National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high energy nuclear

  1. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munity’s ?compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications

  2. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database XML documentsProposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munity’s ?

  3. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network RequirementsCalifornia. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Networkof High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of

  4. Making glue in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Krasnitz; Raju Venugopalan

    1999-05-12

    We discuss a real time, non-perturbative computation of the transverse dynamics of gluon fields at central rapidities in very high energy nuclear collisions.

  5. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  6. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  7. NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in Central High Energy Nuclear Collisions H. Stockera,under Contract High energy nuclear collisions offer a uniquesidewards flow·in high-energy nuclear collisions. The

  8. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  9. MODELS OF HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2011-01-01

    the expansion phase at densities heJow nuclear density, (Jan expansion to a freeaeout density equal to the nuclearexpansion to freezeout is enormous, beginning with a Lorentz contracted nuclear

  10. Baryon Fluctuations in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Gavin; Claude Pruneau

    1999-07-09

    We propose that dramatic changes in the variances and covariance of protons and antiprotons can result if baryons approach chemical equilibrium in nuclear collisions at RHIC. To explore how equilibration alters these fluctuations, we formulate both equilibrium and nonequilibrium hadrochemical descriptions of baryon evolution. Contributions to fluctuations from impact parameter averaging and finite acceptance in nuclear collisions are numerically simulated.

  11. Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Transport in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Kai; Xu, Nu; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction between heavy quarks and the quark gluon plasma makes the open and hidden charm hadrons be sensitive probes of the deconfinement phase transition in high energy nuclear collisions. Both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects change with the colliding energy and significantly influence the heavy quark and charmonium yield and their transverse momentum distributions. The ratio of averaged quarkonium transverse momentum square and the elliptic flow reveal the nature of the QCD medium created in heavy ion collisions at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  12. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li

    2005-12-07

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons and protons in asymmetric nuclear matter. From the resulting Schr\\"{o}% dinger-equivalent potential, the high energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential is studied. We find that the symmetry potential at fixed baryon density is essentially constant once the nucleon kinetic energy is greater than about 500 MeV. Moreover, for such high energy nucleon, the symmetry potential is slightly negative below a baryon density of about $% \\rho =0.22$ fm$^{-3}$ and then increases almost linearly to positive values at high densities. Our results thus provide an important constraint on the energy and density dependence of nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter.

  13. Charmonium Transverse Momentum Distribution in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebo Tang; Nu Xu; Kai Zhou; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-09-19

    The Charmonium transverse momentum distribution is more sensitive to the nature of the hot QCD matter created in high energy nuclear collisions, in comparison with the yield. Taking a detailed transport approach for charmonium motion together with a hydrodynamic description for the medium evolution, the cancelation between the two hot nuclear matter effects, the dissociation and the regeneration, controls the charmonium transverse momentum distribution. Especially, the second moment of the distribution can be used to differentiate between the hot mediums produced at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  14. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

  15. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  16. Energy Loss Effect in High Energy Nuclear Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Gui Duan; Li-Hua Song; Li-Juan Huo; Guang-Lie Li

    2004-05-13

    The energy loss effect in nuclear matter, which is another nuclear effect apart from the nuclear effect on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering process, can be measured best by the nuclear dependence of the high energy nuclear Drell-Yan process. By means of the nuclear parton distribution studied only with lepton deep inelastic scattering experimental data, measured Drell-Yan production cross sections for 800GeV proton incident on a variety of nuclear targets are analyzed within Glauber framework which takes into account energy loss of the beam proton. It is shown that the theoretical results with considering the energy loss effect are in good agreement with the FNAL E866.

  17. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  18. TheHighCostofNuclearPower Why America Should Choose a Clean Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Nuclear Power Companies are Counting on Consumers and Taxpayers to Bear the Risks of ReactorTheHighCostofNuclearPower Why America Should Choose a Clean Energy Future Over New Nuclear Reactors, CalPIRG Education Fund March 2009 The High Cost of Nuclear Power Why America Should Choose a Clean

  19. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

  20. Percolation approach to phase transitions in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rodrigues; R. Ugoccioni; J. Dias de Deus

    1998-12-15

    We study continuum percolation in nuclear collisions for the realistic case in which the nuclear matter distribution is not uniform over the collision volume, and show that the percolation threshold is increased compared to the standard, uniform situation. In terms of quark-gluon plasma formation this means that the phase transition threshold is pushed to higher energies.

  1. The Future of High Energy Nuclear Physics in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schukraft

    2006-02-14

    In less than two years from now, the LHC at CERN will start operating with protons and later with heavy ions in the multi TeV energy range. With its unique physics potential and a strong, state-of-the complement of detectors, the LHC will provide the European, and in fact worldwide Nuclear Physics community, with a forefront facility to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions well into the next decade.

  2. Nuclear correlation and finite interaction-range effects in high-energy $(e,e'p)$ nuclear transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryoichi Seki; T. D. Shoppa; Akihisa Kohama; Koichi Yazaki

    1995-12-06

    Nuclear transparency is calculated for high-energy, semi-inclusive $(e,e'p)$ reactions, by accounting for all orders of Glauber multiple-scattering and by using realistic finite-range $p N$ interaction and (dynamically and statistically) correlated nuclear wave functions. The nuclear correlation effect is reduced due to the $p N$ finite-range effect. The net effect is small, and depends sensitively on details of the nuclear correlations in finite nuclei, which are poorly known at present.

  3. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2013-01-01

    of California. LBL-11774 Jets of Nuclear Matter from Highclusters. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter areExperimental analysis of the jet phenomena is in progress.

  4. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2013-01-01

    be published. Table 1: The jet angle, ejet' relative to theof California. LBL~ll774 Jets of Nuclear Matter from Highreactions. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter are

  5. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office Of Nuclear Energy Sensors and Instrumentation Annual Review Meeting Enhanced Micro-Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD) for High Temperature Reactors Troy Unruh Idaho National...

  6. Nuclear DVCS within the high energy QCD color dipole formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. T. Machado

    2009-05-27

    In this contribution, we present a study of the coherent and incoherent nuclear DVCS process in the small-$x$ regime within the color dipole formalism. Predictions for the nuclear DVCS cross section at photon level in the collider kinematics are presented.

  7. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, H.; Csernai, L.P.; Graebner, G.; Buchwald, G.; Kruse, H.; Cusson, R.Y.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1980-11-01

    The nuclear fluid dynamical model with final thermal breakup is used to study the reactions {sup 20}Ne + {sup 238}U and {sup 40} Ar + {sup 40}Ca at E{sub LAB}=390 MeV/n. Calculated double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/d{Omega}dE are in agreement with recent experimental data. It is shown that azimuthally dependent triple differential cross sections d{sup 3}{sigma}/dEd cos{theta}d{phi} yield considerably deeper insight into the collision process and allow for snapshots of the reactions. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter are predicted.

  8. The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

  9. Azimuthal asymmetry in transverse energy flow in nuclear collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Leonidov; Dmitry Ostrovsky

    2000-05-01

    The azimuthal pattern of transverse energy flow in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC energies is considered. We show that the probability distribution of the event-by-event azimuthal disbalance in transverse energy flow is essentially sensitive to the presence of the semihard minijet component.

  10. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  11. High fidelity nuclear energy system optimization towards an environmentally benign, sustainable, and secure energy source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich; Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Ames, David E., II; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-10-01

    A new high-fidelity integrated system method and analysis approach was developed and implemented for consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles leading to minimized Transuranic (TRU) inventories. The method has been implemented in a developed code system integrating capabilities of Monte Carlo N - Particle Extended (MCNPX) for high-fidelity fuel cycle component simulations. In this report, a Nuclear Energy System (NES) configuration was developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized TRU waste inventories, long-term activities, and radiotoxicities. The reactor systems and fuel cycle components that make up the NES were selected for their ability to perform in tandem to produce clean, safe, and dependable energy in an environmentally conscious manner. The diversity in performance and spectral characteristics were used to enhance TRU waste elimination while efficiently utilizing uranium resources and providing an abundant energy source. A computational modeling approach was developed for integrating the individual models of the NES. A general approach was utilized allowing for the Integrated System Model (ISM) to be modified in order to provide simulation for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the ISM is capable of performing system evaluations under many different design parameter options. Additionally, the predictive capabilities of the ISM and its computational time efficiency allow for system sensitivity/uncertainty analysis and the implementation of optimization techniques.

  12. ? production as a probe for early state dynamics in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Baoyi; Xu, Nu; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2011-02-01

    ? production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energy is investigated. While the transverse momentum spectra of the ground state ?(1s) are controlled by the initial state Cronin effect, the excited bb? states are characterized by the competition between the cold and hot nuclear matter effects and sensitive to the dissociation temperatures determined by the heavy quark potential. We emphasize that it is necessary to measure the excited heavy quark states in order to extract the early stage information in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC.

  13. High Temperature Electrolysis for Efficient Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡High HIGH

  14. Hadron freeze-out conditions in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nu Xu; Masashi Kaneta

    2001-04-23

    Systematic trend of the hadron freeze-out conditions from AGS/SPS to RHIC is discussed. The most interesting results from collisions at RHIC are that the system is indeed approaching net-baryon free and the transverse expansion is much stronger than that from collisions at AGS/SPS energies. In order to understand the trend of the collective velocity, an energy scan between $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 20 - 200 GeV, is important. In addition, systematic studies on the anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and the transverse momentum distributions of $\\phi, \\Omega,$ and $J / \\psi$ are necessary as they will help in determining whether the collectivity is developed at the partonic stage.

  15. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment of Energy009At26-2009NSRC_MOU.pdffactsNUCLEAR ENERGY

  16. Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

    2009-09-17

    We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

  17. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  18. Alternative ansatz to wounded nucleon and binary collision scaling in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Scott Moreland; Jonah E. Bernhard; Steffen A. Bass

    2015-06-07

    We introduce TRENTO, a new parametric initial condition model for high-energy nuclear collisions based on eikonal entropy deposition via a "reduced thickness" function. The model simultaneously describes experimental proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus multiplicity distributions, and generates nucleus-nucleus eccentricity harmonics consistent with experimental flow constraints. In addition, the model is compatible with ultra-central uranium-uranium data unlike existing models that include binary collision terms.

  19. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-10-20

    We describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  20. Nuclear Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Anderw

    2014-05-23

    Andrew Godfrey describes CASL -- the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors--a multi-institutional effort led by the Department of Energy that's using high-performance

  1. Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Anderw

    2014-04-10

    Andrew Godfrey describes CASL -- the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors--a multi-institutional effort led by the Department of Energy that's using high-performance

  2. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto [Hampton U., JLAB

    2013-11-01

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. I devote particular attention to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  3. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto

    2013-11-20

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. Particular attention is devoted to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  4. Tensor force effects and high-momentum components in the nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arianna Carbone; Artur Polls; Constança Providência; Arnau Rios; Isaac Vidaña

    2013-09-10

    We analyze microscopic many-body calculations of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. The calculations are performed in the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock and the Self-Consistent Green's Functions methods. Within Brueckner-Hartree-Fock, the Hellmann-Feynman theorem gives access to the kinetic energy contribution as well as the contributions of the different components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The tensor component gives the largest contribution to the symmetry energy. The decomposition of the symmetry energy in a kinetic part and a potential energy part provides physical insight on the correlated nature of the system, indicating that neutron matter is less correlated than symmetric nuclear matter. Within the Self-Consistent Green's Function approach, we compute the momentum distributions and we identify the effects of the high momentum components in the symmetry energy. The results are obtained for the realistic interaction Argonne V18 potential, supplemented by the Urbana IX three-body force in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations.

  5. Constraining the High-Density Behavior of Nuclear Symmetry Energy with the Tidal Polarizability of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Fattoyev; J. Carvajal; W. G. Newton; Bao-An Li

    2012-10-12

    Using a set of model equations of state satisfying the latest constraints from both terrestrial nuclear experiments and astrophysical observations as well as state-of-the-art nuclear many-body calculations of the pure neutron matter equation of state, the tidal polarizability of canonical neutron stars in coalescing binaries is found to be a very sensitive probe of the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy which is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich nucleonic matter. Moreover, it changes less than $\\pm 10%$ by varying various properties of symmetric nuclear matter and symmetry energy around the saturation density within their respective ranges of remaining uncertainty.

