Sample records for high energy particle

  1. Particle Diffraction at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir A. Petrov

    1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief ideological and historical review of problems of high energy diffractive scattering is given.

  2. Astronomy with ultra high-energy particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joerg R. Hoerandel

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the properties of cosmic rays above 10^17 eV are summarized and implications on our contemporary understanding of their origin are discussed. Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10^20 eV have been measured, they are the highest-energy particles in the Universe. Particles at highest energies are expected to be only marginally deflected by magnetic fields and they should point towards their sources on the sky. Recent results of the Pierre Auger Observatory have opened a new window to the Universe - astronomy with ultra high-energy particles.

  3. Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffini, R; Xue, S -S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

  4. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  5. Studies of High Energy Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitz, David F [Michigan Technological University; Fick, Brian E [Michigan Technological University

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the progress of the Michigan Technological University particle astrophysics group during the period April 15th, 2011 through April 30th, 2014. The principal investigator is Professor David Nitz. Professor Brian Fick is the Co-PI. The focus of the group is the study of the highest energy cosmic rays using the Pierre Auger Observatory. The major goals of the Pierre Auger Observatory are to discover and understand the source or sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10**19 eV, to identify the particle type(s), and to investigate the interactions of those cosmic particles both in space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina was completed in June 2008 with 1660 surface detector stations and 24 fluorescence telescopes arranged in 4 stations. It has a collecting area of 3,000 square km, yielding an aperture of 7,000 km**2 sr.

  6. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from Decaying Superheavy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Decaying superheavy particles can be produced by Topological Defects or, in case they are quasi-stable, as relics from the early Universe. The decays of these particles can be the sources of observed Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays ($E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{12} GeV$). The Topological Defects as the UHE CR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopole-antiminopole pairs are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles are shown to be clustering in the halo and their decays produce UHE CR without GZK cutoff. The Lightest Supersymmetric Particles with Ultra High Energies are naturally produced in the cascades accompanying the decays of superheavy particles. These particles are discussed as UHE carriers in the Universe.

  7. String Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ($r_{ISCO}$) or at the photon orbit ($r_{ph}$) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ($r_{mb}$) i.e. at $r \\equiv r_{ISCO}=r_{ph}=r_{mb}=2M$ could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned spacetimes, which is different from Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m spcetimes. For non-extremal GMGHS spacetimes the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ($\\phi_{0}$).

  8. PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Thakur, N; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two dist...

  9. High Energy Particle Measurement using Compact Neutral Particle Energy Analyzer in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Matsubara, A.; Sato, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kalinina, D. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa, 240-0193 (Japan)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pellet charge exchange technique, which can enhance the charge exchange reaction in plasma core, is utilized. Although there is no fusion reaction in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the simulation experiment can be expected by using the ion cyclotron resonance heated plasma. We newly install CNPA (0.8-168keV, 40 channels) to obtain the high-energy particle spectra in LHD. In pellet experiments, the time resolution of 0.1 ms is equal to 5 cm spatial resolution at the pellet speed of 500 m/s. Pellet penetration depth determines the possible observable area of the energy spectra. In our experiment, the penetration depth (up to {rho}=0.2) can be obtained at 1 mm diameter pellet. The spectra in three different plasmas can be compared.

  10. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  11. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [The Rockefeller University] [The Rockefeller University

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a program of research on ``Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate that the CMSSM is not a viable model. Expressing our results in terms of simple topologies, we exclude squark masses below 0.75 TeV and gluino masses below 1.1 TeV. Astrophysical measurements suggest that about 80% of the matter density of the Universe is non-luminous. One of the theories on dark matter attributes it to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). We searched for WIMPs in 7 TeV and 8 TeV collisions at CMS and set limits on WIMP production rates, which are competitive and complementary to those of direct detection experiments. Searching for monojets (events with only one jet), which in a popular model could be produced by a jet paired by a gravitino that escapes into extra dimensions, we significantly improved the previously set limit. Our results have been used to set limits on Higgs decay to invisible particles and on production of top squarks in compressed SUSY scenarios. Statistics. We computed Bayesian reference priors for several types of measurement and used them in the analysis of CMS data; investigated the applicability of bootstrap methods to HEP measurements; studied several issues associated with simple-versus-simple hypothesis testing and applied the resulting methods to the measurement of some properties of the top quark and Higgs boson.

  12. Rotation as an origin of high energy particle collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaslavskii, O B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider collision of two particles in rotating spacetimes without horizons. If the metric coefficient responsible for rotation of spacetime is big enough in some region, the energy of collisions in the centre of mass frame can be as large as one likes. The results are model-independent and apply both to relativistic stars and wormholes.

  13. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Darryl D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Elliott, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  14. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  15. High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork at HighEnergy

  16. ccsd00001969, Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001969, version 2 ­ 23 Oct 2004 Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron energy electrons from the underdense plasmas are investigated using two dimensional particle- in-cell simulations. When the ratio of the laser power and a critical power of relativistic self

  17. High-energy particle acceleration in the shell of a supernova remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant fraction of the energy density of the interstellar medium is in the form of high-energy charged particles (cosmic rays). The origin of these particles remains uncertain. Although it is generally accepted that the only sources capable of supplying the energy required to accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova explosions, and even though the mechanism of particle acceleration in expanding supernova remnant (SNR) shocks is thought to be well understood theoretically, unequivocal evidence for the production of high-energy particles in supernova shells has proven remarkably hard to find. Here we report on observations of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 (G347.3-0.5), which was discovered by ROSAT in the X-ray spectrum and later claimed as a source of high-energy \\gamma-rays of TeV energies (1 TeV=10^{12} eV). We present a TeV \\gamma-ray image of the SNR: the spatially resolved remnant has a shell morphology similar to that seen in X-rays, which demonstrates that very-high-energy particles are accelerated there. The energy spectrum indicates efficient acceleration of charged particles to energies beyond 100 TeV, consistent with current ideas of particle acceleration in young SNR shocks.

  18. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  19. Evolution of particle density in high-energy pp collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bautista; C. Pajares; J. Dias de Deus

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of the particle density, dn/d\\eta at fixed \\eta with the beam rapidity Y in the framework of string percolation model. Our main results are: (i) The width of the "plateau" increases proportionally to Y, (ii) limiting fragmentation is violated, and (iii) the particle density, reduces to a step function.

  20. Soft vs Hard: Particle Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Pareek, Pooja; Behera, Nirbhay K; Sahoo, Raghunath; Nandi, Basanta K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of pseudorapidity density of charged particles and transverse energy is studied for a wide range of collision energies for heavy-ion collisions at midrapidity. A two-component model approach has been adopted to quantify the soft and hard components of particle production, coming from nucleon participants and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, respectively. Within experimental uncertainties, the hard component contributing to the particle production has been found to be nearly independent of collisions energy from RHIC to LHC. The suppression of high-$p_{\\rm T}$ hadrons and jets in the medium created in heavy-ion collisions seem to play a role in the nearly independent collision energy behavior of hard components in particle production. We also use MC event generators, like HIJING and AMPT to study the possible effects of the suppression of high $p_{T}$ partons inside the medium and the effect of the threshold momentum for minijets, contributing to hard scattering processes.

  1. GRAVITATIONAL MODEL OF HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES IN A COLLIMATED JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Freitas Pacheco, J. A. [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR 7293, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Gariel, J.; Marcilhacy, G.; Santos, N. O., E-mail: pacheco@oca.eu, E-mail: jerome.gariel@upmc.fr, E-mail: gmarcilhacy@hotmail.com, E-mail: nilton.santos@upmc.fr [LERMA-UPMC, University Pierre and Marie Curie, Observatoire de Paris CNRS, UMR 8112, 3 rue de Galilee, F-94200 Ivry sur Seine (France)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations suggest that relativistic particles play a fundamental role in the dynamics of jets emerging from active galactic nuclei as well as in their interaction with the intracluster medium. However, no general consensus exists concerning the acceleration mechanism of those high-energy particles. A gravitational acceleration mechanism is proposed here in which particles leaving precise regions within the ergosphere of a rotating supermassive black hole (BH) produce a highly collimated flow. These particles follow unbound geodesics which are asymptotically parallel to the spin axis of the BH and are characterized by the energy E, the Carter constant Q, and zero angular momentum of the component L{sub z} . If environmental effects are neglected, the present model predicts the presence of electrons with energies around 9.4 GeV at distances of about 140 kpc from the ergosphere. The present mechanism can also accelerate protons up to the highest energies observed in cosmic rays by the present experiments.

  2. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist, SeniorVolume 6

  3. MnBi particles with high energy density made by spark erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Phi-Khanh, E-mail: phi@ucsd.edu; Jin, Sungho [Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Berkowitz, Ami E. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the properties of low-temperature phase (LTP)-MnBi particles produced by the rapid-quenching technique of spark-erosion. The as-prepared powder consists of amorphous, crystalline, and superparamagnetic particles, mostly as porous aggregates. The major fraction of the powder consists of 20–30?nm particles. A short anneal crystallizes the amorphous particles producing a high moment, >90% of theoretical M{sub S}, albeit with H{sub C} of a few kOe. If lightly milled, the agglomerates are broken up to yield H{sub C} of 1?T. These findings are supported by the x-ray diffraction pattern showing broadened peaks of the predominant LTP-MnBi phase. The combination of spark erosion, milling, and annealing has produced randomly oriented particles with (BH){sub MAX}???3.0 MGOe. The particles are expected to show record energy product when aligned along their crystallographic easy axes.

  4. Anisotropic particle production and azimuthal correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize some recent ideas relating to anisotropic particle production in high-energy collisions. Anisotropic gluon distributions lead to anisotropies of the single-particle azimuthal distribution and hence to disconnected contributions to multi-particle cumulants. When these dominate, the four-particle elliptic anisotropy $c_2\\{4\\}$ changes sign. On the other hand, connected diagrams for $m$-particle cumulants are found to quickly saturate with increasing $m$, a ``coherence'' quite unlike conventional ``non-flow'' contributions such as decays. Finally, we perform a first exploratory phenomenological analysis in order to estimate the amplitude ${\\cal A}$ of the $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ anisotropy of the gluon distribution at small $x$, and we provide a qualitative prediction for the elliptic asymmetry from three-particle correlations, $c_2\\{3\\}$.

  5. The Search for Higgs particles at high-energy colliders: Past, Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Djouadi

    2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I briefly review the Higgs sector in the Standard Model and its minimal Supersymmetric extension, the MSSM. After summarizing the properties of the Higgs bosons and the present experimental constraints, I will discuss the prospects for discovering these particle at the upgraded Tevatron, the LHC and a high-energy $e^+e^-$ linear collider. The possibility of studying the properties of the Higgs particles will be then summarized.

  6. Phenomena of spin rotation and oscillation of particles (atoms, molecules) containing in a trap blowing on by wind of high energy particles in storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Baryshevsky

    2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin rotation and oscillation phenomena of particles captured in a gas target through which beam of high energy particles passes is discussed. Such experiment arrangement make it realizable for storage ring and allows to study zero-angle scattering amplitude at highest possible energies.

  7. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  8. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  9. Neutron Stars as Sources of High Energy Particles - the case of RPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Rudak

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly magnetised rapidly spinning neutron stars are widely considered to be natural sites for acceleration of charged particles. Powerful acceleration mechanism due to unipolar induction is thought to operate in the magnetospheres of isolated neutron stars, bringing the particles to ultrarelativistic energies at the expense of the neutron star rotational energy, with inevitable emission of high energy photons. The aim of this review is to present basic ingredients of modern models of magnetospheric activity of rotation powered pulsars in the context of high-energy radiation from these objects. Several aspects of pulsar activity are addressed and related to spectacular results of pulsar observations with two major satellite missions of the past - CGRO and ROSAT. It is then argued that high sensitivity experiments of the future - GLAST, VERITAS and MAGIC - will be vital for a progress in our understanding of pulsar magnetospheric processes. In a conservative approach rotation powered pulsars are not expected to be the sources of UHE Cosmic Rays. However, several scenarios have been proposed recently to explain the UHECR events above the GZK limit with the help of acceleration processes in the immediate surrounding of newly born pulsars. Major features of these scenarios are reviewed along with references to contemporary models of magnetospheric activity.

  10. Axion-Like Particle Imprint in Cosmological Very-High-Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, A.; /Seville U. /IAA, Granada /Madrid, Autonoma U.; Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; /IAC, La Laguna /IAC, La Laguna /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Prada, F.; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Discoveries of very high energy (VHE) photons from distant blazars suggest that, after correction by extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption, there is a flatness or even a turn-up in their spectra at the highest energies that cannot be easily explained by the standard framework. Here, it is shown that a possible solution to this problem is achieved by assuming the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs) with masses {approx} 1 neV. The ALP scenario is tested making use of observations of the highest redshift blazars known in the VHE energy regime, namely 3C 279, 3C 66A, PKS 1222+216 and PG 1553+113. In all cases, better fits to the observed spectra are found when including ALPs rather than considering EBL only. Interestingly, quite similar critical energies for photon/ALP conversions are also derived, independently of the source considered.

  11. Axion-like particle imprint in cosmological very-high-energy sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domínguez, A. [Dpto. de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. Correos 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Sánchez-Conde, M.A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada, F., E-mail: alberto@iaa.es, E-mail: masc@stanford.edu, E-mail: fprada@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Apdo. Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discoveries of very high energy (VHE) photons from distant blazars suggest that, after correction by extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption, there is a flatness or even a turn-up in their spectra at the highest energies that cannot be easily explained by the standard framework. Here, it is shown that a possible solution to this problem is achieved by assuming the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs) with masses ? 1 neV. The ALP scenario is tested making use of observations of the highest redshift blazars known in the VHE energy regime, namely 3C 279, 3C 66A, PKS 1222+216 and PG 1553+113. In all cases, better fits to the observed spectra are found when including ALPs rather than considering EBL only. Interestingly, quite similar critical energies for photon/ALP conversions are also derived, independently of the source considered.

  12. Elementary Particle Physics and High Energy Phenomena: Final Report for FY2010-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumalat, John P.; de Alwis, Senarath P.; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeWolfe, Oliver; Ford, William T.; Hasenfratz, Anna; Mahanthappa, K. T.; Marino, Alysia D.; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James G.; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen R.; Zimmerman, Eric D.

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The work under this grant consists of experimental, theoretical, and phenomenological research on the fundamental properties of high energy subnuclear particles. The work is conducted at the University of Colorado, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and other facilities, employing neutrino-beam experiments, test beams of various particles, and proton-proton collider experiments. It emphasizes mass generation and symmetry-breaking, neutrino oscillations, bottom particle production and decay, detector development, supergravity, supersymmetry, superstrings, quantum chromodynamics, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, cosmology, phase transitions, lattice gauge theory, and anomaly-free theories. The goals are to improve our understanding of the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions. Data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN have revealed new interactions responsible for particle mass, and perhaps will lead to a more unified picture of the forces among elementary material constituents. To this end our research includes searches for manifestations of theories such as supersymmetry and new gauge bosons, as well as the production and decay of heavy-flavored quarks. Our current work at J-PARC, and future work at new facilities currently under conceptual design, investigate the specifics of how the neutrinos change flavor. The research is integrated with the training of students at all university levels, benefiting both the manpower and intellectual base for future technologies.

  13. Parton energy loss and particle production at high momenta from ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertens, Redmer Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partons, produced in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions, lose energy while propagating through the collision medium. This energy loss can be studied by comparing particle yields in different systems (pp, p--Pb, Pb--Pb). In addition, particle yields in different systems can be used to study hadronization mechanisms.

  14. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS, AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary

  15. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  16. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian [Baruch College, New York, NY (United States); The City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); China Central Normal Univ., Wuhan (China); Skokov, Vladimir [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions from genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)

  17. Micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams. In one embodiment, the micro-cone target includes a substantially cone-shaped body including an outer surface, an inner surface, a generally flat and round, open-ended base, and a tip defining an apex. The cone-shaped body tapers along its length from the generally flat and round, open-ended base to the tip defining the apex. In addition, the outer surface and the inner surface connect the base to the tip, and the tip curves inwardly to define an outer surface that is concave, which is bounded by a rim formed at a juncture where the outer surface meets the tip.

  18. Thermophoretically augmented mass-, momentum-, and energy-transfer rates in high particle mass-loaded laminar forced convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H.M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In all previous treatments of thermophoretically-modified aerosol particle transport, even those which attempt to allow for variable host-gas properties, it has been explicitly (or implicitly) assumed that the particle mass fraction is small enough to neglect the influence of the suspended particles on the host-gas momentum-density- and energy-density-fields. However, in high-intensity material-processing applications, particle mass loadings often exceed 1/3, and the thermophoretically enhanced particle mass-deposition flux itself modifies the local-mixture velocity and temperature fields in the vicinity of the deposition surface. A self-consistent pseudo- single-phase mixture (diffusion) approximation which exploits the fact that the volume fraction of suspended particles is negligible even when the particle mass fraction is quite near unity is introduced to calculate the fully coupled problem of mass-, energy- and momentum diffusion for laminar boundary (LBL) flow of a combustion-gas mixture containing submicron particles of appreciable thermophoretic diffusivity but negligible Brownian diffusion. It is shown that thigh particles mass loading systematically increase the wall fluxes of momentum (shear stress), heat and particle mass, much like those effects associated with massive suction in single-phase LBL-theory.

  19. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  20. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Raghunath; Behera, Nirbhay K; Nandi, Basanta K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like...

  1. Speculative Physics: the Ontology of Theory and Experiment in High Energy Particle Physics and Science Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarissa Ai Ling Lee

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation brings together approaches across the fields of physics, critical theory, literary studies, philosophy of physics, sociology of science, and history of science to synthesize a hybrid approach for instigating more rigorous and intense cross-disciplinary interrogations between the sciences and the humanities. There are two levels of conversations going on in the dissertation; at the first level, the discussion is centered on a critical historiography and philosophical implications of the discovery Higgs boson in relation to its position at the intersection of old (current) and the potential for new possibilities in quantum physics; I then position my findings on the Higgs boson in connection to the double-slit experiment that represents foundational inquiries into quantum physics, to demonstrate the bridge between fundamental physics and high energy particle physics. The conceptualization of the variants of the double-slit experiment informs the aforementioned critical comparisons. At the second level of the conversation, theories are produced from a close study of the physics objects as speculative engine for new knowledge generation that are then reconceptualized and re-articulated for extrapolation into the speculative ontology of hard science fiction, particularly the hard science fiction written with the double intent of speaking to the science while producing imaginative and socially conscious science through the literary affordances of science fiction. The works of science fiction examined here demonstrate the tension between the internal values of physics in the practice of theory and experiment and questions on ethics, culture, and morality.

