,000 cycles between potentials 0.6 and 1.0 V. By correlating electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses with electrochemical measurements, we found that the significant improvement of stability of themore » PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst is caused by nitrogen doping while reducing the total precious metal loading.« less

  7. Pt monolayer shell on nitrided alloy core A path to highly stable oxygen reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jue; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Yang, Tae -Hyun; Park, Gu -Gon; Zhang, Chengxu; Chen, Guangyu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-07-22

    The inadequate activity and stability of Pt as a cathode catalyst under the severe operation conditions are the critical problems facing the application of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Here we report on a novel route to synthesize highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts by depositing Pt monolayer on a nitrided alloy core. The prepared PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst retains 89% of the initial electrochemical surface area after 50,000 cycles between potentials 0.6 and 1.0 V. By correlating electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses with electrochemical measurements, we found that the significant improvement of stability of the PtMLPdNiN/C catalyst is caused by nitrogen doping while reducing the total precious metal loading.

  8. On the amorphization behavior and hydrogenation performance of high-energy ball-milled Mg{sub 2}Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Hongchao; Hou, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Hu, Rui; Li, Jinshan; Xue, Xiangyi

    2013-06-15

    Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy was prepared by high energy ball-milling starting with polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni which was prepared with the help of a metallurgy method by using a SPEX 8000D mill. The microstructural and phase structure characterization of the prepared materials was performed via scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stabilities were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The apparent activation energies were determined by means of the Kissinger method. The first and second crystallization reactions take place at ? 255 C and ? 410 C, and the corresponding activation energy of crystallization is E{sub a1} = 276.9 and E{sub a2} = 382.4 kJ/mol, respectively. At 3 MPa hydrogen pressure and 250 C, the hydrogen absorption capacities of crystalline, partially and fully amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy are 2.0 wt.%, 3.2 wt.% and 3.5 wt.% within 30 min, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: We mainly focus on the amorphization behavior of crystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in the high energy ball-milling process and the crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in a follow-up heating process. The relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties is established and explained by models. - Highlights: Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni has been obtained by high energy ball milling the as-cast alloy. The amorphization behavior of polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni is presented. The crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy is illustrated. Establish the relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alloy Development for High-Performance Cast Crankshafts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about applied alloy...

  10. Highly-enhanced reflow characteristics of sputter deposited Cu alloy thin films for large scale integrated interconnections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Takashi; Mizuno, Masao; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Munemasa, Jun; Mizuno, Masataka; Kihara, Teruo; Araki, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2011-08-01

    An attempt to improve the reflow characteristics of sputtered Cu films was made by alloying the Cu with various elements. We selected Y, Sb, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, In, Sn, Mg, and P for the alloys, and ''the elasto-plastic deformation behavior at high temperature'' and ''the filling level of Cu into via holes'' were estimated for Cu films containing each of these elements. From the results, it was found that adding a small amount of Sb or Dy to the sputtered Cu was remarkably effective in improve the reflow characteristics. The microstructure and imperfections in the Cu films before and after high-temperature high-pressure annealing were investigated by secondary ion micrographs and positron annihilation spectroscopy. The results imply that the embedding or deformation mechanism is different for the Cu-Sb alloy films compared to the Cu-Dy alloy films. We consider that the former is embedded by softening or deformation of the Cu matrix, which has a polycrystalline structure, and the latter is embedded by grain boundary sliding.

  11. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Liu, C.T.

    1996-08-13

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding. 13 figs.

  12. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenoir City, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding.

  13. Rules for design of Alloy 617 nuclear components to very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.; Blass, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactors provide attractive options for electric power generation using a direct gas-turbine cycle and for process-heat applications. For the latter, temperatures of at least 950{degree}C (1742{degree}F) are desirable. As a first step to providing rules for the design of nuclear components operating at very high temperatures, a draft ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case has been prepared by an ad hoc Code task force. The Case, which is patterned after the high-temperature nuclear Code Case N-47, covers Ni-Cr-Co-Mo Alloy 617 for temperatures to 982{degree}C (1800{degree}F). The purpose of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the draft Case and the significant differences between it and Case N-47. Particular emphasis is placed on the material behavior and allowables. The paper also recommends some materials and structures development activities that are needed to place the design methodology on a sound and defensible footing. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High Efficiency Triple-Junction Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Technology, Final Technical Report, 6 March 1998 - 15 October 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.

    2001-11-08

    This report describes the research program intended to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for developing high-performance, two-terminal multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells, and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. United Solar uses a spectrum-splitting, triple-junction cell structure. The top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy of {approx}1.8-eV bandgap to absorb blue photons. The middle cell uses an amorphous silicon germanium alloy ({approx}20% germanium) of {approx}1.6-eV bandgap to capture green photons. The bottom cell has {approx}40% germanium to reduce the bandgap to {approx}1.4-eV to capture red photons. The cells are deposited on a stainless-steel substrate with a predeposited silver/zinc oxide back reflector to facilitate light-trapping. A thin layer of antireflection coating is applied to the top of the cell to reduce reflection loss. The major research activities conducted under this program were: (1) Fundamental studies to improve our understanding of materials and devices; the work included developing and analyzing a-Si alloy and a-SiGe alloy materials prepared near the threshold of amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition and studying solar cells fabricated using these materials. (2) Deposition of small-area cells using a radio-frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (3) Deposition of small-area cells using a modified very high frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (4) Large-area cell research to obtain the highest module efficiency. (5) Optimization of solar cells and modules fabricated using production parameters in a large-area reactor.

  15. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  17. Research on high-efficiency, multiple-gap, multijunction, amorphous-silicon-based alloy thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S. )

    1989-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advancing our understanding of amorphous-silicon-based alloys and their use in small-area multijunction solar cells. The principal objectives of the program are to develop a broad scientific base for the chemical, structural, optical, and electronic properties of amorphous-silicon-based alloys; to determine the optimum properties of these alloy materials as they relate to high-efficiency cells; to determine the optimum device configuration for multijunction cells; and to demonstrate proof-of-concept, multijunction, a-Si-alloy-based solar cells with 18% efficiency under standard AM1.5 global insolation conditions and with an area of at least 1 cm{sup 2}. A major focus of the work done during this reporting period was the optimization of a novel, multiple-graded structure that enhances cell efficiency through band-gap profiling. The principles of the operation of devices incorporating such a structure, computer simulations of those, and experimental results for both single- and multijunction cells prepared by using the novel structure are discussed in detail. 14 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

  19. Microstructure–property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, D. R.; Casalena, L.; Yang, F.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-09-18

    NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal compression tests have revealed that the 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf alloy has useful shape memory properties that include a wide range of transformation temperatures as well as highly stable pseudoelastic behavior. These properties are governed by short-term aging conditions, which may be tailored to control transformation temperatures while giving rise to exceptionally high austenite yield strengths which aid transformation stability. The yield strength of the austenite phase can reach 2.1 GPa by aging for 3hrs at 500°C, while aging for 3hrs at 700°C produced an alloy with an austenite finish temperature (A f ) of 146°C. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed a new precipitate phase, H-phase, under the homogenized and extruded condition and the aged 3 hrs at 500°C condition, but only the previously identified H-phase precipitate was observed after aging at temperatures of 600°C and 700°C for 3 hrs. Finally, dislocation analysis indicated that plastic deformation of the austenite phase occurred by <100> type slip, similar to that observed in binary NiTi.

  20. Achievement of high coercivity in sintered R-Fe-B magnets based on misch-metal by dual alloy method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, E Wang, Zhen-Xi; Chen, Zhi-An; Rao, Xiao-Lei; Hu, Bo-Ping; Chen, Guo-An; Zhao, Yu-Gang; Zhang, Jin

    2014-03-21

    The R-Fe-B (R, rare earth) sintered magnets prepared with different ratio of alloys of MM-Fe-B (MM, misch-metal) and Nd-Fe-B by dual alloy method were investigated. As expected, the high ratio of MM-Fe-B alloy degrades the hard magnetic properties heavily with intrinsic coercivity lower than 5 kOe. When the atomic ratio MM/R???21.5% the magnetic properties can reach a practical level of B{sub r}???12.1 kGs, H{sub cj}???10.7 kOe, and (BH){sub max}???34.0 MGOe. And the effect of H{sub cj} enhancement by the grain boundary diffusion process is obvious when MM/R???21.5%. It is revealed that the decrement of intrinsic magnetic properties of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B matrix phase is not the main reason of the degradation of the magnets with high MM ratio. The change of deteriorated microstructure together with phase component plays fundamental roles in low H{sub cj}. In high MM ratio magnets, (a) after annealing, Ce atoms inside main phase are inclined to be segregated in the outer layer of the main phase grains; (b) there is no thin layer of Ce-rich phase as an analogue of Nd-rich phase to separate main phase grains; (c) excessive Ce tends to form CeFe{sub 2} grains.

  1. PdAgAu alloy with high resistance to corrosion by H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Fernando; Miller, James B.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Tarditi, Ana M.; Fleutot, Benoit; Petro, Kondratyuk, Cornaglia, Laura M

    2012-12-01

    PdAgAu alloy films were prepared on porous stainless steel supports by sequential electroless deposition. Two specific compositions, Pd{sub 83}Ag{sub 2}Au{sub 15} and Pd{sub 74}Ag{sub 14}Au{sub 12}, were studied for their sulfur tolerance. The alloys and a reference Pd foil were exposed to 1000 H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} at 623 K for periods of 3 and 30 hours. The microstructure, morphology and bulk composition of both nonexposed and H{sub 2}S-exposed samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). XRD and SEM analysis revealed time-dependent growth of a bulk Pd{sub 4}S phase on the Pd foil during H{sub 2}S exposure. In contrast, the PdAgAu ternary alloys displayed the same FCC structure before and after H{sub 2}S exposure. In agreement with the XRD and SEM results, sulfur was not detected in the bulk of either ternary alloy samples by EDS, even after 30 hours of H{sub 2}S exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles were acquired for both PdAgAu alloys after 3 and 30 hours of exposure to characterize sulfur contamination near their surfaces. Very low S 2p and S 2s XPS signals were observed at the top-surfaces of the PdAgAu alloys, and those signals disappeared before the etch depth reached ~ 10 nm, even for samples exposed to H{sub 2}S for 30 hours. The depth profile analyses also revealed silver and gold segregation to the surface of the alloys; preferential location of Au on the alloys surface may be related to their resistance to bulk sulfide formation. In preliminary tests, a PdAgAu alloy membrane displayed higher initial H{sub 2} permeability than a similarly prepared pure Pd sample and, consistent with resistance to bulk sulfide formation, lower permeability loss in H{sub 2}S than pure Pd.

  2. Evaluation of pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloyed stainless steels welds for FGD plants in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, K.K.; Sung, H.J.; Im, C.S.; Hong, I.P.; Kim, D.K.

    1998-12-31

    For successful application of high-alloyed stainless steels for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants, pitting corrosion resistance of arc welds of N-added 6%Mo austenitic stainless steels (UNS N 08367) and super duplex stainless steels (UNS S 32550) made with various filler metals were evaluated using the Green Death solution. For Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) and Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welds of N 08367, Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) of base metal was 65--70 C, whereas weld made by ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal yielded CPT of 50 C. Welds made by ERNiCrMo-10 or ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals showed CPT of 60--65 C and 65--70C, respectively. For GTA and GMA welds of S 32550, CPT of welds made by ERNiCrMo-3 was 45--50 C, indicating that the filler metal can provide pitting corrosion resistance matching the S 32550 alloy. Thus, a proper pitting corrosion resistance of weldments of high-alloy stainless steels can be achieved by selecting filler metals having at least +10 higher Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PRE{sub N}) value than the base metal regardless of the type of arc welding process. The over-alloyed filler metals would compensate preferential segregation of Cr, MO along the dendrite boundary, which made the dendrite core more susceptible to pitting. Nitrogen addition to the GTA welds of N 08367 made with ERNiCrMo-3 failed to improve pitting corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the precipitation of nitrogen in the weld metal in the form of Nb-nitride.

  3. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laidler, James J. (Richland, WA); Borisch, Ronald R. (Kennewick, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  4. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobson, D.O.

    1998-01-06

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures. 2 figs.

  5. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  6. The magnetic phase transition in Mn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 0.9}P{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} magnetocaloric alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-02-14

    Mn-Fe-P-Ge alloys are promising, low cost, high performance candidates for magnetic cooling applications based on the magnetocaloric effect. These alloys undergo a magnetic phase transition which induces a large entropy change (ΔS). Experimental and modeling studies were conducted to study this transition for varying Ge content. Landau theory and the Bean-Rodbell model were applied to Mn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 0.9}P{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} (x = 0.26, 0.3, and 0.32) melt spun ribbons to model the phase transition and the associated entropy change. The critical behavior of these alloys was studied. The critical composition range at which the cross over from first order to second order magnetic transition occurs was determined. The calculated thermodynamic values and critical temperatures were in good agreement with our experimental results. A high maximum entropy change (ΔS) of ∼44.9 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} was observed in Mn{sub 1.1}Fe{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.74}Ge{sub 0.26} in a 5 T applied magnetic field. The results suggest that Mn-Fe-P-Ge alloys are very attractive materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling.

  7. Experimental Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Tensile Behaviour of TiNi Shape Memory Alloy Fibres Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahli, M. L.; Necib, B.

    2011-05-04

    The shape memory alloys (SMA) possess both sensing and actuating functions due to their shape memory effect, pseudo-elasticity, high damping capability and other remarkable properties. Combining the SMA with other materials can create intelligent or smart composites. The epoxy resin composites filled with TiNi alloys fibres were fabricated and their mechanical properties have been investigated. In this study, stress/strain relationships for a composite with embedded shape memory materials (SMA) fibres are presented. The paper illustrates influence of the SMA fibres upon changes in mechanical behaviour of a composite plate with the SMA components, firstly and secondly, the actuating ability and reliability of shape memory alloy hybrid composites.

  8. X-ray-induced dissociation of H.sub.2O and formation of an O.sub.2-H.sub.2 alloy at high pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Ho-kwang (Washington, DC); Mao, Wendy L. (Washington, DC)

    2011-11-29

    A novel molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 and a method of producing such a molecular alloy are provided. When subjected to high pressure and extensive x-radiation, H.sub.2O molecules cleaved, forming O--O and H--H bonds. In the method of the present invention, the O and H framework in ice VII was converted into a molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2. X-ray diffraction, x-ray Raman scattering, and optical Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that this crystalline solid differs from previously known phases.

  9. High Permeability Ternary Palladium Alloy Membranes with Improved Sulfur and Halide Tolerances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coulter

    2010-12-31

    The project team consisting of Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), TDA Research, and IdaTech LLC was focused on developing a robust, poison-tolerant, hydrogen selective free standing membrane to produce clean hydrogen. The project completed on schedule and on budget with SwRI, GT, CSM, TDA and IdaTech all operating independently and concurrently. GT has developed a robust platform for performing extensive DFT calculations for H in bulk palladium (Pd), binary alloys, and ternary alloys of Pd. Binary alloys investigated included Pd96M4 where M = Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu. They have also performed a series of calculations on Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Ag{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Au{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Ni{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Pt{sub 4}, and Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Y{sub 4}. SwRI deposited and released over 160 foils of binary and ternary Pd alloys. There was considerable work on characterizing and improving the durability of the deposited foils using new alloy compositions, post annealing and ion bombardment. The 10 and 25 {micro}m thick films were sent to CSM, TDA and IdaTech for characterization and permeation testing. CSM conducted over 60 pure gas permeation tests with SwRI binary and ternary alloy membranes. To date the PdAu and PdAuPt membranes have exhibited the best performance at temperatures in the range of 423-773 C and their performance correlates well with the predictions from GT. TDA completed testing under the Department of Energy (DOE) WGS conditions on over 16 membranes. Of particular interest are the PdAuPt alloys that exhibited only a 20% drop in flux when sulfur was added to the gas mixture and the flux was completely recovered when the sulfur flow was stopped. IdaTech tested binary and ternary membranes on a simulated flue gas stream and experienced significant difficulty in mounting and testing the sputter deposited membranes. IdaTech was able to successfully test PdAu and PdAuPt membranes and saw similar sulfur tolerance to what TDA found. The Program met all the deliverables on schedule and on budget. Over ten presentations at national and international conferences were made, four papers were published (two in progress) in technical journals, and three students (2 at GT and 1 at CSM) completed their doctorates using results generated during the course of the program. The three major findings of program were; (1) the DFT modeling was verified as a predictive tool for the permeability of Pd based ternary alloys, (2) while magnetron sputtering is useful in precisely fabricating binary and ternary alloys, the mechanical durability of membranes fabricated using this technique are inferior compared to cold rolled membranes and this preparation method is currently not ready for industrial environments, (3) based on both modeling and experimental verification in pure gas and mixed gas environments PdAu and PdAuPt alloys were found to have the combination of the highest permeability and tolerance to sulfur.

  10. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P., E-mail: pli@sqnc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Information Engineering, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu 476000 (China); Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lei, M.K., E-mail: surfeng@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu, X.P. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-06-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} A modified layer about 30 {mu}m thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. {yields} Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. {yields} More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. {yields} The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. {yields} Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  11. Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Amanda; Zhao, Hongbin; Hopkins, Scott

    2014-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under the U.S. Department of Energy Project Award No.: DE-FE0001181 titled “Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods.” The project started in October 1, 2009 and was finished September 30, 2014. Pall Corporation worked with Cornell University to sputter and test palladium-based ternary alloys onto silicon wafers to examine many alloys at once. With the specialized equipment at Georgia Institute of Technology that analyzed the wafers for adsorbed carbon and sulfur species six compositions were identified to have resistance to carbon and sulfur species. These compositions were deposited on Pall AccuSep® supports by Colorado School of Mines and then tested in simulated synthetic coal gas at the Pall Corporation. Two of the six alloys were chosen for further investigations based on their performance. Alloy reproducibility and long-term testing of PdAuAg and PdZrAu provided insight to the ability to manufacture these compositions for testing. PdAuAg is the most promising alloy found in this work based on the fabrication reproducibility and resistance to carbon and sulfur. Although PdZrAu had great initial resistance to carbon and sulfur species, the alloy composition has a very narrow range that hindered testing reproducibility.

  12. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason A. (Upton, NY); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Ahn, Channing (Pasadena, CA); Yazami, Rachid (Los Angeles, CA)

    2010-08-24

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0

  13. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  14. An improved model for the transit entropy of monatomic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Duane C; Chisolm, Eric D; Bock, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    In the original formulation of V-T theory for monatomic liquid dynamics, the transit contribution to entropy was taken to be a universal constant, calibrated to the constant-volume entropy of melting. This model suffers two deficiencies: (a) it does not account for experimental entropy differences of {+-}2% among elemental liquids, and (b) it implies a value of zero for the transit contribution to internal energy. The purpose of this paper is to correct these deficiencies. To this end, the V-T equation for entropy is fitted to an overall accuracy of {+-}0.1% to the available experimental high temperature entropy data for elemental liquids. The theory contains two nuclear motion contributions: (a) the dominant vibrational contribution S{sub vib}(T/{theta}{sub 0}), where T is temperature and {theta}{sub 0} is the vibrational characteristic temperature, and (b) the transit contribution S{sub tr}(T/{theta}{sub tr}), where {theta}{sub tr} is a scaling temperature for each liquid. The appearance of a common functional form of S{sub tr} for all the liquids studied is a property of the experimental data, when analyzed via the V-T formula. The resulting S{sub tr} implies the correct transit contribution to internal energy. The theoretical entropy of melting is derived, in a single formula applying to normal and anomalous melting alike. An ab initio calculation of {theta}{sub 0}, based on density functional theory, is reported for liquid Na and Cu. Comparison of these calculations with the above analysis of experimental entropy data provides verification of V-T theory. In view of the present results, techniques currently being applied in ab initio simulations of liquid properties can be employed to advantage in the further testing and development of V-T theory.