  6. Constraining the High-Density Behavior of Nuclear Symmetry Energy with the Tidal Polarizability of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattoyev, F J; Newton, W G; Li, Bao-An

    2012-01-01

    Using a set of model equations of state satisfying the latest constraints from both terrestrial nuclear experiments and astrophysical observations as well as state-of-the-art nuclear many-body calculations of the pure neutron matter equation of state, the tidal polarizability of canonical neutron stars in coalescing binaries is found to be a very sensitive probe of the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy which is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich nucleonic matter. Moreover, it changes less than $\\pm 10%$ by varying various properties of symmetric nuclear matter and symmetry energy around the saturation density within their respective ranges of remaining uncertainty.

  7. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear energies in the absence of a proximity contribution.contributions represent the major part of the potential energy of a nuclear

  8. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

  9. The effect of partonic wind on charm quark correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zhu; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2007-09-03

    In high-energy collisions, massive heavy quarks are produced back-to-back initially and they are sensitive to early dynamical conditions. The strong collective partonic wind from the fast expanding quark-gluon plasma created in high-energy nuclear collisions modifies the correlation pattern significantly. As a result, the angular correlation function for D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ pairs is suppressed at the angle $\\Delta\\phi=\\pi$. While the hot and dense medium in collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV) can only smear the initial back-to-back D$\\bar {\\rm D}$ correlation, a clear and strong near side D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ correlation is expected at LHC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5500$ GeV).

  10. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  11. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    REVIEW C 80, 064912 (2009) Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 O.... Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,15 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 I. Bnzarov,17 M...

  12. Hadronic rescattering effects on multi-strange hadrons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Shiori; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Huovinen, Pasi; Nara, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of hadronic rescattering on hadron distributions in high-energy nuclear collisions by using an integrated dynamical approach. This approach is based on a hybrid model combining (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics for the quark gluon plasma (QGP), and a transport model for the hadron resonance gas. Since the hadron distributions are the result of the entire expansion history of the system, understanding the QGP properties requires investigating how rescattering during the hadronic stage affects the final distributions of hadrons. We include multi-strange hadrons in our study, and quantify the effects of hadronic rescattering on their mean transverse momenta and elliptic flow. We find that multi-strange hadrons scatter less during the hadronic stage than non-strange particles, and thus their distributions reflect the properties of the system in an earlier stage than the distributions of non-strange particles.

  13. Probe the QCD phase diagram with ?-mesons in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Mohanty; N. Xu

    2009-01-03

    High-energy nuclear collision provide a unique tool to study the strongly interacting medium. Recent results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) on \\phi-meson production has revealed the formation of a dense partonic medium. The medium constituents are found to exhibit collective behaviour initiated due to partonic interactions in the medium. We present a brief review of the recent results on \\phi production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. One crucial question is where, in the phase diagram, does the transition happen for the matter changing from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom. We discuss how \\phi-meson elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions can be used for the search of the QCD phase boundary.

  14. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01

    J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusof macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions

  15. Nuclear effects in the Drell-Yan process at very high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Kopeliovich; J. Raufeisen; A. V. Tarasov; M. B. Johnson

    2002-11-06

    We study Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton(deuterium)-nucleus and in nucleus-nucleus collisions within the light-cone color dipole formalism. This approach is especially suitable for predicting nuclear effects in the DY cross section for heavy ion collisions, as it provides the impact parameter dependence of nuclear shadowing and transverse momentum broadening, quantities that are not available from the standard parton model. For p(D)+A collisions we calculate nuclear shadowing and investigate nuclear modification of the DY transverse momentum distribution at RHIC and LHC for kinematics corresponding to coherence length much longer than the nuclear size. Calculations are performed separately for transversely and longitudinally polarized DY photons, and predictions are presented for the dilepton angular distribution. Furthermore, we calculate nuclear broadening of the mean transverse momentum squared of DY dileptons as function of the nuclear mass number and energy. We also predict nuclear effects for the cross section of the DY process in heavy ion collisions. We found a substantial nuclear shadowing for valence quarks, stronger than for the sea.

  16. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

  17. Innovating for Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovating for Nuclear Energy Innovating for Nuclear Energy March 9, 2015 - 11:02am Addthis Innovating for Nuclear Energy Nuclear energy is an important part of our nation's energy...

  18. High-Fidelity Nuclear Energy System Optimization towards an Environmentally Benign, Sustainable, and Secure Energy Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ames, David E.

    2011-10-21

    by: Chair of Committee, Pavel V. Tsvetkov Committee Members, Kenneth L. Peddicord Sean M. McDeavitt G. Donald Allen Head of Department, Raymond J. Juzaitis August 2010 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering iii ABSTRACT... VIII.E Radioactive Emissions ??????????????.............. 148 VIII.F Reserves??????????????????..????... 149 VIII.G Land Resource Use?????????..?????????.. 150 IX CONCLUSIONS?????????????.??????????. 151 REFERENCES...

  19. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

  20. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  1. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

  2. Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. PerretGallix, International Journal of Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Carsten

    Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. Perret­Gallix, International Journal on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Pisa, Italy, April 3

  3. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaled nearlyof subsidies. Never- theless, claims that nuclear power is a

  4. NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    2000-01-01

    annafs of NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398 www-4549(00)00033-5 #12;1386 I. Phi!, V. Arzhanov. /Annals qf Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 1385-1398 subcritical systems (ADS

  5. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    and Hydroelectric 1.1.3 Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . .Gain GNEP Global Nuclear Energy Partnership HEU HighlyIn Progress in Nuclear Energy, 17. Pergamon Press, 1986.

  6. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  7. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  8. Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

    2001-05-09

    The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

  9. Early Time Dynamics of Gluon Fields in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Chen; R. J. Fries; J. I. Kapusta; Y. Li

    2015-07-13

    Nuclei colliding at very high energy create a strong, quasi-classical gluon field during the initial phase of their interaction. We present an analytic calculation of the initial space-time evolution of this field in the limit of very high energies using a formal recursive solution of the Yang-Mills equations. We provide analytic expressions for the initial chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic fields and for their energy-momentum tensor. In particular, we discuss event-averaged results for energy density and energy flow as well as for longitudinal and transverse pressure of this system. For example, we find that the ratio of longitudinal to transverse pressure very early in the system behaves as $p_L/p_T = -[1-\\frac{3}{2a}(Q\\tau)^2]/[1-\\frac{1}{a}(Q\\tau)^2]+\\mathcal{O}(Q\\tau)^4$ where $\\tau$ is the longitudinal proper time, $Q$ is related to the saturation scales $Q_s$ of the two nuclei, and $a = \\ln (Q^2/\\hat{m}^2)$ with $\\hat m$ a scale to be defined later. Our results are generally applicable if $\\tau \\lesssim 1/Q$. As already discussed in a previous paper, the transverse energy flow $S^i$ of the gluon field exhibits hydrodynamic-like contributions that follow transverse gradients of the energy density $\

  10. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

    2005-01-01

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons ...

  11. NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01

    und Bonn, Germany, and by the Director, Office of Energy ofD5300 Bonn, Germany, and by the Director, Office of Energy

  12. FINITE PARTICLE NUMBER EFFECTS IN HIGH-ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: IMPLICATIONS ON PION SPECTRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohrmann, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    nuclear matter density) already the interactions among the particles start to cease so that the following expansion

  13. Early Time Dynamics of Gluon Fields in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, G; Kapusta, J I; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei colliding at very high energy create a strong, quasi-classical gluon field during the initial phase of their interaction. We present an analytic calculation of the initial space-time evolution of this field in the limit of very high energies using a formal recursive solution of the Yang-Mills equations. We provide analytic expressions for the initial chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic fields and for their energy-momentum tensor. In particular, we discuss event-averaged results for energy density and energy flow as well as for longitudinal and transverse pressure of this system. For example, we find that the ratio of longitudinal to transverse pressure very early in the system behaves as $p_L/p_T = -[1-\\frac{3}{2a}(Q\\tau)^2]/[1-\\frac{1}{a}(Q\\tau)^2]+\\mathcal{O}(Q\\tau)^4$ where $\\tau$ is the longitudinal proper time, $Q$ is related to the saturation scales $Q_s$ of the two nuclei, and $a = \\ln (Q^2/\\hat{m}^2)$ with $\\hat m$ a scale to be defined later. Our results are generally applicable if $\\tau \\less...

  14. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Workshops Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options CatalogAshley...

  15. Energy Department Invests $67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to high priority nuclear energy research challenges, including instrumentation and vacuum drying systems associated with the storage of used nuclear fuel, an integrated...

  16. Colour Deconfinement and J/Psi Suppression in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Satz

    1997-11-11

    1. Introduction 2. Charmomium Dissociation and Colour Deconfinement 3. J/Psi Production in Nuclear Collisions 4. Anomalous J/Psi Suppression 5. Outlook and Summary

  17. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

  18. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Brayton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) Brayton Lab Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) Brayton Lab...

  19. Entropic and enthalpic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy

    2015-06-06

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted temperature - baryonic chemical potential plane, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: GLPT is typical enthalpic PT (Van-der-Waals-like) while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical entropic PT. Subdivision of 1st-order fluid-fluid phase transitions into enthalpy- and entropy-driven subclasses was proposed previously [arXiv:1403.8053]. Properties of enthalpic and entropic PTs differ significantly. Entropic PTs are always internal parts of more general and extended thermodynamic anomalies - domains with abnormal (negative) sign for the set of (usually positive) second derivatives of thermodynamic potential. Three of them are of primary importance: Gruneizen and thermal expansion and thermal pressure coefficients. Negative sign of these derivatives lead to violation of standard behavior and relative order in P-V plane for many iso-lines, e.g. isotherms, isentropes, shock adiabats etc. Entropic PTs have more complicated topology of stable and metastable areas within its two-phase region in comparison with conventional enthalpic (VdW-like) PTs. In particular, new additional metastable region, bounded by new additional spinodal, appears in the case of entropic PT. All the features of entropic PTs and accompanying abnormal thermodynamics region have transparent geometrical interpretation - multi-layered structure of thermodynamic surfaces for temperature, entropy and internal energy as a pressure-volume functions, e.g. T(P,V), S(P,V) and U(P,V).

  20. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2007-10-02

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  1. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW DatabaseNuclear FuelsNuclear Energy

  2. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on “Nuclear Responsibility” on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

  3. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW Database

  4. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-FeastingPreviouslyComputational Modeling &

  5. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-FeastingPreviouslyComputational Modeling

  6. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-FeastingPreviouslyComputational ModelingSandia's

  7. A Career in Nuclear Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lambregts, Marsha

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear chemist Dr. Marsha Lambregts talks about the Center for Advanced Energy Studies and the benefits of a nuclear energy career. For more information about careers at INL, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cycle Options Catalog Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options CatalogAshley...

  9. Nuclear power high technology colloquium: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-10

    Reports presenting information on technology advancements in the nuclear industry and nuclear power plant functions have been abstracted and are available on the energy data base.

  10. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Mineralization for High Organic and Nitrate Waste Streams for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Williams, M.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NOx in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 deg. C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 deg. C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {>=}1000 deg. C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NOx. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O. (authors)

  11. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  12. THE ENERGY-DEPENDENT SINGLE NUCLEON POTENTIAL IN A RELATIVISTIC FIELD THEORY OF NUCLEAR MATTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.by fitting the binding energy of nuclear matter for a

  13. Evidence for radial flow of thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA60 Collaboration; R. Arnaldi

    2007-11-12

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter Teff extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  14. Material brittle fracture owing to thermoelastic effect of high energy nuclear particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinichenko, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Rapid arising of the overheated domain near very heavy ion path (near fast neutron collision point) in solid results in generation of cylinder (spherical) thermoelastic stress wave. The latter can exceed the material strength and cause brittle fracture at going out on the free body interface. Size and shape of an erosion zone as well as erosion rate for both sorts of primary nuclear particles are found. The role of wave attenuation is discussed. The products of erosion are of macroscopic scaly particles having the typical thickness (1 {divided_by} 5) {center_dot} 10{sup -7} cm and mass 10{sup -18} {divided_by} 10{sup -17} g. Such ion (neutron)-stimulated thermoacoustic grinding can take place in radioactive materials with fissionable addenda. The consideration of the brittle destruction under cosmic ray bombardment may be essential for equipment of deep space missions.