  2. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra; Nirbhay K. Behera; Basanta K. Nandi

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons and the transverse energy measurement.

  3. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of “collectivity” from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitru, Adrian; McLerran, Larry; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how angular asymmetries ~ cos 2? can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to c2{4} is negative while all contributions frommore »genuine two, three and four particle correlations are positive. Our results may provide some qualitative insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p + Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of c2{4} in high multiplicity events. (author)« less

  4. An Interferometric Analysis Method for Radio Impulses from Ultra-high Energy Particle Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Wolf, A; Vieregg, A; Gorham, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an interferometric technique for the reconstruction of ultra-wide band impulsive signals from point sources. This highly sensitive method was developed for the search for ultra-high energy neutrinos with the ANITA experiment but is fully generalizable to any antenna array detecting radio impulsive events. Applications of the interferometric method include event reconstruction, thermal noise and anthropogenic background rejection, and solar imaging for calibrations. We illustrate this technique with applications from the analysis of the ANITA-I and ANITA-II data in the 200-1200 MHz band.

  5. Compilation of high energy physics reaction data: inventory of the particle data group holdings 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, G.C.; Stevens, P.R.; Rittenberg, A.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compilation is presented of reaction data taken from experimental high energy physics journal articles, reports, preprints, theses, and other sources. Listings of all the data are given, and the data points are indexed by reaction and momentum, as well as by their source document. Much of the original compilation was done by others working in the field. The data presented also exist in the form of a computer-readable and searchable database; primitive access facilities for this database are available.

  6. Excitation of autoionizing states of helium-like ions by scattering of high-energy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Nefiodov, A. V., E-mail: anef@thd.pnpi.spb.ru [B. P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Plunien, G. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)] [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for two-electron excitations of helium-like atomic systems into the autoionizing 2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S)- and 2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S)-states by collisions with high-energy electrons and photons are deduced. The evaluations are performed to the leading order of non-relativistic perturbation theory. The analytical formulas for cross sections are obtained in the form of universal scalings. A comparison of our theoretical predictions with available theoretical and experimental results for the helium atom is made.

  7. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  8. Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Gosselin; Herve Mohrbach

    2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium properties of particles adsorption is investigated theoretically. The model relies on a free energy formulation which allows to generalize the Maxwell-Boltzmann description to solutions for which the bulk volume fraction of potentially adsorbed particles is very high. As an application we consider the equilibrium physical adsorption of neutral and charged particles from solution onto two parallel adsorbing surfaces.

  9. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjřlbro, J; Sharma, A; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  10. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjřlbro, J; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Sharma, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for op- timal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally un- friendly Freon-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  11. Experimental aspects of effects of high-energy particles on Alfven modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Alfven modes are observed in a number of tokamaks, including DIII-D and TFTR. Instabilities occur during neutral-beam injection and during fast-wave ICRF heating, and may recently have been observed during alpha-particle heating. Identification of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) is based primarily on the scaling of the real frequency of the mode. Other modes, including the beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE), are also observed. The stability threshold of TAE modes agree (to within a factor of two) with theoretical predictions. Toroidal mode numbers of n = 2-6 are usually most unstable, as theoretically expected. Measurements of the poloidal and radial mode structure are consistent with theoretical predictions, but the uncertainties are large. Both TAE and BAE modes can cause large, concentrated losses of fast ions. Phenomenologically, beam-driven Alfven modes usually {open_quotes}saturate{close_quotes} through bursts that expel beam ions, while modes observed during ICPF heating approach a steady saturation amplitude.

  12. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 {times} 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Impact of high energy particles in InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohyama, H.; Hakata, T. [Kumamoto National Coll. of Technology, Nishigoshi, Kumamoto (Japan)] [Kumamoto National Coll. of Technology, Nishigoshi, Kumamoto (Japan); Simoen, E.; Claeys, C. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)] [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium); Kuroda, S. [Fujitsu Quantum Devices Ltd., Yamanashi (Japan)] [Fujitsu Quantum Devices Ltd., Yamanashi (Japan); Takami, Y. [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunaga, H. [Takasaki JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)] [Takasaki JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation damage and its recovery behavior resulting from thermal annealing in InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic HEMTs, subjected to a 20-MeV alpha ray and 220-MeV carbon, are studied for the first time. The drain current and effective mobility decrease after irradiation, while the threshold voltage increases in positive direction. The degradation of device performance increases with increasing fluence. The decrease of the mobility is thought to be due to the scattering of channel electrons with the induced lattice defects and also to the decrease of the electron density in the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) region. The influence of the radiation source on the degradation and recovery is discussed by comparison with 1-MeV electron and 1-MeV fast neutron exposures with respect to the number of knock-on atoms and the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL). Isochronal thermal annealing for temperatures ranging from 75 to 300 C shows that the device performance degraded by the irradiation recovers completely.

  14. Ultra High Energy Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the behaviour of particles at Ultra Highe energies in the context of the fact that the LHC has already touched an energy of $7 TeV$ and is likely to attain $14 TeV$ by 2013/2014.Consequences like a possible new shortlived interaction within the Compton scale are discussed.

  15. Dark energy and particle mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the vacuum condensate due to particle mixing is responsible of a dynamically evolving dark energy. In particular, we show that values of the adiabatic index close to -1 for vacuum condensates of neutrinos and quarks imply, at the present epoch, contributions to the vacuum energy compatible with the estimated upper bound on the dark energy.

  16. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  17. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  18. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  19. NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-blackbody enclosed particle receiver can support high-temperature thermal energy storage and high-efficiency power cycles.

  20. Phenomena of spin rotation and oscillation of particles (atoms, molecules) containing in a trap blowing on by wind of high energy particles in storage ring - new method of measuring of spin-dependent part of zero-angle coherent scattering amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Baryshevsky

    2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    New experiment arrangement to study spin rotation and oscillation of particles of gas target through which beam of high energy particles passes is discussed. Such experiment arrangement make it realizable for storage ring and allows to study zero-angle scattering amplitude at highest possible energies. Life-time of particle beam in storage ring can reach several hours and even days. Life-time of particle in gas target (gas trap) is long too. Particles circulate in storage ring with frequency $\

  1. Particle Acceleration at High-$?$ Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacek Niemiec

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    First-order Fermi acceleration processes at ultrarelativistic shocks are studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The accelerated particle spectra are obtained by integrating the exact particle trajectories in a turbulent magnetic field near the shock, with a few ``realistic'' features of the field structure included. We show that the main acceleration process at oblique shocks is the particle compression at the shock. Formation of energetic spectral tails is possible in a limited energy range for highly perturbed magnetic fields. Cut-offs in the spectra occur at low energies in the resonance range considered. We relate this feature to the structure of the magnetic field downstream of the shock, where field compression produces effectively 2D turbulence in which cross-field diffusion is very small. Because of the field compression downstream, the acceleration process is inefficient also in parallel high-$\\gamma$ shocks for larger turbulence amplitudes, and features observed in oblique shocks are recovered. For small-amplitude perturbations, particle spectra are formed in a wide energy range and modifications of the acceleration process due to the existence of long-wave perturbations are observed. The critical turbulence amplitude for efficient acceleration at parallel shocks decreases with shock Lorentz factor. We also study the influence of strong short-wave perturbations downstream of the shock on the particle acceleration processes. The spectral indices obtained do not converge to the ``universal'' value . Our results indicate inefficiency of the first-order Fermi process to generate high-energy cosmic rays at ultrarelativistic shocks with the considered perturbed magnetic field structures.

  2. Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lafferty, G. D.; Reeves, P. I.; Whalley, M. R.

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on inclusive particle production in e+e- interactions is presented. Data are given in both tabular and graphical form for multiplicities and inclusive differential cross sections from experiments at all of the world`s high energy e+e- colliders. To facilitate comparison between the data sets, curves are also shown from the JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlo program. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Annihilation, G.D. Lafferty, P.I. Reeves, and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 21, Number 12A, 1995.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  3. New Particle and Energy "Timeless Particle" and "Timeless Energy" that Existed Before the Beginning of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Riza Akcay

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives preliminary information regarding the new particles and energies titled "Timeless Particle" and "Timeless Energy" that existed before the beginning of time.

  4. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  5. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  6. High spatial resolution particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

  7. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Technical Services for Work on Components of CERN Particle Accelerators and High Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 73 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3156/SPL) was sent on 4 November 2002 to three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: 1) the consortium SERCO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (NL) - GERARD PERRIER INDUSTRIE (FR) - INEO ALPES (FR), the lowest bidder, for approximately 55% of the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments, for an initial period of five years and for a total amount not exceeding 37 435 270 euros (54 902 500 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-...

  8. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  9. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Acconcia; A. G. Agocs; F. Barile; G. G. Barnafoldi; R. Bellwied; G. Bencedi; G. Bencze; D. Berenyi; L. Boldizsar; S. Chattopadhyay; F. Cindolo; D. D. Chinellato; S. D'Ambrosio; D. Das; K. Das; L. Das-Bose; A. K. Dash; G. De Cataldo; S. De Pasquale; D. Di Bari; A. Di Mauro; E. Futo; E. Garcia; G. Hamar; A. Harton; G. Iannone; R. T. Jimenez; D. W. Kim; J. S. Kim; A. Knospe; L. Kovacs; P. Levai; E. Nappi; C. Markert; P. Martinengo; D. Mayani; L. Molnar; L. Olah; G. Paic; C. Pastore; G. Patimo; M. E. Patino; V. Peskov; L. Pinsky; F. Piuz; S. Pochybova; I. Sgura; T. Sinha; J. Song; J. Takahashi; A. Timmins; J. B. Van Beelen; D. Varga; G. Volpe; M. Weber; L. Xaplanteris; J. Yi; I. K. Yoo

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.

  10. Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

  11. Spin rotation and birefringence effect for a particle in a high energy storage ring and measurement of the real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude, electric and magnetic polarizabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky; A. A. Gurinovich

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper the equations for the spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are analyzed considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle. Study of spin rotation and birefringence effect for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement as the real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude as well as tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities. We proposed the method for measurement the real part of the elastic coherent zero-angle scattering amplitude of particles and nuclei in a storage ring by the paramagnetic resonance in the periodical in time nuclear pseudoelectric and pseudomagnetic fields.

  12. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  13. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State University; Adams, Todd [Florida State University; Askew, Andrew [Florida State University; Berg, Bernd [Florida State University; Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State University; Okui, Takemichi [Florida State University; Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State University; Reina, Laura [Florida State University; Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  14. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, Craig T. (Overland Park, KS); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic detector head harp (23) used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires (21), typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit (25) formed on a ceramic substrate (26). A method to fabricate harps (23) to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit (25) disposed on the ceramic substrate (26) connects electrically between the detector wires (21) and diagnostic equipment (37) which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires (21) by the high energy particle beams.

  15. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L.

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a diagnostic detector head harp used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires, typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit formed on a ceramic substrate. A method to fabricate harps to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit disposed on the ceramic substrate connects electrically between the detector wires and diagnostic equipment which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires by the high energy particle beams. 6 figs.

  16. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues and experimental data that brought the ultra high energy cosmic rays in the list of Nature's greatest puzzles. After many years of research we still do not know how astrophysical acceleration processes can reach energies exceeding 10$^{11}$ GeV. The main alternative {\\em top-down} mechanism postulates the existence of super massive $X$-particles that create a particle spectrum extending down to the observed energy through their decay channels. The propagation of nuclei and photons from their sources to us adds to the puzzle as all particles of these energies interact with the ambient photons, mostly of the microwave background. We also describe briefly the main observational results and give some information on the new experiments that are being built and designed now.

  17. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10–130 Ĺ on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianli, E-mail: huang.xianli@nifs.ac.jp [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan) [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Dong, Chunfeng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10–130 Ĺ has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Z{sub eff} and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (?180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 ?m thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 ?m thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 ?m thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 ?m Be and 3.3 ?m PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of ? ? 20 Ĺ, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 ?m PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Ĺ even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?3}, when the 0.5 ?m PET filter is used. The iron n = 3–2 L? transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10–18 Ĺ. Each transition in the L? array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Ĺ is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters are also presented with performance of the present spectrometer system.

  18. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  19. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  20. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  1. How Particle Accelerators Work | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37Energy HighlightsCarbon CaptureShadeParticle

  2. High energy photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jabs, Harry

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities...

  3. Particle production sources at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Wolschin

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle production sources at RHIC and LHC energies are investigated in pseudorapidity space. A nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM) with three sources is applied to the analysis of charged-hadron distributions in AuAu collisions at RHIC energies, in PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy of 2.76 TeV, in pPb at 5.02 TeV, and in pp. The size of the midrapidity source relative to the fragmentation sources in heavy-ion collisions is investigated as function of the incident energy. At LHC energies, the midrapidity value is mostly determined by particle production from gluon-gluon collisions.

  4. Phenylxylylethane (PXE): a high-density, high-flashpoint organic liquid scintillator for applications in low-energy particle and astrophysics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borexino Collaboration

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the study of a new liquid scintillator target for neutrino interactions in the framework of the research and development program of the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment. The scintillator consists of 1,2-dimethyl-4-(1-phenylethyl)-benzene (phenyl-o-xylylethane, PXE) as solvent and 1,4-diphenylbenzene (para-Terphenyl, p-Tp) as primary and 1,4-bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as secondary solute. The density close to that of water and the high flash point makes it an attractive option for large scintillation detectors in general. The study focused on optical properties, radioactive trace impurities and novel purification techniques of the scintillator. Attenuation lengths of the scintillator mixture of 12 m at 430 nm were achieved after purification with an alumina column. A radio carbon isotopic ratio of C-14/C-12 = 9.1 * 10^{-18}$ has been measured in the scintillator. Initial trace impurities, e.g. U-238 at 3.2 * 10^{-14} g/g could be purified to levels below 10^{-17} g/g by silica gel solid column purification.

  5. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  6. ccsd-00004163,version1-4Feb2005 Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00004163,version1-4Feb2005 Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption Pierre Gosselin1 of particles adsorption is investigated theoretically. The model relies on a free energy formulation which of potentially adsorbed particles is very high. As an application we consider the equilibrium physical adsorption

  7. Soot particle aerosol dynamics at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA). Physics Dept.); Kennedy, I.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have used detailed calculations to analyze the coagulation dynamics of a soot aerosol at high pressures (20 and 50 atm). They find that the soot size distribution is altered compared to lower-pressure conditions because the mean free path at high pressures is reduced to the point that the particles are similar in size to the mean free path. At lower pressures the form of the size distribution becomes constant (self-preserving) in time, allowing optical measurements to be easily interpreted. However, the authors find that at pressures above about 5 atm the shape of the size distribution continually changes. As a result, proper and accurate interpretation of optical data at high pressures is more difficult than at lower pressures.

  8. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  9. Search for Short Lived Particles in High Multiplicity Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Gazdzicki; Waldemar Retyk; Jan Pluta

    1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of statistical selection of short lived particles in high multiplicity nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed.

  10. Ultra High Energy Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

  11. COLLIMATING TOUSCHEK PARTICLES IN AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    COLLIMATING TOUSCHEK PARTICLES IN AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINEAR ACCELERATOR Michael P. Ehrlichman- tum would usually be inconsequential to the trajectory of the particles through the accelerator to longitudinal momentum significant to the trajec- tory of scattered particles through the accelerator

  12. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  13. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  15. BELLE High Energy Physics Experiment at the KEK B-factory: Data and Physics Results for CPV, Rare, DKM, 5S, Charm, Tau, and New Particles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Belle is a high-energy physics (HEP) experiment that began in 1999 at the KEK B-factory in Japan under the direction of the International Belle Collaboration. The Collaboration was formed around the common interest of clarifying a long standing physics puzzle, that of CP violation. The goal of the experiments was to make a definitive test of the Standard Models predictions for CP violations in the decays of B mesons. The original Belle experiment verified the KM theory, leading to a Nobel prize in 2008 for Kobayashi and Maskawa. Belle II Collaboration is now working on additional discoveries.

  16. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | April 15, 2013 | Ho * This project employs modeling, design, testing, and optimization to further develop and improve key areas of falling particle receiver technology...

  17. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | June 15, 2013 | Ho * This project employs modeling, design, testing, and optimization to further develop and improve key areas of falling particle receiver technology...

  18. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperatures, nitrate salt fluids become chemically unstable. In contrast, direct absorption receivers using solid particles that fall through a beam of concentrated solar...

  19. Process Particle Counter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in the U.S. by Consider theDepartment ofParticle

  20. A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy under Arlon Hunt, "A New Solar Thermal Receiversolar thermal receiver that utilizes a dispersion of very small particles susŁe2ded in a gas to absorb the radiant energy

  1. The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students Kristen Melnyk­Elsner Kimball education outreach program, the Albany Particle Tower (APT) has been made available online to students who to run the detector and analyze real time data. Introduction The Albany Particle Tower is a Cosmic Ray

  2. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  3. Detachment Energies of Spheroidal Particles from Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary B. Davies; Timm Krüger; Peter V. Coveney; Jens Harting

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  4. High-energy electron beam technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

  5. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  6. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pähtz, Thomas; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids ("saltation" and "bedload", respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts ("splash") in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an ...

  7. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingashoter2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  8. High Energy Evolution with Pomeron Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Lublinsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy/density QCD has been widely used for DIS phenomenology with a projectile particle considered as perturbative and dilute. We review some recent attempts to derive a high energy evolution kernel which treats targets and projectiles in a symmetric manner. From theoretical point of view the problem is tightly related to inclusion of Pomeron loops in the evolution. The ultimate goal is to consider high energy scatterings with both projectile and target being dense, the situation faced at RHIC and the LHC.