  15. Mechanical and functional behavior of high-temperature Ni-Ti-Pt shape memory alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Susan, Donald F.; Massad, Jordan E.; McElhanon, James R.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2016-01-22

    A series of Ti-rich Ni-Ti-Pt ternary alloys with 13 to 18 at. pct Pt were processed by vacuum arc melting and characterized for their transformation behavior to identify shape memory alloys (SMA) that undergo transformation between 448 K and 498 K (175 °C and 225 °C) and achieve recoverable strain exceeding 2 pct. From this broader set of compositions, three alloys containing 15.5 to 16.5 at. pct Pt exhibited transformation temperatures in the vicinity of 473 K (200 °C), thus were targeted for more detailed characterization. Preliminary microstructural evaluation of these three compositions revealed a martensitic microstructure with small amountsmore » of Ti2(Ni,Pt) particles. Room temperature mechanical testing gave a response characteristic of martensitic de-twinning followed by a typical work-hardening behavior to failure. Elevated mechanical testing, performed while the materials were in the austenitic state, revealed yield stresses of approximately 500 MPa and 3.5 pct elongation to failure. Thermal strain recovery characteristics were more carefully investigated with unbiased incremental strain-temperature tests across the 1 to 5 pct strain range, as well as cyclic strain-temperature tests at 3 pct strain. As a result, the unbiased shape recovery results indicated a complicated strain recovery path, dependent on prestrain level, but overall acceptable SMA behavior within the targeted temperature and recoverable strain range.« less

  16. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  17. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  18. Origin of Entropy Convergence in Hydrophobic Hydration and Protein Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garde, S.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Paulaitis, M.E.; Pratt, L.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); [Center for Molecular and Engineering Thermodynamics, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); [Department of Chemical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    An information theory model of hydrophobic effects is used to construct a molecular explanation why hydrophobic solvation entropies of protein unfolding measured by high sensitivity calorimetry converge to zero at a common convergence temperature. The entropy convergence follows directly from the weak temperature dependence of occupancy fluctuations {l_angle}{delta}{ital n}{sup 2}{r_angle} for molecular-scale volumes in water. The macroscopic expression of the contrasting entropic behavior of water relative to common organic solvents is the {ital relative} temperature insensitivity of the water isothermal compressibility compared to hydrocarbon liquids. The information theory model used provides a quantitative description of small molecule hydration and, in addition, predicts that the value of the entropy at convergence is slightly {ital negative}. Interpretations of entropic contributions to protein folding should account for this result. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Douglas Way

    2003-01-01

    For hydrogen from coal gasification to be used economically, processing approaches that produce a high purity gas must be developed. Palladium and its alloys, nickel, platinum and the metals in Groups 3 to 5 of the Periodic Table are all permeable to hydrogen. Hydrogen permeable metal membranes made of palladium and its alloys are the most widely studied due to their high hydrogen permeability, chemical compatibility with many hydrocarbon containing gas streams, and infinite hydrogen selectivity. Our Pd composite membranes have demonstrated stable operation at 450 C for over 70 days. Coal derived synthesis gas will contain up to 15000 ppm H{sub 2}S as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and other gases. Highly selectivity membranes are necessary to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration to acceptable levels for solid oxide and other fuel cell systems. Pure Pd-membranes are poisoned by sulfur, and suffer from mechanical problems caused by thermal cycling and hydrogen embrittlement. Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H{sub 2} separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({le} 5 {micro}m) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. With support from this DOE Grant, we have fabricated thin, high flux Pd-Cu alloy composite membranes using a sequential electroless plating approach. Thin, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films exhibit a hydrogen flux more than ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H{sub 2} separation, resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas, and exceed the DOE Fossil Energy target hydrogen flux of 80 ml/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min = 0.6 mol/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s for a feed pressure of 40 psig. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. We have developed practical electroless plating procedures for fabrication of thin Pd-Cu composite membranes at any scale.

  20. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  1. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Coughlin, D. R.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Yang, L.; Devaraj, Arun; Kovarik, Libor; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mills, M. J.

    2013-03-22

    Thermal aging of the high temperature shape memory alloy 50.3Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf (at.%) introduces a novel precipitate phase, which plays an important role in improving shape memory properties. The precipitate phase was investigated by conventional electron diffraction, high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and three dimensional atom probe tomography. An unrelaxed orthorhombic atomic structural model is proposed based on these observations. This model was subsequently relaxed by ab initio calculations. As a result of the relaxation, atom shuffle displacements occur, which in turn yields improved agreement with the STEM images. The relaxed structure, which is termed the H-phase, has also been verified to be thermodymanically stable at 0 K.

  2. Corrosion protection of high-copper aluminum alloys using green technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfeld, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The concept of surface modification as a new method of corrosion protection using chemicals without toxic problems is described for the Al alloys Al 6061, Al 7075-T6 and Al 2024-T3. In the Ce-Mo process Ce and Mo are incorporated into the original oxide film by chemical and electrochemical processes. The resulting surfaces are resistant to pitting in aggressive solutions such as 0.5 N NaCl. Surface modified Al 6013 has passed the salt spray test according to ASTM B 117. For Al 6061 and 7075, hot solutions of CeCl{sub 3} and Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are used, while for Al 2024 CeCl{sub 3} is replaced by Ce acetate. For all alloys anodic polarization is carried out in Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. For Al 2024 and Al 7075 a Cu removal pre-treatment step is used in which Cu intermetallic compounds are removed from the outer surface layers. The resistance to localized corrosion has been evaluated by recording of impedance spectra in 0.5 N NaCl for 30 days. Surface analysis data suggest that Ce and Mo are concentrated at sites where local cathodes such as Cu intermetallic compounds are located. Polarization curves show that both the cathodic and the anodic reaction are inhibited on modified surfaces. The pitting potential E{sub pit} is increased for surface modified samples at constant corrosion potential E{sub corr}. This result could be due to a decrease of the amount of Cl adsorbed at a given potential for oxide layers containing Ce and Mo.

  3. On quantum Rnyi entropies: A new generalization and some properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller-Lennert, Martin; Dupuis, Frdric; Szehr, Oleg; Fehr, Serge; Tomamichel, Marco

    2013-12-15

    The Rnyi entropies constitute a family of information measures that generalizes the well-known Shannon entropy, inheriting many of its properties. They appear in the form of unconditional and conditional entropies, relative entropies, or mutual information, and have found many applications in information theory and beyond. Various generalizations of Rnyi entropies to the quantum setting have been proposed, most prominently Petz's quasi-entropies and Renner's conditional min-, max-, and collision entropy. However, these quantum extensions are incompatible and thus unsatisfactory. We propose a new quantum generalization of the family of Rnyi entropies that contains the von Neumann entropy, min-entropy, collision entropy, and the max-entropy as special cases, thus encompassing most quantum entropies in use today. We show several natural properties for this definition, including data-processing inequalities, a duality relation, and an entropic uncertainty relation.

  4. Entropy in an Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminska, A.; Dudeck, M

    2008-03-19

    The entropy properties in a D.C. argon arc plasma source are studied. The local thermodynamical entropy relations are established for a set of uniform sub-systems (Ar, Ar{sup +}, e) in order to deduce the entropy balance equation in presence of dissipative effects and in the case of a thermal non equilibrium. Phenomenological linear laws are deduced in near equilibrium situation. The flow parameters inside the plasma source are calculated by a Navier-Stokes fluid description taking into account a thermal local non equilibrium. The entropy function is calculated in the plasma source using the values of the local variables obtained from the numerical code.

  5. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-10-30

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  6. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  7. Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized...

  8. Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical Points We study the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy of two dimensional conformal quantum ...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Aluminum Alloys (Agreement ID:24034) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  10. Effects of the interplay between atomic and magnetic order on the properties of metamagnetic Ni-Co-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguí, C.

    2014-03-21

    Ni-Co-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys show metamagnetic behavior for a range of Co contents. The temperatures of the structural and magnetic transitions depend strongly on composition and atomic order degree, in such a way that combined composition and thermal treatment allows obtaining martensitic transformation between any magnetic state of austenite and martensite. This work presents a detailed analysis of the effect of atomic order on Ni-Co-Mn-Ga alloys through the evolution of structural and magnetic transitions after quench from high temperatures and during post-quest ageing. It is found that the way in which the atomic order affects the martensitic transformation temperatures and entropy depends on the magnetic order of austenite and martensite. The results can be explained assuming that improvement of atomic order decreases the free energy of the structural phases according to their magnetic order. However, it is assumed in this work that changes in the slope—that is, the entropy—of the Gibbs free energy curves are also decisive to the stability of the two-phase system. The experimental transformation entropy values have been compared with a phenomenological model, based on a Bragg–Williams approximation, accounting for the magnetic contribution. The excellent agreement obtained corroborates the magnetic origin of changes in transformation entropy brought about by atomic ordering.

  11. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Douglas Way

    2001-07-31

    Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H2 separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({approx}1 mm) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. Based on preliminary results, thin Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films are expected to exhibit hydrogen flux up to ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H2 separation, and resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. The overall objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sequential electroless plating to fabricate Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 4}0 alloy membranes on porous supports for H{sub 2} separation. These following advantages of these membranes for processing of coal-derived gas will be demonstrated: High H{sub 2} flux; Sulfur tolerant, even at very high total sulfur levels (1000 ppm); Operation at temperatures well above 500 C; and Resistance to embrittlement and degradation by thermal cycling. The proposed research plan is designed to providing a fundamental understanding of: Factors important in membrane fabrication; Optimization of membrane structure and composition; Effect of temperature, pressure, and gas composition on H{sub 2} flux and membrane selectivity; and How this membrane technology can be integrated in coal gasification-fuel cell systems.

  12. Synthesis of high T.sub.C superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Wei (Somerville, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method.

  13. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  14. Relating different quantum generalizations of the conditional Rnyi entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomamichel, Marco; Berta, Mario; Hayashi, Masahito

    2014-08-15

    Recently a new quantum generalization of the Rnyi divergence and the corresponding conditional Rnyi entropies was proposed. Here, we report on a surprising relation between conditional Rnyi entropies based on this new generalization and conditional Rnyi entropies based on the quantum relative Rnyi entropy that was used in previous literature. Our result generalizes the well-known duality relation H(A|B) + H(A|C) = 0 of the conditional von Neumann entropy for tripartite pure states to Rnyi entropies of two different kinds. As a direct application, we prove a collection of inequalities that relate different conditional Rnyi entropies and derive a new entropic uncertainty relation.

  15. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  16. Observation on the role of chlorine in high temperature erosion-corrosion of alloys in an AFBC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, W.; Orndorff, W.; Smith, J.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Anderson, K.; Smith, S.; Ho, K.

    1997-12-31

    Two 1,000-hour burns were conducted with the 12-inch (0.3m) laboratory AFBC system at Western Kentucky University. Operating conditions similar to those used at the 160 MW AFBC system at the TVA Shawnee Steam Plant located near Paducah, KY were used. A 1,000-hour burn was done with a low-chlorine (0.012% Cl and 3.0% S) Western Kentucky No.9 coal. A second 1,000-hour burn was conducted with high-chlorine (0.28% Cl and 2.4% S) Illinois No.6 coal. Four different metal alloys [carbon steel C1020 (0.18% C and 0.05% Cr), 304 SS (18.39% Cr and 8.11% Ni), 309 SS (23.28% Cr and 13.41% Ni), and 347 SS (18.03% Cr and 9.79% Ni)] were exposed uncooled in the freeboard at the entrance to the convection pass, where the metal temperature was approximately 900K. The carbon steel samples were essentially destroyed. However, it was expected that C1020 carbon steel samples would not withstand the high temperatures selected for the testing. A small amount of scale failure was observed on the other three samples in both test runs. Based on the SEM-EDS mapping results, there is no localized chloride distribution observed on the surface of the coupons, neither in the scale failure area nor on the rest of the metal part. Some trace amounts of chloride was found, but it was evenly distributed on the surface of the coupons. There is no concentration of chloride on the spot of scale failure. The scale failure might be due to sulfur attack and/or the effect of erosion. Further study with higher chlorine content coals for more conclusive information is needed.

  17. High Accuracy U-235 Enrichment Verification Station for Low Enriched Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillard, C. R.; Hayward, J. P.; Williamson, M. R.

    2012-06-07

    The Y-12 National Security Complex is playing a role in the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor (USHPRR) Conversion program sponsored by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction. The USHPRR program has a goal of converting remaining U.S. reactors that continue to use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The USHPRR program is currently developing a LEU Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel for use in the U.S. high performance research reactors.Y-12 is supporting both the fuel development and fuel fabrication efforts by fabricating low enriched U-Mo foils from its own source material for irradiation experiments and for optimizing the fabrication process in support of scaling up the process to a commercial production scale. Once the new fuel is qualified, Y-12 will produce and ship U-Mo coupons with verified 19.75% +0.2% - 0.3% U-235 enrichment to be fabricated into fuel elements for the USHPRRs. Considering this small enrichment tolerance and the transition into HEU being set strictly at 20% U-235, a characterization system with a measurement uncertainty of less than or equal to 0.1% in enrichment is desired to support customer requirements and minimize production costs. Typical uncertainty for most available characterization systems today is approximately 1-5%; therefore, a specialized system must be developed which results in a reduced measurement uncertainty. A potential system using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been procured, and tests have been conducted to verify its capabilities with regards to the requirements. Using four U-Mo enrichment standards fabricated with complete isotopic and chemical characterization, infinite thickness and peak-ratio enrichment measurement methods have been considered for use. As a result of inhomogeneity within the U-Mo samples, FRAM, an isotopic analysis software, has been selected for initial testing. A systematic approach towards observing effects on FRAM's enrichment analysis has been conducted with regards to count and dead time.

  18. Corrosion of high Ni-Cr alloys and Type 304L stainless steel in HNO/sub 3/-HF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; McLaughlin, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    Nineteen alloys were evaluated as possible materials of construction for steam heating coils, the dissolver vessel, and the off-gas system of proposed facilities to process thorium and uranium fuels. Commercially available alloys were found that are satisfactory for all applications. With thorium fuel, which requires HNO/sub 3/-HF for dissolution, the best alloy for service at 130/sup 0/C when complexing agents for fluoride are used is Inconel 690; with no complexing agents at 130/sup 0/C, Inconel 671 is best. At 95/sup 0/C, six other alloys tested would be adequate: Haynes 25, Ferralium, Inconel 625, Type 304L stainless steel, Incoloy 825, and Haynes 20 (in order of decreasing preference); based on composition, six untested alloys would also be adequate. The ions most effective in reducing fluoride corrosion were the complexing agents Zr/sup 4 +/ and Th/sup 4 +/; Al/sup 3 +/ was less effective. With uranium fuel, modestly priced Type 304L stainless steel is adequate. Corrosion will be most severe in HNO/sub 3/-HF used occasionally for flushing and in solutions of HNO/sub 3/ and corrosion products (ferric and dichromate ions). HF corrosion can be minimized by complexing the fluoride ion and by passivation of the steel with strong nitric acid. Corrosion caused by corrosion products can be minimized by operating at lower temperatures.

  19. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  20. Synthesis of high {Tc} superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

    1998-07-28

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method. 5 figs.

  1. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan Mu

    2007-12-01

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain {beta}-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified {gamma}-Ni + {gamma}-Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase {gamma}-Ni and {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both {gamma}-Ni and {gamma}{prime}Ni{sub 3}Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures ({approx}970 C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It was also inferred that Pt enhances the diffusive flux of aluminum from the substrate to the scale/alloy interface. Relatively low levels of hafnium addition to Pt-free {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al increased the extent of external NiO formation due to non-protective HfO{sub 2} formation. Accordingly, this effect intensified with increasing Hf content from 0.2 to 0.5 at.%.

  2. Sulfur Tolerant Pd/Cu and Pd/Au Alloy Membranes for H2 Separation with High Pressure CO2 for Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Hua Ma; Natalie Pomerantz; Chao-Huang Chen

    2008-09-30

    The effect of H{sub 2}S poisoning on Pd, Pd/Cu, and Pd/Au alloy composite membranes prepared by the electroless deposition method on porous Inconel supports was investigated to provide a fundamental understanding of the durability and preparation of sulfur tolerant membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that the exposure of pure Pd to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures caused bulk sulfide formation at lower temperatures and surface sulfide formation at higher temperatures. Lower temperatures, longer exposure times, and higher H{sub 2}S concentrations resulted in a higher degree of sulfidation. In a Pd membrane, the bulk sulfide formation caused a drastic irrecoverable H{sub 2} permeance decline and an irreparable loss in selectivity. Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes exhibited permeance declines due to surface sulfide formation upon exposure to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. However in contrast to the pure Pd membrane, the permeances of the Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes were mostly recovered in pure H{sub 2} and the selectivity of the Pd alloy layers remained essentially intact throughout the characterization in H{sub 2}, He and H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures which lasted several thousand hours. The amount of irreversible sulfur poisoning decreased with increasing temperature due to the exothermicity of H{sub 2}S adsorption. Longer exposure times increased the amount of irreversible poisoning of the Pd/Cu membrane but not the Pd/Au membrane. Pd/Au coupon studies of the galvanic displacement method showed that higher Au{sup 3+} concentrations, lower pH values, higher bath temperatures and stirring the bath at a rate of 200 rpm yielded faster displacement rates, more uniform depositions, and a higher Au content within the layers. While 400 C was found to be sufficient to form a Pd/Au alloy on the surface, high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies showed that even after annealing between 500-600 C, the Pd/Cu alloys could have part or all of the surface in the less sulfur resistant {beta} phase.

  3. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  4. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  5. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  6. COATED ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  7. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  8. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2005-10-01

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

  9. Gacs quantum algorithmic entropy in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benatti, Fabio, E-mail: benatti@ts.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); Oskouei, Samad Khabbazi, E-mail: kh.oskuei@ut.ac.ir; Deh Abad, Ahmad Shafiei, E-mail: shafiei@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Mathematics, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We extend the notion of Gacs quantum algorithmic entropy, originally formulated for finitely many qubits, to infinite dimensional quantum spin chains and investigate the relation of this extension with two quantum dynamical entropies that have been proposed in recent years.

  10. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow You are accessing a document from...

  11. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Santandrea, Robert P. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR)

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  12. A comparative evaluation of laser and GTA welds in a high-strength titanium alloy -- Ti-6-22-22S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baeslack, W.A. III; Hurley, J.; Paskell, T.

    1994-12-31

    Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr-025Si (hereafter designated Ti-6-22-22S)is an alpha-beta titanium alloy developed for deep hardenability, high strength, intermediate temperature creep resistance, and moderate toughness. As a potential structural material for next-generation aircraft and aerospace systems, the weldability of Ti-6-22-22S has recently become a subject of increasing importance and concern. In the welding of titanium sheet, achieving satisfactory ductility is the principal limitation to alloy weldability, with poor ductility promoted by a coarse beta grain structure in the weld fusion and near-heat-affected zones. Square-butt welds were produced in 1.6 mm thick Ti-6-22-22S sheet using automatic GTA and CO{sub 2} laser welding systems. Microstructure analysis and DPH hardness traverses were performed on mounted. polished and etched specimens. Three-point bend and tensile tests were performed on transverse-weld and longitudinal-weld oriented specimens. Microstructure analysis of the laser welds revealed a fine, columnar fusion zone beta grain macrostructure and a fully-martensitic transformed-beta microstructure. Consistent with the microstructural similarities, fusion zone hardnesses of the laser welds were comparable (385 and 390 DPG, respectively) and greater than that of the base metal (330 DPH). In general, laser welds did not exhibit markedly superior ductilities relative to the GTAW, which was attributed to differences in the nature of the intragranular transformed-beta microstructures, being coarser and softer for the GTAW, the response of these as-welded microstructures to heat treatment, and interactions between the transformed-beta microstructure and the beta grain macrostructure.

  13. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M. (Sandia Park, NM); Powers, Dana A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zhang, Zhenyuan (Durham, NC)

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  14. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.more » In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.« less

  15. 3D characterization of intermetallics in a high pressure die cast Mg alloy using focused ion beam tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasekhar, A.V. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Caceres, C.H., E-mail: c.caceres@uq.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Kong, C. [Electron Microscope Unit, UNSW Analytical Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    The degree of spatial interconnection of the Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} ({beta}-phase) intermetallic in a Mg-9Al-1Zn alloy was assessed through serial sectioning at the centre and near a corner in a casting cross-section. The three dimensional reconstructions showed that the intermetallics were profusely interconnected forming a scaffold-like network over the entire cross-section, but especially near the casting surface. The scale and degree of the interconnection appeared determined by the local concentration of large dendritic grains injected from the shot sleeve. The volume fractions of intermetallics obtained through the 3D reconstruction indicated a higher content of {beta}-phase at the corner regions in comparison with the core. The volume fractions obtained by FIB were consistent with theoretical and experimental values obtained using other techniques.

  16. Mechanisms of structural evolutions associated with the high current pulsed electron beam treatment of a NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, K. M.; Zou, J. X.; Grosdidier, T.; Gey, N.; Weber, S.; Yang, D. Z.; Dong, C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); and Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Universite Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57012 Metz (France); Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Universite Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57012 Metz (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux (LPM, UMR-CNRS 7556), Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy (France); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the surface modifications associated with the use the recently developed high current pulsed electron beam technique for modifying the surface of an intermetallic NiTi alloy. Samples were treated with the same electron beam parameters but different numbers of pulses (i.e., five and ten pulses) and the present article concentrates on a detailed characterization of their texture and microstructure modifications. The observation of surface features such as craters, wavy surfaces with protrusions, chemistry modifications, and the development of specific texture components are discussed as the consequence of the combination of surface melting and evaporation mechanisms. It is also shown that in the subsurface, below the melted layer, the martensitic transformation was triggered due to the effects of the thermal stresses and shock waves propagating in the material.