  15. Sandia Energy - Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute Class of 2012 Kicks Off with 20 Students from the Gulf Cooperation Council Home Energy Assurance Infrastructure Security Infrastructure...

  16. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership An article describing the small scale reactors in the GNEP. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership More...

  17. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  18. Entropic and enthalpic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted temperature - baryonic chemical potential plane, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: GLPT is typical enthalpic PT (Van-der-Waals-like) while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical entropic PT. Subdivision of 1st-order fluid-fluid phase transitions into enthalpy- and entropy-driven subclasses was proposed previously [arXiv:1403.8053]. Properties of enthalpic and entropic PTs differ significantly. Entropic PTs are always internal parts of more general and extended thermodynamic anomalies - domains with abnormal (negative) sign for the set of (usually positive) seco...

  19. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  20. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    serious risks of their own; third, nuclear power will notrisks associated with the opera- tion of nuclear powernuclear power can be considered as a rational solution to our energy needs. There are risks

  1. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    nuclear plants will divert private and public investment from the cheaper and readily available renewable and energy efficiencyenergy efficiency and conservation can be more cost effective and can be deployed much sooner than new nuclear

  2. Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. PerretGallix, International Journal of Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Pisa, Italy, April 3Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. Perret­Gallix, International Journal

  3. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  4. Argonne's Major Nuclear Energy Milestones | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Intelligence Analysis Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Milestones Argonne's Major Nuclear Energy Milestones Argonne's reactor tree Argonne's reactor tree December 2, 1942:...

  5. United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

  6. Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application used for accelerators, high energy astrophysics and nuclear medicine. Performance of the detectors role in transmitting energy and information in nuclear power plants. In addition, research

  7. Nuclear Energy Page 570Page 570

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Energy Page 570Page 570 #12;Energy Supply and Conservation/ Nuclear Energy FY 2007;Energy Supply and Conservation/Nuclear Energy/ Overview FY 2007 Congressional Budget Energy Supply and Conservation Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Overview Appropriation Summary by Program

  8. Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development April 16, 2015 -...

  9. Symmetry Energy in Nuclear Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Danielewicz; Jenny Lee

    2008-12-25

    Interplay between the dependence of symmetry energy on density and the variation of nucleonic densities across nuclear surface is discussed. That interplay gives rise to the mass dependence of the symmetry coefficient in an energy formula. Charge symmetry of the nuclear interactions allows to introduce isoscalar and isovector densities that are approximately independent of the magnitude of neutron-proton asymmetry.

  10. Nuclear Energy RenaissanceNuclear Energy Renaissance National Research Council andNational Research Council and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Energy RenaissanceNuclear Energy Renaissance National Research Council andNational Research ·· Objectives of Nuclear Power RegulationObjectives of Nuclear Power Regulation ·· Major Functions, ANDREGULATIONS, REQUIREMENTS, AND ACCEPTANCE CRITERIAACCEPTANCE CRITERIA ·· LICENSING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES

  11. Nuclear Energy Density Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski; J. Moré; W. Nazarewicz; J. Sarich; N. Schunck; M. V. Stoitsov; S. Wild

    2010-05-27

    We carry out state-of-the-art optimization of a nuclear energy density of Skyrme type in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. The particle-hole and particle-particle channels are optimized simultaneously, and the experimental data set includes both spherical and deformed nuclei. The new model-based, derivative-free optimization algorithm used in this work has been found to be significantly better than standard optimization methods in terms of reliability, speed, accuracy, and precision. The resulting parameter set UNEDFpre results in good agreement with experimental masses, radii, and deformations and seems to be free of finite-size instabilities. An estimate of the reliability of the obtained parameterization is given, based on standard statistical methods. We discuss new physics insights offered by the advanced covariance analysis.

  12. Roundtables Is nuclear energy different than other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    Roundtables Is nuclear energy different than other energy sources? #12;Myths about nuclear claims -- the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), Entergy, NEI again, and the World Nuclear Association (WNA radiation releases. · Costs. Third, without citation, Pietrangelo claims, "Once a nuclear energy facility

  13. Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NuclearEnergyRoadmapFinal.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Science and Technology Committee Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory...

  14. International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Recent Events United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) Annual Steering...

  15. International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Expert meetings in Romania International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Expert meetings in Romania...

  16. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 565 (2006) 650656 Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    2006-01-01

    -energy radiation scintillation detector A. Kastalskya , S. Luryia,Ã, B. Spivakb a University at Stony Brook, ECE scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron­hole pairs in a direct semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can

  17. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial Resolution Distributed Fiber-Optic

  18. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial Resolution Distributed

  19. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial Resolution DistributedOperator

  20. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial Resolution DistributedOperator(A

  1. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial Resolution

  2. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh Spatial ResolutionMicro-Pocket Fission

  3. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Henry S. Rowen, "Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Proliferation -Northeast Asian nuclear energy cooperation advanced byAsia). 2 Cooperation on nuclear energy would have a direct

  4. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media...

  5. Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development April 16, 2015 - 12:46pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT...

  6. NUCLEAR FISSION AND FUSION 6.A Nuclear Binding Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    CHAPTER 6 NUCLEAR FISSION AND FUSION 6.A Nuclear Binding Energies A nucleus is characterized emphasis on the nuclear charge, the mass number of a nucleus plays a large role in its binding energy, and is denoted by 7Li. Some further items from the nuclear lexicon: nuclei with the same Z and differing N

  7. The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

    2013-04-13

    Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the world’s electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Association’s data, the realization of China’s deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

  8. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    irradiation effect * Demonstrate the TEG-powered WSN prototype 3 Background and motivation * TEG is very compact and reliable * Heat sources are very abundant in nuclear power...

  9. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Attributes of Software-Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants) (Carol Smidts) (The Ohio State University) (NEET 2) October 28-29, 2015...

  10. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  11. Preliminary Simulations for Geometric Optimization of a High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectrometer for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is under investigation as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative effort to develop non-destructive assay instruments for plutonium mass quantification in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Results obtained to date indicate that individual isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray spectra can potentially be used to quantify the total fissile content and individual weight fractions of fissile and fertile nuclides present in spent fuel. Adequate assay precision for inventory analysis can be obtained using a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available detection technology. In an attempt to optimize the geometric configuration and material composition for a delayed gamma measurement on spent fuel, the current study applies MCNPX, a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, in order to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. Results are presented for optimizing the neutron spectrum tailoring material, geometries to maximize thermal or fast fissions from a given neutron source, and detector location to allow an acceptable delayed gamma-ray signal while achieving a reasonable detector lifetime while operating in a high-energy neutron field. This work is supported in part by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy /sup 18/F, /sup 34m/Cl, and /sup 76/Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,..gamma..) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied.

  13. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR DATA SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullen, Red

    INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR DATA SERVICES DOCUMENTATION SERIES OF THE IAEA NUCLEAR data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; nuclear data 2014) by Dermott E. Cullen National Nuclear Data Center, BNL, alumnus Nuclear Data Section, IAEA

  14. VERY HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THE ASYMPTOTIC HADRON SPECTRUM, ANTI-NUCLEI, HYPER-NUCLEI, AND QUARK PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glendenning, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    the expansion phase at densities below nuclear density, (1an expansion to a freezeout density equal to the nuclearexpansion stage as a function of 1/p where the density is measured in units of the nuclear

  15. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy: The Thorium Option

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Raja, Rajendran

    2010-01-08

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

  16. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

    2010-11-17

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  17. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind CareerEnergy NuclearNuclear Safety

  18. Induction of nuclear fission by high-voltage application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirokazu Maruyama

    2007-11-20

    In nuclear power generation, fissile materials are mainly used. For example, $U^{235}$ is fissile and therefore quite essential for use of nuclear energy. However, the material $U^{235}$ has very small natural abundance less than 1 %. We should seek possibility of utilizing fissionable materials such as $U^{238}$ because natural abundance of such fissionable materials is generally much larger than fissile ones. In this paper, we show that thermal neutrons with vanishing kinetic energy can induce nuclear fission when high voltage is applied to fissionable materials. To obtain this result, we use the liquid-drop model for nuclei. Finally, we propose how fissionable materials can be utilized.

  19. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  20. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng Li; S. R. Souza; M. B. Tsang; Feng-Shou Zhang

    2015-05-18

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  1. Sandia Energy - Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologies |Education STEMA GreenAdvanced Nuclear

  2. Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Fact Sheet | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Fact Sheet Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Fact Sheet Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Fact Sheet...

  3. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sabharwall; M. Green; S.J. Yoon; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing concerns in the production of reliable energy sources, the next generation in reliable power generation, hybrid energy systems, are being developed to stabilize these growing energy needs. The hybrid energy system incorporates multiple inputs and multiple outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilizing and storing the overproduction of energy to meet peak demands of energy at the time of need. With high thermal energy production of the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct properties. This paper will discuss the different energy storage options with the criteria for efficient energy storage set forth, and will primarily focus on different molten salt energy storage system options through a thermodynamic analysis

  4. Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability L. H. Tsoukalas Purdue University Nuclear Nuclear Today · 439 nuclear power reactors (31 countries) · Over 12,000 years of operating experience · Nuclear reactors supply 16% of the world's electricity as base-load power (372,000 MWe of total capacity

  5. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, J R

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

  6. Roundtables Is nuclear energy different than other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    subsidies ($165 billion) to commercial nuclear than to wind and solar combined ($5 billion), if one countsRoundtables Is nuclear energy different than other energy sources? #12;Cheaper, safer alternatives than nuclear fission Kristin Shrader-Frechette 19 August 2011 If reactors were safe, nuclear industries

  7. Nuclear Energy Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer under pressure |Cafés NovemberServices »Nuclear

  8. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work FeaturedNuclearNP Homenuclear

  9. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  10. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-05-05

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  11. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2009-01-06

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  12. Relativistic Nuclear Energy Density Functionals: adjusting parameters to binding energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Niksic; D. Vretenar; P. Ring

    2008-09-08

    We study a particular class of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals in which only nucleon degrees of freedom are explicitly used in the construction of effective interaction terms. Short-distance (high-momentum) correlations, as well as intermediate and long-range dynamics, are encoded in the medium (nucleon density) dependence of the strength functionals of an effective interaction Lagrangian. Guided by the density dependence of microscopic nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter, a phenomenological ansatz for the density-dependent coupling functionals is accurately determined in self-consistent mean-field calculations of binding energies of a large set of axially deformed nuclei. The relationship between the nuclear matter volume, surface and symmetry energies, and the corresponding predictions for nuclear masses is analyzed in detail. The resulting best-fit parametrization of the nuclear energy density functional is further tested in calculations of properties of spherical and deformed medium-heavy and heavy nuclei, including binding energies, charge radii, deformation parameters, neutron skin thickness, and excitation energies of giant multipole resonances.

  13. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  14. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Nuclear Safety The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes and maintains nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidance including policy and requirements relating to...

  15. Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA seeks to recover the economic value of the material by using the resulting LEU as nuclear reactor fuel. U.S.-Russian Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement NNSA's HEU...

  16. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities...

  17. Nuclear energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiCleanAlincaUK LtdCorp L T JV Jump

  18. Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities December 15, 2005 - 4:46pm...

  19. Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities December 15, 2005 - 4:46pm Addthis 12...

  20. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  1. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  2. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

    2004-10-03

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

  3. Sandia Energy » Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of the University of Minnesota's4thAssists NASA in

  4. Nuclear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiCleanAlincaUK LtdCorp L T JV

  5. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew2008 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION Aof December 9, 2010

  6. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew2008 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION AofDepartment

  7. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t e OfficeResearch and Development

  8. Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and...

  9. Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Solicitation presentation.pdf...