  9. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  10. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  11. 12. Energy balance of particles 12.1 General solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    12. Energy balance of particles 12.1 General solutions In this chapter we want to study only to consider the heating/cooling balance of the temperature as a parameter of a known energy distribution by the balance of effects that depend on the particle energy. We can write down a continuity equation

  12. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  13. Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm for High Occupancy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Elagin; Pavel Murat; Alexandre Pranko; Alexei Safonov

    2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithms based on the particle flow approach are becoming increasingly utilized in collider experiments due to their superior jet energy and missing energy resolution compared to the traditional calorimeter-based measurements. Such methods have been shown to work well in environments with low occupancy of particles per unit of calorimeter granularity. However, at higher instantaneous luminosity or in detectors with coarse calorimeter segmentation, the overlaps of calorimeter energy deposits from charged and neutral particles significantly complicate particle energy reconstruction, reducing the overall energy resolution of the method. We present a technique designed to resolve overlapping energy depositions of spatially close particles using a statistically consistent probabilistic procedure. The technique is nearly free of ad-hoc corrections, improves energy resolution, and provides new important handles that can improve the sensitivity of physics analyses: the uncertainty of the jet energy on an event-by-event basis and the estimate of the probability of a given particle hypothesis for a given detector response. When applied to the reconstruction of hadronic jets produced in the decays of tau leptons using the CDF-II detector at Fermilab, the method has demonstrated reliable and robust performance.

  14. Energy related applications of elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafelski, J.

    1991-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current research position is summarized, and what could be done in the future to clarify issues which were opened up by the research is indicated. Following on the discussion of the viability of catalyzed fusion, there is presented along with the key experimental results, a short account of the physics surrounding the subject. This is followed by a discussion of key research topics addressed. In consequence of the progress made, it appears that the feasibility of a small-scale fusion based on catalyzed reactions rests on either the remote chance that a yet undiscovered ultraheavy negatively charged elementary particle exists in Nature, or on the possible technical realization of a system based on muon-catalyzed fusion (MuCF) in high-density degenerate hydrogen plasma (density 1000 LHD, temperature O(100 eV)). The lattter is considered to have practical promise.

  15. ccsd00004163, Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004163, version 1 ­ 4 Feb 2005 Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption Pierre Gosselin The equilibrium properties of particles adsorption is investigated theoretically. The model relies on a free the equilibrium physical adsorption of neutral and charged particles from solution onto two parallel adsorbing

  16. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  17. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  18. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  19. Energy-range relation and mean energy variation in therapeutic particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, Johanna; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for the mean energy and range of therapeutic light ion beams and low- and high-energy electrons have been derived, based on the energy dependence of their respective stopping powers. The new mean energy and range relations are power-law expressions relevant for light ion radiation therapy, and are based on measured practical ranges or known tabulated stopping powers and ranges for the relevant incident particle energies. A practical extrapolated range, R{sub p}, for light ions was defined, similar to that of electrons, which is very closely related to the extrapolated range of the primary ions. A universal energy-range relation for light ions and electrons that is valid for all material mixtures and compounds has been developed. The new relation can be expressed in terms of the range for protons and alpha particles, and is found to agree closely with experimental data in low atomic number media and when the difference in the mean ionization energy is low. The variation of the mean energy with depth and the new energy-range relation are useful for accurate stopping power and mass scattering power calculations, as well as for general particle transport and dosimetry applications.

  20. High Energy Processes in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Young pulsars produce relativistic winds which interact with matter ejected during the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Particles are accelerated to very high energies somewhere in the pulsar winds or at the shocks produced in collisions of the winds with the surrounding medium. As a result of interactions of relativistic leptons with the magnetic field and low energy radiation (of synchrotron origin, thermal, or microwave background), the non-thermal radiation is produced with the lowest possible energies up to $\\sim$100 TeV. The high energy (TeV) gamma-ray emission has been originally observed from the Crab Nebula and recently from several other objects. Recent observations by the HESS Cherenkov telescopes allow to study for the first time morphology of the sources of high energy emission, showing unexpected spectral features. They might be also interpreted as due to acceleration of hadrons. However, theory of particle acceleration in the PWNe and models for production of radiation are still at their early stage of development since it becomes clear that realistic modeling of these objects should include their time evolution and three-dimensional geometry. In this paper we concentrate on the attempts to create a model for the high energy processes inside the PWNe which includes existence not only relativistic leptons but also hadrons inside the nebula. Such model should also take into account evolution of the nebula in time. Possible high energy expectations based on such a model are discussed in the context of new observations.

  1. Fusion reactions in plasmas as probe of the high-momentum tail of particle distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Coraddu; Marcello Lissia; Giuseppe Mezzorani; Piero Quarati

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion reactions, the Coulomb barrier selects particles from the high-momentum part of the distribution. Therefore, small variations of the high-momentum tail of the velocity distribution can produce strong effects on fusion rates. In plasmas several potential mechanisms exist that can produce deviations from the standard Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Quantum broadening of the energy-momentum dispersion relation of the plasma quasi-particles modifies the high-momentum tail and could explain the fusion-rate enhancement observed in low-energy nuclear reaction experiments.

  2. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

  3. NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear 1

  4. HiResHiRes Mapping the HighMapping the High Energy UniverseEnergy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HiResHiRes ­­ Mapping the HighMapping the High Energy UniverseEnergy Universe Stefan Westerhoff Columbia University HiRes Collaboration Fermilab Wine & Cheese Seminar 24 October 2003 #12;Particle-rays · Gamma-ray Astronomy ­ photons from MeV to TeV · Cosmic Rays ­ protons and heavier nuclei with energies

  5. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), which includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions, we study the rapidity distributions of charged particles such as protons, antiprotons, pions, and kaons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC...

  6. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  7. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements...

  9. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  10. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  11. Computation of Normal Shocks Running into a Cloud of Particles using a High-Order Particle-Source-in-Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Gustaaf "Guus"

    Computation of Normal Shocks Running into a Cloud of Particles using a High-Order Particle are studied with bronze particle cloud in the accelerated flow behind a running shock. The forty thousands particle clouds are arranged initially in a rectangular, triangular and circular shape. The flows

  12. Nanolipoprotein Particles for Hydrogen Production - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593Energy StoragePortal Hydrogen

  13. High Energy Physics Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,ofOpportunitieshighlights/ The Office ofabout/jobs/

  14. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Pähtz; Orencio Durán; Tuan-Duc Ho; Alexandre Valance; Jasper F. Kok

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids ("saltation" and "bedload", respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts ("splash") in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  15. High energy neutrino cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Reno

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical status of the neutrino-nucleon cross section is reviewed for incident neutrino energies up to E_nu=10^12 GeV, including different approaches to high energy extrapolations. Nonstandard model physics may play a role at ultrahigh energies. The cases of mini-black hole production and electroweak instanton contributions are discussed as examples in the context of ultrahigh energy neutrino scattering.

  16. High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Slane

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

  17. High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresented By:DanielHigh Energy Cost

  18. Alternative Discrete Energy Solutions to the Free Particle Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas Edward

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual method of solving the free particle Dirac equation results in the so called continuum energy solutions. Here, we take a different approach and find a set of solutions with quantized energies which are proportional to the total angular momentum.

  19. Alternative Discrete Energy Solutions to the Free Particle Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Edward Brennan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual method of solving the free particle Dirac equation results in the so called continuum energy solutions. Here, we take a different approach and find a set of solutions with quantized energies which are proportional to the total angular momentum.

  20. Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear science, gamma and neutron spectra are counted energy by energy, and then particle by particle. Until recently, few studies have been performed on how exactly those energy spectra are counted, or how those counts are correlated. Because of lack of investigation, cross section covariance and correlation matrices are usually estimated using perturbation method. We will discuss a statistical counting scheme that shall mimic the gamma and neutron counting process used in nuclear science. From this counting scheme, the cross section covariance and correlation can be statistically derived.

  1. Particle mixing, flavor condensate and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Blasone; Antonio Capolupo; Giuseppe Vitiello

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing of neutrinos and quarks generate a vacuum condensate that, at the present epoch, behaves as a cosmological constant. The value of the dark energy is constrained today by the very small breaking of the Lorentz invariance.

  2. Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrial Technologies IndustrialSolar

  3. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  4. How Particle Accelerators Work | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony of Secretary SamuelAs youBriefing

  5. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

  6. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  7. High West Energy, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail NaturalHiflux LtdTechnoHigh

  8. Energy States of Colored Particle in a Chromomagnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sh. Mamedov

    2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The unitary transformation, which diagonalizes squared Dirac equation in a constant chromomagnetic field is found. Applying this transformation, we find the eigenfunctions of diagonalized Hamiltonian, that describe the states with definite value of energy and call them energy states. It is pointed out that, the energy states are determined by the color interaction term of the particle with the background chromofield and this term is responsible for the splitting of the energy spectrum. We construct supercharge operators for the diagonal Hamiltonian, that ensure the superpartner property of the energy states.

  9. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  10. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: WIN 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although high energy neutrino astronomy is a multidisciplinary science, gamma ray bursts have become the theoretical focus since recent astronomical observations revealed their potential as cosmic particle accelerators. This spotlight is shared with investigations of the potential of high energy telescopes to observe oscillating atmospheric neutrinos. The Superkamiokande results have boosted atmospheric neutrinos from a calibration tool and a background for doing astronomy, to an opportunity to confirm the evidence for neutrino mass. Nevertheless, the highlights are mostly on the experimental front with the completion of the first-generation Baikal and AMANDA detectors. Neutrino signals from the Lake Baikal detector bode well for the flurry of activities in the Mediterranean. The completed AMANDA telescope announced first light, neutrinos actually, at this meeting.

  11. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  12. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  13. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinali, M; Bondy, M I Ferretti; Hoek, M; Lauth, W; Rosner, C; Sfienti, C; Thiel, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investi...

  14. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-order (v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt < 2 GeV, the v[2] and v[3] values of K0S particles are larger than those of Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the same pt. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v[2] and v[3] for K0S particles are observed to be consistent with those for Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.

  15. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Sparks, Dennis O [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

  16. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes {Gamma}{sub p}10{sup 23} m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2}. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to {approx}0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in He and 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  17. Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

  18. The Composition of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Through Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nuclei originating outside the Solar System "Ultra High Energy" E > 1017eV First discovered by interact high in the Earth's atmosphere EASs result in billions of secondary particles Fluorescence) Image produced by 16x16 PMT "Cluster Box" 3.3 m diameter mirrors collect light and focus

  19. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  20. High Energy Physics from High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss Quantum Chromodynamics calculations using the lattice regulator. The theory of the strong force is a cornerstone of the Standard Model of particle physics. We present USQCD collaboration results obtained on Argonne National Lab's Intrepid supercomputer that deepen our understanding of these fundamental theories of Nature and provide critical support to frontier particle physics experiments and phenomenology.

  1. PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaslin, J.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

  2. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  3. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  4. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium) [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Yang, Weitao [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H{sub 2}, and eliminates delocalization errors in H{sub 2}{sup +} and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies – competitive with the ph-RPA – with the correct R{sup ?6} asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  5. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

  6. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

  8. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The short review of theoretical aspects of ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos and superGZK neutrinos. The sources and diffuse fluxes of UHE neutrinos are discussed. Much attention is given to comparison of the cascade and cosmic ray upper bounds for diffuse neutrino fluxes. Cosmogenic neutrinos and neutrinos from the mirror mater are considered as superGZK neutrinos.

  9. An Efficient, Movable Single-Particle Detector for Use in Cryogenic Ultra-High Vacuum Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spruck, Kaija; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Novotný, Old?ich; Schippers, Stefan; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to $\\sim$ 10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, high-temperature bakeable and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK's Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  10. High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHigh Efficiency Low -1 DOE

  11. High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHigh Efficiency Low -1 DOE0 DOE

  12. High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHigh Efficiency Low -1 DOE0 DOE09

  13. SHOCK SOLUTIONS FOR HIGH CONCENTRATION PARTICLE-LADEN THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    ], and particle resuspension induced by shear [19, 1]. Only recent studies have centered on particle-laden thin of the flow leading to the stratification of the suspension with a clear fluid moving ahead of the particles and shear-induced migration at the leading order in large scale physics for particle-liquid separation

  14. Spin rotation of polarized beams in high energy storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations for spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are obtained considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle along with the contributions from spin rotation and birefringence effect in polarized matter of an internal target. % Study of the spin rotation and birefringence effects for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement both the spin-dependent real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude and tensor electric (magnetic) polarizabilities.

  15. Ultra-high-energy debris from the collisional Penrose process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Berti; Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Soon after the discovery of the Kerr metric, Penrose realized that superradiance can be exploited to extract energy from black holes. The original idea (involving the breakup of a single particle) yields only modest energy gains. A variant of the Penrose process consists of particle collisions in the ergoregion. The collisional Penrose process has been explored recently in the context of dark matter searches, with the conclusion that the ratio $\\eta$ between the energy of post-collision particles detected at infinity and the energy of the colliding particles should be modest ($\\eta \\lesssim 1.5$). Schnittman has shown that these studies underestimated the maximum efficiency by about one order of magnitude (i.e., $\\eta \\lesssim 15$). In this work we reach an even more striking conclusion: particle collisions in the vicinity of rapidly rotating black holes can result in arbitrarily high efficiencies. The astrophysical likelihood of these events deserves further scrutiny, but our study hints at the tantalizing possibility that the collisional Penrose process may power gamma rays and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  16. How Particle Physics Improves Your Life | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony of Secretary SamuelAs youBriefingParticle

  17. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  18. Fitting Single Particle Energies in $sdgh$ Major Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dikmen, E; Cengiz, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two kinds of non-linear fitting procedures to the single-particle energies in the $sdgh$ major shell to obtain better shell model results. The low-lying energy eigenvalues of the light Sn isotopes with $A=103-110$ in the $sdgh$-shell are calculated in the framework of the nuclear shell model by using CD-Bonn two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained energy eigenvalues are fitted to the corresponding experimental values by using two different non-linear fitting procedures, i.e., downhill simplex method and clonal selection method. The unknown single-particle energies of the states $2s_{1/2}$, $1d_{3/2}$, and $0h_{11/2}$ are used in the fitting methods to obtain better spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn isotopes. We compare the energy spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn and $^{103,105,107,109}$Sn isotopes with/without a nonlinear fit to the experimental results.

  19. Fitting Single Particle Energies in $sdgh$ Major Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Dikmen; O. Öztürk; Y. Cengiz

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two kinds of non-linear fitting procedures to the single-particle energies in the $sdgh$ major shell to obtain better shell model results. The low-lying energy eigenvalues of the light Sn isotopes with $A=103-110$ in the $sdgh$-shell are calculated in the framework of the nuclear shell model by using CD-Bonn two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained energy eigenvalues are fitted to the corresponding experimental values by using two different non-linear fitting procedures, i.e., downhill simplex method and clonal selection method. The unknown single-particle energies of the states $2s_{1/2}$, $1d_{3/2}$, and $0h_{11/2}$ are used in the fitting methods to obtain better spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn isotopes. We compare the energy spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn and $^{103,105,107,109}$Sn isotopes with/without a nonlinear fit to the experimental results.

  20. Preconcentrator with high volume chiller for high vapor pressure particle detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for collecting particles of both high and low vapor pressure target materials entrained in a large volume sample gas stream. Large volume active cooling provides a cold air supply which is mixed with the sample gas stream to reduce the vapor pressure of the particles. In embodiments, a chiller cools air from ambient conditions to 0-15.degree. C. with the volumetric flow rate of the cold air supply being at least equal to the volumetric flow rate of the sample gas stream. In further embodiments an adsorption media is heated in at least two stages, a first of which is below a threshold temperature at which decomposition products of the high vapor pressure particle are generated.

  1. Birkeland currents and charged particles in the high-latitude prenoon region: A new interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bythrow, P.F.; Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, conjugate measurements of magnetic fields and charged particles at low altitude in the high-latitude prenoon sector and the magnetosheath were made with the DMSP F7, HILAT, and Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE satellites on November 1, 1984. These data show that the low-latitude portion of the traditional ''cusp'' particle signature is coincident with the prenoon region 1 current system in both hemispheres and for both northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland currents are associated with the dispersion region of cusp ions when the IMF is directed southward and with electron fluxes that are slightly enhanced over polar rain intensities. Finally, electron spectra measured by AMPTE CCE in the magnetosheath near 1000 MLT are similar in shape and energy to those acquired at low altitude by both DMSP F7 and HILAT. These observations indicate that for both northward and southward IMF, the traditional ''cusp particle'' signature is coincident with the region 1 Birkeland current system and maps to low altitude along field lines that thread the dayside boundary layer. The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland current system flows along field lines that lie poleward of the region of cusp particles and the region 1 current system. These field lines thread the plasma mantle. Thus, we suggest that the traditional ''cusp'' current system might be appropriately renamed the ''mantle'' Birkeland current system. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Optimization of Polymer-based Nanocomposites for High Energy Density Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barhoumi Ep Meddeb, Amira

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    nanocomposites, i.e., high dielectric particles embedded into a high dielectric breakdown polymer, are promising candidates to overcome the limitations of monolithic materials for energy storage applications. The main objective of this dissertation...

  3. Type IIn supernovae as sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirakashvili, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed in the IceCube experiment can be produced by protons accelerated in extragalactic Type IIn supernova remnants by shocks propagating in the dense circumstellar medium. The nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model is used for description of particle acceleration.