  17. Anomalous phonon behavior in the high-temperature shape-memory alloy Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, S. M.; Xu Guangyong; Winn, B. L.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T.; Erwin, R.

    2007-08-01

    Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x} is a high-temperature shape-memory alloy with a martensitic transformation temperature strongly dependent on the Cr composition. Prior to the transformation, a premartensitic phase is present with an incommensurate modulated cubic lattice with wave vector of q{sub 0}=(0.22,0.22,0). The temperature dependence of the diffuse scattering in the cubic phase is measured as a function temperature for x=6.5, 8.5, and 10 at. %. The lattice dynamics has been studied and reveals anomalous temperature and q dependences of the [110]-TA{sub 2} transverse phonon branch. The phonon linewidth is broad over the entire Brillouin zone and increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to the behavior expected for anharmonicity. No anomaly is observed at q{sub 0}. The results are compared with first principles calculation of the phonon structure.

  18. In situ atomic force microscope study of high-temperature untwinning surface relief in Mn-Fe-Cu antiferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Cui, Y. G.; Wan, J. F.; Rong, Y. H.; Zhang, J. H.; Jin, X.; Cai, M. M.

    2013-05-06

    The N-type untwinning surface relief associated with the fcc {r_reversible} fct martensitic transformation (MT) was observed in the Mn{sub 81.5}Fe{sub 14.0}Cu{sub 4.5} antiferromagnetic high-temperature shape memory alloy (SMA) by in situ atomic force microscopy. The measured untwinning relief angles ({theta}{sub {alpha}} Double-Vertical-Line {theta}{sub {beta}}) at the ridge and at the valley were different, and both angles were less than the conventional values. The surface relief exhibited good reversibility during heating and cooling because of the crystallographic reversibility of thermal-elastic SMAs. Untwinning shear was proposed as the main mechanism of the N-type surface relief. The order of the reverse MT was discussed based on the experimental measurements.

  19. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Alloys for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1.+-.0.8%)Al--(1.0.+-.0.8%)Mo--(0.7.+-.0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques.

  20. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  1. Tritium Production from Palladium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Thoma, D.J.; Teter, D.F.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1998-04-19

    A number of palladium alloys have been loaded with deuterium or hydrogen under low energy bombardment in a system that allows the continuous measurement of tritium. Long run times (up to 200 h) result in an integration of the tritium and this, coupled with the high intrinsic sensitivity of the system ({approximately}0.1 nCi/l), enables the significance of the tritium measurement to be many sigma (>10). We will show the difference in tritium generation rates between batches of palladium alloys (Rh, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Be, B, Li, Hf, Hg and Fe) of various concentrations to illustrate that tritium generation rate is dependent on alloy type as well as within a specific alloy, dependent on concentration.

  2. Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical Points

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical Points Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical Points We study the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy of two dimensional conformal quantum critical systems, i.e. systems with scale invariant wave functions. They include two-dimensional generalized quantum dimer models on bipartite lattices and quantum loop models, as

  3. Universal entanglement entropy in two-dimensional conformal quantum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    critical points (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Universal entanglement entropy in two-dimensional conformal quantum critical points Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal entanglement entropy in two-dimensional conformal quantum critical points We study the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy of two-dimensional conformal quantum critical systems, i.e., systems with scale-invariant wave functions. They include two-dimensional generalized quantum dimer models on

  4. Control corrosion with new nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schade, J.P. ); Ross, R.W. Jr. )

    1994-07-01

    Nickel plays an important role in many of the alloys developed to withstand corrosive process environments such as those in chemical, petrochemical, power, marine, and pulp and paper industries. It imparts excellent corrosion resistance, toughness, metallurgical stability, and fabricability to alloys containing iron, chromium, tungsten, and other metals. These alloys are valuable in processes with high concentrations of corrosives and high operating temperatures. These alloys and their corrosive environments are discussed here.

  5. Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Grazing collisions of gravitational shock ...

  6. Casimir energy and entropy in the sphere-sphere geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo

    2011-08-15

    We calculate the Casimir energy and entropy for two spheres described by the perfect-metal model, plasma model, and Drude model in the large-separation limit. We obtain nonmonotonic behavior of the Helmholtz free energy as a function of separation and temperature for the perfect-metal and plasma models, leading to parameter ranges with negative entropy, and also we obtain nonmonotonic behavior of the entropy as a function of temperature and the separation between the spheres. This nonmonotonic behavior has not been found for the Drude model. The appearance of this anomalous behavior of the entropy as well as its thermodynamic consequences are discussed.

  7. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The boundary entropy log(g) can therefore increase during appropriate bulk flows. This is demonstrated explicitly in flows between minimal models. We discuss the applications of ...

  8. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic Solid Solution Alloys with FCC Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenggang; Bei, Hongbin; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.

    2014-10-03

    We found that compared to decades-old theories of strengthening in dilute solid solutions, the mechanical behavior of concentrated solid solutions is relatively poorly understood. A special subset of these materials includes alloys in which the constituent elements are present in equal atomic proportions, including the high-entropy alloys of recent interest. A unique characteristic of equiatomic alloys is the absence of “solvent” and “solute” atoms, resulting in a breakdown of the textbook picture of dislocations moving through a solvent lattice and encountering discrete solute obstacles. Likewise, to clarify the mechanical behavior of this interesting new class of materials, we investigate here a family of equiatomic binary, ternary and quaternary alloys based on the elements Fe, Ni, Co, Cr and Mn that were previously shown to be single-phase face-centered cubic (fcc) solid solutions. The alloys were arc-melted, drop-cast, homogenized, cold-rolled and recrystallized to produce equiaxed microstructures with comparable grain sizes. Tensile tests were performed at an engineering strain rate of 10-3 s-1 at temperatures in the range 77–673 K. Unalloyed fcc Ni was processed similarly and tested for comparison. The flow stresses depend to varying degrees on temperature, with some (e.g. NiCoCr, NiCoCrMn and FeNiCoCr) exhibiting yield and ultimate strengths that increase strongly with decreasing temperature, while others (e.g. NiCo and Ni) exhibit very weak temperature dependencies. Moreover, to better understand this behavior, the temperature dependencies of the yield strength and strain hardening were analyzed separately. Lattice friction appears to be the predominant component of the temperature-dependent yield stress, possibly because the Peierls barrier height decreases with increasing temperature due to a thermally induced increase of dislocation width. In the early stages of plastic flow (5–13% strain, depending on material), the temperature dependence of strain hardening is due mainly to the temperature dependence of the shear modulus. In all the equiatomic alloys, ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature down to 77 K. Keywords

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic Solid Solution Alloys with FCC Crystal Structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Zhenggang; Bei, Hongbin; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.

    2014-10-03

    We found that compared to decades-old theories of strengthening in dilute solid solutions, the mechanical behavior of concentrated solid solutions is relatively poorly understood. A special subset of these materials includes alloys in which the constituent elements are present in equal atomic proportions, including the high-entropy alloys of recent interest. A unique characteristic of equiatomic alloys is the absence of “solvent” and “solute” atoms, resulting in a breakdown of the textbook picture of dislocations moving through a solvent lattice and encountering discrete solute obstacles. Likewise, to clarify the mechanical behavior of this interesting new class of materials, we investigate heremore » a family of equiatomic binary, ternary and quaternary alloys based on the elements Fe, Ni, Co, Cr and Mn that were previously shown to be single-phase face-centered cubic (fcc) solid solutions. The alloys were arc-melted, drop-cast, homogenized, cold-rolled and recrystallized to produce equiaxed microstructures with comparable grain sizes. Tensile tests were performed at an engineering strain rate of 10-3 s-1 at temperatures in the range 77–673 K. Unalloyed fcc Ni was processed similarly and tested for comparison. The flow stresses depend to varying degrees on temperature, with some (e.g. NiCoCr, NiCoCrMn and FeNiCoCr) exhibiting yield and ultimate strengths that increase strongly with decreasing temperature, while others (e.g. NiCo and Ni) exhibit very weak temperature dependencies. Moreover, to better understand this behavior, the temperature dependencies of the yield strength and strain hardening were analyzed separately. Lattice friction appears to be the predominant component of the temperature-dependent yield stress, possibly because the Peierls barrier height decreases with increasing temperature due to a thermally induced increase of dislocation width. In the early stages of plastic flow (5–13% strain, depending on material), the temperature dependence of strain hardening is due mainly to the temperature dependence of the shear modulus. In all the equiatomic alloys, ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature down to 77 K. Keywords« less

  11. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  12. Temporal Entropy Generation in the Viscous Layers of Laterally-converging Duct Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald M. McEligot; Robert S. Brodkey; Helmut Eckelmann

    2008-12-01

    Since insight into entropy generation is a key to increasing efficiency and thereby reducing fuel consumption and/or waste and -- for wall-bounded flows -- most entropy is generated in the viscous layer, we examine the transient behavior of its dominant contributor there for a non-canonical flow. New measurements in oil flow are presented for the effects of favorable streamwise mean pressure gradients on temporal entropy generation rates and, in the process, on key Reynolds-stress-producing events such as sweep front passage and on the deceleration/outflow phase of the overall bursting process. Two extremes have been considered: (1) a high pressure gradient, nearing "laminarization," and (2), for comparison, a low pressure gradient corresponding to many earlier experiments. In both cases, the peak temporal entropy generation rate occurs shortly after passage of the ejection/sweep interface. Whether sweep and ejection rates appear to decrease or increase with the pressure gradient depends on the feature examined and the manner of sampling. When compared using wall coordinates for velocities, distances and time, the trends and magnitudes of the transient behaviors are mostly the same. The main effects of the higher pressure gradient are (1) changes in the time lag between detections -- representing modification of the shape of the sweep front and the sweep angle with the wall, (2) modification of the magnitude of an instantaneous Reynolds shear stress with wall distance and (3) enlarging the sweeps and ejections. Results new for both low and high pressure gradients are the temporal behaviors of the dominant contribution to entropy generation; it is found to be much more sensitive to distance from the wall than to streamwise pressure gradient.

  13. Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments - Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure

  14. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric ... Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring ...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Advanced High Strength Cast Alloys for Heavy Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Caterpillar at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of advanced high...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Advanced High Strength Cast Alloys for Heavy Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Caterpillar at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of advanced high...

  18. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  19. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by identifying the structural feature responsible for the entropy change, and point to a possible explanation for the observed dependence on length scale. Our key results are that the hydrophobic effect, i.e. the signature, temperature-dependent, solvation entropy of nonpolar molecules in water, is largely due to a dispersion force arising from correlations between rotating permanent dipole moments, that the strength of this force depends on the Kirkwood g-factor, and that the strength of this force may be obtained exactly without simulation.

  20. Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletti, Luigi

    2014-08-15

    The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

  1. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Oak Ridge, TN); Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy havign additions of monovalent iodides. Although the perferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy.

  2. Entropy squeezing for qubit – field system under decoherence effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Khalek, S; Berrada, K; A-S F Obada; Wahiddin, M R

    2014-03-28

    We study in detail the dynamics of field entropy squeezing (FES) for a qubit – field system whose dynamics is described by the phase-damped model. The results of calculations show that the initial state and decoherence play a crucial role in the evolution of FES. During the temporal evolution of the system under decoherence effect, an interesting monotonic relation between FES, Wehrl entropy (WE) and negativity is observed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heavy ion collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions AdS/CFT correspondence is now widely used for the study of strongly coupled plasmas, such as those produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. While properties

  4. Numerical estimation of the relative entropy of entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinchenko, Yuriy; Friedland, Shmuel; Gour, Gilad

    2010-11-15

    We propose a practical algorithm for the calculation of the relative entropy of entanglement (REE), defined as the minimum relative entropy between a state and the set of states with positive partial transpose. Our algorithm is based on a practical semidefinite cutting plane approach. In low dimensions the implementation of the algorithm in matlab provides an estimation for the REE with an absolute error smaller than 10{sup -3}.

  5. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in polymer melts (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 4, 2016 Title: Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts Authors: Freed, Karl F. [1] + Show Author Affiliations James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  6. Entropy-driven structure and dynamics in carbon nanocrystallites (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Entropy-driven structure and dynamics in carbon nanocrystallites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-driven structure and dynamics in carbon nanocrystallites New carbon composite materials are being developed that contain carbon nanocrystallites in the range of 5 17 A in radius dispersed within an amorphous carbon matrix. Evaluating the applicability of these materials for use in battery electrodes requires a molecular-level

  7. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  8. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  9. ternay-pd-alloys-pall | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at high temperature and pressure from gasified coal in the presence of typical contaminants. Goals for the project include creating an advanced palladium alloy for optimum hydrogen...

  10. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  11. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Randy B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  12. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steel. Part 2, Water flow rate effects in high sulfur plate steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, L.A; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high- sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O{sub 2} < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243{degrees}C, under loading conditions ({Delta}K, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/sec. or 4.7 m/sec. was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi- stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/sec. and 5.0 m/sec. parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity.

  13. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  14. Wettability of brazing alloys on molybdenum and TZM (Mo-Ti-Zr alloy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, M.M.; Keller, D.L.; Heiple, C.R.; Hofmann, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Vacuum brazing studies have been performed on molybdenum and TZM (0.5Ti-0.08Zr-Mo). Wettability tests have been conducted for nineteen braze metal filler alloys on molybdenum and thirty-two braze metal filler alloys on TZM over a wide range of temperatures. A wetting index, which is a function of contact angle and braze alloy contact area, was determined for each filler alloy at each brazing temperature. The nature and extent of interaction between the brazing alloys and the base metals was analyzed by conventional metallography, scanning-electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis. A comparison is made between the behavior of filler alloys on molybdenum and TZM -- filler alloys consistently exhibited less wettability on TZM than on molybdenum. The lower wettability of TZM is believed to be due to a small amount of titanium in the surface oxide on TZM. Cracking was observed in the base metal under some of the high temperature braze deposits. The cracking is shown to arise from liquid metal embrittlement from nickel in the high temperature braze alloys. 7 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High-Temperature Aluminum Alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  16. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

    2012-06-12

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  17. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2010-04-20

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  18. Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2013-07-09

    A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

  19. New developments in hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, R.

    1996-02-01

    The hardfacing industry has matured substantially since its inception in the early 1920s. Numerous welding alloys have been developed and field proven. By developing a strong working knowledge of available alloys, wear conditions and the specific wear situation, the goal of selecting the proper alloy to prolong service life and fight wear is now more attainable than ever. Hardfacing is the process in which a coating or cladding is applied to a substrate for the main purpose of reducing wear or loss of material by abrasion, impact, erosion, galling and cavitation. Most service environments involve a combination of these factors. The choice of an alloy system depends to a great degree on the nature of the wear process encountered. This can range from a simple low-stress condition to a very complex situation that involves abrasion combined with a corrodant and high temperature. The list of possible wear conditions is outlined below: (1) low-stress abrasion, (2) high-stress abrasion, (3) impact, (4) metal-to-metal wear, (5) erosion, and (6) cavitation erosion. In general, service conditions involve a combination of several of the conditions listed above. In addition to the type of wear, three other factors are also important as far as the severity of the wear condition is concerned. These are: (1) type of abradant, (2) service temperature, and (3) service environment. It is clear that in terms of the nature of the wear process as well as the environmental conditions, service conditions are extremely complex. They are, therefore, difficult to simulate in the laboratory. The selection of hardfacing alloys for an application is based primarily on actual field experiences and these are refined with data gathered with time.

  20. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  1. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten

  2. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten

  3. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten

  4. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Wednesday, 28 February 2007 00:00 Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and

  5. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  6. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  7. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten

  8. Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten

  9. Entanglement entropy in quantum spin chains with broken reflection symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadar, Zoltan; Zimboras, Zoltan

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the entanglement entropy of a block of L sites in quasifree translation-invariant spin chains concentrating on the effect of reflection-symmetry breaking. The Majorana two-point functions corresponding to the Jordan-Wigner transformed fermionic modes are determined in the most general case; from these, it follows that reflection symmetry in the ground state can only be broken if the model is quantum critical. The large L asymptotics of the entropy are calculated analytically for general gauge-invariant models, which have, until now, been done only for the reflection-symmetric sector. Analytical results are also derived for certain nongauge-invariant models (e.g., for the Ising model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction). We also study numerically finite chains of length N with a nonreflection-symmetric Hamiltonian and report that the reflection symmetry of the entropy of the first L spins is violated but the reflection-symmetric Calabrese-Cardy formula is recovered asymptotically. Furthermore, for noncritical reflection-symmetry-breaking Hamiltonians, we find an anomaly in the behavior of the saturation entropy as we approach the critical line. The paper also provides a concise but extensive review of the block-entropy asymptotics in translation-invariant quasifree spin chains with an analysis of the nearest-neighbor case and the enumeration of the yet unsolved parts of the quasifree landscape.

  10. Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2003-04-08

    Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

  11. Uranium-titanium-niobium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gail M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A uranium alloy having small additions of Ti and Nb shows improved strength and ductility in cross section of greater than one inch over prior uranium alloy having only Ti as an alloying element.

  12. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  13. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  14. Magnetocaloric effect in as-cast Gd{sub 1−x}Y{sub x} alloys with x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara Pérez, E. S.; Hernández Paz, J. F.; Elizalde Galindo, J. T.; Betancourt, I.; Matutes Aquino, J. A.

    2014-05-07

    In this report, we present the magnetocaloric effect of Gd{sub 1−x}Y{sub x} alloys (0.0 ≤ × ≤ 0.4) prepared by arc-melting from high purity Gd and Y precursors in inert atmosphere. The formation of Gd{sub 1−x}Y{sub x} solid solutions was verified by means of X-ray diffraction analysis across the compositional series; also, residual secondary phases Gd and Y were present. Magnetic characterization performed by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry at a maximum applied field of 3.0 T showed a drastic reduction of the magnetization saturation (from 233 emu/g for x = 0.0 to 183 emu/g for x = 0.4), due to a dilution effect of the Y alloying, together with a marked Curie temperature decrease from 296 K to 196 K between x = 0.0 and x = 0.4. The second-order character of the magnetic transition was established by Arrot plots for all the cases. On the other hand, the magnetic entropy variation, determined from numerical integration of Maxwell relation displayed excellent values above 5.30 J/kg K for alloys with x < 0.3 due to the steep transition of the thermomagnetic curves.

  15. Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1999-04-20

    A method is described for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds. 4 figs.

  16. Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Stephen Everett (Livermore, CA); Thomas, George John (Livermore, CA); Bauer, Walter (Livermore, CA); Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi (Lafayette, CA)

    1999-04-20

    A method for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds.

  17. Dual-phase Cr-Ta alloys for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Zhu, Jiahong (Knoxville, TN); Tortorelli, Peter F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    Dual phase alloys of chromium containing 2 to 11 atomic percent tantalum with minor amounts of Mo, Cr, Ti, Y, La, Cr, Si and Ge are disclosed. These alloys contain two phases including Laves phase and Cr-rich solid solution in either eutectic structures or dispersed Laves phase particles in the Cr-rich solid solution matrix. The alloys have superior mechanical properties at high temperature and good oxidation resistance when heated to above 1000.degree. C. in air.

  18. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E; Rieken, Joel

    2013-12-10

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with an introduced reactive species than does the alloying element and wherein one or more atomizing parameters is/are modified to controllably reduce the amount of the reactive species, such as oxygen, introduced into the atomized particles so as to reduce anneal times and improve reaction (conversion) to the desired strengthening dispersoids in the matrix. The atomized alloy particles are solidified as solidified alloy particles or as a solidified deposit of alloy particles. Bodies are made from the dispersion strengthened alloy particles, deposit thereof, exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures by virtue of the presence of the corrosion and/or oxidation resistance imparting alloying element in solid solution in the particle alloy matrix.