  10. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 18 JANUARY 1999 High Energy Resolution Bolometers for Nuclear Physics and X-Ray Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency, since only a narrow band of energy can be analyzed at a time. The complementary energy dispersiveVOLUME 82, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 18 JANUARY 1999 High Energy Resolution Bolometers for Nuclear Physics and X-Ray Spectroscopy A. Alessandrello,1 J. W. Beeman,2 C

  11. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    first, investments in nuclear power are risky as indicatedto stay clear; second, nuclear power plants are statedrisks of their own; third, nuclear power will not reduce our

  12. Nuclear Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyam, Radhey

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ is large enough ($\\sim$ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss applications of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  13. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  14. Nuclear structure effects of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at high excitation energy and large angular momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, V.; Egido, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    Using the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism we analyze the properties of the nuclei {sup 152,154,156}Dy at the quasicontinuum region from {ital I}=0{h_bar} to 70{h_bar} and excitation energy up to approximately 16 MeV. We discuss energy gaps, shapes, moments of inertia, and entropy among others. The role of shape fluctuations is studied in the frame of classical statistics and we find large effects on several observables. A very rich structure is found in terms of excitation energy and angular momentum.

  15. Harry Potter, Oxford and Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harry Potter, Oxford and Nuclear Energy Harry Potter, Oxford and Nuclear Energy July 16, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Dr. Peter Lyons meets with students on the Oxford...

  16. Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And StatisticsProgram Manager DirectoryofDOEAccomplishmentsAdv.Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects

  17. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, Fiscal Year...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Area: Reactor Concepts RD&D Project Start Date: January 2011 Project End Date: December 2013 38 | International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Fiscal Year 2011...

  18. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    & Screening of Fuel Cycle Options Advanced Fuel Development · Thorium Fuel Cycles · Silicon Carbide - 1996* Advanced Nuclear Fuels* Materials in Radiation Environments* * Continuing program within NS Nuclear Safety Advanced Nuclear Systems · Radiation Resistant Materials · Accident Tolerant Fuels

  19. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    planning and oversight for programs funded by the Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Non- proliferation, for Weapons Ac- tivities and Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Federal employees at the NNSA service379 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Federal Funds General and special

  20. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oversight for programs funded by the Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Non- proliferation, and Naval pro- gram direction for Weapons Activities and Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Federal employees361 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Federal Funds General and special

  1. Nuclear Energy's Renaissance Andrew C. Kadak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23% 22% 3% 8% 3% 41% Electricity Production Source: EIA Gas 15% Hydro 8% Coal 51% Oil 3% Other 2 (1) Beaver Valley (2) 103 Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe Columbia (1) Diablo Canyon (2) San Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe 103 Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe National Energy

  2. Theories of Low Energy Nuclear Transmutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. N. Srivastava; A. Widom; J. Swain

    2012-10-27

    Employing concrete examples from nuclear physics it is shown that low energy nuclear reactions can and have been induced by all of the four fundamental interactions (i) (stellar) gravitational, (ii) strong, (iii) electromagnetic and (iv) weak. Differences are highlighted through the great diversity in the rates and similarity through the nature of the nuclear reactions initiated by each.

  3. GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling...

  4. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 HEPlogo.jpg The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Computing and Storage...

  5. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of...

  6. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  7. Nuclear Processes at Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Broggini

    2003-08-29

    LUNA, Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics at Gran Sasso, is measuring fusion cross sections down to the energy of the nucleosynthesis inside stars. Outstanding results obtained up to now are the cross-section measurements within the Gamow peak of the Sun of $^{3}He(^{3}He,2p)^{4}He$ and the $D(p,\\gamma)^{3}He$. The former plays a big role in the proton-proton chain, largely affecting the calculated solar neutrino luminosity, whereas the latter is the reaction that rules the proto-star life during the pre-main sequence phase. The implications of such measurements will be discussed. Preliminary results obtained last year on the study of $^{14}N(p,\\gamma)^{15}O$, the slowest reaction of the CNO cycle, will also be shown.

  8. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

  9. Department of Energy Releases Global Nuclear Energy Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan outlines a path forward to enable worldwide increase in the use of safe, emissions-free nuclear energy without contributing to the spread of nuclear weapons capabilities in...

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxon, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Conf. Hioh Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure, Vancouver,on High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure, Vancouver,Conf. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure, Vancouver

  11. Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin, Sümer

    2014-09-30

    Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, {sup 233}U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO{sub 2}/RG?PuO{sub 2}) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 96 % ThO{sub 2}; 6 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 94 % ThO{sub 2}; 10 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 90 % ThO{sub 2}; 20 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 80 % ThO{sub 2}; 30 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 70 % ThO{sub 2}, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ? 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ? 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG?PuO{sub 2} fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MW{sub th} has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ?160 kg {sup 233}U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ?1.3.

  12. Secretary Chu Announces Nuclear Energy University Program Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Chu Announces Nuclear Energy University Program Awards Secretary Chu Announces Nuclear Energy University Program Awards June 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -...

  13. Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

  14. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors GNEP will provide...

  15. Sandia Energy - Sandia Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to National Academy of Engineering Home Infrastructure Security Energy Nuclear Energy Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities...

  16. Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology...

  17. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress...

  18. International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold...

  19. Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment Fund Management Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment Fund...

  20. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8,...

  1. Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Graduates EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program Intern...

  2. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steering Group Members Approve Transformation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group Members Approve...

  3. Ultra High Energy Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-04-07

    The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

  4. Update to Assessment of Direct Disposal in Unsaturated Tuff of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Owned by U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. D. Wheatley; R. P. Rechard

    1998-09-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to provide information and guidance to the Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) about the level of characterization necessary to dispose of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The disposal option modeled was codisposal of DOE SNF with defense high-level waste (DHLW). A specific goal was to demonstrate the influence of DOE SNF, expected to be minor, in a predominately commercial repository using modeling conditions similar to those currently assumed by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). A performance assessment (PA) was chosen as the method of analysis. The performance metric for this analysis (referred to as the 1997 PA) was dose to an individual; the time period of interest was 100,000 yr. Results indicated that cumulative releases of 99Tc and 237Np (primary contributors to human dose) from commercial SNF exceed those of DOE SNF both on a per MTHM and per package basis. Thus, if commercial SNF can meet regulatory performance criteria for dose to an individual, then the DOE SNF can also meet the criteria. This result is due in large part to lower burnup of the DOE SNF (less time for irradiation) and to the DOE SNF's small percentage of the total activity (1.5%) and mass (3.8%) of waste in the potential repository. Consistent with the analyses performed for the YMP, the 1997 PA assumed all cladding as failed, which also contributed to the relatively poor performance of commercial SNF compared to DOE SNF.

  5. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    5.3.2 Nuclear Energy System Model . . . . . . . . . . .scenarios of global nuclear energy demand . . . . . . . .Brief History of Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . Nuclear Fuel

  6. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    5.3.2 Nuclear Energy System Model . . . . . . . . . . .Brief History of Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . Nuclear FuelModeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 Nuclear Energy System

  7. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    efficiency given the expected high demand for nuclear energyefficiency. In Chapter 2, an overview of nuclear energyNUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM MODEL Table 5.2: Baseline Reactor Parameters Parameter UOX CFR BFR Reactor Power (GW th ) Capacity Factor Thermal Efficiency

  8. The low-energy nuclear density of states and the saddle point approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay K. Ghosh; Byron K. Jennings

    2001-07-30

    The nuclear density of states plays an important role in nuclear reactions. At high energies, above a few MeV, the nuclear density of states is well described by a formula that depends on the smooth single particle density of states at the Fermi surface, the nuclear shell correction and the pairing energy. In this paper we present an analysis of the low energy behaviour of the nuclear density of states using the saddle point approximation and extensions to it. Furthermore, we prescribe a simple parabolic form for excitation energy, in the low energy limit, which may facilitate an easy computation of level densities.

  9. The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Sustainable - Coal, Oil and Natural Gas · Natural Gas is a Clean Fuel - relative to what - coal? · RenewablesThe Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant Andrew C. Kadak Massachusetts Institute of Technology are "clean and free"... · Conservation with sacrifice will work · There is no solution to nuclear waste

  10. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  11. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

  12. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-08

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Supersedes SEN-35-91.

  13. Nuclear Safety at the Department of Energy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-12-05

    Nuclear Safety is a core value of the Department of Energy. As our management principle state: "We will pursue our mission in a manner that is safe, secure, legally and ethically sound, and fiscally responsible."

  14. Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    President Obama

    2010-09-01

    President Obama announces more than $8 billion in loan guarantees for two new nuclear reactors as part of the Administration's commitment to providing clean energy and creating new jobs.

  15. Manpower development for new nuclear energy programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2012, nine countries were seriously considering embarking on nuclear energy programs, either having signed contracts with reactor vendors or having made investments for the development of infrastructure ...

  16. Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama announces more than $8 billion in loan guarantees for two new nuclear reactors as part of the Administration's commitment to providing clean energy and creating new jobs.

  17. NMIS-07 SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, MARCH 2002 SECOND REVIEW 1 Abstract--We consider detection of high-energy photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibulevsky, Michael

    Anger algorithm. Index Terms--emission tomography, gamma camera, scintillation detector, artificial on the Anger scintillation camera [1]. Incident high- energy gamma quanta, generated due to positron decay. Application of such thick crystals in PET scanners is desirable, due to their low cost and very high light

  18. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  19. Nuclear recoil corrections to the $2p_\\frac{3}{2}$ state energy of hydrogen-like and high $Z$ lithium like atoms in all orders in $?Z$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Artemyev; V. M. Shabaev; V. A. Yerokhin

    1995-10-16

    The relativistic nuclear recoil corrections to the energy of the $2p_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ state of hydrogen-like and the $(1s)^{2}2p_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ state of high $Z$ lithium-like atoms in all orders in $\\alpha Z$ are calculated. The calculations are carried out using the B-spline method for the Dirac equation. For low $Z$ the results of the calculation are in good agreement with the $\\alpha Z$ -expansion results. It is found that the total nuclear recoil contribution to the energy of the $(1s)^{2}2p_{\\frac{3}{2}}- (1s)^{2}2s$ transition in lithium-like uranium constitutes $-0.09\\,eV$.

  20. Feasibility of lateral emplacement in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Sutton

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy recently filed a motion to withdraw the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license application for the High Level Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. As the U.S. has focused exclusively ...

  1. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

  2. Microsoft Word - Advanced_Nuclear_Energy_Projects_Loan_Guarantee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 45 Loan Guarantee Solicitation Announcement Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects 1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FULL ANNOUNCMENT Loan Guarantee...

  3. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy promotes nuclear power as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    nuclear power as a resource capable of meeting the Nation's energy, environmental and national security nuclear power plants. zz NuclearzEnergyzEnablingzTechnologiesz-- to explore transformative, "out our national and international supplies of fuel for nuclear power plants remain stable

  4. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    readily available renewable and energy efficiency optionsannual investments in renewable energy capacity are now M.billion US dollars, and renewable energy markets continue to

  5. Nuclear Energy Density Optimization: UNEDF2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; J. McDonnell; W. Nazarewicz; E. Olsen; P. -G. Reinhard; J. Sarich; N. Schunck; S. M. Wild; D. Davesne; J. Erler; A. Pastore

    2014-10-30

    The parameters of the UNEDF2 nuclear energy density functional (EDF) model were obtained in an optimization to experimental data consisting of nuclear binding energies, proton radii, odd-even mass staggering data, fission-isomer excitation energies, and single particle energies. In addition to parameter optimization, sensitivity analysis was done to obtain parameter uncertainties and correlations. The resulting UNEDF2 is an all-around EDF. However, the sensitivity analysis also demonstrated that the limits of current Skyrme-like EDFs have been reached and that novel approaches are called for.

  6. Symmetry energy in nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Nazarewicz; P. -G. Reinhard; W. Satula; D. Vretenar

    2013-07-22

    The nuclear symmetry energy represents a response to the neutron-proton asymmetry. In this survey we discuss various aspects of symmetry energy in the framework of nuclear density functional theory, considering both non-relativistic and relativistic self-consistent mean-field realizations side-by-side. Key observables pertaining to bulk nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are reviewed. Constraints on the symmetry energy and correlations between observables and symmetry-energy parameters, using statistical covariance analysis, are investigated. Perspectives for future work are outlined in the context of ongoing experimental efforts.