  4. Integrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    plots from the Particle Data Group; each point is cum avg. #12;But there is also good in us... http articles so far; now about 1/week. · Data also contain many well understood processes that can be usedIntegrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics Jeffrey D. RichmanJeffrey D. Richman

  5. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  6. RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo [ORNL; Golzarri y Moreno, Dr. Jose Ignacio [Instituto de Fisica, Mexico; Bogard, James S [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

  7. SHOCK SOLUTIONS FOR HIGH CONCENTRATION PARTICLE-LADEN THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    of particles [32, 4], the settling of heavy par- ticles due to gravity [12], and particle resuspension induced. At low inclination angles and concentrations, particles settle out of the flow leading a model to identify a balance between hindered settling and shear-induced migration as the leading order

  8. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  9. A High Energy Electron and Photon Detector Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srikanta Sinha

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed Monte-Carlo code has been developed from basic principles that simulates almost all of the basic photon and charged particle interactions. The code is used to derive the response functions of a high energy photon detector to incident beams of photons of various energies. The detector response matrices (DRMs) are calculated using this code. Deconvolution of an artificially generated spectrum is presented.

  10. PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reames, Donald V., E-mail: dvreames@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

  11. High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy-efficient commercial building technologies. Through the High Impact Technology Catalyst program, initiated in 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identifies...

  12. Particle Image Velocimetery (PIV) Diagnostics for Wind Energy and Energy Security Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pol, Suhas Uddhav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Image Velocimetery (PIV) is a laser based technique that involves correlation analysis of tracer particle images to estimate the velocity field in a fluid. High resolution velocity measurement capability and non-intrusive nature of PIV make it desirable for understanding complex fluid flow phenomena occurring in various scenarios. This presentation briefly describes the development of novel PIV diagnostics that forward Wind Energy research and advance scaling models to solve expensive maintenance issues of the Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR). Two new diagnostic implementations of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to facilitate understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics in unprecedented detail. It has been demonstrated that a Large-Field PIV (LF-PIV) diagnostic capable of measuring large scale flow fields of up to 4.3m x 2.8m per camera has been developed. This diagnostic, which represents a significant leap in the field of view of existing centimeter scale PIV systems, allows the measurement of velocity fields at multiple points with high accuracy for large scale flows, such as, flows around wind turbines. Further, to characterize the near blade boundary layer of wind turbines a rotating PIV system (R-PIV) is also under development at LANL (patent application in progress). Design considerations and results of bench top tests that confirm the reliability of PIV measurements obtained using the above diagnostics will be presented in this talk. PIV along with conductivity and temperature probe data has been useful to develop models that simulate the evolution of the layered structure of crude oil stored in the subterranean caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR). Understanding the evolution of stratified layers of crude oil that are subjected to geothermal forcing is crucial in improving the efficiency of maintenance procedures carried out for the SPR and hence ensure Energy Security of the nation. Through analytical and experimental analysis it has been found that the dynamics of crude oil mixing are significantly affected by the presence of heating sidewalls of the storage caverns. Scaling laws that have been advanced for evolution of mixed layers for stratified fluid layers stored in slender containers will also be described in this presentation.

  13. Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLaND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pair-production in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

  14. Screen bowl centrifuge: a high-efficiency particle size separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, M.K.; Zhang, B.; Khanna, N.; Palit, A.; Dube, B. [South Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. for Mining & Mineral Resources Engineering

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years, screen bowl centrifuges have been widely used for dewatering fine coal in coal preparation plants in the United States and elsewhere. It is generally recognized in the engineering and scientific communities that screen bowl centrifuges provide some degree of particle size separation while dewatering fine coal in a common application. However, the extent of differential partitioning of coarse and fine particles achievable by a screen bowl centrifuge has not been systematically studied in the past. The present investigation was aimed at conducting a parametric study using a statistically designed experimental program to better understand and optimize the size classification performance of a screen bowl centrifuge. A continuously operating screen bowl centrifuge having a bowl diameter of 0.5 m was used for this study at the Illinois Coal Development Park. Three key operating parameters, i.e., feed flow rate, feed solid content and pool depth, were varied to conduct a total of 17 experiments using a three-level factorial test matrix. Some of the best size separation performances achieved in this study may be described as having an imperfection value of 0.13 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 38 mu m and an imperfection value of 0.27 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 2.8 mu m. Due to an effective separation of ultrafine high ash materials, the ash content of the screen bowl feed was reduced from 22.3% to a minimum of 8.84% with a combustible recovery of 84.1% and an ash rejection of 71.6%. A higher combustible recovery of 92.1% was achieved at a product ash content of 12.5% with a d(50c) of 2.8 mu m and imperfection of 0.27.

  15. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

  16. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  17. ''Bare'' single-particle energies in Ni-56 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Kolomiets, A.; Shlomo, S.; Heyde, K.; Dejbakhsh, H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhou, XG; Jacob, VE; Oros, AM.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 57Ni and 57Cu that the lowest orbital in the N53 shell is 2p3/2 @1#. The first and second excited states in 57Ni at E*50.768 MeV, Jp55/22 and E*51.113 MeV, Jp51/22 have good single-particle character @2# and corre- spond to the next two orbitals.... A quick look higher into the energy spectrum shows a group of three levels of negative parity and spins Jp55/22, 7/22, and 3/22 around the energy of the first excited state in the core at E(211)52701 keV with half-lives T1/25 31, 47, and 12 fs...

  18. High Performance Zintl Phase TE Materials with Embedded Particles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHighLouisianaDepartment of

  19. IAEACN69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles the severe problem of concentrated power loading of the divertor. [2] Experiments have shown that a large1 IAEA­CN­69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

  20. IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy production (7.6ĘMJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles the severe problem of concentrated power loading of the divertor.Ę[2] Experiments have shown that a large1 IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

  1. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  2. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  3. Energy Star Helps Manufacturers To Achieve High Energy Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutrow, E.; Hicks, T.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From personal electronic devices to homes and office buildings, ENERGY STAR® is a recognized symbol of high quality energy performance which enables consumers, home buyers, and businesses to make informed energy decisions. Now, the U...

  4. Energy Star Helps Manufacturers To Achieve High Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutrow, E.; Hicks, T.

    From personal electronic devices to homes and office buildings, ENERGY STAR® is a recognized symbol of high quality energy performance which enables consumers, home buyers, and businesses to make informed energy decisions. Now, the U...

  5. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  6. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liss, Tony M. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois; Thaler, Jon J. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  7. Ultra high energy cosmic rays from cosmological relics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) can be a signal from very early (post-inflationary) Universe. At this cosmological epoch Topological Defects (TD) and long-lived suprheavy (SH) particles are expected to be naturally and effectively produced. Both of these relics can produce now the particles, such as protons and photons, with energies in a great excess of what is observed in UHECR, $E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{11} GeV$. The Topological Defects as the UHECR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopolonia are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles and monopolonia are shown to be clustering in the halo of our Galaxy and their decays produce UHECR without the GZK cutoff. The observational signature of both models are discussed.

  8. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-ordermore »(v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt « less

  9. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

  10. High Country Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei SungrowHelukabel GmbH

  11. High constriction ratio continuous insulator based dielectrophoretic particle sorting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qianru, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a promising technique to study cell surface dielectric properties. To date, iDEP has been exploited to distinguish, characterize, and manipulate particles and ...

  12. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pui, David Y. H. (Plymouth, MN); Chen, Da-Ren (Creve Coeur, MO)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  13. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Signature in Top-Down Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Aloisio

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are the best candidates to test the extreme Universe and ideas beyond the Standard Model of particle Physics. Once produced, neutrinos do not suffer any kind of attenuation by intervening radiation fields like the Cosmic Microwave Background and are not affected by magnetic fields. In this sense neutrinos are useful messengers from the far and young Universe. In the present paper we will discuss a particular class of sources of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays introduced to explain the possible excess of events with energy larger than the Graisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off. These sources, collectively called top-down, share a common feature: UHE particles are produced in the decay or annihilation of superheavy, exotic, particles. As we will review in the present paper, the largest fraction of Ultra High Energy particles produced in the top-down scenario are neutrinos. The study of these radiation offers us a unique opportunity to test the exotic mechanisms of the top-down scenario.

  14. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  15. High energy emission from microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Fender; Tom Maccarone

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The microquasar phenomenon is associated with the production of jets by X-ray binaries and, as such, may be associated with the majority of such systems. In this chapter we briefly outline the associations, definite, probable, possible, and speculative, between such jets and X-ray, gamma-ray and particle emission.

  16. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  17. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Ames, C A

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  18. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Johnson, F H

    1986-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  19. High energy octupole resonance in Sn-116

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, HL; Youngblood, David H.; Lui, YW.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The region of excitation energy from 7 less than or equal to E(x) less than or equal to 38 MeV in Sn-116 was studied with inelastic scattering of 240 MeV alpha particles. Parameters obtained for the isoscalar giant monopole resonance...

  20. Energy related applications of elementary particle physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafelski, J.

    1991-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current research position is summarized, and what could be done in the future to clarify issues which were opened up by the research is indicated. Following on the discussion of the viability of catalyzed fusion, there is presented along with the key experimental results, a short account of the physics surrounding the subject. This is followed by a discussion of key research topics addressed. In consequence of the progress made, it appears that the feasibility of a small-scale fusion based on catalyzed reactions rests on either the remote chance that a yet undiscovered ultraheavy negatively charged elementary particle exists in Nature, or on the possible technical realization of a system based on muon-catalyzed fusion (MuCF) in high-density degenerate hydrogen plasma (density 1000 LHD, temperature O(100 eV)). The lattter is considered to have practical promise.

  1. High energy gamma rays from old accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Blasi

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a magnetized neutron star with accretion from a companion star or a gas cloud around it, as a possible source of gamma rays with energy between $100$ $MeV$ and $10^{14}-10^{16}~eV$. The flow of the accreting plasma is terminated by a shock at the Alfv\\'en surface. Such a shock is the site for the acceleration of particles up to energies of $\\sim 10^{15}-10^{17}~eV$; gamma photons are produced in the inelastic $pp$ collisions between shock-accelerated particles and accreting matter. The model is applied to old neutron stars both isolated or in binary systems. The gamma ray flux above $100~MeV$ is not easily detectable, but we propose that gamma rays with very high energy could be used by Cherenkov experiments as a possible signature of isolated old neutron stars in dense clouds in our galaxy.

  2. High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for Spectroscopy & Micromachining PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES. In addition to the OPO, a custom designed ultrafast pump source, provides high pulse energy (.res.hw.ac.uk Professor Derryck Reid (Principal Investigator) www.ultrafast.hw.ac.uk BENEFITS & APPLICATIONS: · High pulse

  3. Searches For New Physics with High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Sauvan

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results of searches for new phenomena performed at high energy colliders are reviewed. The results reported are based on data samples of up to 1 fb^-1 and 4 fb^-1 collected at HERA and at the Tevatron, respectively. No significant evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been found and limits at the 95% confidence level have been set on the mass and couplings of several possible new particles.

  4. Amplitudes for High Energy Factorization via BCFW recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serino, Mirko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, an extension of the BCFW on-shell recursion relation suitable to compute gauge invariant scattering amplitudes with off-shell particles has been presented for Yang-Mills theories with fermions. In particular, 4- and 5-point amplitudes have been completely worked out. The results are needed for the study of multi-parton scattering at hadron colliders in the framework of High Energy Factorization (HEF).

  5. PARTICIPATION IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Christopher

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant funded experimental and theoretical activities in elementary particles physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The experiments in which IIT faculty collaborated included the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, the MINOS experiment, the Double Chooz experiment, and FNAL E871 - HyperCP experiment. Funds were used to support summer salary for faculty, salary for postdocs, and general support for graduate and undergraduate students. Funds were also used for travel expenses related to these projects and general supplies.

  6. Particle acceleration in thick parallel shocks with high compression ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joni J. P. Virtanen; Rami Vainio

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report studies on first-order Fermi acceleration in parallel modified shock waves with a large scattering center compression ratio expected from turbulence transmission models. Using a Monte Carlo technique we have modeled particle acceleration in shocks with a velocity ranging from nonrelativistic to ultrarelativistic and a thickness extending from nearly steplike to very wide structures exceeding the particle diffusion length by orders of magnitude. The nonrelativistic diffusion approximation is found to be surprisingly accurate in predicting the spectral index of a thick shock with large compression ratio even in the cases involving relativistic shock speeds.

  7. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  8. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Macridin, Alexandru [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spentzouris, Panagiotis [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  9. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemore »capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).« less

  10. Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

    2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

  11. Particle Environment in Low-and High-Earth Orbit! Sacrificial Charge and Particle Background!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    energy due to sacrificial charge. "Solar Min Solar Max · Calibration sources - Radioactive Fe-55/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Measured energy scale evolution is due to radiation damage modified is higher and subject to variations due to the solar cycle and solar storms. This is in contrast to the rate

  12. Participation in high energy physics, Task D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Communication and Advancement of High Energy Physics; B-Quarks; Secondary Vertex Trigger; and Science Education.

  13. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other high- energy cathodes. Improved the performance of Li-rich, Mn-rich layered composite cathode suitable for PHEV and EV applications. Developed electrolyte additives...

  14. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergyGeothermal HomeGridHHigh

  15. High Mesa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: Energy Resources Jump to:HidroflotMesa Jump

  16. Langston University - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    snow, joel

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data for the experiment. Eventually this included the FNAL SAM data grid system, the SAMGrid (SG) infrastructure, and the Open Science Grid software stacks for computing and storage elements. At the end of 2003 the PI took on the role of global Monte Carlo production coordinator for the DZero experiment. In January of 2004 the PI started working with the SAMGrid development team to help debug, deploy, and integrate SAMGrid with DZero Monte Carlo production. The PI installed and configured SG execution and client sites at LUHEP and OUHEP, and a SG scheduler site at LUHEP. The PI developed a python based GUI (DAJ) that acts as a front end for job submission to SAMGrid. The GUI interfaces to the DZero Mone Carlo (MC) request system that uses SAM to manage MC requests by the physics analysis groups. DAJ significantly simplified SG job submission and was deployed in DZero in an effort to increase the user base of SG. The following year was the advent of SAMGrid job submission to the Open Science Grid (OSG) and LHC Computing Grid (LCG) through a forwarding mechanism. The PI oversaw the integration of these grids into the existing production infrastructure. The PI developed an automatic MC (Automc) request processing system capable of operating without user intervention (other than getting grid credentials), and able to submit to any number of sites on various grids. The system manages production at all but 2 sites. The system was deployed at Fermilab and remains operating there today. The PI's work in distributed computing resulted in several talks at international conferences. UTA, OU, and LU were chosen as the collaborating institutions that form the Southwest Tier 2 Center (SWT2) for ATLAS. During the project period the PI contributed to the online and offline software infrastructure through his work with the Run 2 online group, and played a major role in Monte Carlo production for DZero. During the part of the project period in which the PI served as MC production coordinator MC production increased very significantly. In the first year of the PI's tenure as production coor

  17. A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field of high temperature solar process heat. The ultimateof solar applications including industrial process heat and

  18. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; /SLAC; Le Diberder, Francois; /Orsay, LAL; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; /SLAC; Bellis, Matt; /Stanford U.; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab; Konigsberg, Jacobo; /Florida U.; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, Donatella; /INFN, Padua; Denisov, Dmitri; /Fermilab; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; /Manchester U.; Li, Qizhong; /Fermilab; Varnes, Erich; /Arizona U.; Jonckheere, Alan; /Fermilab; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  19. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  20. Review of lattice results concerning low energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinya Aoki; Yasumichi Aoki; Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Gilberto Colangelo; Michele Della Morte; Stephan Dürr; Aida X. El Khadra; Hidenori Fukaya; Roger Horsley; Andreas Jüttner; Takeshi Kaneko; Jack Laiho; Laurent Lellouch; Heinrich Leutwyler; Vittorio Lubicz; Enrico Lunghi; Silvia Necco; Tetsuya Onogi; Carlos Pena; Christopher T. Sachrajda; Stephen R. Sharpe; Silvano Simula; Rainer Sommer; Ruth S. Van de Water; Anastassios Vladikas; Urs Wenger; Hartmut Wittig

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f+(0), arising in semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio fK/fpi of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements Vus and Vud. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)LxSU(2)R and SU(3)LxSU(3)R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, for this review, we focus on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.

  1. SETI at Planck Energy: When Particle Physicists Become Cosmic Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacki, Brian C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the meaning of the Fermi Paradox -- are we alone or is starfaring rare? Can general relativity be united with quantum mechanics? The searches for answers to these questions could intersect. It is known that an accelerator capable of energizing particles to the Planck scale requires cosmic proportions. The energy required to run a Planck accelerator is also cosmic, of order 100 M_sun c^2 for a hadron collider, because the natural cross section for Planck physics is so tiny. If aliens are interested in fundamental physics, they could resort to cosmic engineering for their experiments. These colliders are detectable through the vast amount of "pollution" they produce, motivating a YeV SETI program. I investigate what kinds of radiation they would emit in a fireball scenario, and the feasibility of detecting YeV radiation at Earth, particularly YeV neutrinos. Although current limits on YeV neutrinos are weak, Kardashev 3 YeV neutrino sources appear to be at least 30--100 Mpc apart on average, if they are ...

  2. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tower. The bucket elevator's speed and hopper size are optimized to deliver a particle density to the central receiver focal point that can capture the maximum available...

  4. The ultimate structure of matter: The high energy physics program from the 1950s through the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This discusses the following topics in High Energy Physics: The Particle Zoo; The Strong and the Weak; The Particle Explosion; Deep Inside the Nucleon; The Search for Unity; Physics in Collision; The Standard Model; Particles and the Cosmos; and Practical Benefits.

  5. Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLightingFebruary 23,C L S C

  6. High Temperature | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name:Hidralia

  7. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  8. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration, time- varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We ex- tend histogramBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to acceler- ate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram

  9. ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; LEONARD,AW; SNYDER,PB; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GROEBNER,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROTH,M; HOLLMANN,E; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. Results from a series of dedicated experiments measuring the effect of particle and energy pulses from Type-I Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor are compared with a simple model of ELM propagation in the boundary plasma. The simple model asserts that the propagation of ELM particle and energy perturbations is dominated by ion parallel convection along SOL fields lines and the recovery from the ELM perturbation is determined by recycling physics. Time scales associated with the initial changes of boundary plasma parameters are expected to be on the order of the ion transit time from the outer midplane, where the ELM instability is initiated, to the divertor targets. To test the model, the ion convection velocity is changed in the experiment by varying the plasma density. At moderate to high density, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} = 0.5-0.8, the delays in the response of the boundary plasma to the midplane ELM pulses, the density dependence of those delays and other observations are consistent with the model. However, at the lowest densities, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} {approx} 0.35, small delays between the response sin the two divertors, and changes in the response of the pedestal thermal energy to ELM events, indicate that additional factors including electron conduction in the SOL, the pre-ELM condition of the divertor plasma, and the ratio of ELM instability duration to SOL transit time, may be playing a role. The results show that understanding the response of the SOL and divertor plasmas to ELMs, for various pre-ELM conditions, is just as important to predicting the effect of ELM pulses on the target surfaces of future devices as is predicting the characteristics of the ELM perturbation of the core plasma.