  19. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  20. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shaber, Eric L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DuPont, John N. (Whitehall, PA); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, David B. (Bethlehem, PA)

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  1. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  2. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  3. Alloys in energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  4. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  5. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  6. Entropy considerations in constraining the mSUGRA parameter space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunez, Dario; Sussman, Roberto A.; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragon, Myriam

    2006-09-25

    We explore the use of two criteria to constraint the allowed parameter space in mSUGRA models. Both criteria are based in the calculation of the present density of neutralinos as dark matter in the Universe. The first one is the usual ''abundance'' criterion which is used to calculate the relic density after the ''freeze-out'' era. To compute the relic density we used the numerical public code micrOMEGAs. The second criterion applies the microcanonical definition of entropy to a weakly interacting and self-gravitating gas evaluating then the change in the entropy per particle of this gas between the ''freeze-out'' era and present day virialized structures (i.e systems in virial equilibrium). An ''entropy-consistency'' criterion emerges by comparing theoretical and empirical estimates of this entropy. The main objective of our work is to determine for which regions of the parameter space in the mSUGRA model are both criteria consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds according to WMAP for the relic density: 0.0945 < {omega}CDMh2 < 0.1287. As a first result, we found that for A0 = 0, sgn{mu} +, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan{beta} {approx_equal} 50 are both criteria significantly consistent.

  7. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  8. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged AlZnMgCu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  9. High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cost Titanium Alloy Production ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Production Titanium for Energy Efficient Mechanical Systems. Titanium (Ti) is highly valued for ...

  10. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  11. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  12. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  13. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  14. High strain in polycrystalline Ni{sub 48.8}Mn{sub 31.4}Ga{sub 19.8} Heusler alloys under overlapped static and oscillating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanher, D. Z.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Ctica, L. F.; Santos, I. A.; Gotardo, R. A. M.; Viana, D. S. F.; Garcia, D.; Eiras, J. A.

    2014-09-21

    Martensitic polycrystalline Ni{sub 48.8}Mn{sub 31.4}Ga{sub 19.8} Heusler alloys, with a stacking period of 14 atomic planes at room temperature, were innovatively processed by combining high-energy ball milling and powder metallurgy. Bulk samples were mechanically coupled to a piezoelectric material in a parallel configuration, and the mechanical deformation of the studied system due to the twin's variant motion was investigated under overlapped static and oscillating magnetic fields. A reversible and high mechanical deformation is observed when the frequency of the oscillating magnetic field is tuned with the natural vibration frequency of this system. In this condition, a linear deformation as a function of the static magnetic field amplitude occurs in the 4 kOe range, and a mechanical deformation of 2% at 10 kOe is observed.

  15. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  16. Entanglement entropy of two black holes and entanglement entropic force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiba, Noburo

    2011-03-15

    We study the entanglement entropy S{sub C} of the massless free scalar field on the outside region C of two black holes A and B whose radii are R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} and how it depends on the distance r(>>R{sub 1},R{sub 2}) between two black holes. If we can consider the entanglement entropy as thermodynamic entropy, we can see the entropic force acting on the two black holes from the r dependence of S{sub C}. We develop the computational method based on that of Bombelli et al. to obtain the r dependence of S{sub C} of scalar fields whose Lagrangian is quadratic with respect to the scalar fields. First, we study S{sub C} in (d+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. In this case the state of the massless free scalar field is the Minkowski vacuum state, and we replace two black holes by two imaginary spheres and take the trace over the degrees of freedom residing in the imaginary spheres. We obtain the leading term of S{sub C} with respect to 1/r. The result is S{sub C}=S{sub A}+S{sub B}+(1/r{sup 2d-2})G(R{sub 1},R{sub 2}), where S{sub A} and S{sub B} are the entanglement entropy on the inside region of A and B, respectively, and G(R{sub 1},R{sub 2}){<=}0. We do not calculate G(R{sub 1},R{sub 2}) in detail, but we show how to calculate it. In the black hole case we use the method used in the Minkowski spacetime case with some modifications. We show that S{sub C} can be expected to be the same form as that in the Minkowski spacetime case. But in the black hole case, S{sub A} and S{sub B} depend on r, so we do not fully obtain the r dependence of S{sub C}. Finally, we assume that the entanglement entropy can be regarded as thermodynamic entropy and consider the entropic force acting on two black holes. We argue how to separate the entanglement entropic force from other forces and how to cancel S{sub A} and S{sub B} whose r dependences are not obtained. Then we obtain the physical prediction, which can be tested experimentally in principle.

  17. Fe-based long range ordered alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.

    Malleable long range ordered alloys with high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Co,Fe)/sub 3/ and V(Co,Fe,Ni)/sub 3/ system. The composition comprising by weight 22 to 23% V, 35 to 50% Fe, 0 to 22% Co and 19 to 40% Ni with an electron density no greater than 8.00. Excellent high temperature properties occur in alloys having compositions comprising by weight 22 to 23% V, 35 to 45% Fe, 0 to 10% Co, 25 to 35% Ni; 22 to 23% V, 28 to 33% Ni and the remainder Fe; and 22 to 23% V, 19 to 22% Co and the remainder Fe. The alloys are fabricable by casting, deforming and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure.

  18. Fe-based long range ordered alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T; Inouye, Henry; Schaffhauser, Anthony C.

    1980-01-01

    Malleable long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Co,Fe).sub.3 and V(Co,Fe,Ni).sub.3 system having the composition comprising by weight 22-23% V, 35-50% Fe, 0-22% Co and 19-40% Ni with an electron density no greater than 8.00. Excellent high temperature properties occur in alloys having compositions comprising by weight 22-23% V, 35-45% Fe, 0-10% Co, 25-35% Ni; 22-23% V, 28-33% Ni and the remainder Fe; and 22-23% V, 19-22% Ni, 19-22% Co and the remainder Fe. The alloys are fabricable by casting, deforming and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure.

  19. Entropy flattening, gas clumping, and turbulence in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Lapi, A.

    2014-03-10

    Several physical processes and formation events are expected in cluster outskirts, a vast region up to now essentially not covered by observations. The recent Suzaku (X-ray) and Planck (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect) observations out to the virial radius have highlighted in these peripheral regions a rather sharp decline of the intracluster gas temperature, an entropy flattening in contrast with the theoretically expected power law increase, the break of the hydrostatic equilibrium even in some relaxed clusters, a derived gas mass fraction above the cosmic value measured from several cosmic microwave background experiments, and a total X-ray mass lower than the weak lensing mass determinations. Here we present the analysis of four clusters (A1795, A2029, A2204, and A133) with the SuperModel that includes a nonthermal pressure component due to turbulence to sustain the hydrostatic equilibrium also in the cluster outskirts. In this way, we obtain a correct determination of the total X-ray mass and of the gas mass fraction; this in turn allows us to determine the level of the gas clumping that can affect the shape of the entropy profiles reported by the Suzaku observations. Our conclusion is that the role of the gas clumping is very marginal and that the observed entropy flattening is due to the rapid decrement of the temperature in the cluster outskirts caused by non-gravitational effects. Moreover, we show that the X-ray/SZ joint analysis from ROSAT and Planck data, as performed in some recent investigations, is inadequate for discriminating between a power law increase and a flattening of the entropy.

  20. Effect of the time-dependent coupling on a superconducting qubit-field system under decoherence: Entanglement and Wehrl entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Eleuch, H.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of a superconducting (SC) qubit interacting with a field under decoherence with and without time-dependent coupling effect is analyzed. Quantum features like the collapse–revivals for the dynamics of population inversion, sudden birth and sudden death of entanglement, and statistical properties are investigated under the phase damping effect. Analytic results for certain parametric conditions are obtained. We analyze the influence of decoherence on the negativity and Wehrl entropy for different values of the physical parameters. We also explore an interesting relation between the SC-field entanglement and Wehrl entropy behavior during the time evolution. We show that the amount of SC-field entanglement can be enhanced as the field tends to be more classical. The studied model of SC-field system with the time-dependent coupling has high practical importance due to their experimental accessibility which may open new perspectives in different tasks of quantum formation processing.

  1. Preparation and characterization of highly L2{sub 1}-ordered full-Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} thin films for spintronics device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Shan Rong; Furubayashi, Takao; Inomata, Koichiro

    2008-06-02

    We report the investigation of structure and magnetic properties of full-Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} (CFAS) thin films grown on MgO-buffered MgO (001) substrates through magnetron sputtering. It was found that single-crystal CFAS thin films with high degree of L2{sub 1} ordering and sufficiently flat surface could be obtained after postdeposition annealing. All the films show a distinct uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with the easy axis of magnetization along the in-plane [110] direction. These results indicate that the use of the MgO buffer for CFAS is a promising approach for achieving a higher tunnel magnetoresistance ratio, and thus for spintronics device applications.

  2. Dynamics of entropy perturbations in assisted dark energy with mixed kinetic terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwan, Khamphee

    2011-02-01

    We study dynamics of entropy perturbations in the two-field assisted dark energy model. Based on the scenario of assisted dark energy, in which one scalar field is subdominant compared with the other in the early epoch, we show that the entropy perturbations in this two-field system tend to be constant on large scales in the early epoch and hence survive until the present era for a generic evolution of both fields during the radiation and matter eras. This behaviour of the entropy perturbations is preserved even when the fields are coupled via kinetic interaction. Since, for assisted dark energy, the subdominant field in the early epoch becomes dominant at late time, the entropy perturbations can significantly influence the dynamics of density perturbations in the universe. Assuming correlations between the entropy and curvature perturbations, the entropy perturbations can enhance the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect if the signs of the contributions from entropy perturbations and curvature perturbations are opposite after the matter era, otherwise the ISW contribution is suppressed. For canonical scalar field the effect of entropy perturbations on ISW effect is small because the initial value of the entropy perturbations estimated during inflation cannot be sufficiently large. However, in the case of k-essence, the initial value of the entropy perturbations can be large enough to affect the ISW effect to leave a significant imprint on the CMB power spectrum.

  3. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  4. Dispersoid reinforced alloy powder and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E; Terpstra, Robert L

    2014-10-21

    A method of making dispersion-strengthened alloy particles involves melting an alloy having a corrosion and/or oxidation resistance-imparting alloying element, a dispersoid-forming element, and a matrix metal wherein the dispersoid-forming element exhibits a greater tendency to react with a reactive species acquired from an atomizing gas than does the alloying element. The melted alloy is atomized with the atomizing gas including the reactive species to form atomized particles so that the reactive species is (a) dissolved in solid solution to a depth below the surface of atomized particles and/or (b) reacted with the dispersoid-forming element to form dispersoids in the atomized particles to a depth below the surface of said atomized particles. Bodies made from the dispersion strengthened solidified particles exhibit enhanced fatigue and creep resistance and reduced wear as well as enhanced corrosion and/or oxidation resistance at high temperatures.

  5. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou (Knoxville, TN); Xu, Hanbing (Knoxville, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  6. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  7. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strasser, Peter (Houston, TX); Koh, Shirlaine (Houston, TX); Mani, Prasanna (Houston, TX); Ratndeep, Srivastava (Houston, TX)

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  8. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of some Molybdenum based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Pratik Kumar

    2010-12-15

    The advent of Ni based superalloys revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry. These materials are capable of operating in extremely harsh environments, comprising of temperatures around 1050 C, under oxidative conditions. Demands for increased fuel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under oxidative conditions at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that melt in the 1250 - 1450 C, resulting in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research directions have been skewed towards exploring and developing newer alloy systems. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. Techniques for rapid thermodynamic assessments were developed and applied to two different systems - Mo-Si alloys with transition metal substitutions (and this forms the first part of the thesis) and Ni-Al alloys with added components for providing high temperature strength and ductility. A hierarchical approach towards alloy design indicated the Mo-Ni-Al system as a prospective candidate for high temperature applications. Investigations on microstructures and oxidation behavior, under both isothermal and cyclic conditions, of these alloys constitute the second part of this thesis. It was seen that refractory metal systems show a marked microstructure dependence of oxidation.

  9. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil ... Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring ...

  10. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  11. Entropy-based separation of linear chain molecules by exploiting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    differences in the saturation capacities in cage-type zeolites | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Entropy-based separation of linear chain molecules by exploiting differences in the saturation capacities in cage-type zeolites Previous Next List Rajamani Krishna, Jasper M. van Baten, Sep. Purif. Technol., 76, 325-330 (2011) DOI: 10.1016/j.seppur.2010.10.023 Full-size image (26 K) Abstract: For zeolites such as CHA, LTA, DDR, ERI, AFX, and TSC

  12. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Schweiger, H.; Do?an, .N.; Hawk, J.; Widom M.

    2013-02-20

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of CrV binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poissons ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poissons ratio for bcc CrV alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  13. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  14. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2006-10-03

    An alloy made of heat treated material represented by Gd.sub.5(Si.sub.xGe.sub.1-x).sub.4 where 0.47.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.56 that exhibits a magnetic entropy change (-.DELTA.S.sub.m) of at least 16 J/kg K, a magnetostriction of at least 2000 parts per million, and a magnetoresistance of at least 5 percent at a temperature of about 300K and below, and method of heat treating the material between 800 to 1600 degrees C. for a time to this end.

  15. Shape Memory Alloys and their Applications in Power Generation and Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun

    2013-07-01

    The shape memory effect is closely related to the reversible martensitic phase transformation, which is diffusionless and involves shear deformation. The recoverable transformation between the two phases with different crystalline symmetry results in reversible changes in physical properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetization, and elasticity. Accompanying the transformation is a change of entropy. Fascinating applications are developed based on these changes. In this paper, the history, fundamentals and technical challenges of both thermoelastic and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are briefly reviewed; applications related to energy conversion such as power generation and refrigeration as well as recent developments will be discussed.

  16. Shape Memory Alloys and Their Applications in Power Generation and Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun

    2013-03-27

    The shape memory effect is closely related to the reversible martensitic phase transformation, which is diffusionless and involves shear deformation. The recoverable transformation between the two phases with different crystalline symmetry results in reversible changes in physical properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetization, and elasticity. Accompanying the transformation is a change of entropy. Fascinating applications are developed based on these changes. In this paper, the history, fundamentals and technical challenges of both thermoelastic and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are briefly reviewed; applications related to energy conversion such as power generation and refrigeration as well as recent developments will be discussed.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  19. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  20. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  1. Report on Characterization of U-10 wt.% Zr Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown, J; Wall, M; Hsiung, L; Turchi, P

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the chemical and structural characterization results for a U-10 wt.% Zr alloy to be used in an ultra-high burn-up nuclear fuel concept. The as-cast alloy material was received from Texas A and M University. Characterization and an initial heat treatment of the alloy material were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The as-received ingot was sectioned for X-ray analysis, metallography, SEM, TEM, and heat treatments, as shown in Figure 1.

  2. Possible dynamical explanations for Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virgo, Nathaniel Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-12-05

    Throughout the history of non-equilibrium thermodynamics a number of theories have been proposed in which complex, far from equilibrium flow systems are hypothesised to reach a steady state that maximises some quantity. Perhaps the most celebrated is Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production for the horizontal heat flux in Earth's atmosphere, for which there is some empirical support. There have been a number of attempts to derive such a principle from maximum entropy considerations. However, we currently lack a more mechanistic explanation of how any particular system might self-organise into a state that maximises some quantity. This is in contrast to equilibrium thermodynamics, in which models such as the Ising model have been a great help in understanding the relationship between the predictions of MaxEnt and the dynamics of physical systems. In this paper we show that, unlike in the equilibrium case, Paltridge-type maximisation in non-equilibrium systems cannot be achieved by a simple dynamical feedback mechanism. Nevertheless, we propose several possible mechanisms by which maximisation could occur. Showing that these occur in any real system is a task for future work. The possibilities presented here may not be the only ones. We hope that by presenting them we can provoke further discussion about the possible dynamical mechanisms behind extremum principles for non-equilibrium systems, and their relationship to predictions obtained through MaxEnt.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines 2012 FOA 648 Topic 3a

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  4. Multi-range force sensors utilizing shape memory alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2003-04-15

    The present invention provides a multi-range force sensor comprising a load cell made of a shape memory alloy, a strain sensing system, a temperature modulating system, and a temperature monitoring system. The ability of the force sensor to measure contact forces in multiple ranges is effected by the change in temperature of the shape memory alloy. The heating and cooling system functions to place the shape memory alloy of the load cell in either a low temperature, low strength phase for measuring small contact forces, or a high temperature, high strength phase for measuring large contact forces. Once the load cell is in the desired phase, the strain sensing system is utilized to obtain the applied contact force. The temperature monitoring system is utilized to ensure that the shape memory alloy is in one phase or the other.

  5. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gerald D. (Kennewick, WA); Lobsinger, Ralph J. (Kennewick, WA); Hamilton, Margaret L. (Richland, WA); Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Throughput Study of Diffusion and Phase Transformation Kinetics of Magnesium-Based Systems For Automotive Cast Magnesium Alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ohio State University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-throughput study...

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Liu, C. T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  10. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  11. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  12. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  13. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  14. A Computationally Based Approach to Homogenizing Advanced Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J

    2011-02-27

    We have developed a computationally based approach to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of complex alloys. The Scheil module within the Thermo-Calc software is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within alloys, and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformations) is used to model the homogenization kinetics as a function of time, temperature and microstructural scale. We will discuss this approach as it is applied to both Ni based superalloys as well as the more complex (computationally) case of alloys that solidify with more than one matrix phase as a result of segregation. Such is the case typically observed in martensitic steels. With these alloys it is doubly important to homogenize them correctly, especially at the laboratory scale, since they are austenitic at high temperature and thus constituent elements will diffuse slowly. The computationally designed heat treatment and the subsequent verification real castings are presented.

  15. Tensile and toughness assessment of the procured advanced alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-11

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance by 2024 in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments

  16. Immersion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1991-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of exposure studies performed on two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated Tuff Repository conditions. Testing was performed at 90{degrees}C in three environments; simulated J-13 well water, and two environments that simulated the chemical effects resulting from boiling and irradiation of the groundwater. Creviced specimens and U-bends were exposed to liquid, to vapor above the condensed phase, and to alternate immersion. A rod specimen was used to monitor corrosion at the vapor-liquid interface. The specimens were evaluated by electrochemical, gravimetric, and metallographic techniques following approximately 2000 hours of exposure. Results of the exposure tests indicated that all four alloys exhibited acceptable general corrosion rates in simulated J-13 well water. These rates decreased with time. Incipient pitting was observed under deposits on Alloy 825 and pitting was observed on both Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 715 in the simulated J-13 well water. No SCC was observed in U-bend specimens of any of the alloys in simulated J-13 well water. 33 refs., 48 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

    2012-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  18. Surface Studies of HSLA [high strength low alloy] Steel after Electrochemical Corrosion in Supercritical CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M. Holcomb, G. Tylczak, J Beck, J Fedkin, M. Lvov, S.

    2011-10-11

    Corrosion resistance of pipeline materials for transporting coal combustion produced supercritical CO{sub 2} from power plants to sequestration sites has not been fully determined. Although pipeline materials are resistant to corrosion in pure supercritical CO{sub 2}, cleaning costs of combustion produced CO{sub 2} streams from impurities such as H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} are too high, making sequestration of pure CO{sub 2} streams unfeasible. Impacts of the H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} impurities on pipeline corrosion must be determined. Filling Up This Technological Gap requires studying effects of H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} concentrations on pipeline.

  19. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  20. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  1. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Paxton, Michael M. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  2. Titanium Alloys - Some

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLM of Aluminium and Titanium Alloys - Some lessons learned Presented by: Dr Chris Tuck § Nottingham Background § Lattice Design § Investigating Density § Investigating Laser Spatter § Mechanical Properties § Heat Treatments effects § Bringing it all together Contents 3 3DPRG Staff § Group established in 1992 on RP and RT § Began AM research in 2000 § Began Multifunctional AM in 2011 § Over 70 staff and Post-Grads dedicated to AM § Currently have

  3. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  4. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braski, David N. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowcliffe, Arthur F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  5. Applied technology of stainless and nickel base alloys in fossil energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitcraft, P.K.

    1994-12-31

    Fossil energy systems, particularly those sourced on coal, provide a range of conditions that can prove to be a severe test of a construction material`s corrosion resistance. Two recently developed high strength heat resistant stainless steel alloys, UNS S30615 and UNS S30815, are being utilized within fossil energy and related process systems. These alloys offer not only elevated temperature strength levels above those of conventional alloys, but offer exceptional resistance to oxidation, sulfidation and other contaminating species. Alloy data and application experience for these materials is reviewed.

  6. Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister/cask vacuum drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures, internal gas pressures, and hoop stresses. The HBU PWR cladding alloys have a wide range of

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated UMo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and AlSi Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with AlSi matrices.

  8. 2015 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop | netl.doe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Effect of Mixture Concentration Inhomogeneity on Detonation Properties in Pressure ... Advanced Bond Coats for Thermal Barrier Coating Systems Based on High Entropy Alloys Derek ...