  7. Nuclear Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer under pressure |CafésNuclearNuclear Fuels Nuclear

  8. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing founda/ons and advancing fundamental understanding #12;The High Energy Density developing innovative techniques to study the properties of instabilities in magnetized-high-energy-density

  9. India's Nuclear Energy Program : prospects The talk will begin with a brief introduction to nuclear fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    India's Nuclear Energy Program : prospects The talk will begin with a brief introduction to nuclear posed by reactors, the accident liability laws and regulatory structure governing nuclear energy, Wednesday, Oct 29th 4:00 PM (Tea/Coffee at Seminar Hall, TCIS Colloquium India's Nuclear Energy Program

  10. Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovember 2014 Postings(NSUF) Gateway to NuclearNuclear

  11. Public opinion and nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.; Melber, B.D.; Rankin, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Public acceptance of a nuclear power plant (NPP) built near one's residence has declined steadily since the early 1970's. Following the TMI accident, this acceptance decreased dramatically. There has been some attitude rebound, however, and through mid-1981, the % who supported continued NPP construction in USA was 5 to 10% more than those in opposition. Men's and women's attitudes are different and were differentially affected by the TMI accident. Beliefs and attitudes about specific nuclear power issues were explored using questionnaires. Reactor-safety concerns were found to be more important than nuclear-waste concerns. Nuclear fuel-supply considerations are believed to be a major advantage of nuclear power. The public was largely unaware of the breeder-reactor concept. The US public generally does not favor selling US reactors abroad. It also greatly underestimates how long it takes to build a NPP. Most people believed solar-generated electricity is cheapest. The public has little information or has misinformation about some areas of nuclear power. (DLC)

  12. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

    2008-04-16

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  13. EXTENDING NUCLEAR ENERGY TO NON-ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Boardman; M. McKellar; D. Ingersoll; Z. Houghton; , R. Bromm; C. Desportes

    2014-09-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these non-traditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers.

  14. Nuclear parton distribution functions and energy loss effect in the Drell-Yan reaction off nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ChunGui Duan; LiHua Song; ShuoHe Wang; GuangLie Li

    2006-01-23

    The energy loss effect in nuclear matter is another nuclear effect apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering process. The quark energy loss can be measured best by the nuclear dependence of the high energy nuclear Drell-Yan process. By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the different sets of nuclear parton distribution functions, we present a analysis of the E866 experiments on the nuclear dependence of Drell-Yan lepton pair production resulting from the bombardment of Be, Fe and W targets by 800GeV protons at Fermilab. It is found that the quark energy loss in cold nuclei is strongly dependent on the used nuclear parton distribution functions. The further prospects of using relatively low energy proton incident on nuclear targets are presented by combining the quark energy loss rate determined from a fit to the E866 nuclear-dependent ratios versus $x_1$, with the nuclear parton distribution functions given from lA deep inelastic scattering (DIS) data. The experimental study of the relatively low energy nuclear Drell-Yan process can give valuable insight in the enengy loss of fast quark propagating a cold nuclei and help to pin down nuclear parton distributions functions.

  15. NUCLEAR ENERGY Annals of Nuclear Energy 32 (2005) 812842

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    or density wave oscillation (DWO) in boiling water reactors (BWRs) (Analytis et al., 2001; Lansa°ker, 1997 rods in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Such noise sources are not considered in this paper.elsevier.com/locate/anucene Identification and localization of absorbers of variable strength in nuclear reactors C. Demazie`re a,*, G

  16. The development of nuclear energy in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleta, C. )

    1992-01-01

    The paper traces the development of nuclear energy in the Philippines and outlines the program on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the country as well as the problems and prospects of nuclear energy development. Nuclear power is at a standstill but the other areas of nuclear energy development are underway. The projects on the application of nuclear energy in agriculture, industry, public health and safety, are being pursued. Technology transfer to end users is sometimes hampered by public acceptance issues, such as irradiated food being believed to become radioactive, dislike with anything associated with radiation, and plain inherent fear of nuclear energy.

  17. CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  18. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sabharwall; S.B. Sitton; S.J. Yoon; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing demand of energy and costs of the fossil fuels, coupled with the environmental concerns have resulted in an increased interest in alternative energy sources. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) are being considered which incorporates renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy combined with nuclear reactor and energy storage to meet the peak hours demand imposed on the grid, along with providing process heat for other potential industrial applications. This concept could potentially satisfy various energy demands and improve reliability, robustness and resilience for the entire system as a whole, along with economic and net efficiency gains. This paper provides a brief understanding of potential NHES system and architecture along with the challenges

  19. Nuclear Fusion Energy Research Ghassan Antar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Nuclear Fusion Energy Research at AUB Ghassan Antar Physics Department American University of Beirut #12;Laboratory for Plasma and Fluid Dynamics [LPFD) Dr. G. Antar 2 Students: - R. Hajjar [Physics Advantages of Fusion on other ways to Produce Energy · Abundant Fuel Supply on Earth and Beyond · No Risk

  20. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News...

  1. Energy Department Issues Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensed Facilities Procurement Energy Department Issues Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensed...

  2. Nuclear Energy University Program: A Presentation to Vice Presidents...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Energy University Program: A Presentation to Vice Presidents of Research and Development of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, given by the Office of Nuclear...

  3. Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications for Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Requests for Applications for Nuclear-Related Science and Engineering Scholarships and Fellowships Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications for Nuclear-Related Science...

  4. Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    meet the need for advanced nuclear energy production and help to close the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. "Today's awards accelerate our nation's drive towards diverse...

  5. Climate Control Using Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moninder Singh Modgil

    2008-01-01

    We examine implications of anthropogenic low pressure regions, - created by injecting heat from nuclear reactors, into atmosphere. We suggest the possibility that such artificially generated low pressure regions, near hurricanes could disrupt their growth, path, and intensity. This method can also create controlled tropical stroms, which lead to substantial rainfall in arid areas, such as - (1)Sahara desert, (2) Australian interior desert, and (3) Indian Thar desert. A simple vortex suction model is developed to study, effect on atmospheric dynamics, by such a nuclear heat injection system.

  6. Correlation energy contribution to nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Baroni; M. Armati; F. Barranco; R. A. Broglia; G. Colo'; G. Gori; E. Vigezzi

    2004-04-07

    The ground state correlation energies associated with collective surface and pairing vibrations are calculated for Pb- and Ca-isotopes. It is shown that this contribution, when added to those predicted by one of the most accurate modern nuclear mass formula (HFBCS MSk7 mass formula), reduces the associated rms error by an important factor, making mean field theory, once its time dependence is taken into account, a quantitative predictive tool for nuclear masses.

  7. Instabilities in the Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski

    2010-02-05

    In the field of Energy Density Functionals (EDF) used in nuclear structure and dynamics, one of the unsolved issues is the stability of the functional. Numerical issues aside, some EDFs are unstable with respect to particular perturbations of the nuclear ground-state density. The aim of this contribution is to raise questions about the origin and nature of these instabilities, the techniques used to diagnose and prevent them, and the domain of density functions in which one should expect a nuclear EDF to be stable.

  8. Innovations in the Use of Nuclear Energy for Sustainable Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Stephen Herring

    2010-10-01

    Abstract Over the next 50 years, nuclear energy will become increasingly important in providing the electricity and heat needed both by the presently industrialized countries and by those countries which are now developing their manufacturing industries. The twin concerns of global climate change and of the vulnerability of energy supplies caused by increasing international competition will lead to a greater reliance on nuclear energy for both electricity and process heat. Conservative estimates of new nuclear construction indicate a 50% increase in capacity by 2030. Other estimates predict a tripling of present capacity. Required machine tool technologies will include the improvements in the manufacture of standard LWR components, such as pressure vessels and pumps. Further in the future, technologies for working high temperature metals and ceramics will be needed and will require new machining capabilities.

  9. RETHINKING THE FUTURE GRID: INTEGRATED NUCLEAR-RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Bragg-Sitton; R. Boardman

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 electricity generation mix in the United States consisted of ~13% renewables (hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal), 19% nuclear, 27% natural gas, and 39% coal. In the 2011 State of the Union Address, President Obama set a clean energy goal for the nation: “By 2035, 80 percent of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources. Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal and natural gas. To meet this goal we will need them all.” The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recognize that “all of the above” means that we are called to best utilize all available clean energy sources. To meet the stated environmental goals for electricity generation and for the broader energy sector, there is a need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere. New energy systems must be capable of significantly reducing environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. A concept being advanced by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product. For the purposes of the present work, the hybrid system would integrate two or more energy resources to generate two or more products, one of which must be an energy commodity, such as electricity or transportation fuel. Subsystems would be integrated ‘‘behind’’ the electrical transmission bus and would be comprised of two or more energy conversion subsystems that have traditionally been separate or isolated. Energy flows would be dynamically apportioned as necessary to meet grid demand via a single, highly responsive connection to the grid that provides dispatchable electricity while capital-intensive generation assets operate at full capacity. Candidate region-specific hybrid energy systems selected for further study and figures of merit that will be used to assess system performance will be presented.

  10. Nuclear and gravitational energies in stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia [Astronomical Observatory of Geneva University (Switzerland); Courvoisier, Thierry [ISDC, Astronomical Observatory of Geneva University (Switzerland)

    2014-05-09

    The force that governs the evolution of stars is gravity. Indeed this force drives star formation, imposes thermal and density gradients into stars at hydrostatic equilibrium and finally plays the key role in the last phases of their evolution. Nuclear power in stars governs their lifetimes and of course the stellar nucleosynthesis. The nuclear reactions are at the heart of the changes of composition of the baryonic matter in the Universe. This change of composition, in its turn, has profound consequences on the evolution of stars and galaxies. The energy extracted from the gravitational, respectively nuclear reservoirs during the lifetimes of stars of different masses are estimated. It is shown that low and intermediate mass stars (M < 8 M{sub ?}) extract roughly 90 times more energy from their nuclear reservoir than from their gravitational one, while massive stars (M > 8 M{sub ?}), which explode in a supernova explosion, extract more than 5 times more energy from the gravitational reservoir than from the nuclear one. We conclude by discussing a few important nuclear reactions and their link to topical astrophysical questions.

  11. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Asia, examine the energy- security connection in Asia withon the long-term security of energy supply, which mustin East Asia's security, nuclear energy, and environment. It

  12. Particle Diffraction at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir A. Petrov

    1998-04-27

    A brief ideological and historical review of problems of high energy diffractive scattering is given.

  13. Criteria for Global Nuclear Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Michael J.

    2002-07-01

    Global energy consumption will at least double over the next fifty years due to population growth, increased consumption, and an urgent need to improve the standard of living in under-developed countries. Thirty percent of this growth will be for electricity. At the same time, carbon emissions must be significantly reduced to respond to concerns regarding global warming. The use of nuclear energy to meet this growing electricity demand without carbon emissions is an obvious solution to many observers, however real concerns over economics, safety, waste and proliferation must be adequately addressed. The issue is further complicated by the fact that developing countries, which have the most pressing need for additional electricity generation, have the least capability and infrastructure to deploy nuclear energy. Nevertheless, if the specific needs of developing countries are appropriately considered now as new generation reactors are being developed, and institutional arrangements based upon the fundamental principles of President Eisenhower's 1953 Atoms For Peace speech are followed, nuclear energy could be deployed in any country. From a technical perspective, reactor safety and accessibility of special nuclear material are primary concerns. Institutionally, plant and fuel ownership and waste management issues must be addressed. International safety and safeguards authority are prerequisites. While the IAEA's IMPRO program and the United States' Generation IV programs are focusing on technical solutions, institutional issues, particularly with regard to deployment in developing countries, are not receiving corresponding attention. Full-service, cradle-to-grave, nuclear electricity companies that retain custody and responsibility for the plant and materials, including waste, are one possible solution. Small modular reactors such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor could be ideal for such an arrangement. While waste disposal remains a major obstacle, this is already true for numerous nuclear programs even in developed countries with limited geologically suitable formations. Fortunately, several organizations are currently pursuing international solutions to the nuclear waste disposal problem. While the capability to deploy nuclear energy in a specific country may not be desirable for a number of reasons, we should not develop nuclear hardware that can only benefit and serve technically and economically advanced countries. The potential benefits of nuclear energy are global, and we should not unduly limit that potential by inattention today to the requirements necessary for global deployment. (authors)

  14. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingcwdd2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  15. Sandia Energy - High Pressure Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Pressure Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry High Pressure ChemistryAshley...

  16. Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frederickson, James R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

  17. Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M J; Bench, G

    2009-08-19

    A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

  18. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  19. Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear...