  10. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D. [University of California Los Angeles] [University of California Los Angeles

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  11. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Towards Kilometer-Scale Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all high-energy particles, only neutrinos can directly convey astronomical information from the edge of the universe---and from deep inside the most cataclysmic high-energy processes. Copiously produced in high-energy collisions, travelling at the velocity of light, and not deflected by magnetic fields, neutrinos meet the basic requirements for astronomy. Their unique advantage arises from a fundamental property: they are affected only by the weakest of nature's forces (but for gravity) and are therefore essentially unabsorbed as they travel cosmological distances between their origin and us. Many of the outstanding mysteries of astrophysics may be hidden from our sight at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum because of absorption by matter and radiation between us and the source. For example, the hot dense regions that form the central engines of stars and galaxies are opaque to photons. In other cases, such as supernova remnants, gamma ray bursters, and active galaxies, all of which may involve compact objects or black holes at their cores, the precise origin of the high-energy photons emerging from their surface regions is uncertain. Therefore, data obtained through a variety of observational windows---and especially through direct observations with neutrinos---may be of cardinal importance. In this talk, the scientific goals of high energy neutrino astronomy and the technical aspects of water and ice Cherenkov detectors are examined, and future experimental possibilities, including a kilometer-square deep ice neutrino telescope, are explored.

  12. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  13. Particle-hole symmetry broken pseudogap in high temperature superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village Resort BParticle September 11,

  14. SETI at Planck Energy: When Particle Physicists Become Cosmic Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Lacki

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the meaning of the Fermi Paradox -- are we alone or is starfaring rare? Can general relativity be united with quantum mechanics? The searches for answers to these questions could intersect. It is known that an accelerator capable of energizing particles to the Planck scale requires cosmic proportions. The energy required to run a Planck accelerator is also cosmic, of order 100 M_sun c^2 for a hadron collider, because the natural cross section for Planck physics is so tiny. If aliens are interested in fundamental physics, they could resort to cosmic engineering for their experiments. These colliders are detectable through the vast amount of "pollution" they produce, motivating a YeV SETI program. I investigate what kinds of radiation they would emit in a fireball scenario, and the feasibility of detecting YeV radiation at Earth, particularly YeV neutrinos. Although current limits on YeV neutrinos are weak, Kardashev 3 YeV neutrino sources appear to be at least 30--100 Mpc apart on average, if they are long-lived and emit isotropically. I consider the feasibility of much larger YeV neutrino detectors, including an acoustic detection experiment that spans all of Earth's oceans, and instrumenting the entire Kuiper Belt. Any detection of YeV neutrinos implies an extraordinary phenomenon at work, whether artificial and natural. Searches for YeV neutrinos from any source are naturally commensal, so a YeV neutrino SETI program has value beyond SETI itself, particularly in limiting topological defects. I note that the Universe is very faint in all kinds of nonthermal radiation, indicating that cosmic engineering is extremely rare.

  15. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Avens, Larry R [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  16. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results {bar p}p in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained.

  17. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  18. H5hut: A High-Performance I/O Library for Particle-based Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Adelmann, Andreas; Bethel, E. Wes; Gsell, Achim; Oswald, Benedikt; Prabhat,

    2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle-based simulations running on large high-performance computing systems over many time steps can generate an enormous amount of particle- and field-based data for post-processing and analysis. Achieving high-performance I/O for this data, effectively managing it on disk, and interfacing it with analysis and visualization tools can be challenging, especially for domain scientists who do not have I/O and data management expertise. We present the H5hut library, an implementation of several data models for particle-based simulations that encapsulates the complexity of HDF5 and is simple to use, yet does not compromise performance.

  19. High Energy Scattering Amplitudes of Superstring Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan-Tsung Chan; Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We use three different methods to calculate the proportionality constants among high-energy scattering amplitudes of different string states with polarizations on the scattering plane. These are the decoupling of high-energy zero-norm states (HZNS), the Virasoro constraints and the saddle-point calculation. These calculations are performed at arbitrary but fixed mass level for the NS sector of 10D open superstring. All three methods give the consistent results, which generalize the previous works on the high-energy 26D open bosonic string theory. In addition, we discover new leading order high-energy scattering amplitudes, which are still proportional to the previous ones, with polarizations orthogonal to the scattering plane. These scattering amplitudes are of subleading order in energy for the case of 26D open bosonic string theory. The existence of these new high-energy scattering amplitudes is due to the worldsheet fermion exchange in the correlation functions and is, presumably, related to the high-energy massive spacetime fermionic scattering amplitudes in the R-sector of the theory.

  20. Method for producing through extrusion an anisotropic magnet with high energy product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandhok, Vijay K.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing an anisotropic magnet with high energy product through extrusion and, more specifically, by placing a particle charge of a composition from the which magnet is to be produced in a noncircular container, heating the container and particle charge and extruding the container and particle charge through a noncircular extrusion die in such a manner that one of the cross-sectional axes or dimension of the container and particle charge is held substantially constant during the extrusion to compact the particle charge to substantially full density by mechanical deformation produced during the extrusion to achieve a magnet with anisotropic magnetic properties along the axes or dimension thereof and, more specifically, a high energy product along the transverse of the smallest cross-sectional dimension of the extruded magnet.

  1. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 114 (2008) Printed 10 January 2009 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) High-energy particle acceleration at the radio-lobe shock of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 1­14 (2008) Printed 10 January 2009 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) HighTT, UK 8 Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA, 22904

  2. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Compressible Electromagnetic Turbulence in High-? Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhihong

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported by this award, the PI and his research group at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have carried out computational and theoretical studies of instability, turbulence, and transport in laboratory and space plasmas. Several massively parallel, gyrokinetic particle simulation codes have been developed to study electromagnetic turbulence in space and laboratory plasmas. In space plasma projects, the simulation codes have been successfully applied to study the spectral cascade and plasma heating in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, the linear and nonlinear properties of compressible modes including mirror instability and drift compressional mode, and the stability of the current sheet instabilities with finite guide field in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The research results have been published in 25 journal papers and presented at many national and international conferences. Reprints of publications, source codes, and other research-related information are also available to general public on the PI’s webpage (http://phoenix.ps.uci.edu/zlin/). Two PhD theses in space plasma physics are highlighted in this report.

  3. Center of Mass Energy of the Collision for two Neutral Particles in the Background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayesha Zakria; Mubasher Jamil

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the center of mass energy of the collision for two neutral particles with different rest masses falling freely from rest at infinity in the background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole. Further, we discuss the center of mass energy near the horizon(s) of an extremal and non-extremal Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole and show that an arbitrarily high center of mass energy is achievable under some restrictions. We will study the special case of the center of mass energy when the specific energy, specific angular momentum and Carter constant of both the particles are same.

  4. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  5. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  6. ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT ION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a high current ion source for ultra-low energy ions has beenthe Department of Energy ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT IONedited by A. Anders. ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT ION

  7. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  8. Signatures of Energy Flux in Particle Production: A Black Hole Birth Cry and Death Gasp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, Michael R R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is recently argued that if the Hawking radiation process is unitary, then a black hole's mass cannot be monotonically decreasing. We examine the time dependent particle count and negative energy flux in the non-trivial conformal vacuum via the moving mirror approach. A new, exactly unitary solution is presented which emits a characteristic above-thermal positive energy burst, a thermal plateau, and negative energy flux. It is found that the characteristic positive energy flare and thermal plateau is observed in the particle outflow. However, the results of time dependent particle production show no overt indication of negative energy flux. Therefore, a black hole's birth cry is detectable by asymptotic observers via particle count, whereas its death gasp is not.

  9. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of the $\\gamma_{dir}$ energy within uncertainties. These measurements indicate that the parton energy loss, in the covered kinematic range, is insensitive to the parton path length.

  10. Rapid thermal processing of steel using high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Newton, A.; Smith, C. Jr.

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy electron beams (HEEBs) with megavolt energies represent a new generation of charged particle beams that rapidly deposit up to several hundred joules/pulse over areas on the order of a few square millimeters to 100s of square centimeters. These pulsed beams have energies in the 1 to 10 MeV range, which enables the electrons to deposit large amounts of energy deeply into the material being processed, and these beams have short pulse durations (50 ns) that can heat materials at rates as high as 10{sup 10} {degrees}C/s for a 1000 {degree}C temperature rise in the material. Lower heating rates, on the order of 10{sup 4} {degrees}C/s, can be produced by reducing the energy per pulse and distributing the total required energy over a series of sub-ms pulses, at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) up to several kHz. This paper presents results from materials processing experiments performed on steel with a 6 MeV electron beam, analyzes these results using a Monte Carlo transport code, and presents a first-order predictive method for estimating the peak energy deposition, temperature, and heating rate for HEEB processed steel.

  11. NET-ZERO ENERGY HIGH PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    , University of Nebraska­Lincoln · Denise Kuehn, Manager, Demand Side and Sustainable Management, Omaha Public was that the largest potential for enhancing energy supplies in this country is making buildings more efficient. "-- Harvey Perlman, UNL Chancellor #12;Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Green Buildings | 1 INTRODUCTION

  12. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  13. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mendez, Victor P. (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  14. Utility of extracting {alpha}-particle energy by waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.; Herrmann, M.C.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utility of extracting {alpha}-particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated. As power is diverted to fast ions and then to ions, a number of effects come into play, as the relative amounts of pressure taken up by electrons, fuel ions, and fast {alpha}-particles shift. In addition, if the {alpha}-particle power is diverted to fast fuel ions, there is an enhanced fusion reactivity because of the nonthermal component of the ion distribution. Some useful expressions for describing these effects are derived, and it is shown that fusion reactors with power density about twice what otherwise might be obtained can be contemplated, so long as a substantial amount of the {alpha}-particle power can be diverted. Interestingly, in this mode of operation, once the electron heat is sufficiently confined, further improvement in confinement is actually not desirable. A similar improvement in fusion power density can be obtained for advanced fuel mixtures such as D-He{sup 3}, where the power of both the energetic {alpha}-particles and the energetic protons might be diverted advantageously.

  15. air bone particles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: . Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signa-...

  16. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

  17. Measuring Tiny Waves with High Power Particle Beams | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |MaterialsMatt10Laser,

  18. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela V. Olinto

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The surprising lack of a high energy cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum at the highest energies together with an apparently isotropic distribution of arrival directions have strongly challenged most models proposed for the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Young neutron star winds may be able to explain the mystery. We discuss this recent proposal after summarizing the observational challenge and plausible acceleration sites. Young neutrons star winds differ from alternative models in the predictions for composition, spectrum, and angular distribution which will be tested in future experiments.

  19. Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a) C. K. Li, F, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple model for the accelerating T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 1997 . Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types

  20. Separation of particles leading to decay and unlimited growth of energy in a driven stadium-like billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André L. P. Livorati; Matheus S. Palmero; Carl P. Dettmann; Iberę L. Caldas; Edson D. Leonel

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed giving emphasis in the decay of energy mechanism. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy and a statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration. Also, a transport analysis along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy and making use distributions of histograms of frequency, and we set that the causes of the decay of energy are due to the capture of the orbits by the resonant fixed points.

  1. A new code for radiation processes in high energy plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Belmont; J. Malzac; A. Marcowith

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme objects such as X-ray binaries, AGN, or $\\gamma$-ray bursters harbor high energy plasmas whose properties are not well understood yet. Not only are they responsible of the hard X- and $\\gamma$-ray emission we observe but also they have a strong influence on the main dynamics and energetics of these objects themselves. Here we present a new kinetic code that solves the evolution equations for particles and photons around compact objects. It produces spectra that will be compared with observations from Simbol-X to constrain the radiation and acceleration processes in these objects.

  2. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

    2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  3. High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Krafft

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

  4. Fractal properties in fundamental force coupling constants, in atomic energies, and in elementary particle masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Tatischeff

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the discrete-scale invariance theory, we show that the coupling constants of fundamental forces, the atomic masses and energies, and the elementary particle masses, obey to the fractal properties.

  5. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China) [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Centre for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Weiland, J.; Zang, Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  6. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  7. Bulk and particle strain analysis in high-temperature deformation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kelly

    and Russell [Quane, S.L., Russell, J.K., 2005a. Welding: insights from high-temperature analogue experimentsBulk and particle strain analysis in high-temperature deformation experiments Steven L. Quane a,, J. Keywords: image analysis; strain; welding; experimental; rheology 1. Introduction Rock deformation presses

  8. Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr will describe the design of a high temperature solar receiver capable of driving a gas turbine for power conclusions regarding the best way to operate a solar powered gas turbine have been obtained

  9. Stress generation during lithiation of high-capacity electrode particles in lithium ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ting

    Stress generation during lithiation of high-capacity electrode particles in lithium ion batteries S in controlling stress generation in high-capacity electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Ă? 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lithium ion battery; Lithiation

  10. New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum |EnergyNewEnergy ServicesEnergyINL High

  11. gEMpicker: A Highly Parallel GPU-Accelerated Particle Picking Tool for Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    gEMpicker: A Highly Parallel GPU-Accelerated Particle Picking Tool for Cryo-Electron Microscopy Abstract Background: Picking images of particles in cryo-electron micrographs is an important step particle images. Thus, a computational bottleneck in reaching high resolution is the accurate and automatic

  12. Negative energy densities in integrable quantum field theories at one-particle level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostelmann, Henning

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomenon of negative energy densities in quantum field theories with self-interaction. Specifically, we consider a class of integrable models (including the sinh-Gordon model) in which we investigate the expectation value of the energy density in one-particle states. In this situation, we classify the possible form of the stress-energy tensor from first principles. We show that one-particle states with negative energy density generically exist in non-free situations, and we establish lower bounds for the energy density (quantum energy inequalities). Demanding that these inequalities hold reduces the ambiguity in the stress-energy tensor, in some situations fixing it uniquely. Numerical results for the lowest spectral value of the energy density allow us to demonstrate how negative energy densities depend on the coupling constant and on other model parameters.

  13. Negative energy densities in integrable quantum field theories at one-particle level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henning Bostelmann; Daniela Cadamuro

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomenon of negative energy densities in quantum field theories with self-interaction. Specifically, we consider a class of integrable models (including the sinh-Gordon model) in which we investigate the expectation value of the energy density in one-particle states. In this situation, we classify the possible form of the stress-energy tensor from first principles. We show that one-particle states with negative energy density generically exist in non-free situations, and we establish lower bounds for the energy density (quantum energy inequalities). Demanding that these inequalities hold reduces the ambiguity in the stress-energy tensor, in some situations fixing it uniquely. Numerical results for the lowest spectral value of the energy density allow us to demonstrate how negative energy densities depend on the coupling constant and on other model parameters.

  14. TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEONARD, A.W.; BOEDO, J.A.; FENSTERMACHER, M.E.; GROEBNER, R.J.; GROTH, M.; LASNIER, C.J.; MAHDAVI, M.A.; OSBORNE, T.H.; RUDAKOV, D.L.; PETRIE, T.W.; WATKINS, J.G.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on DIII-D data that reveal the underlying processes responsible for transport of energy and particles from the edge pedestal to the divertor target during edge-localized modes (ELMs). The separate convective and conductive transport of energy due to an ELM is determined by Thomson scattering measurements of electron density and temperature in the pedestal. Conductive transport is measured as a drop in pedestal temperature and decreases with increasing density. The convective transport of energy, measured as a loss of density from the pedestal, however, remains constant as a function of density. From the SOL ELM energy is quickly carried to the divertor target. An expected sheath limit to the ELM heat flux set by the slower arrival of pedestal ions is overcome by additional ionization of neutrals generated from the divertor target as evidenced by a fast, {approx}100 {micro}s, rise in divertor density. A large in/out asymmetry of the divertor ELM heat flux is observed at high density, but becomes nearly symmetric at low density.

  15. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugbřlle, Troels [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Řster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Řster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Frederiksen, Jacob Trier [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordlund, Ĺke [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark) [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Řster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks.

  16. A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Allen L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cieren, Emmanuel B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feltman, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leibs, Christopher A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarthy, Colleen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murthy, Karthik S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yijie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

  17. Binding Energies of the Alpha Particle and the A=3 Isobars from a Theoretical Geometric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

    2008-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume a triple geometric structure for the electromagnetic nuclear interaction. This nuclear electromagnetism is used to calculate the binding energies of the alpha particle and the A=3 isobar nuclides. The approximation for the resultant wave equation which lead to the deuteron binding energy from the modified Mathieu equation for the radial eigenvalue equation also establishes proton-electron-proton magnetic bonds in these nuclides and determines their binding energies. Completely theoretical calculations give 28.5 Mev., 7.64 Mev. and 8.42 Mev. for the binding energies of the alpha particle, the helium 3 isotope and tritium respectively. These values admit correction factors due to the approximations made.

  18. Separation of particles leading to decay and unlimited growth of energy in a driven stadium-like billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André L. P. Livorati; Matheus S. Palmero; Carl P. Dettmann; Iberę L. Caldas; Edson D. Leonel

    2013-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed. The dynamics of an ensemble of non-interacting particles inside a closed domain in the shape of a stadium is described by the use of a four-dimensional non-linear mapping. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy. A statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. Transport along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy by using distributions of histograms of frequency. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration -- unlimited energy growth due collisions of a classical particle to a moving boundary -- is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness to hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration.