  9. PowerPoint-Präsentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Metal-diamondmetal-cBN composites Novel High-entropy alloy components ... ... to remove from the base plate. ... and have already a very good abrasive effect ...

  10. CX-010797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Serration Behavior of High Entropy Alloys CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. Themore » most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.« less

  12. Block entropy and quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2010-06-15

    We study the von Neumann block entropy in the Kondo necklace model for different anisotropies {eta} in the XY interaction between conduction spins using the density matrix renormalization group method. It was found that the block entropy presents a maximum for each {eta} considered, and, comparing it with the results of the quantum criticality of the model based on the behavior of the energy gap, we observe that the maximum block entropy occurs at the quantum critical point between an antiferromagnetic and a Kondo singlet state, so this measure of entanglement is useful for giving information about where a quantum phase transition occurs in this model. We observe that the block entropy also presents a maximum at the quantum critical points that are obtained when an anisotropy {Delta} is included in the Kondo exchange between localized and conduction spins; when {Delta} diminishes for a fixed value of {eta}, the critical point increases, favoring the antiferromagnetic phase.

  13. Examining Information Entropy Approaches as Wind Power Forecasting Performance Metrics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Milligan, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the parameters associated with the calculation of the Renyi entropy in order to further the understanding of its application to assessing wind power forecasting errors.

  14. Solvent Electrostriction-Driven Peptide Folding Revealed by Quasi Gaussian Entropy Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noe, F [University of Heidelberg; Daidone, Isabella [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Amadei, Andrea [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy

    2008-08-01

    A quantitative understanding of the complex relationship between microscopic structure and the thermodynamics driving peptide and protein folding is a major goal of biophysical chemistry. Here, we present a methodology comprising the use of an extended quasi-Gaussian entropy theory parametrized using molecular dynamics simulation that provides a complete description of the thermodynamics of peptide conformational states. The strategy is applied to analyze the conformational thermodynamics of MR121-GSGSW, a peptide well characterized in experimental studies. The results demonstrate that the extended state of the peptide possesses the lowest partial molar entropy. The origin of this entropy decrease is found to be in the increase of the density and orientational order of the hydration water molecules around the peptide, induced by the 'unfolding'. While such a reduction of the configurational entropy is usually associated with the hydrophobic effect, it is here found to be mainly due to the interaction of the solute charges with the solvent, that is, electrostriction.

  15. Solvent Electrostriction Driven Peptide Folding revealed by Quasi-Gaussian Entropy Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noe, F [University of Heidelberg; Daidone, Isabella [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Amadei, Andrea [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy

    2008-06-01

    A quantitative understanding of the complex relationship between microscopic structure and the thermodynamics driving peptide and protein folding is a major goal of biophysical chemistry. Here, we present a methodology comprising the use of an extended quasi-Gaussian entropy theory parametrized using molecular dynamics simulation that provides a complete description of the thermodynamics of peptide conformational states. The strategy is applied to analyze the conformational thermodynamics of MR121-GSGSW, a peptide well characterized in experimental studies. The results demonstrate that the extended state of the peptide possesses the lowest partial molar entropy. The origin of this entropy decrease is found to be in the increase of the density and orientational order of the hydration water molecules around the peptide, induced by the 'unfolding'. While such a reduction of the configurational entropy is usually associated with the hydrophobic effect, it is here found to be mainly due to the interaction of the solute charges with the solvent, that is, electrostriction.

  16. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  18. Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrodes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Electrodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Electrodes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Hudak, Nicholas ; Davis, Lorie Elizabeth ; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1183161 Report Number(s): SAND2014-17923J Journal ID: ISSN 0013--4651; 537664 DOE Contract

  19. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations In this study, we evaluate the possibility

  20. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere

  1. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using

  2. Quantum Gravity corrections and entropy at the Planck time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Vagenas, Elias C.; Das, Saurya E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the effects of Quantum Gravity on the Planck era of the universe. In particular, using different versions of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle and under specific conditions we find that the main Planck quantities such as the Planck time, length, mass and energy become larger by a factor of order 10?10{sup 4} compared to those quantities which result from the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. However, we prove that the dimensionless entropy enclosed in the cosmological horizon at the Planck time remains unchanged. These results, though preliminary, indicate that we should anticipate modifications in the set-up of cosmology since changes in the Planck era will be inherited even to the late universe through the framework of Quantum Gravity (or Quantum Field Theory) which utilizes the Planck scale as a fundamental one. More importantly, these corrections will not affect the entropic content of the universe at the Planck time which is a crucial element for one of the basic principles of Quantum Gravity named Holographic Principle.

  3. Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-04-15

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID experiments. Peptide radical cations and anions were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes. The effect of the charge, radical, and the presence of a basic residue on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of peptide ions was examined using RVYIHPF (1) and HVYIHPF (2) as model systems. Comparison of the survival curves for of [M+H]{sup +}, [M-H]{sup -}, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, and [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}} ions of these precursors demonstrated that even-electron ions are more stable towards fragmentation than their odd-electron counterparts. RRKM modeling of the experimental data demonstrated that the lower stability of the positive radicals is mainly attributed to lower dissociation thresholds while entropy effects are responsible the relative instability of the negative radicals. Substitution of arginine with less basic histidine residue has a strong destabilizing effect on the [M+H]{sup +} ions and a measurable stabilizing effect on the odd-electron ions. Lower threshold energies for dissociation of both positive and negative radicals of 1 are attributed to the presence of lower-energy dissociation pathways that are most likely promoted by the presence of the basic residue.

  4. Entropy-driven structure and dynamics in carbon nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNutt, Nicholas W; Wang, Qifei; Rios, Orlando; Keffer, David J

    2014-01-01

    New carbon composite materials are being developed that contain carbon nanocrystallites in the range of 5 17 A in radius dispersed within an amorphous carbon matrix. Evaluating the applicability of these materials for use in battery electrodes requires a molecular-level understanding of the thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic properties of the nanocrystallites. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations reveal the molecular-level mechanisms for such experimental observations as the increased spacing between carbon planes in nanocrystallites as a function of decreasing crystallite size. As the width of this spacing impacts Li-ion capacity, an explanation of the origin of this distance is relevant to understanding anode performance. It is thus shown that the structural configuration of these crystallites is a function of entropy. The magnitude of out-of-plane ripples, binding energy between layers, and frequency of characteristic planar modes are reported over a range of nanocrystallite sizes and temperatures. This fundamental information for layered carbon nanocrystallites may be used to explain enhanced lithium ion diffusion within the carbon composites.

  5. Entropy density of an adiabatic relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaidir, Ahmad Firdaus; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-04-24

    Inspired by recent works, we investigate how the thermodynamics parameters (entropy, temperature, number density, energy density, etc) of Bose-Einstein Condensate star scale with the structure of the star. Below the critical temperature in which the condensation starts to occur, we study how the entropy behaves with varying temperature till it reaches its own stability against gravitational collapse and singularity. Compared to photon gases (pressure is described by radiation) where the chemical potential, ? is zero, entropy of photon gases obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law for a small values of T while forming a spiral structure for a large values of T due to general relativity. The entropy density of Bose-Einstein Condensate is obtained following the similar sequence but limited under critical temperature condition. We adopt the scalar field equation of state in Thomas-Fermi limit to study the characteristics of relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate under varying temperature and entropy. Finally, we obtain the entropy density proportional to (?T{sup 3}-3T) which obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law in ultra-relativistic condition.

  6. Thermo-physical Properties of DU-10 wt.% Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas E. Burkes; Cynthia A. Papesch; Andrew P. Maddison; Thomas Hartmann; Francine J. Rice

    2010-08-01

    Low-enriched uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum is under consideration by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative reactor convert program as a very high density fuel to enable the conversion of high-performance research reactors away from highly-enriched uranium fuels. As with any fuel development program, the thermophysical properties of the fuel as a function of temperature are extremely important and must be well characterized in order to effectively model and predict fuel behavior under normal and off-normal irradiation conditions. For the alloy system under investigation, there is a lack of thermophysical property data, and in most cases, the data is relatively inconsistent and lacks sufficient explanation. Available literature on this alloy system comes mainly from studies done during the 1960s and 1970s, and often does not include sufficient information on fabrication history or conditions to draw conclusions for the current application. The current paper has investigated specific heat capacity, coefficient of linear thermal expansion, density, and thermal diffusivity that were then used to calculate alloy thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The data obtained from this investigation was compared to available literature on similar U-Mo alloys, and in most cases are in good agreement.

  7. High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. The redshift evolution of the mean temperature, pressure, and entropy profiles in 80 SPT-selected galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Bayliss, M.; Forman, W. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg{sup 2} South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ?20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R {sub 500}, which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (?30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R {sub 500}) and outer (r > R {sub 500}) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R {sub 500} of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r ? 0.7R {sub 500}this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r ? R {sub 500} in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (?3) rate at which group-mass (?2 keV) halos, which would go undetected at our survey depth, are accreting onto the cluster at z ? 1. This work demonstrates a powerful method for inferring spatially resolved cluster properties in the case where individual cluster signal-to-noise is low, but the number of observed clusters is high.

  9. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  10. Extreme solid state refrigeration using nanostructured Bi-Te alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima Sharma, Ana L.; Spataru, Dan Catalin; Medlin, Douglas L.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Morales, Alfredo Martin

    2009-09-01

    Materials are desperately needed for cryogenic solid state refrigeration. We have investigated nanostructured Bi-Te alloys for their potential use in Ettingshausen refrigeration to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These alloys form alternating layers of Bi{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} blocks in equilibrium. The composition Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} was identified as having the greatest potential for having a high Ettingshausen figure of merit. Both single crystal and polycrystalline forms of this material were synthesized. After evaluating the Ettingshausen figure of merit for a large, high quality polycrystal, we simulated the limits of practical refrigeration in this material from 200 to 77 K using a simple device model. The band structure was also computed and compared to experiments. We discuss the crystal growth, transport physics, and practical refrigeration potential of Bi-Te alloys.

  11. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layer leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Strength, Dissimilar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks | Department of Energy High Strength, Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Strength, Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high strength, dissimilar alloy aluminum tailor-welded blanks. PDF icon

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks | Department of Energy High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high speed joining of dissimilar alloy aluminum

  14. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  15. The Effect of Cold Work on Properties of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is approved for non-nuclear construction in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section I and Section VIII, but is not currently qualified for nuclear use in ASME Code Section III. A draft Code Case was submitted in 1992 to qualify the alloy for nuclear service but efforts were stopped before the approval process was completed.1 Renewed interest in high temperature nuclear reactors has resulted in a new effort to qualify Alloy 617 for use in nuclear pressure vessels. The mechanical and physical properties of Alloy 617 were extensively characterized for the VHTR programs in the 1980’s and incorporated into the 1992 draft Code Case. Recently, the properties of modern heats of the alloy that incorporate an additional processing step, electro-slag re-melting, have been characterized both to confirm that the properties of contemporary material are consistent with those in the historical record and to increase the available database. A number of potential issues that were identified as requiring further consideration prior to the withdrawal of the 1992 Code Case are also being re-examined in the current R&D program. Code Cases are again being developed to allow use of Alloy 617 for nuclear design within the rules of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In general the Code defines two temperature ranges for nuclear design with austenitic and nickel based alloys. Below 427°C (800°F) time dependent behavior is not considered, while above this temperature creep and creep-fatigue are considered to be the dominant life-limiting deformation modes. There is a corresponding differentiation in the treatment of the potential for effects associated with cold work. Below 427°C the principal issue is the relationship between the level of cold work and the propensity for stress corrosion cracking and above that temperature the primary concern is the impact of cold work on creep-rupture behavior.

  16. Progress Report 2011: Understanding compound phase transitions in Heusler alloy giant magnetocaloric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane Stadler

    2011-12-13

    Our goal is to gain insight into the fundamental physics that is responsible for magnetocaloric effects (MCE) and related properties at the atomic level. We are currently conducting a systematic study on the effects of atomic substitutions in Ni2MnGa-based alloys, and also exploring related full- and half-Heusler alloys, for example Ni-Mn-X (X=In, Sn, Sb), that exhibit a wide variety of interesting and potentially useful physical phenomena. It is already known that the magnetocaloric effect in the Heusler alloys is fundamentally connected to other interesting phenomena such as shape-memory properties. And the large magnetic entropy change in Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25Ga has been attributed to the coupling of the first-order, martensitic transition with the second-order ferromagneticâ??paramagnetic (FM-PM) transition. Our research to this point has focused on understanding the fundamental physics at the origin of these complex, compound phase transitions, and the novel properties that emerge. We synthesize the materials using a variety of techniques, and explore their material properties through structural, magnetic, transport, and thermo-magnetic measurements.

  17. Entropy vs. energy waveform processing: A comparison based on the heat equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Michael S.; McCarthy, John E.; Bruillard, Paul J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2015-05-25

    Virtually all modern imaging devices collect electromagnetic or acoustic waves and use the energy carried by these waves to determine pixel values to create what is basically an “energy” picture. However, waves also carry “information”, as quantified by some form of entropy, and this may also be used to produce an “information” image. Numerous published studies have demonstrated the advantages of entropy, or “information imaging”, over conventional methods. The most sensitive information measure appears to be the joint entropy of the collected wave and a reference signal. The sensitivity of repeated experimental observations of a slowly-changing quantity may be defined as the mean variation (i.e., observed change) divided by mean variance (i.e., noise). Wiener integration permits computation of the required mean values and variances as solutions to the heat equation, permitting estimation of their relative magnitudes. There always exists a reference, such that joint entropy has larger variation and smaller variance than the corresponding quantities for signal energy, matching observations of several studies. Moreover, a general prescription for finding an “optimal” reference for the joint entropy emerges, which also has been validated in several studies.

  18. Entropy vs. energy waveform processing: A comparison based on the heat equation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hughes, Michael S.; McCarthy, John E.; Bruillard, Paul J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2015-05-25

    Virtually all modern imaging devices collect electromagnetic or acoustic waves and use the energy carried by these waves to determine pixel values to create what is basically an “energy” picture. However, waves also carry “information”, as quantified by some form of entropy, and this may also be used to produce an “information” image. Numerous published studies have demonstrated the advantages of entropy, or “information imaging”, over conventional methods. The most sensitive information measure appears to be the joint entropy of the collected wave and a reference signal. The sensitivity of repeated experimental observations of a slowly-changing quantity may be definedmore » as the mean variation (i.e., observed change) divided by mean variance (i.e., noise). Wiener integration permits computation of the required mean values and variances as solutions to the heat equation, permitting estimation of their relative magnitudes. There always exists a reference, such that joint entropy has larger variation and smaller variance than the corresponding quantities for signal energy, matching observations of several studies. Moreover, a general prescription for finding an “optimal” reference for the joint entropy emerges, which also has been validated in several studies.« less

  19. Present Status of Vanadium Alloys for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muroga, Takeo; Chen, J. M.; Chernov, V. M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Le Flem, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vanadium alloys are advanced options for low activation structural materials. After more than two decades of research, V-4Cr-4Ti has been emerged as the leading candidate, and technological progress has been made in reducing the number of critical issues for application of vanadium alloys to fusion reactors. Notable progress has been made in fabricating alloy products and weld joints without degradation of properties. Various efforts are also being made to improve high temperature strength and creep-rupture resistance, low temperature ductility after irradiation, and corrosion resistance in blanket conditions. Future research should focus on clarifying remaining uncertainty in the operating temperature window of V-4Cr-4Ti for application to near to middle term fusion blanket systems, and on further exploration of advanced materials for improved performance for longer-term fusion reactor systems.

  20. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Walker, Larry R; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  1. Method for preparing homogeneous single crystal ternary III-V alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1991-01-01

    A method for producing homogeneous, single-crystal III-V ternary alloys of high crystal perfection using a floating crucible system in which the outer crucible holds a ternary alloy of the composition desired to be produced in the crystal and an inner floating crucible having a narrow, melt-passing channel in its bottom wall holds a small quantity of melt of a pseudo-binary liquidus composition that would freeze into the desired crystal composition. The alloy of the floating crucilbe is maintained at a predetermined lower temperature than the alloy of the outer crucible, and a single crystal of the desired homogeneous alloy is pulled out of the floating crucible melt, as melt from the outer crucible flows into a bottom channel of the floating crucible at a rate that corresponds to the rate of growth of the crystal.

  2. Radioactive material package closures with the use of shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, J.A.; Bronowski, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    When heated from room temperature to 165 C, some shape memory metal alloys such as titanium-nickel alloys have the ability to return to a previously defined shape or size with dimensional changes up to 7%. In contrast, the thermal expansion of most metals over this temperature range is about 0.1 to 0.2%. The dimension change of shape memory alloys, which occurs during a martensite to austenite phase transition, can generate stresses as high as 700 MPa (100 kspi). These properties can be used to create a closure for radioactive materials packages that provides for easy robotic or manual operations and results in reproducible, tamper-proof seals. This paper describes some proposed closure methods with shape memory alloys for radioactive material packages. Properties of the shape memory alloys are first summarized, then some possible alternative sealing methods discussed, and, finally, results from an initial proof-of-concept experiment described.

  3. Features of primary damage by high energy displacement cascades in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    concentrated Ni-based alloys (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Features of primary damage by high energy displacement cascades in concentrated Ni-based alloys This content will become publicly available on February 25, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Features of primary damage by high energy displacement cascades in concentrated Ni-based alloys Alloying of Ni with Fe or Co reduces primary damage production under ion irradiation. Similar results have been obtained from classical molecular dynamics

  4. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  5. CREEP AND CREEP-FATIGUE OF ALLOY 617 WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Jill; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2014-08-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) may be joined to piping or other components by welding. Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a predominant failure mechanism of the IHX1 and thus weldments used in its fabrication will experience varying cyclic stresses interrupted by periods of elevated temperature deformation. These periods of elevated temperature deformation are greatly influenced by a materials’ creep behavior. The nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, is the primary material candidate for a VHTR-type IHX, and it is expected that Alloy 617 filler metal will be used for welds. Alloy 617 is not yet been integrated into Section III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, however, nuclear component design with Alloy 617 requires ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code qualification. The Code will dictate design for welded construction through significant performance reductions. Despite the similar compositions of the weldment and base material, significantly different microstructures and mechanical properties are inevitable. Experience of nickel alloy welds in structural applications suggests that most high temperature failures occur at the weldments or in the heat-affected zone. Reliably guarding against this type of failure is particularly challenging at high temperatures due to the variations in the inelastic response of the constituent parts of the weldment (i.e., weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) [ref]. This work focuses on the creep-fatigue behavior of nickel-based weldments, a need noted during the development of the draft Alloy 617 ASME Code Case. An understanding of Alloy 617 weldments when subjected to this important deformation mode will enable determination of the appropriate design parameters associated with their use. Specifically, the three main areas emphasized are the performance reduction due to a weld discontinuity in terms of the reduced number of the cycles to failure and whether a saturation in reduced cycle life with increased hold times is observed, the microstructural stability over long cycle times, and finally, the location of the generated weldment data on a creep-fatigue damage diagram (D-diagram).

  6. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  7. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenior City, TN)

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

  8. Identifying Wave-Packet Fractional Revivals by Means of Information Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romera, Elvira; Santos, Francisco de los

    2007-12-31

    Wave-packet fractional revivals is a relevant feature in the long time-scale evolution of a wide range of physical systems, including atoms, molecules, and nonlinear systems. We show that the sum of information entropies in both position and momentum conjugate spaces is an indicator of fractional revivals by analyzing three different model systems: (i) the infinite square well, (ii) a particle bouncing vertically against a wall in a gravitational field, and (iii) the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen iodide molecules. This description in terms of information entropies complements the usual one in terms of the autocorrelation function.

  9. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  10. Microstructural Development and Mechanical Properties for Reactive Air Brazing of ZTA to Ni Alloys using Ag-CuO Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevost, Erica; DeMarco, A.Joseph; MacMichael, Beth; Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Hoffman, John W.; Walker, William J.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) is a potential joining technique to join metal alloys to ceramics for a variety of applications. In the current study, nickel (Ni) alloys were heat treated to form an oxide layer prior to RAB joining to zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA). The Ni alloys evaluated were Nicrofer 6025 HT, Inconel 600, Inconel 693, Haynes 214 and Inconel 601. The ZTA studied had compositions of 0 to 15 wt% zirconia and 0 to 14 wt% glass. Four point-bend tests were performed to evaluate the joint strength of ZTA/ZTA and ZTA/nickel alloys brazed with Ag-2wt% CuO braze alloys. It was determined that the joint strength is not a function of the ZTA composition, but that the strength is a strong function of the chemistry and microstructure of the oxide layer formed on the nickel alloy. It was determined that an increase in the aluminum content of the Ni alloy resulted in an increase of the thickness of alumina in the oxide layer and was directly proportional to the bond strength with the exception of Inconel 601 which exhibited relatively high joint strengths even though it had a relatively low aluminum content.