  20. Nuclear Physics A 770 (2006) 131 Relativistic nuclear energy density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Physics A 770 (2006) 1­31 Relativistic nuclear energy density functional constrained by low 10 February 2006 Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract A relativistic nuclear energy density Keywords: Relativistic mean field; Density functional theory; Nuclear structure; Chiral dynamics; QCD sum

  1. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  2. Policy Paper 37: Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

    1998-01-01

    security, nuclear energy, and environment. It also indicatesbased on its nuclear submarine technology Energy Environmentalternatives? Environment--Use of nuclear energy can lessen

  3. Department of Energy Releases Global Nuclear Energy Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of our nation's need to incorporate safe, emissions-free nuclear power into our nation's energy mix. While DOE labs and research facilities host some of the best scientists, the...

  4. Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As an element of its plans to return the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site in eastern Idaho to its historic mission of nuclear technology development, the DOE asked its Nuclear Energy Research...

  5. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  6. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory Fellows Jerry Simmons IsNationalNuclear

  7. Nuclear Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems...

  8. Enhancement Mechanisms of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gareev, F A

    2005-01-01

    The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle [1] and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes [2]. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play role as a trigger for LENR. Superlow energy of external fields may stimulate LENR [3]. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics,... The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical ...

  9. Nuclear Energy Density Functionals Constrained by Low-Energy QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Vretenar

    2008-02-06

    A microscopic framework of nuclear energy density functionals is reviewed, which establishes a direct relation between low-energy QCD and nuclear structure, synthesizing effective field theory methods and principles of density functional theory. Guided by two closely related features of QCD in the low-energy limit: a) in-medium changes of vacuum condensates, and b) spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry; a relativistic energy density functional is developed and applied in studies of ground-state properties of spherical and deformed nuclei.

  10. Nuclear Materials Disposition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind CareerEnergy Nuclear Fuels

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission More Documents & Publications What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear...

  12. Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn...

  13. Integrating Nuclear Energy to Oilfield Operations – Two Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Lee O. Nelson; Michael G. McKellar; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Mike W. Patterson

    2011-11-01

    Fossil fuel resources that require large energy inputs for extraction, such as the Canadian oil sands and the Green River oil shale resource in the western USA, could benefit from the use of nuclear power instead of power generated by natural gas combustion. This paper discusses the technical and economic aspects of integrating nuclear energy with oil sands operations and the development of oil shale resources. A high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) that produces heat in the form of high pressure steam (no electricity production) was selected as the nuclear power source for both fossil fuel resources. Both cases were based on 50,000 bbl/day output. The oil sands case was a steam-assisted, gravity-drainage (SAGD) operation located in the Canadian oil sands belt. The oil shale development was an in-situ oil shale retorting operation located in western Colorado, USA. The technical feasibility of the integrating nuclear power was assessed. The economic feasibility of each case was evaluated using a discounted cash flow, rate of return analysis. Integrating an HTGR to both the SAGD oil sands operation and the oil shale development was found to be technically feasible for both cases. In the oil sands case, integrating an HTGR eliminated natural gas combustion and associated CO2 emissions, although there were still some emissions associated with imported electrical power. In the in situ oil shale case, integrating an HTGR reduced CO2 emissions by 88% and increased natural gas production by 100%. Economic viabilities of both nuclear integrated cases were poorer than the non-nuclear-integrated cases when CO2 emissions were not taxed. However, taxing the CO2 emissions had a significant effect on the economics of the non-nuclear base cases, bringing them in line with the economics of the nuclear-integrated cases. As we move toward limiting CO2 emissions, integrating non-CO2-emitting energy sources to the development of energy-intense fossil fuel resources is becoming increasingly important. This paper attempts to reduce the barriers that have traditionally separated fossil fuel development and application of nuclear power and to promote serious discussion of ideas about hybrid energy systems.

  14. Office of Nuclear Energy Research and Development Benefits Analysis Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    A presentation for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review from the Office of Nuclear Energy Research and Development.

  15. Determining the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy using heavy-ion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong

    2007-11-12

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy radioactive beams. We further discuss the implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei.

  16. Nuclear Liability | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 News enDepartment of Energy101

  17. Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond G. P. Gilfoyle Physics Physics: Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Program Program Manager: Dr. Gulshan Rai 1 #12;2 #12;Contents 1 Justification 39 3 #12;4 #12;Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond G. P. Gilfoyle

  18. Getting to Know Nuclear Energy: The Past, Present & Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Getting to Know Nuclear Energy: The Past, Present & Future Argonne National Laboratory was founded on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and has pioneered many of the technologies in use today. Argonne's Roger Blomquist will discuss the history of nuclear energy, advanced reactor designs and future technologies, all

  19. Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined July 31, 2013 The journal Inorganic Chemistry published a special Forum issue on the role of inorganic chemistry in nuclear energy. John Gordon and Argonne National Laboratory collaborated on the work. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office

  20. Mycle Schneider Consulting Independent Analysis on Energy and Nuclear Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Mycle Schneider Consulting Independent Analysis on Energy and Nuclear Policy 45, allée des deux Mycle Schneider International Consultant on Energy and Nuclear Policy Paris, May 2009 This research the Author Mycle Schneider works as independent international energy nuclear policy consultant. Between 1983

  1. THE FUTURE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY IN THE UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    THE FUTURE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY IN THE UK Birmingham Policy Commission The Report July 2012 #12;2 The Future of Nuclear Energy in the UK Foreword by the Chair of the Commission It was a great honour to have security. Historically nuclear energy has had a significant role in the UK and could continue to do so

  2. Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the second most important source of electric energy in the United States and at the same time, the most method of generating energy from nuclear fission in both the United States and the world. A key mission system using nuclear energy by 2015; and developing a next-generation nuclear system for deployment after

  3. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW DatabaseNuclear FuelsNuclear

  4. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  5. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Assistance and Nuclear Proliferation. Cambridge, MA:Way. The Correlates of Nuclear Proliferation: A Quantitativethe linkages between nuclear proliferation and energy. Susan

  6. Nuclear Power and the World's Energy Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellano, V; Dunning-Davies, J

    2004-01-01

    The global requirements for energy are increasing rapidly as the global population increases and the under-developed nations become more advanced. The traditional fuels used in their traditional ways will become increasingly unable to meet the demand. The need for a review of the energy sources available is paramount, although the subsequent need to develop a realistic strategy to deal with all local and global energy requirements is almost as important. Here attention will be restricted to examining some of the claims and problems of using nuclear power to attempt to solve this major question.

  7. Nuclear Power and the World's Energy Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Castellano; R. F. Evans; J. Dunning-Davies

    2004-06-10

    The global requirements for energy are increasing rapidly as the global population increases and the under-developed nations become more advanced. The traditional fuels used in their traditional ways will become increasingly unable to meet the demand. The need for a review of the energy sources available is paramount, although the subsequent need to develop a realistic strategy to deal with all local and global energy requirements is almost as important. Here attention will be restricted to examining some of the claims and problems of using nuclear power to attempt to solve this major question.

  8. Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging...

  9. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy to Award 16 Million for GNEP Studies United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes...

  10. A Roman Shipwreck and Safe Nuclear Storage | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    more information on Energy Department's Office of Science, please go to: http:science.energy.gov. Addthis Related Articles A Roman Shipwreck and Safe Nuclear Storage Ancient...

  11. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fragment properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals: Static potential energy surfaces and fission...

  12. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  13. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    waste disposal (Low) and nuclear reactor construction (Construction of Nuclear Reactors Global Sustainability (High) Nuclear Waste

  14. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 News enDepartment ofProgram mission is to support the

  15. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  16. Parametric study of high altitude nuclear EMP fields. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavigne, R.J.

    1984-03-01

    A program is developed to model the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear detonation. A Runge-Kutta numerical technique is used to solve for the electric fields. A continuous Fourier Transform of the EMP is used to determine the frequency profile of the EMP. Parametric studies are performed to determine cause and effect relationships between burst parameters and the EMP frequency profile from 100 KHz to 100 MHz. Burst parameters studied are: gamma pulse time history, gamma ray energies from 1 MeV to 10 MeV, gamma ray yield, height of burst from 75 Km to 200 Km and intersection angle of the slant range with the geomagnetic field from 90 degrees to 30 degrees.

  17. Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-08

    The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Supersedes DOE O 5600.1.

  18. NUCLEAR SPIN ISOSPIN RESPONSES FOR LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    NUCLEAR SPIN ISOSPIN RESPONSES FOR LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINOS Hiroyasu EJIRI Nuclear Physics Laboratory Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567 Japan. E-mail address: ejiri@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp (H. Ejiri). Physics Reports 338 (2000) 265}351 Nuclear spin isospin responses for low

  19. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    report, National Nuclear Security Administration, Departmentproliferation and security risks of nuclear energy systemsthe proliferation and security risk posed by nuclear energy

  20. Relativistic Mean-Field Theory and the High-Density Nuclear Equation of State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst Mueller; Brian D. Serot

    1996-03-22

    The properties of high-density nuclear and neutron matter are studied using a relativistic mean-field approximation to the nuclear matter energy functional. Based on ideas of effective field theory, nonlinear interactions between the fields are introduced to parametrize the density dependence of the energy functional. Various types of nonlinearities involving scalar-isoscalar ($\\sigma$), vector-isoscalar ($\\omega$), and vector-isovector ($\\rho$) fields are studied. After calibrating the model parameters at equilibrium nuclear matter density, the model and parameter dependence of the resulting equation of state is examined in the neutron-rich and high-density regime. It is possible to build different models that reproduce the same observed properties at normal nuclear densities, but which yield maximum neutron star masses that differ by more than one solar mass. Implications for the existence of kaon condensates or quark cores in neutron stars are discussed.

  1. State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Page Welcome to

  2. LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS G. I. Silvestrov, Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics Novosibirsk, August 1998. #12;1 LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS target of liquid metal. The technical solution is producing the target in the form of flat jet flowing

  3. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  4. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pacoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  5. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pocoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  6. Ex Parte Meeting Between the Department of Energy and the Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Energy Institute Regarding Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Ex Parte Meeting Between the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Energy...

  7. NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing SwimmingMicrosoft Word1SustainabilityEnergyTO8:00AMENERGY

  8. Nuclear Energy University Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind Career MapPowerHydrogenNowEnablingEnergy

  9. Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind CareerEnergy Nuclear FuelsReactor

  10. Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    1 Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond G. P. Gilfoyle Physics Physics: Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Program Program Manager: Dr. Brad Tippens #12;2 #12;3 Contents 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4.1 Facilities and Support for Nuclear Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2

  11. Molten salts and nuclear energy production Christian Le Bruna*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with solid fuels, liquid fuel in molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the caseMolten salts and nuclear energy production Christian Le Bruna* a Laboratoire de Physique or chlorides) have been taken in consideration very soon in nuclear energy production researches

  12. Master's programme in Nuclear Energy Engineering Programme outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    .With advances in science and technology, nuclear energy is increasingly re- garded as an eminent part technology will play an important role in future sustainable energy systems.the ongoing advances in nuclear science and technology play the central role in the development of future nuclear power systems

  13. Nuclear Energy: Where do we go from here? Keith Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    11.30am Nuclear Energy: Where do we go from here? Keith Bradley Argonne National Laboratories Abstract For the past several decades, nuclear energy has proven to be one of the most reliable and cost's so-called carbon footprint suggested a resurgence in modern nuclear power -- a renaissance period

  14. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2011-09-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  15. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent W. Dixon; Steven J. Piet

    2004-10-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository (63,000 MTiHM commercial, 7,000 MT non-commercial). There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected. The first step in understanding the need for different spent fuel management approaches is to understand the size of potential spent fuel inventories. A full range of potential futures for domestic commercial nuclear energy is considered. These energy futures are as follows: 1. Existing License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus extrapolation of future plant-by-plant discharges until the end of each operating license, including known license extensions. 2. Extended License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus a plant-by-plant extrapolation of future discharges assuming on all operating plants having one 20-year extension. 3. Continuing Level Energy Generation - Based on extension of the current ~100 GWe installed commercial base and average spent fuel discharge of 2100 MT/yr through the year 2100. 4. Continuing Market Share Generation – Based on a 1.8% compounded growth of the electricity market through the year 2100, matched by growing nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge. 5. Growing Market Share Generation - Extension of current nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge through 2100 with 3.2% growth representing 1.5% market growth (all energy, not just electricity) and 1.7% share growth. Share growth results in tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined.