  19. Free energy of colloidal particles at the surface of sessile drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Guzowski; M. Tasinkevych; S. Dietrich

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of finite system size on the free energy of a spherical particle floating at the surface of a sessile droplet is studied both analytically and numerically. In the special case that the contact angle at the substrate equals $\\pi/2$ a capillary analogue of the method of images is applied in order to calculate small deformations of the droplet shape if an external force is applied to the particle. The type of boundary conditions for the droplet shape at the substrate determines the sign of the capillary monopole associated with the image particle. Therefore, the free energy of the particle, which is proportional to the interaction energy of the original particle with its image, can be of either sign, too. The analytic solutions, given by the Green's function of the capillary equation, are constructed such that the condition of the forces acting on the droplet being balanced and of the volume constraint are fulfilled. Besides the known phenomena of attraction of a particle to a free contact line and repulsion from a pinned one, we observe a local free energy minimum for the particle being located at the drop apex or at an intermediate angle, respectively. This peculiarity can be traced back to a non-monotonic behavior of the Green's function, which reflects the interplay between the deformations of the droplet shape and the volume constraint.

  20. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  1. Measurement of Energy Distribution of Deuterium-Tritium Fusion Alpha-particles and MeV Energy Knock-on Deuterons in JET Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Energy Distribution of Deuterium-Tritium Fusion Alpha-particles and MeV Energy Knock-on Deuterons in JET Plasmas

  2. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Statistical Computation Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty: High Energy Astrophysics and the PCG Sampler David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical

  3. Nano Particles - Supercritical Fluid Process - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ONThe

  4. High-speed discrimination and sorting of sub-micron particles using a microfluidic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumar Rajauria; Christopher Axline; Claudia Gottstein; Andrew N. Cleland

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The size- and fluorescence-based sorting of micro- and nano-scale particles suspended in fluid presents a significant and important challenge for both sample analysis and for manufacturing of nanoparticle-based products. Here we demonstrate a disposable microfluidic particle sorter that enables high-throughput, on-demand counting and binary sorting of sub-micron particles and cells, using either fluorescence or an electrically-based determination of particle size. Size-based sorting uses a resistive pulse sensor integrated on-chip, while fluorescence-based discrimination is achieved using on-the-fly optical image capture and analysis. Following detection and analysis, the individual particles are deflected using a pair of piezoelectric actuators, directing the particles into one of two desired output channels; the main flow goes into a third waste channel. The integrated system can achieve sorting fidelities of better than 98\\%, and the mechanism can successfully count and actuate, on demand, more than 60,000 particles/min.

  5. High-Powered Lasers for Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3 HanfordHarry|High-Powered Lasers

  6. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  7. A high energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eingorn, Maxim; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; De Persio, Fulvio; Meddi, Franco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics studies in the energy range from 20 MeV to 1000 MeV is considered. The proposed concept uses a stack of silicon micro-strip detectors where they play the roles of both a converter and a tracker. The purpose of this paper is to outline the parameters of such a polarimeter and to estimate the productivity of measurements. Our study supported by a Monte Carlo simulation shows that with a one-year observation period the polarimeter will provide 5.5 % accuracy of the polarization degree for a photon energy of 100 MeV, which would be a significant advance relative to the currently explored energy range of a few MeV. The proposed polarimeter design could easily be adjusted to the specific photon energy range to maximize efficiency if needed.

  8. Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

  9. High Stability, Self-Protecting Electrocatalyst Particles - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that easily passivates, creating a relatively inert surface layer which inhibits corrosion of the underlying constituents. Including the passivating element protects the...

  10. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High EnergyHigh

  11. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI] [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI] [Co-PI

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, #12;ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22; ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water-#12;lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  12. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22;{mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  13. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  14. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf More...

  15. Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping This factsheet describes a...

  16. Developing new high energy gradient concentration cathode material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new high energy gradient concentration cathode material Developing new high energy gradient concentration cathode material 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  17. USABC Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development USABC Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  18. Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature...

  19. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with Closed-Loop Exhaust By-Pass System Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with...

  20. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. Abstract: We will...

  1. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

  2. Sandia Energy - High-Resolution Computational Algorithms for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Resolution Computational Algorithms for Simulating Offshore Wind Farms Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind High-Resolution...

  3. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract: Li-rich, Mn-rich...

  4. Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  5. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for...

  6. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012...

  7. Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

  8. Search for High Energy Density Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess|2StanfordOptimizationofSeanHigh

  9. High Bridge, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: Energy Resources Jump to:Hidroflot JumpHigh

  10. High Energy Batteries India Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail NaturalHiflux Ltd Jump to:High

  11. Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty, 480082 (Kazakhstan); Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow oblast, 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

  12. Particle acceleration and high-frequency (X-ray and $?$-ray) emission in the jets of active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Usov; M. V. Smolsky

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested that the outflowing plasma in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is inhomogeneous and consists of separate clouds. These clouds are strongly magnetized and move away from the central engine at relativistic speeds. The clouds interact with an ambient medium which is assumed to be at rest. In the process of this interaction, particles of the ambient medium are accelerated to high energies at the cloud front and flow ahead of the front. It is shown that the radiation of the accelerated particles may be responsible for the X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray emission from AGN jets. TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission is generated in the inner parts of AGN jets where the Lorentz factor of the cloud fronts is $\\Gamma_0\\geq 30$, while GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission emanates from the outer parts of AGN jets where $\\Gamma_0$ is $\\sim 10$.

  13. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics 101 | Science of Matter, Energy,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab'sSpace and Time Science

  14. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Dark matter and dark energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab'sSpace and

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: very high solar energy conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    very high solar energy conversion efficiency ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy...

  16. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High SchoolBundles to LivingPortal HighlyHydrogen

  17. High Performance Valve Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHighLouisiana |HighMaterials High

  18. Cherenkov light Extrapolation at Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in Extensive Air Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Al-Rubaiee

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simulation of Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) from particles of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) with ultra high energy cosmic rays (E>=10^16 eV) was simulated for primary protons by the computer code CORSIKA. The parameterization, that constructed on the basis of this simulation have allowed us to reconstruct the events, that is, to reconstruct the type and energy of the particle that generated EAS from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov light registered with the Tunka-25 facility. The extrapolation of the Cherenkov light LDF approximation at the energy range (10^16-2.10^18 eV) was taken into account.

  19. Long-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ®cant num- bers of particles out of the ambient solar wind to high energies, but it can con®ne and reLong-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989 A. Anttila, L. G. Kocharov, Finland Fax: +358 2 333 5993; e-mail: aanttila@utu.® Received: 17 November 1997 / Revised: 9 February 1998

  20. Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 1: theory of steady states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    , such as that pro- vided by a conventional overhead heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system, is mixingParticle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 1: theory of steady states Introduction of this energy is spent on ventilation of buildings with summer time cooling account for almost 10% of the US

  1. Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 2: Transients and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 2: Transients and experiments- sumption is a must for efficient ventilation system design. In this work, we study the transport ventilated by low energy displacement-ventilation systems. With these results and the knowledge of typical

  2. Cosmic ray spectrum by energy scattered by EAS particles in the atmosphere and galactic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Knurenko; A. A. Ivanov; A. V. Sabourov

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential energy spectrum of cosmic rays from Cherenkov radiation measurements in EAS in the energy range of 10^15-10^20eV has been compared with an anomalous diffusion model for the particles in interstellar space having fractal properties (Lagutin et al, 2001). The close association between experimental data and calculated "all particle" spectra in form at E(0) (10^15-10^18)eV is found. In this case, the average mass composition of cosmic rays calculated by five components does not contradict the average mass composition from experimental data which was obtained by several of EAS characteristics in that energy region.

  3. Energy conservation and scaling violations in particle production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dias de Deus; J. G. Milhano

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a simple Colour Glass Condensate/String Percolation Model argument to show the existence, due to energy conservation, of bounds to the violation of Feynman scaling and limiting fragmentation.

  4. Particle mixing as possible explanation of the dark energy conundrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Capolupo; Giuseppe Vitiello

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum condensate due to neutrino and quark mixing behaves as a perfect fluid and, at the present epoch, as a cosmological constant. The very small breaking of the Lorentz invariance constrains today the value of the dark energy.

  5. Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum

  6. Particle size analysis of prepared solutions and fingerprint deposits of high explosive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmack, W.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) was tasked via the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and US Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct various studies involving the detection and measurement of explosive materials and their associated residues. This report details the results of an investigation to determine the particle size characteristics of the explosive materials used in the design, development, and testing of trace explosives detection systems. These materials, in the form of water suspensions of plastic explosives, are used to provide a quantitative means of monitoring the performance characteristics of the detection systems. The purpose of this investigation is to provide data that allows a comparison between the particles deposited using the suspension standards and the particles deposited from fingerprints. This information may support the development of quality control aids, measurement methods, or performance criteria specifications for the use of trace explosives detection systems. For this report, particle size analyses were completed on explosives standard suspensions/solutions for composition C-4, Semtex-H, and Detasheet and fingerprints for C-4, Detasheet, and pentolite. Because of the difficulty in collecting microscopic images of the particles in the suspensions from test protocol surfaces, this paper discusses the characteristics of the particles as they are found on metal, glass, and paper. The results of the particle characterization analyses indicate that the water suspensions contain particulate composed of binder materials and dissolved portions of the explosive compounds. Upon drying of the water suspensions, significant particle nucleation and growth is observed. The nucleated particulate is comparable to the particulate deposited by fingerprints.

  7. Stochastic Optimization for Collision Selection in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Whiteson; D. Whiteson

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The underlying structure of matter can be deeply probed via precision measurements of the mass of the \\emph{top quark}, the most massive observed fundamental particle. Top quarks can be produced and studied only in collisions at high energy particle accelerators. Most collisions, however, do not produce top quarks; making precise measurements requires culling these collisions into a sample that is rich in collisions producing top quarks (\\emph{signal}) and spare in collisions producing other particles (\\emph{background}). Collision selection is typically performed with heuristics or supervised learning methods. However, such approaches are suboptimal because they assume that the selector with the highest classification accuracy will yield a mass measurement with the smallest statistical uncertainty. In practice, however, the mass measurement is more sensitive to some backgrounds than others. Hence, this paper presents a new approach that uses stochastic optimization techniques to directly search for selectors that minimize statistical uncertainty in the top quark mass measurement. Empirical results confirm that stochastically optimized selectors have much smaller uncertainty. This new approach contributes substantially to our knowledge of the top quark's mass, as the new selectors are currently in use selecting real collisions.

  8. High-energy limit of collision-induced false vacuum decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Demidov; Dmitry Levkov

    2015-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a consistent semiclassical description of field-theoretic collision-induced tunneling at arbitrary high energies. As a playground we consider a (1+1)-dimensional false vacuum decay accompanied by N-particle collisions at energy E. The semiclassical suppression exponent F_N(E) of this process is computed numerically at N>>1 and extrapolated to N=2 with the aid of the Rubakov-Son-Tinyakov conjecture. Our method is based on a specific behavior of F_N(E): it decreases with energy, reaches minimum F=F_{min}(N) at E=E_{rt}(N) and stays constant at higher energies. The respective cross section is exponentially suppressed at all energies. This behavior is numerically observed in the (1+1)-dimensional model and conjectured to be general. We show that F_{min}(N) and E_{rt}(N) are evaluated using a special class of complex semiclassical solutions which describe exponentially suppressed transitions but nevertheless evolve in real time. Importantly, we argue that the collision-induced transitions with N=2 initial particles can be described perturbatively at E>E_{rt}(2) in the background of these solutions, and the terms of the perturbative expansion remain bounded in the high-energy limit. Transitions in the latter regime involve emission of many soft quanta with total energy E_{rt}(2) by the two colliding particles; the energy excess E-E_{rt}(2) remains in the initial particles till the end of the process.

  9. High-speed discrimination and sorting of sub-micron particles using a microfluidic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Gottstein, Claudia; Cleland, Andrew N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The size- and fluorescence-based sorting of micro- and nano-scale particles suspended in fluid presents a significant and important challenge for both sample analysis and for manufacturing of nanoparticle-based products. Here we demonstrate a disposable microfluidic particle sorter that enables high-throughput, on-demand counting and binary sorting of sub-micron particles and cells, using either fluorescence or an electrically-based determination of particle size. Size-based sorting uses a resistive pulse sensor integrated on-chip, while fluorescence-based discrimination is achieved using on-the-fly optical image capture and analysis. Following detection and analysis, the individual particles are deflected using a pair of piezoelectric actuators, directing the particles into one of two desired output channels; the main flow goes into a third waste channel. The integrated system can achieve sorting fidelities of better than 98\\%, and the mechanism can successfully count and actuate, on demand, more than 60,000...

  10. DNS AND LES WITH STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF SUBGRID ACCELERATION APPLIED TO SOLID PARTICLES IN A HIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    implications for many environmental systems, from sediment transport to at- mospheric dispersion of pollutantsDNS AND LES WITH STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF SUBGRID ACCELERATION APPLIED TO SOLID PARTICLES IN A HIGH Stochastic Acceleration Model), in which an approximation to the instantaneous non-filtered velocity field

  11. HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC SEPARATION Michael D. Vahey conductivity. Using a re- cently developed separation method - iso-dielectric separation (IDS) - we character for developing new screens. THEORY We recently developed a separa- tion method, called iso-dielectric sepa

  12. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  13. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Brown; Ramona Vogt

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  14. Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHSSEffects

  15. Gasoline Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003 IntellectualSE DOE/IG-480 I N S2 DOE1

  16. Particle Receiver Integrated with Fludized Bed | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrative Judgea. Part B 1 Part B - Natural Gasfact sheet

  17. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments HomeDatabase onSandia WindEnergyReceiver

  18. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »Energy Poneman |Arthur C.

  19. Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising fundsReal Property ManagementReal-time

  20. Sandia Energy - Parallel Implementation of Smoothed-Particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley RuehlReport PostednanorodHydrodynamics Method

  1. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of t...

  2. Modeling of particle and energy transport in the edge plasma of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umansky, M.V.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J.L. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study recycling and transport in the edge plasma of Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)] is modeled and analyzed with the multi-fluid code UEDGE [T. D. Rognlien {ital et al.}, J. Nucl. Mater. {bold 196{endash}198}, 347 (1992)]. Matching the experimental plasma density profiles in the scrape-off layer (SOL) requires a spatially dependent effective anomalous diffusion coefficient D{sub {perpendicular}} growing rapidly towards the wall. The midplane pressure of neutral gas, P{sub mid}, is a key parameter that reflects the magnitude of anomalous transport of plasma from the core. Recycling of plasma on the main chamber wall appears to be quite significant, especially in the case of high P{sub mid}{approximately}0.3 mTorr when the main wall provides {approximately}70{percent} of recycling neutrals in the main chamber. In the upper SOL (well above the {ital x} point) draining of particles by the poloidal flow is weak and thus the particle balance is predominantly radial. For the radial heat transport it is found that energy flux carried by radial plasma convection and by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals is quite significant in SOL. In the high P{sub mid} case, heat conduction by CX neutrals along with radial heat convection by plasma carries most of the power flux ({approximately}75{percent}) across the last closed flux surface. Even in the low P{sub mid} case, heat conduction by CX neutrals dominates the radial heat flux far out in the SOL. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs BosonAccurate knowledgeHigh energy

  4. Property:SalinityHIgh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/Organization RAPID/Contact/ID8/Positionmaterial JumpSalinityHIgh Jump

  5. High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name:Hidralia EnergiaFalls,High

  6. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High Energy

  7. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  8. ''Bare'' single-particle energies in Ni-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Kolomiets, A.; Shlomo, S.; Heyde, K.; Dejbakhsh, H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhou, XG; Jacob, VE; Oros, AM.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The differences between the Coulomb energy shifts of various orbitals in Ni-56 are discussed and compared with those resulting from Hartree-Fock calculations carried out using a broad range of Skyrme interactions. The parameters of the Woods-Saxon potential...

  9. Shadowing Effects on Particle and Transverse Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Emel'yanov; A. Khodinov; S. R. Klein; R. Vogt

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of shadowing on the early state of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions and transverse energy production is discussed. Results are presented for RHIC Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV and LHC Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 5.5$ TeV.

  10. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments.

  11. Particle simulation of energetic particle driven Alfvn modes TH/5-1K. Shinohara, M. Ishikawa, M. Takechi Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    Particle simulation of energetic particle driven Alfvén modes TH/5-1K. Shinohara, M. Ishikawa, M. Takechi Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193, Japan W.W. Heidbrink, A. Bierwage University-day tokamaks and comparison between simulation and experiment before ALE after ALE (experimental) relaxed

  12. High-Energy Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce neutrino astronomy from the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. We review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. Among these gamma ray bursts and active galaxies represent well-motivated speculations because these are also the sources of the highest energy gamma rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. We discuss why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing high-energy neutrino beams associated with the highest energy cosmic rays. Cosmic ray sources may produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest energy cosmic rays and gamma rays. The technology for commissioning such instruments exists.

  13. Outreach and Education on High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Michael Barnett

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review ongoing efforts and discuss possible future directions in informing the public and educating students about Particle Physics.

  14. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  15. Constraints of Dark Energy at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiping Su; Rong-Gen Cai

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Constrains of dark energy (DE) at high redshift from current and mock future observational data are obtained. It is found that present data give poor constraints of DE even beyond redshift z=0.4, and mock future 2298 type Ia supernove data only give a little improvement of the constraints. We analyze in detail why constraints of DE decrease rapidly with the increasing of redshift. Then we try to improve the constraints of DE at high redshift. It is shown that the most efficient way is to improve the error of observations.

  16. High Performance Window Attachments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar Power ProjectHawai'iPresentedHigh PenetrationEnergyHigh

  17. High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork by C. Kim

  18. High Temperature PEM - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork by C.

  19. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke ne rgy data s

  20. High West Energy, Inc (Nebraska) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name:HidraliaWells Geothermal ProjectHigh

  1. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H IMaterials Development of High Energy Cathode

  2. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High Energy Cathode

  3. Engineering of high energy cathode material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High EnergyHighhigh

  4. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  5. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  6. High Penetration Solar Deployment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHigh

  7. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Kogler; David M. South; Michael Steder

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and preservation models, technological expectations and governance aspects at local and international levels are examined.