  11. Cycling-Induced Changes in the Entropy Profiles of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hudak, N. S.; Davis, L. E.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2014-12-09

    Entropy profiles of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) electrodes were measured at various stages in the cycle life to examine performance degradation and cycling-induced changes, or lack thereof, in thermodynamics. LiCoO2 electrodes were cycled at C/2 rate in half-cells (vs. lithium anodes) up to 20 cycles or C/5 rate in full cells (vs. MCMB anodes) up to 500 cycles. The electrodes were then subjected to entropy measurements (?E/?T, where E is open-circuit potential and T is temperature) in half-cells at regular intervals over the approximate range 0.5 ? x ? 1 in LixCoO2. Despite significant losses in capacity upon cycling, neithermorecycling rate resulted in any change to the overall shape of the entropy profile relative to an uncycled electrode, indicating retention of the basic LiCoO2 structure, lithium insertion mechanism, and thermodynamics. This confirms that cycling-induced performance degradation in LiCoO2 electrodes is primarily caused by kinetic barriers that increase with cycling. In the case of electrodes cycled at C/5, there was a subtle, quantitative, and gradual change in the entropy profile in the narrow potential range of the hexagonal-to-monoclinic phase transition. The observed change is indicative of a decrease in the intralayer lithium ordering that occurs at these potentials, and it demonstrates that a cyclinginduced structural disorder accompanies the kinetic degradation mechanisms.less

  12. Constraining the mSUGRA parameter space through entropy and abundance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragon, Myriam; Nunez, Dario; Sussman, Roberto A.; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas

    2007-06-19

    We explore the use of two criteria to constrain the allowed parameter space in mSUGRA models; both criteria are based in the calculation of the present density of neutralinos {chi}0 as Dark Matter in the Universe. The first one is the usual ''abundance'' criterion that requieres that present neutralino relic density complies with 0.0945 < {omega}CDMh2 < 0.1287, which are the 2{sigma} bounds according to WMAP. To calculate the relic density we use the public numerical code micrOMEGAS. The second criterion is the original idea presented in [3] that basically applies the microcanonical definition of entropy to a weakly interacting and self-gravitating gas, and then evaluate the change in entropy per particle of this gas between the freeze-out era and present day virialized structures. An 'entropy consistency' criterion emerges by comparing theoretical and empirical estimates of this entropy. One of the objetives of the work is to analyze the joint application of both criteria, already done in [3], to see if their results, using approximations for the calculations of the relic density, agree with the results coming from the exact numerical results of micrOMEGAS. The main objetive of the work is to use this method to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models that are inputs for the calculations of micrOMEGAS, and thus to get some bounds on the predictions for the SUSY spectra.

  13. Aqueous recovery of actinides from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.; Chostner, D.F.; Gray, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the 1980's, a joint Rocky Flats/Savannah River program was established to recover actinides from scraps and residues generated during Rocky Flats purification operations. The initial program involved pyrochemical treatment of Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) chloride salts and Electrorefining (ER) anode heel metal to form aluminum alloys suitable for aqueous processing at Savannah River. Recently Rocky Flats has expressed interest in expanding the aluminum alloy program to include treatment of chloride salt residues from a modified Molten Salt Extraction process and from the Electrorefining purification operations. Samples of the current aluminum alloy buttons were prepared at Rocky Flats and sent to Savannah River Laboratory for flowsheet development and characterization of the alloys. A summary of the scrub alloy-anode heel alloy program will be presented along with recent results from aqueous dissolution studies of the new aluminum alloys. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening ...

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  16. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M. (Kingston, TN); Northcutt, Jr., Walter G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  17. High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAlTiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for MoNiAl alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated MoNiAl alloys is discussed.

  18. High Bandgap III-V Alloys for High Efficiency Optoelectronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners...

  19. Investigation of Effects of Neutron Irradiation on Tantalum Alloys for Radioisotope Power System Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2007-01-30

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W) and to reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive the increasing high pressures of the RTG's operating environment resulting from the alpha decay of the 238-plutonium dioxide fuel. However, 238-plutonium is also a powerful neutron source. Therefore, the RTG operating environment produces large amounts of 3-helium and neutron displacement damage over the 30 year life of the RTG. The literature to date shows that there has been very little work focused on the mechanical properties of irradiated tantalum and tantalum alloys and none at the fluence levels associated with a RTG operating environment. The minimum, reactor related, work that has been reported shows that these alloys tend to follow trends seen in the behavior of other BCC alloys under irradiation. An understanding of these mechanisms is important for the confident extrapolation of mechanical-property trends to the higher doses and gas levels corresponding to actual service lifetimes. When comparing the radiation effects between samples of Ta-10%W and T-111 (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) subjected to identical neutron fluences and environmental conditions at temperatures <0.3Tm ({approx}700 deg. C), evidence suggests the possibility that T-111 will exhibit higher levels of internal damage accumulation and degradation of mechanical properties compared to Ta-10%W.

  20. Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, J.H.

    1998-06-23

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. 2 figs.

  1. Process for the electrodeposition of low stress nickel-manganese alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, James John; Goods, Steven Howard; Yang, Nancy Yuan-Chi; Cadden, Charles Henry

    2005-06-07

    A process for electrodepositing a low stress nickel-manganese multilayer alloy on an electrically conductive substrate is provided. The process includes the steps of immersing the substrate in an electrodeposition solution containing a nickel salt and a manganese salt and repeatedly passing an electric current through an immersed surface of the substrate. The electric current is alternately pulsed for predetermined durations between a first electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and a second electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and manganese. A multilayered alloy having adjacent layers of nickel and a nickel-manganese alloy on the immersed surface of the substrate is thereby produced. The resulting multilayered alloy exhibits low internal stress, high strength and ductility, and high strength retention upon exposure to heat.

  2. Average Structure Evolution of ?-phase Pu-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Alice Iulia; Page, Katharine L.; Gourdon, Olivier; Siewenie, Joan E.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2015-03-30

    [Full Text] Plutonium metal is a highly unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, from room temperature to its melting point. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with temperature, pressure, chemical additions, and time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long time periods. The fcc ?-phase deserves additional attention, not only in the context of understanding the electronic structure of Pu, but also as one of the few high-symmetry actinide phases that can be stabilized down to ambient pressure and room temperature by alloying it with trivalent elements. We will present results on recent work on aging of Pu-2at.%Ga and Pu-7at.%Ga alloys

  3. A REVIEW OF THE OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ALLOYS IN STEAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Ian G; Dooley, Barry

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this review is the state of knowledge of the oxidation behavior in steam of alloys with potential for use as pressure parts in steam boilers. Growth of steam-side oxides has implications for scale exfoliation, tube blockage and overheating, and turbine erosion. Mitigation of such problems requires mechanistic understanding of the influences of alloy composition and microstructure as well as time, temperature, and boiler operating parameters on the evolution of specific scale structures. The oxidation behavior in steam of three classes of alloys is addressed: ferritic steels (particularly the 9-12 wt% Cr alloys), austenitic steels, and high-temperature nickel-based alloys. Understanding the interplay among compositional and microstructural requirements for strengthening and oxidation resistance, and their influence on the rate and mode of scale evolution is key to the most effective application of these alloy classes. Underlying these interests is the apparently different mode of oxide growth in steam than in air, especially contributions from inward transport of oxidant species. The particular species involved and their roles in the oxidation process are expected to exert a large influence on the oxide morphologies developed, while the fate of any hydrogen released in the alloy is a further topic of particular interest.

  4. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  5. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Junjun, E-mail: junjun.shen@hzg.de; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Solid-State Joining Processes, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  6. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  7. Alloy substantially free of dendrites and method of forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de Figueredo, Anacleto M. (West Newton, MA); Apelian, Diran (West Boylston, MA); Findon, Matt M. (Monson, MA); Saddock, Nicholas (S. Windson, CT)

    2009-04-07

    Described herein are alloys substantially free of dendrites. A method includes forming an alloy substantially free of dendrites. A superheated alloy is cooled to form a nucleated alloy. The temperature of the nucleated alloy is controlled to prevent the nuclei from melting. The nucleated alloy is mixed to distribute the nuclei throughout the alloy. The nucleated alloy is cooled with nuclei distributed throughout.

  8. Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacchi, J.V.; Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.A.

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

  9. Room temperature synthesis of Ni-based alloy nanoparticles by radiolysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Berry, Donald T.; Lu, Ping; Leung, Kevin; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2009-09-01

    Room temperature radiolysis, density functional theory, and various nanoscale characterization methods were used to synthesize and fully describe Ni-based alloy nanoparticles (NPs) that were synthesized at room temperature. These complementary methods provide a strong basis in understanding and describing metastable phase regimes of alloy NPs whose reaction formation is determined by kinetic rather than thermodynamic reaction processes. Four series of NPs, (Ag-Ni, Pd-Ni, Co-Ni, and W-Ni) were analyzed and characterized by a variety of methods, including UV-vis, TEM/HRTEM, HAADF-STEM and EFTEM mapping. In the first focus of research, AgNi and PdNi were studied. Different ratios of Ag{sub x}- Ni{sub 1-x} alloy NPs and Pd{sub 0.5}- Ni{sub 0.5} alloy NP were prepared using a high dose rate from gamma irradiation. Images from high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) show that the Ag-Ni NPs are not core-shell structure but are homogeneous alloys in composition. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) maps show the homogeneity of the metals in each alloy NP. Of particular interest are the normally immiscible Ag-Ni NPs. All evidence confirmed that homogeneous Ag-Ni and Pd-Ni alloy NPs presented here were successfully synthesized by high dose rate radiolytic methodology. A mechanism is provided to explain the homogeneous formation of the alloy NPs. Furthermore, studies of Pd-Ni NPs by in situ TEM (with heated stage) shows the ability to sinter these NPs at temperatures below 800 C. In the second set of work, CoNi and WNi superalloy NPs were attempted at 50/50 concentration ratios using high dose rates from gamma irradiation. Preliminary results on synthesis and characterization have been completed and are presented. As with the earlier alloy NPs, no evidence of core-shell NP formation occurs. Microscopy results seem to indicate alloying occurred with the CoNi alloys. However, there appears to be incomplete reduction of the Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} to form the W{sup 2+} ion in solution; the predominance of WO{sup +} appears to have resulted in a W-O-Ni complex that has not yet been fully characterized.

  10. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  11. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  12. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  13. Variational method for the minimization of entropy generation in solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, Sjoerd; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-04-07

    In this work, a method is presented to extend traditional solar cell simulation tools to make it possible to calculate the most efficient design of practical solar cells. The method is based on the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, which is used to derive an expression for the local entropy generation rate in the solar cell, making it possible to quantify all free energy losses on the same scale. The framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics can therefore be combined with the calculus of variations and existing solar cell models to minimize the total entropy generation rate in the cell to find the most optimal design. The variational method is illustrated by applying it to a homojunction solar cell. The optimization results in a set of differential algebraic equations, which determine the optimal shape of the doping profile for given recombination and transport models.

  14. Oxidation of alloys targeted for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-03-12

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  15. Entropic dynamics: From entropy and information geometry to Hamiltonians and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caticha, Ariel; Bartolomeo, Daniel; Reginatto, Marcel

    2015-01-13

    Entropic Dynamics is a framework in which quantum theory is derived as an application of entropic methods of inference. There is no underlying action principle. Instead, the dynamics is driven by entropy subject to the appropriate constraints. In this paper we show how a Hamiltonian dynamics arises as a type of non-dissipative entropic dynamics. We also show that the particular form of the 'quantum potential' that leads to the Schrdinger equation follows naturally from information geometry.

  16. Entanglemet entropy of the bond order phase in graphene in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arikawa, Mitsuhiro; Aoki, Hideo; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2011-12-23

    The quantum Hall effect (QHE) in graphene has a peculiar edge mode at E = 0 that resides right within the n = 0 Landau level as protected by the chiral symmetry, in contrast that the usual edge states in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) reside between adjacent Landau levels. We investigate edge states of graphene with the Kekule bond order, which respect the chiral symmetry using the entanglement entropy.

  17. Oracle inequalities for SVMs that are based on random entropy numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwart, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for bounding local Rademacher averages of function classes induced by a loss function and a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). At the heart of this technique lies the observation that certain expectations of random entropy numbers can be bounded by the eigenvalues of the integral operator associated to the RKHS. We then work out the details of the new technique by establishing two new oracle inequalities for SVMs, which complement and generalize orevious results.

  18. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yuanzhen (Wayne, NJ), Parikh, Hemant (Harriman, NY); Smith, Terry E. (Murray, KY)

    2002-05-28

    A process for making homogeneous copolymers of vinylpyrrolidone (VP) and vinyl acetate (VA) which form clear aqueous solutions and have high cloud points. The process involves precharging VP and VA monomers in a predetermined ratio, and then feeding VP and VA at a predetermined rate, the ratio of the components in the initial charge and the feeding rates for the monomer being selected in accordance with the reactivity rates of the monomers towards copolymerization as opposed to homopolymerization.

  19. Zirconium vanadium chromium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

    1980-10-14

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V/sub 1-x/Cr/sub x/)/sub 2/ where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200/sup 0/C, at pressures down to 10/sup -6/ torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  20. Novel pre-alloyed powder processing of modified alnico 8: Correlation of microstructure and magnetic properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, I. E.; Kassen, A. G.; White, E. M. H.; Zhou, L.; Tang, W.; Palasyuk, A.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Kramer, M. J.

    2015-04-13

    Progress is reviewed on development of an improved near-final bulk magnet fabrication process for alnico 8, as a non-rare earth permanent magnet with promise for sufficient energy density and coercivity for electric drive motors. This study showed that alnico bulk magnets in near-final shape can be made by simple compression molding from spherical high purity gas atomized pre-alloyed powder. Dwell time at peak sintering temperature (1250°C) greatly affected grain size of the resulting magnet alloys. This microstructure transformation was demonstrated to be useful for gaining partially aligned magnetic properties and boosting energy product. While a route to increased coercivity wasmore » not identified by these experiments, manufacturability of bulk alnico magnet alloys in near-final shapes was demonstrated, permitting further processing and alloy modification experiments that can target higher coercivity and better control of grain anisotropy during grain growth.« less

  1. Novel pre-alloyed powder processing of modified alnico 8: Correlation of microstructure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, I. E.; Kassen, A. G.; White, E. M. H.; Zhou, L.; Tang, W.; Palasyuk, A.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Kramer, M. J.

    2015-04-13

    Progress is reviewed on development of an improved near-final bulk magnet fabrication process for alnico 8, as a non-rare earth permanent magnet with promise for sufficient energy density and coercivity for electric drive motors. This study showed that alnico bulk magnets in near-final shape can be made by simple compression molding from spherical high purity gas atomized pre-alloyed powder. Dwell time at peak sintering temperature (1250C) greatly affected grain size of the resulting magnet alloys. This microstructure transformation was demonstrated to be useful for gaining partially aligned magnetic properties and boosting energy product. While a route to increased coercivity was not identified by these experiments, manufacturability of bulk alnico magnet alloys in near-final shapes was demonstrated, permitting further processing and alloy modification experiments that can target higher coercivity and better control of grain anisotropy during grain growth.

  2. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-11-01

    A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

  3. Grain Growth Behavior, Tensile Impact Ductility, and Weldability of Cerium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKamey, C.G.

    2002-05-28

    An iridium alloy doped with small amounts of cerium and thorium is being developed as a potential replacement for the iridium-based DOP-26 alloy (doped with thorium only) that is currently used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the iridium-based alloy (designated as DOP-40) containing both cerium and thorium. Included within this report are data on grain growth of sheet material in vacuum and low-pressure oxygen environments, grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material, weldability, and the effect of grain size and test temperature on tensile properties. Where applicable, data for the DOP-26 alloy are included for comparison. Both grain size and grain-boundary cohesion affect the ductility of iridium alloys. In this study it was found that cerium and thorium, when added together, refine grain size more effectively than when thorium is added by itself (especially at high temperatures). In addition, the effect of cerium additions on grain-boundary cohesion is similar to that of thorium. Mechanical testing at both low ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) and high ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) strain rates showed that the Ce/Th-doped alloys have tensile ductilities that are as good or better than the DOP-26 alloy. The general conclusion from these studies is that cerium can be used to replace some of the radioactive thorium currently used in DOP-26 while maintaining or improving its metallurgical properties. The current DOP-26 alloy meets all requirements for cladding the radioactive fuel in the RTG heat source, but the new DOP-40 alloy could serve as a back-up alloy to be used if the costs of refining, handling, and transporting DOP-26 become prohibitively high.

  4. Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Giant Nonhysteretic Responses of Two-Phase Nanostructured Alloys ...

  5. Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Authors: Xue, Dezhen ; Zhou, Yumei ; ...

  6. Thorium doped iridium alloy for radioisotope heat sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Inouye, Henry; Schaffhauser, Anthony C.; White, Calvin L.

    1981-01-01

    A novel iridium alloy containing 100-500 ppm thorium has enhanced impact properties over undoped iridium and over prior art iridium alloys.

  7. Patent: Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEpatents Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems Citation Details Title: Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

  8. Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylczak, Joseph

    2014-05-02

    This paper reports on the results of a study that compares the erosion-corrosion behavior of a variety of alloys (Fe- 2Cr 1Mo, 304 SS, 310 SS, Incoloy 800, Haynes 230 and a Fe3Al) in a combustion environment. Advanced coal combustion environments, with higher temperatures, are driving re-examination of traditional and examination of new alloys in these hostile environments. In order to simulate conditions in advanced coal combustion boilers, a special erosion apparatus was used to allow for impingement of particles under a low abrasive flux in a gaseous environment comprised of 20 % CO2, 0.05 % HCl, 77 % N2, 3 % O2, and 0.1 % SO2. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 700 C with ~ 270 ?m silica, using an impact velocity of 20 m/s in both air and the simulated combustion gas environment. The erosion-corrosion behavior was characterized by gravimetric measurements and by examination of the degraded surfaces optically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At room temperature most of the alloys had similar loss rates. Not surprisingly, at 700 C the lower chrome-iron alloy had a very high loss rate. The nickel alloys tended to have higher loss rates than the high chrome austenitic alloys.

  9. Radiation Tolerance of Neutron-Irradiated Model Fe-Cr-Al Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Ken; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-01

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  10. Amorphous Alloy Membranes Prepared by Melt-Spin methods for Long-Term use in Hydrogen Separation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Dhanesh; Kim, Sang-Mun; Adibhatla, Anasuya; Dolan, Michael; Paglieri, Steve; Flanagan, Ted; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; Wermer, Joseph

    2013-02-28

    Amorphous Ni-based alloy membranes show great promise as inexpensive, hydrogenselective membrane materials. In this study, we developed membranes based on nonprecious Ni-Nb-Zr alloys by adjusting the alloying content and using additives. Several studies on crystallization of the amorphous ribbons, in-situ x-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM, hydrogen permeation, hydrogen solubility, hydrogen deuterium exchange, and electrochemical studies were conducted. An important part of the study was to completely eliminate Palladium coatings of the NiNbZr alloys by hydrogen heattreatment. The amorphous alloy (Ni0.6Nb0.4)80Zr20 membrane appears to be the best with high hydrogen permeability and good thermal stability.

  11. Multifold Seebeck increase in RuO{sub 2} films by quantum-guided lanthanide dilute alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Music, Denis Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Han, Liang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo; Devender; Gengler, Jamie J.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2014-02-03

    Ab initio predictions indicating that alloying RuO{sub 2} with La, Eu, or Lu can increase the Seebeck coefficient ? manifold due to quantum confinement effects are validated in sputter-deposited La-alloyed RuO{sub 2} films showing fourfold ? increase. Combinatorial screening reveals that ? enhancement correlates with La-induced lattice distortion, which also decreases the thermal conductivity twentyfold, conducive for high thermoelectric figures of merit. These insights should facilitate the rational design of high efficiency oxide-based thermoelectrics through quantum-guided alloying.

  12. Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

    2008-07-24

    The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

  13. Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

    2014-12-09

    The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

  14. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hays, Auda K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  15. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.

    1992-04-28

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition. 4 figs.