  16. Innovating for Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | Department ofInfrastructure andInitiatives

  17. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind Career MapPowerHydrogenNow

  18. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  19. Nuclear Energy Response in the EMF27 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Wada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-03-25

    The nuclear energy response for mitigating global climate change across eighteen participating models of the EMF27 study is investigated. Diverse perspectives on the future role of nuclear power in the global energy system are evident in the broad range of nuclear power contributions from participating models of the study. In the Baseline scenario without climate policy, nuclear electricity generation and shares span 0 – 66 EJ/ year and 0 - 25% in 2100 for all models, with a median nuclear electricity generation of 39 EJ/year (1,389 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and median share of 9%. The role of nuclear energy increased under the climate policy scenarios. The median of nuclear energy use across all models doubled in the 450 ppm CO2e scenario with a nuclear electricity generation of 67 EJ/year (2,352 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and share of 17% in 2100. The broad range of nuclear electricity generation (11 – 214 EJ/year) and shares (2 - 38%) in 2100 of the 450 ppm CO2e scenario reflect differences in the technology choice behavior, technology assumptions and competitiveness of low carbon technologies. Greater clarification of nuclear fuel cycle issues and risk factors associated with nuclear energy use are necessary for understanding the nuclear deployment constraints imposed in models and for improving the assessment of the nuclear energy potential in addressing climate change.

  20. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: ? First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; ? Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; ? Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  1. Nuclear's role in 21. century Pacific rim energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Clifford; Taylor, J'Tia [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, MC-234, 103 S. Goodwin Ave., University of Illinios at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Extrapolations contrast the future of nuclear energy use in Japan and the Republic of Korea (ROK) to that of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Japan can expect a gradual rise in the nuclear fraction of a nearly constant total energy use rate as the use of fossil fuels declines. ROK nuclear energy rises gradually with total energy use. ASEAN's total nuclear energy use rate can rapidly approach that of the ROK if Indonesia and Vietnam make their current nuclear energy targets by 2020, but experience elsewhere suggests that nuclear energy growth may be slower than planned. Extrapolations are based on econometric calibration to a utility optimization model of the impact of growth of population, gross domestic product, total energy use, and cumulative fossil carbon use. Fractions of total energy use from fluid fossil fuels, coal, water-driven electrical power production, nuclear energy, and wind and solar electric energy sources are fit to market fractions data. Where historical data is insufficient for extrapolation, plans for non-fossil energy are used as a guide. Extrapolations suggest much more U.S. nuclear energy and spent nuclear fuel generation than for the ROK and ASEAN until beyond the first half of the twenty-first century. (authors)

  2. Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabeche, Dion Tunick

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

  3. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Invests 60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology June 5, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940...

  4. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolter, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution I discuss the nuclear symmetry energy in the regime of hadronic degrees of freedom. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important from very low densities in supernova explosions, to the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around saturation density, and to several times saturation density in neutron stars. Heavy ion collisions are the only means to study this density dependence in the laboratory. Numerical simulations of transport theories are used to extract the equation-of-state, and thus also the symmetry energy. I discuss some examples, which relate particularly to the high density symmetry energy, which is of particular interest today. I review the status and point out some open problems in the determination of the symmetry energy in heavy ion collisions.

  5. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann Wolter

    2015-06-15

    In this contribution I discuss the nuclear symmetry energy in the regime of hadronic degrees of freedom. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important from very low densities in supernova explosions, to the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around saturation density, and to several times saturation density in neutron stars. Heavy ion collisions are the only means to study this density dependence in the laboratory. Numerical simulations of transport theories are used to extract the equation-of-state, and thus also the symmetry energy. I discuss some examples, which relate particularly to the high density symmetry energy, which is of particular interest today. I review the status and point out some open problems in the determination of the symmetry energy in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saum-Manning,L.

    2008-07-13

    Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

  7. NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1977-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    A Relation Between Nuclear Dynamics and the RenormalizationMultiplicity Distributions in Nuclear Collision M. GyulassyHigh Energy Nuclear Collisions in the Resonance Dominated

  8. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWind Career MapPowerHydrogenNowEnabling

  9. 5. Energy Production and Transport 5.1 Energy Release from Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    5. Energy Production and Transport 5.1 Energy Release from Nuclear Reactions As mentioned when we looked at energy generation, it is now known that most of the energy radiated by stars must be released by nuclear reactions. In this section we will consider why it is that energy can be released by nuclear

  10. Enhancement Mechanisms of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Gareev; I. E. Zhidkova

    2005-05-08

    The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle [1] and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes [2]. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play role as a trigger for LENR. Superlow energy of external fields may stimulate LENR [3]. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics,... The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong. Our main conclusions:

  11. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

    2008-05-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

  12. International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.A. Wigeland

    2008-10-01

    Abstract: The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the President’s Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cycle—in which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repository—to a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

  14. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    2005. Cowan Robin. "Nuclear Power Reactors: A Study inThe Last Chance for Nuclear Power?" Energy Studies ReviewInfrastructure for Nuclear Power", IAEA Nuclear Energy

  15. Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

  16. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  17. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  18. Nuclear Self-energy and Realistic Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Frick; Kh. Gad; H. Müther; P. Czerski

    2001-11-14

    The structure of nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter is evaluated for various realistic models of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Starting from the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation without the usual angle-average approximation, the effects of hole-hole contributions and a self-consistent treatment within the framework of the Green function approach are investigated. Special attention is paid to the predictions for the spectral function originating from various models of the NN interaction which all yield an accurate fit for the NN phase shifts.

  19. secretary of energy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nuclear Securityhr |of energy | National

  20. Sandia Energy - Sandia Teaches Nuclear Safety Course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal EnergyRenewableCompanies PilotTeaches Nuclear Safety Course

  1. Surface Symmetry Energy of Nuclear Energy Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Nikolov; N. Schunck; W. Nazarewicz; M. Bender; J. Pei

    2010-12-28

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron- rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. Foiling the Flu Bug Global Partnerships for Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1663 Foiling the Flu Bug Global Partnerships for Nuclear Energy Dark Universe Mysteries WILL NOT NEED TESTING Expanding Nuclear Energy the Right Way GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS AND AN ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE sense.The Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy

  3. American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    gas-cooled reactors, and no operating high-level nuclear waste repository. Further, each year less and less of the nuclear material in international commerce is of U.S. origin and...

  4. Astronomy 117 High Energy Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Astronomy 117 High Energy Astrophysics Instructor: David A. Williams (office NS2 319, phone 459-3032, e-mail: daw@scipp.ucsc.edu) Place: Earth & Marine Sciences, B210 Time: Mondays, Wednesdays is · High Energy Astrophysics, second edition, volumes 1 and 2, by Malcolm S. Longair Course materials

  5. Department of Energy Issues Final $12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final 12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy Loan Guarantee Solicitation Department of Energy Issues Final 12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy Loan Guarantee Solicitation December...

  6. Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    educational and research opportunities to prepare NS&E students for nuclear energy professions, in support of NE's mission. NE is seeking applicants for undergraduate...

  7. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the University of Pittsburg-- Development of thermo-acoustic sensors for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) Find more information at the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear...

  8. What's Next for Nuclear Energy? MIT Students Discuss Path Forward

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) gathered Friday to have a casual discussion with the U.S. government’s foremost expert on nuclear energy

  9. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced 3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects --...

  10. Louisiana Nuclear Energy and Radiation Control Law (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation of nuclear energy safety, permitting and radiation safety and control in Louisiana. The Department operates...

  11. In 2008, the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    In 2008, the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE NNSA) established the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to develop the policies,...

  12. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements...

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the design, development, and demonstration of ABRs as part of the GNEP. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors More Documents &...

  14. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Under GNEP, the U.S. will work...

  15. Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit...

  16. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to validate statistical models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulations for...

  17. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    content will become publicly available on March 24, 2016 Title: Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects Authors:...

  18. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting Makes Marked Progress December 19, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis...

  19. Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for Worker Safety and Health Violations October 8, 2010 - 12:00am...

  20. Symmetry energy at subnuclear densities deduced from nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Oyamatsu; Kei Iida

    2010-04-19

    We examine how nuclear masses are related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Using a macroscopic nuclear model we calculate nuclear masses in a way dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. We find by comparison with empirical two-proton separation energies that a smaller symmetry energy at subnuclear densities, corresponding to a larger density symmetry coefficient L, is favored. This tendency, which is clearly seen for nuclei that are neutron-rich, nondeformed, and light, can be understood from the property of the surface symmetry energy in a compressible liquid-drop picture.

  1. Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop: Report of Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Antkowiak, M.; Gossett, S.

    2011-12-01

    Two of the major challenges the U.S. energy sector faces are greenhouse gas emissions and oil that is both imported and potentially reaching a peak (the point at which maximum extraction is reached). Interest in development of both renewable and nuclear energy has been strong because both have potential for overcoming these challenges. Research in both energy sources is ongoing, but relatively little research has focused on the potential benefits of combining nuclear and renewable energy. In September 2011, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) convened the Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify potential synergies and strategic leveraging opportunities between nuclear energy and renewable energy. Industry, government, and academic thought leaders gathered to identify potential broad categories of synergies and brainstorm topic areas for additional analysis and research and development (R&D). This report records the proceedings and outcomes of the workshop.

  2. "THE NUCLEAR OPTION IN GREEK NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "THE NUCLEAR OPTION IN GREEK NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY: A RENAISSANCE OR A DJA VUE" by RAPHAEL MOISSIS;· Starting from as early as the late 1950's, many scientists produced paper studies on nuclear application: Governor Demopoulos Establishes "Nuclear Office" #12;· Mid to late 1970's · Konstantinos Karamanlis

  3. Nuclear Security Conference 2010 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 14, 2010 Secretary Steven Chu spoke this morning at the Nuclear Security Conference 2010: the Role of the Private Sector in Securing Nuclear Materials. Below are his...

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Administration National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration More Documents & Publications Global Threat Reduction Initiative U.S. Global Threat...

  5. High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptionsthroughput spectrometerEnergy Physics

  6. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    of Con- trolled Nuclear Fusion, CONF-760975-P3, pages 1061–more effective solution, nuclear fusion. Fission Energy Thethe development of nuclear fusion weapons, humankind has

  7. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes. [Northwestern Univ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth, Kamal K.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications. (RWR)

  8. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  9. Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume..................................................................................................................25 Weapons Activities..............................................................................................................................51 Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

  10. Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at LBNL | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of...

  11. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    risky approach to nuclear expansion that offsets theirglobal implications of nuclear expansion in aggregate and10, 32, 103] The expansion of nuclear energy stalled

  12. Policy Paper 37: Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

    1998-01-01

    The bilateral nuclear and security agreement between theThe bilateral nuclear and security agreement between thein East Asia's security, nuclear energy, and environment. It

  13. Russian Nuclear Energy Official Pleads Guilty | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA Token RequestingRoundtablesRussian Nuclear Energy

  14. highly enriched uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFallHemmertHighlights6, 1999highly

  15. High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing ToolSustainableSecurityHigh Energy Cost Grants High Energy

  16. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR DATA SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullen, Red

    Library by Dermott E. Cullen National Nuclear Data Center, BNL, alumnus Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library by Dermott E. Cullen National Nuclear Data-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, 2) publicly

  17. Nuclear Energy Density Functionals: What do we really know?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulgac, Aurel; Jin, Shi

    2015-01-01

    We present the simplest nuclear energy density functional (NEDF) to date, determined by only 4 significant phenomenological parameters, yet capable of fitting measured nuclear masses with better accuracy than the Bethe-Weizs\\"acker mass formula, while also describing density structures (charge radii, neutron skins etc.) and time-dependent phenomena (induced fission, giant resonances, low energy nuclear collisions, etc.). The 4 significant parameters are necessary to describe bulk nuclear properties (binding energies and charge radii); an additional 2 to 3 parameters have little influence on the bulk nuclear properties, but allow independent control of the density dependence of the symmetry energy and isovector excitations, in particular the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. This Hohenberg-Kohn-style of density functional theory successfully realizes Weizs\\"acker's ideas and provides a computationally tractable model for a variety of static nuclear properties and dynamics, from finite nuclei to neutron stars, where...