  8. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Gary R; Oliver, William P; Napier, Austin; Gallagher, Hugh R

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  9. antiproton high energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the vicinity of the Earth low energy particles are strongly modulated by the solar wind, which makes any analysis ambiguous. The adverse effects of the solar wind can be...

  10. Transient particle energies in shortcuts to adiabatic expansions of harmonic traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang-Yang Cui; Xi Chen; J. G. Muga

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of a harmonic potential that holds a quantum particle may be realized without any final particle excitation but much faster than adiabatically via "shortcuts to adiabaticity" (STA). While ideally the process time can be reduced to zero, practical limitations and constraints impose minimal finite times for the externally controlled time-dependent frequency protocols. We examine the role of different time-averaged energies (total, kinetic, potential, non-adiabatic) and of the instantaneous power in characterizing or selecting different protocols.Specifically, we prove a virial theorem for STA processes, set minimal energies for specific times or viceversa, and discuss their realizability by means of Dirac impulses or otherwise.

  11. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

  13. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

  14. Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESSHeavy-duty Engine using the

  15. Filamentous Carbon Particles for Cleaning Oil Spills - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb.Information 9 Default Caption and

  16. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, T.

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering

  17. Experimental investigations in particle physics at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, L.B.; Highland, V.L.; Martoff, C.J.; McFarlane, K.W.; Guss, C.; Kettell, S.

    1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The major elements of this project continues to be on fundamental symmetries and parameters of the Standard Model. The projects in the current period have been BNL E791 (a search for the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e, which would violate the rule of separate lepton number conservation), test of an upgrade proposal (E871), and LSND, a neutrino experiment at LAMPF. For E791, data taking was completed in June 1990, and preliminary results are now available for the decays K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e and K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu}from the entire data set. The data for decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} ee are still being analysed. These are an upper limit for the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e of 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} (90% C.L.). From the 1990 data alone, we have a new (preliminary) value of the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu} of (6.96{plus minus}0. 4{plus minus}0.22) {times} 10{sup {minus}9}, with a sample of 349 events. Combining this with earlier data gives (6.96{plus minus}0.34) {times} 10{sup 9}, by far the most precise value. The limit on the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e places a lower limit on the mass of a new particle mediating such decays of 85 TeV. The LSND (Large Scintillator Neutrino Detector), a search for neutrino oscillations at LAMPF, has been approved, and is now underway. Other neutrino work at Los Alamos, E764, has resulted in a final publication. This includes the best, measurement of {nu}-nuclear scattering, in {nu}{sub mu} {sup 12}C inclusive cross sections. The measurement of the cross section for the exclusive reaction {nu}{sup mu}{sup 12}C {yields} {mu}{sup {minus}12} N is unique. In a new development, Dr. Martoff has established a facility for fabrication of superconducting detectors of nuclear radiation; the equipment has been funded and is partly installed. Planned uses include scattering for Dark Matter.' In summary, the objectives for this year have been met.

  18. Bose-Einstein correlations and thermal cluster formation in high-energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Bialas; Wojciech Florkowski; Kacper Zalewski

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The blast wave model is generalized to include the production of thermal clusters, as suggested by the apparent success of the statistical model of particle production at high energies. The formulae for the HBT correlation functions and the corresponding HBT radii are derived.

  19. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  2. The Running Spectral Index as a Probe of Physics at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Espinosa

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The WMAP results on the scalar spectral index n and its running with scale, though preliminary, open a very interesting window to physics at very high energies. We address the problem of finding simple inflaton potentials well motivated by particle physics which can accommodate WMAP data.

  3. Particle concentrations in air-conditioned office building with normal and high efficiency filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, W.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particle generation or resuspension, for particles largerLayton DW 1995. Deposition, resuspension, and penetration ofindoor generation or resuspension of particles larger than

  4. Detection method and observed data of high-energy gamma rays under the influence of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kifune, T. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high-energy particles affected by quantum gravity is argued from the experimental viewpoint of raising a question, 'our detection method for high-energy ?-rays supplies trustworthy observation data and we are now seeing the true image of the universe through high-energy ?-rays?' The modified dispersion relation (MDR) for particles' energy and momentum is applied to the equation of energy-momentum conservation in particle reactions, to study the restriction imposed on the kinematic state of high-energy particles by the Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) due to quantum gravity, as a function of the incident particle energy of the reaction. The result suggests that the interaction utilized for ?-ray detection is not free from the effect of quantum gravity when ?-ray energy is higher than 10{sup 13} ? 10{sup 17} eV depending on models of MDR. Discussion is presented on the prospect of finding clear evidence of the LIV effect from ?-ray observations, as well as on the radiation and propagation mechanism of ?-rays under the influence of the LIV effect.

  5. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.M.K. Nefkens (Principal Investigator, ed.); J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin (ed.)

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G�parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;�}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and non�coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

  6. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  7. Energy Dependence Systematics of Strange and Multi-Strange Particle Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Speltz

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on systematic measurements of strange and multi-strange particles with the STAR detector for center of mass energies per nucleon pair of 62.4 and 200 GeV in ultra-relativistic Au+Au collisions at RHIC. We use these results to characterize the chemical and kinetic freeze-out properties of the fireball produced by the collision. This is done by comparison to statistical and hydrodynamical models as well as parameterization. We emphasize particularly the energy dependence of these features comparing measurements obtained at RHIC with different energies but also at the lower energies available at the SPS.

  8. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset.

  9. Final Report: Particle Physics Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karchin, Paul E.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent progress in accelerator-based experiments in high-energy particle physics and progress in theoretical investigations in particle physics. We also describe future plans in these areas.

  10. High fidelity nuclear energy system optimization towards an environmentally benign, sustainable, and secure energy source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Ames, David E., II (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact associated with energy generation and utilization is immeasurable due to the immense, widespread, and myriad effects it has on the world and its inhabitants. The polar extremes are demonstrated on the one hand, by the high quality of life enjoyed by individuals with access to abundant reliable energy sources, and on the other hand by the global-scale environmental degradation attributed to the affects of energy production and use. Thus, nations strive to increase their energy generation, but are faced with the challenge of doing so with a minimal impact on the environment and in a manner that is self-reliant. Consequently, a revival of interest in nuclear energy has followed, with much focus placed on technologies for transmuting nuclear spent fuel. The performed research investigates nuclear energy systems that optimize the destruction of nuclear waste. In the context of this effort, nuclear energy system is defined as a configuration of nuclear reactors and corresponding fuel cycle components. The proposed system has unique characteristics that set it apart from other systems. Most notably the dedicated High-Energy External Source Transmuter (HEST), which is envisioned as an advanced incinerator used in combination with thermal reactors. The system is configured for examining environmentally benign fuel cycle options by focusing on minimization or elimination of high level waste inventories. Detailed high-fidelity exact-geometry models were developed for representative reactor configurations. They were used in preliminary calculations with Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtented (MCNPX) and Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code systems. The reactor models have been benchmarked against existing experimental data and design data. Simulink{reg_sign}, an extension of MATLAB{reg_sign}, is envisioned as the interface environment for constructing the nuclear energy system model by linking the individual reactor and fuel component sub-models for overall analysis of the system. It also provides control over key user input parameters and the ability to effectively consolidate vital output results for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and optimization procedures. The preliminary analysis has shown promising advanced fuel cycle scenarios that include Pressure Water Reactors Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and dedicated HEST waste incineration facilities. If deployed, these scenarios may substantially reduce nuclear waste inventories approaching environmentally benign nuclear energy system characteristics. Additionally, a spent fuel database of the isotopic compositions for multiple design and control parameters has been created for the VHTR-HEST input fuel streams. Computational approaches, analysis metrics, and benchmark strategies have been established for future detailed studies.

  11. Photoresist integrity during high energy implant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrill, T.M. [Texas Instruments Productization, Dallas, TX (United States); Jones, M. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Jain, A. [Texas Indstruments Semiconductor Process and Development Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoresist integrity was evaluated on a commercial high-energy ion implanter operated up to the specified energy (1.7 MeV B or 3.0 MeV P) and power (1.0 MeV B at 1000 p{mu}A or 2.0 MeV P at 500 p{mu}A) limits. SEM Cross-sectional analysis of several photoresists showed that the proper cooling was maintained to avoid significant photoresist degradation. Photoresist shrinkage was observed, resulting in thickness reductions up to 22% and significant changes in sidewall slope. Little asymmetry was observed when photoresist was implanted at a 7{degrees} tilt. At the specified power limits, photoresist outgassing prevented smooth implant operation unless pressure compensation was implemented.

  12. Ultra-High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry on Drop-on-Demand Jetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hoath, S.D.; Castrejon-Pita, A.A.; Morrison, N.F.; Hsiao, W.-K.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Applied Mathematics Hsiao, Wen-Kai; University of Cambridge, Engineering Hutchings, Ian; University of Cambridge, Engineering Ultra-High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry on Drop-on- Demand Jetting José R. Castrejón-Pita, Stephen D. Hoath... ). The velocity response extracted from this point is shown in Fig. 3. Figure 3. Time variation of the fluid velocity as measured by PIV. See Figure 2. Numerical method The simulations were performed using computational methods similar to those reported...

  13. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. [City College of New York, New York (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B. [Bonner Nuclear Lab., Houston, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  14. A new perspective in the dark energy puzzle from particle mixing phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Blasone; A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent results on particle mixing and oscillations in quantum field theory. We discuss the role played in cosmology by the vacuum condensate induced by the neutrino mixing phenomenon. We show that it can contribute to the dark energy of the universe.

  15. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D. (Bellevue, WA); Romea, Richard D. (Seattle, WA); Steinhauer, Loren C. (Bothell, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  16. Crops sought as high chemical energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawls, R.

    1983-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Dept of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service is searching for native plants that are not now being grown as commercial crops but that could be grown profitably to produce easily extractable, high-energy organic products. Usually these products are hydrocarbons or whole plant oils; protein content and plant fiber content are also considered. One such plant being investigated is smooth sumac, a woody perennial that is native to North America and is a particularly good source of polyphenols, resins and oils.

  17. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  18. Particle dynamics in two-dimensional random energy landscapes - experiments and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Evers; Christoph Zunke; Richard D. L. Hanes; Joerg Bewerunge; Imad Ladadwa; Andreas Heuer; Stefan U. Egelhaaf

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of individual colloidal particles in random potential energy landscapes were investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulations. The value of the potential at each point in the two-dimensional energy landscape follows a Gaussian distribution. The width of the distribution, and hence the degree of roughness of the energy landscape, was varied and its effect on the particle dynamics studied. This situation represents an example of Brownian dynamics in the presence of disorder. In the experiments, the energy landscapes were generated optically using a holographic set-up with a spatial light modulator, and the particle trajectories were followed by video microscopy. The dynamics are characterized using, e.g., the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, the mean squared displacement, the van Hove function and the non-Gaussian parameter. In both, experiments and simulations, the dynamics are initially diffusive, show an extended sub-diffusive regime at intermediate times before diffusive motion is recovered at very long times. The dependence of the long-time diffusion coefficient on the width of the Gaussian distribution agrees with theoretical predictions. Compared to the dynamics in a one-dimensional potential energy landscape, the localization at intermediate times is weaker and the diffusive regime at long times reached earlier, which is due to the possibility to avoid local maxima in two-dimensional energy landscapes.

  19. High-Tech Means High-Efficiency: The Business Case for Energy Management in High-Tech Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamshoian, Gary; Blazek, Michele; Naughton, Phil; Seese, Robert S.; Mills, Evan; Tschudi, William

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (1999 values). High-Tech buildings from LBNL benchmarking databases.

  20. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

  1. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climates Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Humid Climates School districts around the country are finding that the smart energy choices can help them...

  2. Neutralinos in Vector Boson Fusion at High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin, Asher; Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovering dark matter at high energy colliders continues to be a compelling and well-motivated possibility. Weakly interacting massive particles are a particularly interesting class in which the dark matter particles interact with the standard model weak gauge bosons. Neutralinos are a prototypical example that arise in supersymmetric models. In the limit where all other superpartners are decoupled, it is known that for relic density motivated masses, the rates for neutralinos are too small to be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but that they may be large enough for a 100 TeV collider to observe. In this work we perform a careful study in the vector boson fusion channel for pure winos and pure higgsinos. We find that given a systematic uncertainty of 1% (5%), with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the LHC is sensitive to winos of 240 GeV (125 GeV) and higgsinos of 125 GeV (55 GeV). A future 100 TeV collider would be sensitive to winos of 1.1 TeV (750 GeV) and higgsinos of 530 GeV (180 GeV) with a 1% (5%) uncert...

  3. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  4. Sedimentation behavior of noble metal particles in simulated high-level waste borosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, M.; Ohyama, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Miyauchi, A.; Yamashita, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1109 (Japan); Komamine, S.; Ochi, E. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, Bussan-Bldg. Bekkan, 1-1-5 Nishi-Shinbashi Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solubility of noble metal elements (NME) in the melted borosilicate glass is much smaller than its normal concentration of the high level liquid waste. Thus most of NME show small particles in the melted glass and tend to sediment in the bottom region of the vitrification melter due to their higher density than that of glass. Experiments of the sedimentation of NME particles in the melted glass were carried out under static condition. Three conditions of initial NME concentration (1.1, 3.0, 6.1 wt % with an equivalent for each oxide) in the simulated glass were set and held at 1100 C. degrees up to 2880 hours. The specimen with 1.1 wt % initial NME concentration indicated zone settling, and the settling rate of the interface is constant: 2.4 mm/h. This sedimentation behavior is the type of rapid settling. Following the rapid settling, the settling rate goes gradually slower; this is the type of compressive settling. The specimens with 3.0 wt % and 6.1 wt % initial NME concentration showed compression settling from the beginning. From the settling curve of the interface, the maximum concentration of NME in sediment was estimated to be around 23- 26 wt %. Growth of NME particles was observed by holding at 1100 C. degrees for up to 2880 hours. The viscosity becomes higher as NME concentration increases and the dependence on shear rate becomes simultaneously stronger. The effect of the particle growth to viscosity appears to be not significant.

  5. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY Tadashi KIFUNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    elementary particles as progenitor. The particle interaction includes also absorption of gamma rays through the present time. Detection of the relics of the earlier Universe, such as gamma rays from anti­based tech­ nique to detect TeV gamma rays. The current status of gamma ray astronomy in its growing stage

  6. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAY Tadashi KIFUNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    particles as progenitor. The particle interaction includes also absorption of gamma rays through the process to detect TeV gamma rays. The current status of gamma ray astronomy in its growing stage is demonstrated of observation 2. Ground-based detection of VHE gamma rays from SN 1006 and Markaraina 501 The review of gamma

  7. Photon emission by ultra-relativistic positrons in crystalline undulators: the high-energy regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, W; Solov'yov, A V; Greiner, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the undulator radiation emitted by high-energy positrons during planar channeling in periodically bent crystals. We demonstrate that the construction of the undulator for positrons with energies of 10 GeV and above is only possible if one takes into account the radiative energy losses. The frequency of the undulator radiation depends on the energy of the particle. Thus the decrease of the particle's energy during the passage of the crystal should result in the destruction of the undulator radiation regime. However, we demonstrate that it is possible to avoid the destructive influence of the radiative losses on the frequency of the undulator radiation by the appropriate variation of the shape of the crystal channels. We also discuss a method by which, to our mind, it would be possible to prepare the crystal with the desired properties of its channels.

  8. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 atDepartment ofLLCEngineering of High Energy

  9. High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHigh Efficiency Low -1 DOE0Novel

  10. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  11. Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tani, K. [Nippon Advanced Technology, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)] [Nippon Advanced Technology, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value ?2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for ?3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

  12. The Dual Nature of Light Wave and Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    converted to heat 44% visible light JUST RIGHT! suitable energy for life - photosynthesis absorbed1 The Dual Nature of Light Wave and Particle Light as a particle Particles or packets of light Photon carries fixed amount of energy Determines how fast it vibrates high energy = fast low energy

  13. On de Broglie's soliton wave function of many particles with finite masses, energies and momenta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agung Budiyono

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a mass-less manifestly covariant {\\it linear} Schr\\"odinger equation. First, we show that it possesses a class of non-dispersive soliton solution with finite-size spatio-temporal support inside which the quantum amplitude satisfies the Klein-Gordon equation with finite {\\it emergent} mass. We then proceed to interpret the soliton wave function as describing a particle with finite mass, energy and momentum. Inside the spatio-temporal support, the wave function shows spatio-temporal internal vibration with angular frequency and wave number that are determined by the energy-momentum of the particle as firstly conjectured by de Broglie. Imposing resonance of the internal vibration inside the spatio-temporal support leads to Planck-Einstein quantization of energy-momentum. The first resonance mode is shown to recover the classical energy-momentum relation developed in special relativity. We further show that the linearity of the Schr\\"odinger equation allows one to construct many solitons solution through superposition, each describing a particle with various masses, energies and momenta.

  14. Unbounded energies of debris from head-on particle collisions near black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Zaslavskii

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    If two particles move toward a black hole and collide near the horizon, the energy E_{c.m.} in the centre of mass can grow unbounded. This is a so-called Ba\\~nados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. One of problems creating obstacles to the possibility of its observation consists in that individual energy E of a fragment at infinity remains finite because of redshift. We show that in the case of head-on collision, debris may have unbounded energy E. An essential ingredient of this scenario is a particle moving away from a black hole in the near-horizon region. It can appear due to precedent collision that implies multiple scattering.

  15. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  16. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 ?m or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  17. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kasei * Focused on High Capacity Manganese Rich (HCMR TM ) cathodes & Silicon-Carbon composite anodes for Lithium ion batteries * Envia's high energy Li-ion battery materials...

  18. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Case study describes...

  19. Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

  20. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  1. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Guesto-Barnak, Donna (Dupont, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-300.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., low emission cross section, .sigma.<2.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2, and a high fluorescence lifetime, .tau.>325 .mu.secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): wherein Ln.sub.2 O.sub.3 is the sum of lanthanide oxides; .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <24 unless .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is 0, then the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B.sub.2 O.sub.3 is 0.48-4.20.

  2. High Energy Resummation in Quantum Chromo–Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzani, Simone

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I discuss different aspects of high energy resummation in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics and its relevance for precision physics at hadron colliders. The high energy factorisation theorem is presented and discussed ...