  16. Pressure-composition-isotherms of palladium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, T.B.

    1996-11-01

    About one year ago a summary report was submitted covering the previous three years of the contract. This earlier report should be consulted as a useful survey and evaluation of the research carried out by the authors. Because of difficulties during the current contract period arising from the anomalous nature of the melt-spun alloys received from LANL, it is not possible to contribute much beyond that given in last year's summary with regard to the overall picture of the behavior of Pd-rich alloys towards hydrogen and its isotopes. In this contract year deuterium was employed instead of hydrogen and instead of using cycled alloys, the alloys employed for each isotherm measurement were in their virgin condition. Because of the anomalous behavior of the melt-spun alloys, it was not feasible or worthwhile in some cases, e.g., when the alloy behaved anomalously, to carry out all of the originally proposed work. Nonetheless considering these obstacles, some useful data were obtained. For example, the obtaining of deuterium isotherms for the Pd-Rh alloys down to {minus}40 C using internally oxidized melt-spun alloys may prove to be useful.

  17. Method and apparatus for producing high purity silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A method for producing high purity silicon includes forming a copper silie alloy and positioning the alloy within an enclosure. A filament member is also placed within the enclosure opposite the alloy. The enclosure is then filled with a chemical vapor transport gas adapted for transporting silicon. Finally, both the filament member and the alloy are heated to temperatures sufficient to cause the gas to react with silicon at the alloy surface and deposit the reacted silicon on the filament member. In addition, an apparatus for carrying out this method is also disclosed.

  18. Method and apparatus for producing high purity silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.

    1983-05-27

    A method for producing high purity silicon includes forming a copper silicide alloy and positioning the alloy within an enclosure. A filament member is also placed within the enclosure opposite the alloy. The enclosure is then filled with a chemical vapor transport gas adapted for transporting silicon. Finally, both the filament member and the alloy are heated to temperatures sufficient to cause the gas to react with silicon at the alloy surface and deposit the reacted silicon on the filament member. In addition, an apparatus for carrying out this method is also disclosed.

  19. High pressure furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  20. High pressure furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  1. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  2. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  3. Annealing studies of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, J.D.; Perepezko, J.H.; Nordman, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, Mo-Si, and W-Si were sputter deposited on single-crystal semiconductor substrates. One-hour crystallization temperatures of the films were determined to within +-25/sup 0/C by annealing and x-ray diffraction measurements. Interdiffusion between Au or Cu overlayers and the amorphous films were studied by annealing combined with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) profiling, and by Rutherford Backscatter (RBS) analysis. Supplementary measurements used to study structural relaxation and crystallization included resistivity as a function of temperature; DTA and DSC; and electron microscopy.

  4. Properties of Alloy 617 for Heat Exchanger Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Richard Neil; Carroll, Laura Jill; Benz, Julian Karl; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Lillo, Thomas Martin; Lybeck, Nancy Jean

    2014-10-01

    Abstract – Alloy 617 is among the primary candidates for very high temperature reactor heat exchangers anticipated for use up to 950ºC. Elevated temperature properties of this alloy and the mechanisms responsible for the observed tensile, creep and creep-fatigue behavior have been characterized over a wide range of test temperatures up to 1000ºC. Properties from the current experimental program have been combined with archival information from previous VHTR research to provide large data sets for many heats of material, product forms, and weldments. The combined data have been analyzed to determine conservative values of yield and tensile strength, strain rate sensitivity, creep-rupture behavior, fatigue and creep- fatigue properties that can be used for engineering design of reactor components. Phenomenological models have been developed to bound the regions over which the engineering properties are well known or can be confidently extrapolated for use in design.

  5. An Electromotive Force Measurement System for Alloy Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban; Robert Mariani; J. Rory Kennedy

    2010-11-01

    The development of advanced nuclear fuels requires a better understanding of the transmutation and micro-structural evolution of the materials. Alloy fuels have the advantage of high thermal conductivity and improved characteristics in fuel-cladding chemical reaction. However, information on thermodynamic and thermophysical properties is limited. The objective of this project is to design and build an experimental system to measure the thermodynamic properties of solid materials from which the understanding of their phase change can be determined. The apparatus was used to measure the electromotive force (EMF) of several materials in order to calibrate and test the system. The EMF of chromel was measured from 100C to 800C and compared with theoretical values. Additionally, the EMF measurement of Ni-Fe alloy was performed and compared with the Ni-Fe phase diagram. The prototype system is to be modified eventually and used in a radioactive hot-cell in the future.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Strength, Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999)...

  7. Application of Combined Sustained and Cyclic Loading Test Results to Alloy 617 Elevated Temperature Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2014-08-25

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of 900-950°C . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200°F (650°C). The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, 1200o F , is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures.

  8. Fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys processed by power and ingot metallurgy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Kim, N.J. ); Pizzo, P.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in powder-metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys, namely, mechanically-alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.80{sub 2} (Inco 905-XL) and rapid-solidification-processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions, has been studied, and results compared with data on an equivalent ingot-metallurgy (I/M) Al-Li alloy, 2090-T81 plate. Fatigue-crack growth resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is found to be comparable to the I/M Al-Li alloy; in contrast, crack velocities in MA 905-XL extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster. Growth-rate response in both P/M Al-Li alloys, however, is high anisotropic. Results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural influence of strengthening mechanism, slip mode, grain morphology and texture on the development of crack-tip shielding from crack-path deflection and crack closure. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

    2012-09-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

  10. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia

    2012-05-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

  11. Crystallographic attributes of a shape-memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, K.

    1999-01-01

    Shape-memory alloys are attractive for many potential applications. In an attempt to provide ideas and guidelines for the development of new shape-memory alloys, this paper reports on a series of investigations that examine the reasons in the crystallography that made (i) shape-memory alloys special amongst martensites and (ii) Nickel-Titanium special among shape-memory alloys.

  12. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  13. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-12-31

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m{sup 2} respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys` FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m{sup 2} respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Seongil

    1994-05-01

    Procedures required for minimizing structural defects generated during ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers were studied. Synthesis of 200 mm SiGe alloy layers by implantation of 120-keV Ge ions into <100> oriented Si wafers yielded various Ge peak concentrations after the following doses, 2{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}, 3{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (mid), and 5{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (high). Following implantation, solid phase epitaxial (SPE) annealing in ambient N2 at 800C for 1 hr. resulted in only slight redistribution of the Ge. Two kinds of extended defects were observed in alloy layers over 3{times}l0{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}cm dose at room temperature (RT): end-of-range (EOR) dislocation loops and strain-induced stacking faults. Density of EOR dislocation loops was much lower in alloys produced by 77K implantation than by RT implantation. Decreasing the dose to obtain 5 at% peak Ge concentration prevents strain relaxation, while those SPE layers with more than 7 at% Ge peak show high densities of misfit- induced stacking faults. Sequential implantation of C following high dose Ge implantation (12 at% Ge peak concentration in layer) brought about a remarkable decrease in density of misfit-induced stacking faults. For peak implanted C > 0.55 at%, stacking fault generation in the epitaxial layer was suppressed, owing to strain compensation by C atoms in the SiGe lattice. A SiGe alloy layer with 0.9 at% C peak concentration under a 12 at% Ge peak exhibited the best microstructure. Results indicate that optimum Ge/C ratio for strain compensation is between 11 and 22. The interface between amorphous and regrown phases (a/c interface) had a dramatic morphology change during its migration to the surface. Initial <100> planar interface decomposes into a <111> faceted interface, changing the growth kinetics; this is associated with strain relaxation by stacking fault formation on (111) planes in the a/c interface.

  16. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. [GM China Lab] [GM China Lab; Song, GuangLing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Titanium Alloys Manufacturing Co Div

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of National Lead of Ohio - NY 41 Alloys Manufacturing Co Div of National Lead of Ohio - NY 41 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TITANIUM ALLOYS MANUFACTURING CO., DIV. OF NATIONAL LEAD OF OHIO (NY.41) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Titanium Alloy Metals Titanium Alloy Manufacturing Division Titanium Alloy Manufacturing (TAM) Division of National Lead Company The Titanium Pigment Co. NL Industries ICD/Niagara NY.41-1 NY.41-2 NY.41-3

  18. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel alloy for use as a fuel cell catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorer, Alexander (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2003-01-01

    An improved noble metal alloy composition for a fuel cell catalyst, the alloy containing platinum, ruthenium, and nickel. The alloy shows methanol oxidation activity.

  19. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel alloy for use as a fuel cell catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorer, Alexander

    2004-04-20

    An improved noble metal alloy composition for a fuel cell catalyst, the alloy containing platinum, ruthenium, and nickel. The alloy shows methanol oxidation activity.

  20. Relative entropy and optimization-driven coarse-graining methods in VOTCA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Jochum, Mara N.; Koschke, Konstantin; Aluru, N. R.; Rühle, Victor; Junghans, Christoph; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-07-20

    We discuss recent advances of the VOTCA package for systematic coarse-graining. Two methods have been implemented, namely the downhill simplex optimization and the relative entropy minimization. We illustrate the new methods by coarse-graining SPC/E bulk water and more complex water-methanol mixture systems. The CG potentials obtained from both methods are then evaluated by comparing the pair distributions from the coarse-grained to the reference atomistic simulations.We have also added a parallel analysis framework to improve the computational efficiency of the coarse-graining process.

  1. Transition Metal Oxide Alloys as Potential Solar Energy Conversion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-02-21

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are inexpensive potentia alternative materials for solar energy conversion devices. However, some TMOs, such as manganese(II) oxide, have band gaps that are too large for efficiently absorbing solar energy. Other TMOs, such as iron(II) oxide, have conduction and valence band edges with the same orbital character that may lead to unfavorably high electronhole recombination rates. Another limitation of iron(II) oxide is that the calculated valence band edge is not positioned well for oxidizing water. We predict that key properties, including band gaps, band edge positions, and possibly electronhole recombination rates, may be improved by alloying TMOs that have different band alignments. A new metric, the band gap center offset, is introduced for simple screening of potential parent materials. The concept is illustrated by calculating the electronic structure of binary oxide alloys that contain manganese, nickel, iron, zinc, and/or magnesium, within density functional theory (DFT)+U and hybrid DFT theories. We conclude that alloys of iron(II) oxide are worth evaluating further as solar energy conversion materials.

  2. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Isochronous Stress-Strain Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill K. Wright; Richard N. Wright; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2014-03-01

    Isochronous stress-strain curves for Alloy 617 up to a temperature of 1000°C will be required to qualify the material for elevated temperature design in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Several potential methods for developing these curves are reviewed in this report. It is shown that in general power-law creep is the rate controlling deformation mechanism for a wide range of alloy heats, test temperatures and stresses. Measurement of the strain rate sensitivity of Alloy 617 indicates that the material is highly strain rate sensitive in the tensile deformation range above about 750°C. This suggests that the concept of a hot tensile curve as a bounding case on the isochronous stress-strain diagrams is problematic. The impact of strain rate on the hot tensile curves is examined and it is concluded that incorporating such a curve is only meaningful if a single tensile strain rate (typically the ASTM standard rate of 0.5%/min) is arbitrarily defined. Current experimentally determined creep data are compared to isochronous stress-strain curves proposed previously by the German programs in the 1980s and by the 1990 draft ASME Code Case. Variability in how well the experimental data are represented by the proposed design curves that suggests further analysis is necessary prior to completing a new draft Code Case.

  3. Optical Properties of ZnO-Alloyed Nanocrystalline Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Che, Hui; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, John L.; Thapa, Dinesh; Huso, Michelle; Yeh, Wei Jiang; Tarun, M. C.; McCluskey, M. D.; Bergman, Leah

    2012-01-01

    ZnO is emore » merging as one of the materials of choice for UV applications. It has a deep excitonic energy level and a direct bandgap of ~3.4 eV. Alloying ZnO with certain atomic constituents adds new optical and electronic functionalities to ZnO. This paper presents research on M g x Z n 1 − x O and Z n S 1 − x O x nanocrystalline flexible films, which enable tunable optical properties in the deep-UV and in the visible range. The ZnO and Mg 0 .3 Zn 0 .7 O films were found to have bandgaps at 3.35 and 4.02 eV, respectively. The photoluminescence of the Mg 0 .3 Zn 0 .7 O exhibited a bandedge emission at 3.95 eV, and at lower energy 3.38 eV due to the limited solubility inherent to these alloys. ZnS 0 .76 O 0 .24 and ZnS 0 .16 O 0 .84 were found to have bandgaps at 3.21 and 2.65 eV, respectively. The effect of nitrogen doping on ZnS 0 .16 O 0 .84 is discussed in terms of the highly lattice mismatched nature of these alloys and the resulting valence-band modification.« less

  4. Influence of a Cerium Surface Treatment on the Oxidation Behavior of Cr2O3-Forming Alloys (title on slides varies: Oxidation Behavior of Cerium Surface Treated Chromia Forming Alloys)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, G.R.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This temperature will require the construction of boiler and turbine components from austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys. Many of the alloys being considered for use are primarily Cr2O3 forming alloys [1-4]. It is well known that the addition of a small amount of reactive elements, such as the rare earths elements Ce, La, and Y, can significantly improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of both iron- and nickel- base alloys. A list of the benefits of the reactive element effect include: (i) slowing scale growth, (ii) enhancing scale adhesion; and (iii) stabilizing Cr2O3 formation at lower Cr levels. The incorporation of the reactive element can be made in the melt or through a surface infusion or surface coating. Surface modifications allow for the concentration of the reactive element at the surface where it can provide the most benefit. This paper will detail a Ce surface treatment developed at NETL that improves the high temperature oxidation resistance of Cr2O3 forming alloys. The treatment consists of painting, dip coating, or spraying the alloy surface with a slurry containing CeO2 and a halide activator followed by a thermal treatment in a mild (x10-3 Torr) vacuum. During treatment the CeO2 reacts with the alloy to for a thin CrCeO3-type scale on the alloy surface. Upon subsequent oxidation, scale growth occurs at a reduced rate on alloys in the surface treated condition compared to those in the untreated condition.

  5. High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless Steels and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nickel Alloys (Conference) | SciTech Connect High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys Authors: Yu, Xinghua [1] ; Qiao, Dongxiao [1] ; Feng, Zhili [1] ; Crooker, Paul [2] ; Wang, Yanli [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1159430

  6. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  7. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-04-08

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

  8. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  9. Method for homogenizing alloys susceptible to the formation of carbide stringers and alloys prepared thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braski, David N. (Oak Ridge, TN); Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

    1980-01-01

    A novel fabrication procedure prevents or eliminates the reprecipitation of segregated metal carbides such as stringers in Ti-modified Hastelloy N and stainless steels to provide a novel alloy having carbides uniformly dispersed throughout the matrix. The fabrication procedure is applicable to other alloys prone to the formation of carbide stringers. The process comprises first annealing the alloy at a temperature above the single phase temperature for sufficient time to completely dissolve carbides and then annealing the single phase alloy for an additional time to prevent the formation of carbide stringers upon subsequent aging or thermomechanical treatment.

  10. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  11. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Hybrid laser-arc welding of nickel-base alloys can increase productivity and decrease costs during construction and repair of critical components in nuclear power plants. However, laser and hybrid welding of nickel-base alloys is not well understood. This project sought to understand the physical processes during hybrid welding necessary to fabricate quality joints in Alloy 690, a Ni- Cr-Fe alloy. This document presents a summary of the data and results collected over the course of the project. The supporting documents are a collection of the research that has been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals along with a report from the partner at the national lab. Understanding the solidification behavior of Alloy 690 is important for knowing the final properties of the weldment. A study was undertaken to calculate the solidification parameters, such as temperature gradient, solidification rate, and cooling rate in Alloy 690 welds. With this information and measured cell and dendrite arm spacings, an Alloy 690 map was constructed to guide process parameter development and interpret fusion zones in later hybrid welds. This research is contained in Solidification Map of a Nickel Base Alloy. The keyhole formed under high laser intensity gives the hybrid welding technique the greater penetration depths compared to arc welding. However, keyhole behavior can form defects in the material, so knowing transient keyhole characteristics is important. With international collaborators, a study was undertaken to validate a new process monitoring tool known as inline coherent imaging (ICI), which is able to measure the keyhole depth with spatial and temporal resolutions on the order of 10 microns and 10 microseconds. ICI was validated for five alloy systems, including Alloy 690. Additionally, the keyhole growth rates at the start of welding were measured with unprecedented accuracy. This research is contained in Real Time Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Keyhole Depth by Laser Interferometry. During full penetration welding of thick sections, root defects can form, which result in unacceptable weld quality. A study was undertaken to determine the competing forces in root defect formation by independently changing the weight forces and surface tension forces. The weight force was altered by changing the plate thickness, and the surface tension force was altered by changing the surface condition at the bottom surface. Root defects do depend on these two forces. This research is contained in Mitigation of Root Defect in Laser and Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding. Validation of the hybrid laser-arc model is necessary to properly model heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in Alloy 690 hybrid welds. Therefore, the developed model was validated for low carbon steel. Temperatures calculated by the model were included into a microstructural model in order to calculate the phase fractions. Process maps were developed for the selection of welding parameters to avoid martensite formation. This research is contained in Fusion Zone Microstructure in Full Penetration Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Low Alloy Steel. Alloy 690 suffers from ductility dip cracking, a form of hot cracking. This type of cracking inhibits the use of multipass welding to join Alloy 690. Our partners at ORNL performed some hot ductility testing with Alloy 690 samples using digital image correlation. The results of this work is contained in the report Summary of 690 ductility dip cracking testing using Gleeble and digital image correlation. Macro-porosity is a limiting factor in the widespread deployment of laser and hybrid laser-arc welding for construction and repair of nuclear power plant components. Keyhole instability and fluctuation results in the formation of large bubbles, which become trapped at the advancing solid- liquid interface as pores. Laser and hybrid laser-arc welds were fabricated for a range of conditions. Porosity levels in the welds were measured in X-ray computed tomography (CT), which provides very detailed data on the size and lo

  12. Corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of alloy 803 for heat resisting applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesan, P.; Tassen, C.S.

    1997-08-01

    Alloy 803 was developed for applications as straight and twisted ID finned tubing in the petrochemical and chemical process industries, such as ethylene pyrolysis, that require enhanced resistance to oxidation and carburization in addition to adequate stress rupture strength. This paper presents the mechanical properties characterized for the alloy produced in other forms, such as plate, sheet and bar products, for applications in the heat treatment, chemical and petrochemical industries. The mechanical properties covered include room and high temperature tensile test results, impact strength, creep and stress rupture data for temperatures up to 2,000 F (1,093 C) at various stress levels. The preliminary results of the room and high temperature tensile and impact properties after long term exposures at intermediate temperatures are also presented. In addition to mechanical properties, the corrosion performance of alloy 803 in oxidation, sulfidation and carburization environments are presented.

  13. Method for removing magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys with engineered scavenger compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W.D.; Jong, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    The invention relates to a method for removal and production of high purity magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys using an engineered scanvenger compound. In particular, the invention relates to a method for removal and production of high purity magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys using the engineered scanvenger compound (ESC) lithium titanate (Li2O3TiO2). The removal of magnesium from the aluminum-magnesium alloys is performed at about 600-750 C in a molten salt bath of KCl or KCl-MgCl2 using lithium titanate (Li2O3TiO2) as the engineered scavenger compound (ESC). Electrode deposition of magnesium from the loaded ESC onto a stainless steel electrode is accomplished in a second step, and provides a clean magnesium electrode deposit for recycling. The second step also prepares the ESC for reuse.

  14. Effect of entropy of lithium intercalation in cathodes and anodes on Li-ion battery thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Xu, Wu; Towne, Silas A; Williford, Ralph E; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-06-01

    The entropy changes (ΔS) in various cathode and anode materials, as well as complete Li-ion batteries, were measured using an electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system (ETMS). LiCoO2 has a much larger entropy change than electrodes based on LiNixCoyMnzO2 and LiFePO4, while lithium titanate based anode has lower entropy change compared to graphite anodes. Reversible heat generation rate was found to be a significant portion of the total heat generation rate. The appropriate combinations of cathode and anode were investigated to minimize reversible heat.

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 m making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by optical and electron microscopy techniques and linked to crack-growth test results to help define material and environmental parameters controlling SCC susceptibility.

  16. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolodosky, A.; Fratoni, M.

    2014-11-20

    Pre-conceptual fusion blanket designs require research and development to reflect important proposed changes in the design of essential systems, and the new challenges they impose on related fuel cycle systems. One attractive feature of using liquid lithium as the breeder and coolant is that it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns. If the chemical reactivity of lithium could be overcome, the result would have a profound impact on fusion energy and associated safety basis. The overriding goal of this project is to develop a lithium-based alloy that maintains beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns. To minimize the number of alloy combinations that must be explored, only those alloys that meet certain nuclear performance metrics will be considered for subsequent thermodynamic study. The specific scope of this study is to evaluate the neutronics performance of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) engine. The results of this study will inform the development of lithium alloys that would guarantee acceptable neutronics performance while mitigating the chemical reactivity issues of pure lithium.