  3. New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks June 11, 2009 -...

  4. High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher D.

    High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control Christopher D. Hall. Decomposition of the space of internal torques separates the attitude control functionfrom the energy storage simultaneously performing energy storage and extraction operations. 1 Introduction The power engineering

  5. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  6. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  7. Pomeron loop and running coupling effects in high energy QCD evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dumitru; E. Iancu; L. Portugal; G. Soyez; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a (1+1)-dimensional model which mimics evolution and scattering in QCD at high energy, we study the influence of the running of the coupling on the high-energy dynamics with Pomeron loops. We find that the particle number fluctuations are strongly suppressed by the running of the coupling, by at least one order of magnitude as compared to the case of a fixed coupling, for all the rapidities that we have investigated, up to Y=200. This reflects the slowing down of the evolution by running coupling effects, in particular, the large rapidity evolution which is required for the formation of the saturation front via diffusion. We conclude that, for all energies of interest, processes like deep inelastic scattering or forward particle production can be reliably studied within the framework of a mean-field approximation (like the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation) which includes running coupling effects.

  8. ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13th ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics" 15 September, 2010, Budker) is organizing the 13th SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics", from 01 till 05 September 2010 of this Seminar is to report on the newest achievements and challenges in High Energy Physics and to identify

  9. Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier SOSCIP July 3, 2014 Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 1 / 8 #12;The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 2 / 8 #12;The ATLAS detector Bertrand

  10. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty in High Energy Astrophysics David A. van Dyk1 Vinay Kashyap2 Taeyoung Park3 Jin Xu4 David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics

  11. Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers with High-Energy Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    , including generation of ultra-short and high-energy pulses. Since the invention of the laser researchers, technological, medical, and other applications. High energies and ultra-short pulse durations are both resonators. In addition, the path to high-energy ultra-short pulses is, typically, further complicated

  12. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gary J. (Sandia Park, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  13. FPGA based High Speed Data Acquisition System for High Energy Physics Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swagata Mandal; Suman Sau; Amlan Chakrabarti; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In high energy physics experiments (HEP), high speed and fault resilient data communication is needed between detectors/sensors and the host PC. Transient faults can occur in the communication hardware due to various external effects like presence of charged particles, noise in the environment or radiation effects in HEP experiments and that leads to single/multiple bit error. In order to keep the communication system functional in such a radiation environment where direct intervention of human is not possible, a high speed data acquisition (DAQ) architecture is necessary which supports error recovery. This design presents an efficient implementation of field programmable gate array (FPGA) based high speed DAQ system with optical communication link supported by multi-bit error correcting model. The design has been implemented on Xilinx Kintex-7 board and is tested for board to board communication as well as for PC communication using PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect express). Data communication speed up to 4.8 Gbps has been achieved in board to board and board to PC communication and estimation of resource utilization and critical path delay are also measured.

  14. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  15. Axionic shortcuts for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolaidis, A., E-mail: nicolaid@auth.gr [Theoretical Physics Department, University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the photon axion mixing in the presence of large extra dimensions. The eigenvalues and eigenstates of the mixing matrix are analyzed and we establish the resonance condition for the total conversion of a high energy photon into a Kaluza-Klein (KK) axion state. This resonant transition, a photon transformed into a KK axion traveling freely through the bulk and converting back into a photon, may provide a plausible explanation for the transparency of the universe to energetic photons. If the brane we live in is curved, then there are shortcuts through the bulk, which the axion can take. Within our model, the photons having the appropriate resonance energy are using the axionic shortcut and arrive earlier compared to the photons which follow the geodesic on the brane. We suggest that such axionic shortcuts are at the root of the dispersion of time arrival of photons observed by the MAGIC telescope. We indicate also the cosmological significance of the existence of axionic shortcuts for the photon.

  16. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  17. A Novel Scheme to Search for Fractional Charge Particles in Low Energy Accelerator Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianguo Bian; Jiahui Wang

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the quarks and anti-quarks have fractional charge equal to $\\pm1/3$ or $\\pm2/3$ of the electron's charge. There has been a large number of experiments searching for fractional charge, isolatable, elementary particles using a variety of methods, including $e^+e^-$ collisions using dE/dx ionization energy loss measurements, but no evidence has been found to confirm existence of free fractional charge particles, which leads to the quark confinement theory. In this paper, a proposal to search for this kind particles is presented, which is based on the conservation law of four-momentum. Thanks to the CLEOc and BESIII detectors' large coverage, good particle identification, precision measurements of tracks' momenta and their large recorded data samples, these features make the scheme feasible in practice. The advantage of the scheme is independent of any theoretical models and sensitive for a small fraction of the quarks transitioning to the unconfinement phase from the confinement phase.

  18. High fidelity nuclear energy system optimization towards an environmentally benign, sustainable, and secure energy source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Ames, David E., II (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high-fidelity integrated system method and analysis approach was developed and implemented for consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles leading to minimized Transuranic (TRU) inventories. The method has been implemented in a developed code system integrating capabilities of Monte Carlo N - Particle Extended (MCNPX) for high-fidelity fuel cycle component simulations. In this report, a Nuclear Energy System (NES) configuration was developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized TRU waste inventories, long-term activities, and radiotoxicities. The reactor systems and fuel cycle components that make up the NES were selected for their ability to perform in tandem to produce clean, safe, and dependable energy in an environmentally conscious manner. The diversity in performance and spectral characteristics were used to enhance TRU waste elimination while efficiently utilizing uranium resources and providing an abundant energy source. A computational modeling approach was developed for integrating the individual models of the NES. A general approach was utilized allowing for the Integrated System Model (ISM) to be modified in order to provide simulation for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the ISM is capable of performing system evaluations under many different design parameter options. Additionally, the predictive capabilities of the ISM and its computational time efficiency allow for system sensitivity/uncertainty analysis and the implementation of optimization techniques.

  19. uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    under construc- tion at CERN in Geneva,will attempt to find the Higgs boson, a particle associatedH uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle physics for more than half a century; through high-energy collisions of accelera- ted particles, the fundamental building

  20. Cryogenic microcalorimeter system for ultra-high resolution alpha-particle spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabin, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bacrania, Mnesh K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croce, Mark P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoteling, N J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, S P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plionis, A A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dry, D E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ullom, J N [NIST; Bennett, D A [NIST; Horansky, R [NIST; Kotsubo, V [NIST; Cantor, R [STAR CRYOELECTRONICS

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with {approx}15 uK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis, This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  1. TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEONARD,AW; OSBORNE,TH; FENSTERMACHER,ME; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; LASNIER,CJ; MAHDAVI,MA; PETRIE,TW; SNYDER,PB; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. The reduction in size of Type I edge localized models (ELMs) with increasing density is explored in DIII-D for the purpose of studying the underlying transport of ELM energy. The separate convective and conductive transport of energy due to an ELM is determined by Thomson scattering measurements of electron density and temperature in the pedestal. The conductive transport from the pedestal during an ELM decreases with increasing density, while the convective transport remains nearly constant. The scaling of the ELM energy loss is compared with an edge stability model. The role of the divertor sheath in limiting energy loss from the pedestal during an ELM is explored. Evidence of outward radial transport to the midplane wall during an ELM is also presented.

  2. High power Cherenkov radiation from a relativistic particle rotating around a dielectric ball

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Sh. Grigoryan; H. F. Khachatryan; S. R. Arzumanyan; M. L. Grigoryan

    2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some characteristic features in the radiation from a relativistic electron uniformly rotating along an equatorial orbit around a dielectric ball have been studied. It was shown that at some harmonics, in case of weak absorption of radiation in the ball material, the electron may generate radiation field quanta exceeding in several dozens of times those generated by electron rotating in a continuous, infinite and transparent medium having the same real part of permittivity as the ball material. The rise of high power radiation is due to the fact that electromagnetic oscillations of Cherenkov radiation induced along the trajectory of particle are partially locked inside the ball and superimposed in nondestructive way.

  3. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    : Effective area records sensitivity as a function of energy Energy redistribution matrix can vary with energy/location Point Spread Functions can vary with energy and location Exposure Map shows how effective area variesCalibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation Back to Calibration Uncertainty

  4. Klein-Gordon equations for energy-momentum of the relativistic particle in rapidity space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaleev, R. M., E-mail: iamaleev@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Laboratory of Information Technologies (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of four-rapidity is defined as a four-vector with one time-like and three space-like coordinates. It is proved, the energy and momentum defined in the space of four-rapidity obey Klein-Gordon equations constrained by the classical trajectory of a relativistic particle. It is shown, for small values of a proper mass influence of the constraint is weakened and the classical motion gains features of a wave motion.

  5. Decomposition of Harmonic and Jet Contributions to Particle-pair Correlations at Ultra-relativistic Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; W. G. Holzmann; M. Issah; Roy A. Lacey; A. Shevel; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methodology is presented for analysis of two-particle azimuthal angle correlation functions obtained in collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. We show that harmonic and di-jet contributions to these correlation functions can be reliably decomposed by two techniques to give an accurate measurement of the jet-pair distribution. Results from detailed Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques in the study of possible modifications to jet topologies in heavy ion reactions.

  6. Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonshill

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

  7. Different methods for particle diameter determination of low density and high density lipoproteins-Comparison and evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidyanathan, Vidya

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predominance of small dense Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) is associated with a two to threefold increase in risk for Coronary Heart Disease (CVD). Small, dense HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) particles protect small dense LDL from oxidative stress...

  8. Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

  9. Analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies and Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Nazmitdinov; E. I. Shahaliev; M. K. Suleymanov; S. Tomsovic

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel statistical approach to the analysis of experimental data obtained in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies which borrows from methods developed within the context of Random Matrix Theory. It is applied to the detection of correlations in momentum distributions of emitted particles. We find good agreement between the results obtained in this way and a standard analysis based on the method of effective mass spectra and two-pair correlation function often used in high energy physics. The method introduced here is free from unwanted background contributions.

  10. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, R. C. N.

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system ...

  11. Astroparticle Physics with High Energy Neutrinos: from AMANDA to IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Halzen

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature produces protons and photons with energies in excess of $10^{20}$\\,eV and $10^{13}$\\,eV, respectively. The puzzle of where and how Nature accelerates the highest energy cosmic particles is unresolved almost a century after their discovery. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the science reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos. The outline of this review is as follows: Introduction Why Kilometer-Scale Detectors? Cosmic Neutrinos Associated with the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Methodologies of Neutrino Detection High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Status

  12. High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjipanayis, George C. [University of Delaware] [University of Delaware; McCallum, William R. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Sellmyer, David J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln] [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Harris, Vincent [Northeastern University] [Northeastern University; Carpenter, Everett E. [Virginia Commonwealth University] [Virginia Commonwealth University; Liu, Jinfang [Electron Energy Corporation] [Electron Energy Corporation

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes research undertaken by a multidisciplinary team aimed at the development of the next generation high-energy permanent magnets. The principal approach was relied on bottom-up fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite magnets. Our efforts resulted in further development of the theoretical concept and fabrication principles for the nanocomposites and in synthesis of a range of rare-earth-based hard magnetic nanoparticles. Even though we did not make a breakthrough in the assembly of these hard magnetic particles with separately prepared Fe(Co) nanoparticles and did not obtain a compact nanocomposite magnet, our performed research will help to direct the future efforts, in particular, towards nano-assembly via coating, when the two phases which made the nanocomposite are first organized in core-shell-structured particles. Two other approaches were to synthesize (discover) new materials for the traditional singe-material magnets and the nanocomposite magnets. Integrated theoretical and experimental efforts lead to a significant advance in nanocluster synthesis technique and yielded novel rare-earth-free nanostructured and nanocomposite materials. Examination of fifteen R-Fe-X alloy systems (R = rare earth), which have not been explored earlier due to various synthesis difficulties reveal several new ferromagnetic compounds. The research has made major progress in bottom-up manufacturing of rare-earth-containing nanocomposite magnets with superior energy density and open new directions in development of higher-energy-density magnets that do not contain rare earths. The advance in the scientific knowledge and technology made in the course of the project has been reported in 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous presentations at scientific meetings.

  13. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and the Production of Cosmogenic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated version of the {\\it SimProp} Monte Carlo code to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays in astrophysical backgrounds computing the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on earth. The study of secondary neutrinos provides a powerful tool to constrain the source models of these extremely energetic particles. We will show how the newly detected IceCube neutrino events at PeV energies together with the the latest experimental results of the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment are almost at the level of excluding several hypothesis on the astrophysical sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Results presented here can be also used to evaluate the discovery capabilities of future high energy cosmic rays and neutrino detectors.

  14. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  15. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Guesto-Barnak, D.

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20-300 C] <80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, low emission cross section, [sigma]<2.5[times]10[sup [minus]20] cm[sup 2], and a high fluorescence lifetime, [tau]>325 [mu]secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): (Mole %) P[sub 2]O[sub 5], (52-72); Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<20); B[sub 2]O[sub 3], (>0-25); ZnO, (0-31); Li[sub 2]O, (0-5); K[sub 2]O, (0-5); Na[sub 2]O, (0-5); Cs[sub 2]O, (0-5); Rb[sub 2]O, (0-5); MgO, (>0-<30); CaO, (0-20); BaO, (0-20); SrO, (0-<20); Sb[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); As[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], (0-<1); Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3], (up to 6.5); PbO, (0-<5); and SiO[sub 2], (0-3); wherein Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3] is the sum of lanthanide oxides; [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <24 unless [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is 0, then the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B[sub 2]O[sub 3] is 0.48-4.20. 7 figs.

  16. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Zborovsky; M. Tokarev

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

  17. Electroweak Radiative Corrections at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner

    2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    For energies far above the electroweak scale, large electroweak radiative corrections occur that grow logarithmically with energy and can easily reach several tens of per cent in the TeV range. Recent work on these corrections is reviewed.

  18. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  19. Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study R. Grossman, X. &in, D. Valsamis. Nixdorf, B. Scipioni, T. Song Superconducting Supercollider Laboratory Abstract We describe the initial experimental data from high energy physics. At this time, we have designed two proto- types to analyze high

  20. Low Cost Components: Advanced High Power & High Energy Battery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08amine2.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering of High...

  1. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Chang Kee [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Douglas, Michaek [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Hobbs, John [State University of New York at Stony Brook; McGrew, Clark [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Rijssenbeek, Michael [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  3. Studies of heavy flavour production and the hadronic final state in high energy ep collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An extract of recent results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations is shown. Various properties of quantum chromo dynamics are investigated by studying the details of the hadronic final state of high energy electron proton collisions at HERA. The presented results include analyses of jet cross sections and single particle production such as $\\gamma$ and $D$. Part of the measurements deal with final states involving identified heavy quarks (charm and beauty).

  4. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  5. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  6. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Aston, Mary Kay (Moscow, PA); Elder, Melanie L. (Dublin, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  7. Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, David Emery; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

  8. Impact of different energies of precipitating particles on NOx1 generation in the middle and upper atmosphere during geomagnetic2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    and energy spectra available today of solar proton events, auroral energy30 electrons, and relativistic1 Impact of different energies of precipitating particles on NOx1 generation in the middle a Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, Tähteläntie 62, FI-99600 Sodankylä, Finland.8 b Earth Observation

  9. A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column electrical discharges using equivalent species transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column species are generated in the kinetic module. The hybrid model has been used to examine electron energy which has discrete negative energies representing bound states, and a positive continuum representing

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts as Possible High Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are known to be sources of high-energy gamma rays, and are likely to be sources of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Following a short review of observations of GRBs at multi-MeV energies and above, the physics of leptonic and hadronic models of GRBs is summarized. Evidence for two components in BATSE and EGRET/TASC data suggest that GRBs are sources of high-energy cosmic rays. GLAST observations will reveal the high-energy gamma-ray power and energy releases from GRBs, and will provide detailed knowledge of anomalous high-energy emission components, but confirmation of cosmic ray acceleration must await 100 TeV -- PeV neutrino detection from GRBs.

  11. Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeng, YiXiang

    The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective ...

  12. City of High Point Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of High Point offers the Hometown Green Program to help customers reduce energy use. Under this program, rebates are available for newly constructed energy efficient homes, heat pumps, and...

  13. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  14. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  15. On the Hamiltonian and energy operators in a curved spacetime, especially for a Dirac particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arminjon, Mayeul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The definition of the Hamiltonian operator H for a general wave equa-tion in a general spacetime is discussed. We recall that H depends on the coordinate system merely through the corresponding reference frame. When the wave equation involves a gauge choice and the gauge change is time-dependent, H as an operator depends on the gauge choice. This dependence extends to the energy operator E, which is the Hermitian part of H. We distinguish between this ambiguity issue of E and the one that occurs due to a mere change of the "represen-tation" (e.g. transforming the Dirac wave function from the "Dirac representation" to a "Foldy-Wouthuysen representation"). We also assert that the energy operator ought to be well defined in a given ref-erence frame at a given time, e.g. by comparing the situation for this operator with the main features of the energy for a classical Hamilto-nian particle.

  16. Constraints on high energy phenomena from low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hanhart

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure to derive bounds on coupling strengths of exotic particles to nucleons from the neutrino signal of supernovae is outlined. The analysis is based on a model independent calculation for the emissivities for the exotic, detailed simulation for the evolution of the early proto-neutron star as well as a Likelihood analysis. As an example we derive confidence levels for the upper bound of the size of gravity only extra dimensions.

  17. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  18. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  19. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery PI - Chris Caylor, GMZ Director of Thermoelectric Systems GMZ Team: Bed Poudel, Giri Joshi, Jonathan D'Angelo,...

  20. High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Basu; Tapan Mukhopadhyay

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Role of the isospin asymmetry in nuclei and neutron stars, with an emphasis on the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, is discussed. The symmetry energy is obtained using the isoscalar as well as isovector components of the density dependent M3Y effective interaction. The constants of density dependence of the effective interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of spin and isospin symmetric cold infinite nuclear matter. Implications for the density dependence of the symmetry energy in case of a neutron star are discussed, and also possible constraints on the density dependence obtained from finite nuclei are compared.