  17. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is usedmore » to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. Here, the findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.« less

  18. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  19. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  20. Environmental embrittlement in ordered intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.T.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1992-12-31

    Ordered intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides possess many promising properties for elevated-temperature applications; however, poor fracture resistance and limited fabricability restrict their use as engineering material. Recent studies have shown that environmental embrittlement is a major cause of low ductility and brittle fracture in many ordered intermetallic alloys. There are two types of environmental embrittlement observed in intermetallic alloys. One is hydrogen-induced embrittlement occurring at ambient temperatures in air. The other is oxygen-induced embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In most cases, the embrittlements are due to a dynamic effect involving generation and penetration of embrittling agents (i.e., hydrogen or oxygen ) during testing. Diffusion of embrittling agents plays a dominant role in fracture of these intermetallic alloys. This chapter summarizes recent progress in understanding and reducing environmental embrittlement in these alloys.

  1. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of FeGaAl alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in FeGaAl alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ? D03 ? L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.

  2. Entropy of near-extremal black holes in AdS5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; de Boer, Jan; Jejjala, Vishnu; Simon, Joan

    2007-07-24

    We construct the microstates of near-extremal black holes in AdS_5 x S5 as gases of defects distributed in heavy BPS operators in the dual SU(N) Yang-Mills theory. These defects describe open strings on spherical D3-branes in the S5, and we show that they dominate the entropy by directly enumerating them and comparing the results with a partition sum calculation. We display new decoupling limits in which the field theory of the lightest open strings on the D-branes becomes dual to a near-horizon region of the black hole geometry. In the single-charge black hole we find evidence for an infrared duality between SU(N) Yang-Mills theories that exchanges the rank of the gauge group with an R-charge. In the two-charge case (where pairs of branes intersect on a line), the decoupled geometry includes an AdS_3 factor with a two-dimensional CFT dual. The degeneracy in this CFT accounts for the black hole entropy. In the three-charge case (where triples of branes intersect at a point), the decoupled geometry contains an AdS_2 factor. Below a certain critical mass, the two-charge system displays solutions with naked timelike singularities even though they do not violate a BPS bound. We suggest a string theoretic resolution of these singularities.

  3. The derivation of constraints on the msugra parameter space from the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Nellen, L.; Nunez, D.; Sussmann, R.; Zavala, J.

    2009-04-20

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a present dark matter halo described by a Navarro-Frenk-White modified model with a central core. We obtain an expression for the relic abundance of neutralinos by comparing this entropy of the halo with the value it had during the freeze-out era. Using WMAP observations, we constrain the parameter space for mSUGRA models. Combining our results with the usual abundance criteria, we are able to discriminate clearly among different validity regions for tan {beta} values. For this, we require both criteria to be consistent within a 2{sigma} bound of the WMAP observations for the relic density: 0.112<{omega}h{sup 2}<0.122. We find that for sgn {mu} = +1, small values of tan {beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta}{approx}50 are both criteria significantly consistent. Both criteria allow us to put a lower bound on the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  4. Constraining the mSUGRA (minimal supergravity) parameter space using the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunez, Dario; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Sussman, Roberto A; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G; Mondragon, Myriam E-mail: jzavala@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lukas@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lgcabral@ciidet.edu.mx; Collaboration: For the Instituto Avanzado de Cosmologia, IAC

    2008-05-15

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a dark matter halo described using a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a core. The comparison of this entropy with that of dark matter in the freeze-out era allows us to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models. Moreover, combining these constraints with the ones obtained from the usual abundance criterion and demanding that these criteria be consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds for the abundance of dark matter: 0.112{<=}{Omega}{sub DM}h{sup 2}{<=}0.122, we are able to clearly identify validity regions among the values of tan{beta}, which is one of the parameters of the mSUGRA model. We found that for the regions of the parameter space explored, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta} Asymptotically-Equal-To 50 are the two criteria significantly consistent. In the region where the two criteria are consistent we also found a lower bound for the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  5. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  6. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Anthony (San Diego, CA); Heuer, Matthias (Berkeley, CA); Istratov, Andrei A. (Albany, CA); Pickett, Matthew D. (Berkeley, CA); Marcus, Mathew A. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Eicke R. (Piedmont, CA)

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  7. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  8. CX-010473: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Integrated Study on a Novel High Temperature High Entropy Alloy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010472: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Integrated Study on a Novel High Temperature High Entropy Alloy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Receive Funds for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, La.) - An Integrated Study on a Novel High-Temperature, High-Entropy Alloy. The team at Southern University and A&M College ...

  11. High magnetic-refrigeration performance of plate-shaped La{sub 0.5}Pr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 11.4}Si{sub 1.6} hydrides sintered in high-pressure H{sub 2} atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, N. K. Guo, J.; Zhao, X. G. Zhang, Z. D.; Si, P. Z.; Huang, J. H.

    2015-03-02

    La(Fe, Si){sub 13} hydride is regarded as one of the most promising room-temperature refrigerants. However, to use the alloys in an active magnetic regenerator machine, it is vital to prepare thin refrigerants. In this work, a high H{sub 2} gas pressure of 50 MPa was employed to suppress the desorption of hydrogen atoms during the sintering process of plate-shaped La{sub 0.5}Pr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 11.4}Si{sub 1.6} hydrides. At 330 K, a high-density sintered thin plate shows a large magnetic-entropy change ΔS{sub m} of 15.5 J/kg K (106 mJ/cm{sup 3 }K) for a field change of 2 T. The volumetric ΔS{sub m} is almost twice as large as that of bonded La(Fe,Si){sub 13} hydrides. Favorably, hysteresis is almost absent due to the existence of micropores with a porosity of 0.69% which has been analyzed with high-resolution X-ray microtomography.

  12. Ultrashort pulse laser machining of metals and alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2003-09-16

    The invention consists of a method for high precision machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of metals and alloys. By using pulses of a duration in the range of 10 femtoseconds to 100 picoseconds, extremely precise machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. Because the pulses are so short, there is negligible thermal conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond approximately 0.1-1 micron (dependent upon the particular material) from the laser machined surface. Due to the short duration, the high intensity (>10.sup.12 W/cm.sup.2) associated with the interaction converts the material directly from the solid-state into an ionized plasma. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces with negligible redeposition either within the kerf or on the surface. Since there is negligible heating beyond the depth of material removed, the composition of the remaining material is unaffected by the laser machining process. This enables high precision machining of alloys and even pure metals with no change in grain structure.

  13. Effect of niobium addition on the martensitic transformation and magnetocaloric effect in low hysteresis NiCoMnSn magnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emre, Baris; Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Yuce Emre, Suheyla; Karaman, Ibrahim

    2014-12-08

    The effect of Nb substitution for Ni in Ni{sub 45}Co{sub 5}Mn{sub 40}Sn{sub 10} magnetic shape memory alloys on their magnetic properties, martensitic transformation characteristics, transformation hysteresis, and magnetocaloric properties was studied using wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization. Ni{sub 45}Co{sub 5}Mn{sub 40}Sn{sub 10} alloy has a very low transformation hysteresis; however, the martensitic transformation temperatures are notably above room temperature, which is not desirable for magnetic refrigeration applications. In this study, small quantities of Nb substitution were shown to drastically shift the transformation temperatures to lower temperatures, at a rate of 68 K/at. % Nb, which is needed for household refrigeration. The austenite Curie temperature also decreased with increasing Nb content. However, a decrease in the latent heat of the martensitic transition was observed, which negatively affects the magnetic field-induced adiabatic temperature change capability. Still, the relatively large transformation entropy and the low transformation hysteresis make the Nb-doped Ni{sub 45}Co{sub 5}Mn{sub 40}Sn{sub 10} alloys potential candidates for solid state refrigeration near room temperature.

  14. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  15. Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goegebakan, Musa; Soguksu, Ali Kemal; Uzun, Orhan; Dogan, Ali

    2007-04-23

    The mechanical alloying technique has been used to produce shape memory Cu83Al13Ni4 alloy. The structure and thermal properties were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology of the surface suggests the presence of martensite.

  16. Tailoring the physical properties of Ni-based single-phase equiatomic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alloys by modifying the chemical complexity (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Tailoring the physical properties of Ni-based single-phase equiatomic alloys by modifying the chemical complexity This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Tailoring the physical properties of Ni-based single-phase equiatomic alloys by modifying the chemical complexity We discovered that equiatomic alloys (e.g. high entropy alloys) have recently attracted considerable

  17. Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 18, 2016 Title: Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of

  18. Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy This content will become publicly available on September 18, 2016 Title: Microstructure-property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni-29Ti-20Hf shape memory alloy NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential

  19. Nondestructive evaluation of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, S.; Gordon, S.; Karsh, M.; Ayers, R.; Olson, D. L.; Wiezman, A.

    2011-06-23

    The nondestructive evaluation of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) alloys for applications such as heat treatment for biomaterials applications (dental) and welding was investigated. Ni-Ti alloys and its ternary alloys are valued for mechanical properties in addition to the shape memory effect. Two analytical approaches were perused in this work. Assessment of the microstructure of the alloy that determines the martensitic start temperature (Ms) of Ni-Ti alloy as a function of heat treatment, and secondly, an attempt to evaluate a Friction Stir Welding, which involves thermo-mechanical processing of the alloy.

  20. Welding development for V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.; King, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Welds have been produced and characterized using the gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding processes. Thin sheet (0.75 mm) welds were made with three levels of interstitial contamination, and hardness and tensile properties were found to be strongly affected by oxygen pickup. Thick-section (6 mm) welds have been produced using both processes, and no embrittlement is experienced when high purity atmosphere is maintained. Metallographic examination shows a narrow, but coarse grained, heat affected zone for the GTA welds. Transition joint welding development between vanadium alloy and stainless steel has shown encouraging results.

  1. Foaming of aluminium-silicon alloy using concentrated solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cambronero, L.E.G.; Ruiz-Roman, J.M.; Canadas, I.; Martinez, D.

    2010-06-15

    Solar energy is used for the work reported here as a nonconventional heating system to produce aluminium foam from Al-Si alloy precursors produced by powder metallurgy. A commercial precursor in cylindrical bars enclosed in a stainless-steel mould was heated under concentrated solar radiation in a solar furnace with varied heating conditions (heating rate, time, and temperature). Concentrated solar energy close to 300 W/cm{sup 2} on the mould is high enough to achieve complete foaming after heating for only 200 s. Under these conditions, the density and pore distribution in the foam change depending on the solar heating parameters and mould design. (author)

  2. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic database developed in this project, thermodynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of sodium on the HTE of Al-Mg alloys. The simulation results indicated that the liquid miscibility gap resulting from the dissolved sodium in the molten material plays an important role in HTE. A liquid phase forms from the solid face-centered cubic (fcc) phase (most likely at grain boundaries) during cooling, resulting in the occurrence of HTE. Comparison of the thermodynamic simulation results with experimental measurements on the high-temperature ductility of an Al-5Mg-Na alloy shows that HTE occurs in the temperature range at which the liquid phase exists. Based on this fundamental understanding of the HTE mechanism during processing of aluminum alloy, an HTE sensitive zone and a hot-rolling safe zone of the Al-Mg-Na alloys are defined as functions of processing temperature and alloy composition. The tendency of HTE was evaluated based on thermodynamic simulations of the fraction of the intergranular sodium-rich liquid phase. Methods of avoiding HTE during rolling/extrusion of Al-Mg-based alloys were suggested. Energy and environmental benefits from the results of this project could occur through a number of avenues: (1) energy benefits accruing from reduced rejection rates of the aluminum sheet and bar, (2) reduced dross formation during the remelting of the aluminum rejects, and (3) reduced CO2 emission related to the energy savings. The sheet and extruded bar quantities produced in the United States during 2000 were 10,822 and 4,546 million pounds, respectively. It is assumed that 50% of the sheet and 10% of the bar will be affected by implementing the results of this project. With the current process, the rejection rate of sheet and bar is estimated at 5%. Assuming that at least half of the 5% rejection of sheet and bar will be eliminated by using the results of this project and that 4% of the aluminum will be lost through dross (Al2O3) during remelting of the rejects, the full-scale industrial implementation of the project results would lead to energy savings in excess of 6.2 trillion Btu/year and cost savings of $42.7 million by 2020.

  3. Ion irradiation testing and characterization of FeCrAl candidate alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Aydogan, Eda; Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-10-29

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development programs Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels. This effort involves development of fuel cladding materials that will be resistant to oxidizing environments for extended period of time such as loss of coolant accident. Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are among the promising candidates due to formation of a stable Al?O? oxide scale. In addition to being oxidation resistant, these promising alloys need to be radiation tolerant under LWR conditions (maximum dose of 10-15 dpa at 250 350C). Thus, in addition to a number of commercially available alloys, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys developed at ORNL were tested using high energy proton irradiations and subsequent characterization of irradiation hardening and damage microstructure. This report summarizes ion irradiation testing and characterization of three nuclear grade FeCrAl cladding materials developed at ORNL and four commercially available Kanthal series FeCrAl alloys in FY14 toward satisfying FCRD campaign goals.

  4. Corrosion of boiler tube alloys in refuse firing: Shredded vs bulk refuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, H.H. ); Daniel, P.L.; Blue, J.D. )

    1994-08-01

    Results of corrosion probe exposures at two mass burning incinerators were compared with those conducted in a unit burning refuse-derived fuel. Tests were conducted with carbon steel, low-alloy steels, stainless steels, and high nickel-chromium alloys. Corrosion rates at similar metal and gas temperatures were essentially the same for both types of fuel. Boiler tube performance in the waterwalls of other incinerators confirmed these results. Boiler design and operating conditions appear to be more important factors in tube wastage than the extent of refuse processing.

  5. Characterizations Of Precipitate Phases In a Ti-Ni-Pd Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Kovarik, Libor; Phillips, Patrick J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-06-01

    Precipitates in the Ti46Ni37.5Pd16.5 alloy were investigated by electron diffraction and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The phase content and stability were determined at several different temperatures and times. Aging at 400 C for an hour results in a new phase, which is consumed by P-phase at longer aging time. At 450 C, the new phase appears first, and then coexists with P-phase. At 500 C, the entire alloy transformed into the new phase. At 550 C, Ti3(Ni,Pd)4 phase begins to form.

  6. Direct evidence of detwinning in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys during deformation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, Z. H.; Lin Peng, R.; Johansson, S.; Oliver, E. C.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Liu, Y. D.; Deng, J. N.; Zuo, L.; Brown, D. E.; Northwestern Univ., China; Linkoping Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-01-01

    In situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction and high-energy x-ray diffraction techniques were used to reveal the preferred reselection of martensite variants through a detwinning process in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys under uniaxial compressive stress. The variant reorientation via detwinning during loading can be explained by considering the influence of external stress on the grain/variant orientation-dependent distortion energy. These direct observations of detwinning provide a good understanding of the deformation mechanisms in shape memory alloys.

  7. Fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on aluminum alloy substrates by RF-sputtered polytetrafluoroethylene coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Hai Feng Zhou, Zhi Ping

    2014-03-15

    In this work, we present a method of fabricating super-hydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy substrate. The etching of aluminum surfaces has been performed using Beck's dislocation etchant for different time to create micrometer-sized irregular steps. An optimised etching time of 50 s is found to be essential before polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, to obtain a highest water contact angle of 1652 with a lowest contact angle hysteresis as low as 52. The presence of patterned microstructure as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the low surface energy ultrathin RF-sputtered PTFE films renders the aluminum alloy surfaces highly super-hydrophobic.

  8. Integrated Design and Rapid Development of Refractory Metal Based Alloys for Fossil Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; King, P.E.; Gao, M.C.

    2008-07-01

    One common barrier in the development of new technologies for future energy generating systems is insufficiency of existing materials at high temperatures (>1150oC) and aggressive atmospheres (e.g., steam, oxygen, CO2). To overcome this barrier, integrated design methodology will be applied to the development of refractory metal based alloys. The integrated design utilizes the multi-scale computational methods to design materials for requirements of processing and performance. This report summarizes the integrated design approach to the alloy development and project accomplishments in FY 2008.

  9. Boron-doped back-surface fields using an aluminum-alloy process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.M.; Bode, M.D.; Silva, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Boron-doped back-surface fields (BSF`s) have potentially superior performance compared to aluminum-doped BSF`s due to the higher solid solubility of boron compared to aluminum. However, conventional boron diffusions require a long, high temperature step that is both costly and incompatible with many photovoltaic-grade crystalline-silicon materials. We examined a process that uses a relatively low-temperature aluminum-alloy process to obtain a boron-doped BSF by doping the aluminum with boron. In agreement with theoretical expectations, we found that thicker aluminum layers and higher boron doping levels improved the performance of aluminum-alloyed BSF`s.

  10. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  11. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F; Santella, Michael L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  12. Shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio from giant dipole resonances in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2011-09-15

    The Green-Kubo relation and fluctuation-dissipation theorem are employed to calculate the shear viscosity {eta} of a finite hot nucleus directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of this nucleus. The ratio {eta}/s of shear viscosity {eta} to entropy density s is extracted from the experimental systematics of the GDR in copper, tin, and lead isotopes at finite temperature T. These empirical results are then compared with the predictions by several independent models as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio {eta}/s in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing temperature T to reach (1.3--4)x({h_bar}/2{pi})/(4{pi}k{sub B}) at T=5 MeV.

  13. Implication of Tsallis entropy in the ThomasFermi model for self-gravitating fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-03-15

    The ThomasFermi approach for self-gravitating fermions is revisited within the theoretical framework of the q-statistics. Starting from the q-deformation of the FermiDirac distribution function, a generalized ThomasFermi equation is derived. It is shown that the Tsallis entropy preserves a scaling property of this equation. The q-statistical approach to Jeans instability in a system of self-gravitating fermions is also addressed. The dependence of the Jeans wavenumber (or the Jeans length) on the parameter q is traced. It is found that the q-statistics makes the Fermionic system unstable at scales shorter than the standard Jeans length. -- Highlights: ThomasFermi approach for self-gravitating fermions. A generalized ThomasFermi equation is derived. Nonextensivity preserves a scaling property of this equation. Nonextensive approach to Jeans instability of self-gravitating fermions. It is found that nonextensivity makes the Fermionic system unstable at shorter scales.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Titanium Alloys Manufacturing...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alloys Manufacturing Co Div of National Lead of Ohio - NY 41 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TITANIUM ALLOYS MANUFACTURING CO., DIV. OF NATIONAL LEAD OF OHIO (NY.41) Eliminated from...

  15. Survey of degradation modes of four nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdowski, G.E. KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA

    1991-03-01

    This report examines the degradation modes of four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys under conditions relevant to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The materials considered are Alloys C-276, C-4, C-22, and 625 because they have desirable characteristics for the conceptual design (CD) of the high-level radioactive-waste containers presented in the YMP Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The types of degradation covered in this report are general corrosion; localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in chloride environments; hydrogen embrittlement (HE); and undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability. Topics not specifically addressed are welding concerns and microbiological corrosion. The four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments such as seawater as well as in more aggressive environments. They have significantly better corrosion resistance than the six materials considered for the CD waste container in the YMP SCP. (Those six materials are Types 304L and 3161L stainless steels, Alloy 825, unalloyed copper, Cu(70)-Ni(30), and 7% aluminum bronze.) In seawater, the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have negligible general corrosion rates and show little evidence of localized corrosion. The four base materials of these alloys are expected to have nearly indistinguishable corrosion resistance in the YMP environments. The strength requirements of the SCP-CD waste container are met by these materials in the annealed condition; in this condition, they are highly resistant to HE. Historically, HE has been noted when these materials have been strengthened (cold-worked) and used in sour gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) well service -- conditions that are not expected for the YMP. Metallurgical phase stability may be a concern under conditions favoring (1) the formation of intermetallics and carbides, and (2) microstructural ordering.

  16. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary Dale (Ringwood, NJ)

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  17. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  18. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shield, Jeffrey E. (Sandy, UT); Goldman, Alan I. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture.

  19. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shield, J.E.; Goldman, A.I.; Anderson, I.E.; Ellis, T.W.; McCallum, R.W.; Sordelet, D.J.

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates is disclosed wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture. 3 figs.

  20. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H. [Graduate School of Osaka Institute of Technology (Japan); Haga, T. [Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya Asahiku Osaka city 535-8585 (Japan); Watari, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda Midoriku Yokohama city 226-8502 (Japan); Kumai, S. [Gunma University, 1-5-1 tenjin cho Kiryu city 376-8515 (Japan)

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.