  18. On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Casinos

    2008-05-22

    The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

  19. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    efficiency and direct state control in nuclear energyEfficiency of hydrogen production systems using alternative nuclear energyEfficiency of hydrogen production systems using alternative nuclear energy

  20. Energy Loss in Nuclear Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Jun Yang; Guang-Lie Li

    1998-05-21

    By means of the nuclear parton distributions which can be used to provide a good explanation for the EMC effect in the whole x range, we investigate the energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process. When the cross section of lepton pair production is considered varying with the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon-nucleon collision, we find that the nuclear Drell-Yan(DY) ratio is suppressed due to the energy loss, which balances the overestimate of the DY ratio only in consideration of the effect of nuclear parton distributions.

  1. Energy Department Announces New Nuclear Energy Innovation Investments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronicConservation-AgreementEnergy InnovationNetwork | Energy

  2. Nuclear Energy: Policies and Technology for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) formed two subcommittees to develop a report for the new Administration: a Policy Subcommittee chartered to evaluate U.S....

  3. Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    1 Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond G. P. Gilfoyle Physics Physics: Medium Energy Nuclear Physics Program Program Manager: Dr. Ted Barnes #12;2 #12;3 Contents 1 Project Introduction 5 2 Project Description 7 2.1 Status of Current Projects

  4. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevinof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevinof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevin

  5. Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy Master in Nuclear Energy Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application Code Name Major in Nuclear Energy Master's Program Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction

  6. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: Professor - ResearchAdministration |High

  7. Spectral function at high missing energies and momenta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Frick; Kh. S. A. Hassaneen; D. Rohe; H. Müther

    2004-06-03

    The nuclear spectral function at high missing energies and momenta has been determined from a self-consistent calculation of the Green's function in nuclear matter using realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. The results are compared with recent experimental data derived from ($e,e'p$) reactions on $^{12}C$. A rather good agreement is obtained if the Green's functions are calculated in a non-perturbative way.

  8. A Practical Approach to a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustained Nuclear Energy - 12383

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D.; Del Cul, Guillermo D.; Spencer, Barry B.; Williams, Kent A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6152, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recent systems analysis studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have shown that sufficient information is available from previous research and development (R and D), industrial experience, and current studies to make rational decisions on a practical approach to a closed nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. These studies show that a near-term decision is needed to recycle used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States, to encourage public recognition that a practical solution to disposal of nuclear energy wastes, primarily UNF, is achievable, and to ensure a focus on essential near-term actions and future R and D. Recognition of the importance of time factors is essential, including the multi-decade time period required to implement industrial-scale fuel recycle at the capacity needed, and the effects of radioactive decay on proliferation resistance, recycling complexity, radioactive emissions, and high-level-waste storage, disposal form development, and eventual emplacement in a geologic repository. Analysis of time factors led to identification of the benefits of processing older fuel and an 'optimum decay storage time'. Further benefits of focused R and D can ensure more complete recycling of UNF components and minimize wastes requiring disposal. Analysis of recycling costs and nonproliferation requirements, which are often cited as reasons for delaying a decision to recycle, shows that (1) the differences in costs of nuclear energy with open or closed fuel cycles are insignificant and (2) nonproliferation requirements can be met by a combination of 'safeguards-by-design' co-location of back-end fuel cycle facilities, and applied engineered safeguards and monitoring. The study shows why different methods of separating and recycling used fuel components do not have a significant effect on nonproliferation requirements and can be selected on other bases, such as process efficiency, maturity, and cost-effectiveness. Finally, the study concludes that continued storage of UNF without a decision to recycle is not a solution to the problem of nuclear waste disposal, but can be a deterrent to public confidence in nuclear energy. In summary, our studies have shown, in contrast to findings of the more prominent studies, that today we do have sufficient knowledge to make informed choices for the values and essential methods of UNF recycling, based on previous research, industrial experience, and current analyses. We have shown the significant importance of time factors, including the benefits of an optimum decay storage time on deploying effective nonproliferation safeguards, enabling reduced recycling complexity and environmental emissions, and optimizing waste management and disposal. Together with the multi-decade time required to implement industrial-scale UNF recycle at the capacity needed to match generation rate, our conclusion is that a near-term decision to recycle as many UNF components as possible is vitally needed. Further indecision and procrastination can lead to a loss of public confidence and favorable perception of nuclear energy. With no near-term decision, the path forward for UNF disposal will remain uncertain, with many diverse technologies being considered and no possible focus on a practical solution to the problem. However, a near-term decision to recycle UNF fuel and to take advantage of processing UNF and surface storing HLW, together with development and incorporation of more-complete recycling of UNF components, can provide the focus needed for a practical solution to the problem of nuclear waste disposal. (authors)

  9. Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems: Foundational Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Richard Boardman; John Collins; Mark Ruth; Owen Zinaman; Charles Forsberg

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can drastically reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that produces new energy currency for the combined electricity grid, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation energy sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing the right type of energy, at the right time, in the right place. At the direction of DOE-NE and DOE-EERE leadership, project leads at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have identified and engaged stakeholders in discussing integrated energy systems that would optimize renewable and nuclear energy integration on a region-by-region basis. Subsequent work will entail conduct of technical, economic, environmental and socio-political evaluations of the leading integrated system options based on a set of criteria established with stakeholder input. The Foundational Workshop for Integrated Nuclear – Renewable Energy Systems was organized around the following objectives: 1. Identify and refine priority region-specific opportunities for integrated nuclear-renewable energy systems in the U.S.; 2. Select Figures of Merit (FOM) to rank and prioritize candidate systems; 3. Discuss enabling technology development needs; 4. Identify analysis requirements, capabilities and gaps to estimate FOM for integrated system options; 5. Identify experimental needs to develop and demonstrate nuclear-renewable energy systems.

  10. Recommendations for a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy R and D Agenda Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The current US nuclear energy policy is primarily formulated as part of the nation`s overall energy policy. In addition, nuclear energy policy is impacted by other US policies, such as those for defense and environment, and by international obligations through their effects on nuclear weapons dismantlement and stewardship, continued reliance on space and naval nuclear power sources, defense waste cleanup, and on nuclear nonproliferation. This volume is composed of the following appendices: Appendix 1--Objectives of the Federal Government Nuclear Energy Related Policies and Research and Development Programs; Appendix 2--Nuclear Energy and Related R and D in the US; Appendix 3--Summary of Issues That Drive Nuclear Energy Research and Development; Appendix 4: Options for Policy and Research and Development; Appendix 5--Pros and Cons of Objectives and Options; and Appendices 6--Recommendations.

  11. The nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector observables from the point of view of nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Colo'; X. Roca-Maza; N. Paar

    2015-04-08

    In this contribution, we review some works related with the extraction of the symmetry energy parameters from isovector nuclear excitations, like the giant resonances. Then, we move to the general issue of how to assess whether correlations between a parameter of the nuclear equation of state and a nuclear observable are robust or not. To this aim, we introduce the covariance analysis and we discuss some counter-intuitive, yet enlightening, results from it.

  12. Statewise Correlates of Civil Nuclear Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kafle, Nischal

    2014-08-01

    the values zero 8 Table 2.1: 86NC states, and their respective nuclear reliances, circa 2011 [14]. State Nuclear Reliance [%] State Nuclear Reliance [%] Algeria 0.0 Mexico 3.6 Argentina 5.0 Morocco 0.0 Australia 0.0 Myanmar 0.0 Austria 0.0 Nepal 0...

  13. 2015 Call for Proposals for the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program 2015 Call for Proposals for the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research and...

  14. United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, J. W.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

  15. A Strategy for Nuclear Energy Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph G. Bennett

    2008-12-01

    The United States is facing unprecedented challenges in climate change and energy security. President-elect Obama has called for a reduction of CO2 emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, with a further 80% reduction by 2050. Meeting these aggressive goals while gradually increasing the overall energy supply requires that all non-emitting technologies must be advanced. The development and deployment of nuclear energy can, in fact, help the United States meet several key challenges: 1) Increase the electricity generated by non-emitting sources to mitigate climate change, 2) Foster the safe and proliferation-resistant use of nuclear energy throughout the world, 3) Reduce the transportation sector’s dependence on imported fossil fuels, and 4) Reduce the demand on natural gas for process heat and hydrogen production. However, because of the scale, cost, and time horizons involved, increasing nuclear energy’s share will require a coordinated research effort—combining the efforts of industry and government, supported by innovation from the research community. This report outlines the significant nuclear energy research and development (R&D) necessary to create options that will allow government and industrial decision-makers to set policies and create nuclear energy initiatives that are decisive and sustainable. The nuclear energy R&D strategy described in this report adopts the following vision: Safe and economical nuclear energy in the United States will expand to address future electric and non-electric needs, significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide energy diversity, while providing leadership for safe, secure and responsible expansion of nuclear energy internationally.

  16. March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) marks a major change in the direction of the DOE’s nuclear energy R&D program. It is a coherent plan to test technologies that promise to markedly...

  17. PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaslin, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

  18. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    2005. Cowan Robin. "Nuclear Power Reactors: A Study inThe Last Chance for Nuclear Power?" Energy Studies Reviewa National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power", IAEA Nuclear

  19. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Brayton Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory Fellows Jerry Simmons IsNationalNuclear Energy

  20. 2012 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology Factsheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i s tDistributedDISCLAIMER ThisNationalNuclear

  1. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Ex Parte | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t e Office ofVerificationNuclear

  2. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Transient

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW DatabaseNuclear Fuels Testing

  3. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL)/Brayton Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREW DatabaseNuclear Fuels

  4. An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste of Mo in glasses containing simplified simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) streams has been originating from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Experiments using simulated nuclear waste streams

  5. Anatomy of symmetry energy of dilute nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; B. K. Agrawal

    2010-09-23

    The symmetry energy coefficients of dilute clusterized nuclear matter are evaluated in the $S$-matrix framework. Employing a few different definitions commonly used in the literature for uniform nuclear matter, it is seen that the different definitions lead to perceptibly different results for the symmetry coefficients for dilute nuclear matter. They are found to be higher compared to those obtained for uniform matter in the low density domain. The calculated results are in reasonable consonance with those extracted recently from experimental data.

  6. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  7. Nuclear energy: Where do we go from here?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muslim, Dato’ Dr Noramly

    2015-04-29

    As Malaysia progresses towards 2020, the depleting resource of oil and gas has forced a re-look at alternatives to replace fossil fuels as energy sources. Among the viable options is nuclear energy, enabling us to meet energy needs and sustain national development in the twenty-first century. Three essential steps Malaysia must take to introduce nuclear power into its energy mix are: energy planning, infrastructure development, and deployment. Malaysia has to face a series of challenges, including public acceptance, waste management, minimizing proliferation risk, and ensuring the security of nuclear plants and materials. Timely development of qualified and competent manpower is a key limiting factor in the development and transfer of nuclear technologies — and education and training take time, effort and money. There is a need for political will. Within the Asian region, China, Korea and Japan are in the forefront in utilizing nuclear power to meet electricity demands. Countries such as UAE, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Turkey are moving ahead with the nuclear option for electricity generation and they have begun planning and construction of nuclear power plants. Against this backdrop, what are Malaysia’s moves? This paper discusses various options and challenges, obstacles and repercussions in meeting future energy demands.

  8. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  9. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  10. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Transient...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories is home to the United States' only operational pulsed nuclear reactor capable of a comprehensive range of transient nuclear fuels testing. The...

  11. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 Mr. J.D. Campbell Chairman Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board 1660 Old Pecos...

  12. Nuclear Energy in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Francesco Ganda, Ph.D., Argonne National Laboratory, fganda@anl.gov Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4814 May 2014...

  13. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2013 Annual...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for...

  14. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2014-09-10

    This grant had two components: Density functional theory and pairing and Nuclear reactions. This final report summarizes the activities for this SciDAC-2 project.

  15. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    then I compare the politics of nuclear policy in Russia andpaper, I discussed the politics of nuclear energy regulationNuclear Energy Regulation and the Politics of Social

  16. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    for global nuclear security, given my aforementionedthe national security dimensions of nuclear energy see forecological and security risks associated with nuclear energy

  17. Reconstruction of Energy Spectra of Neutrino Beams Independent of Nuclear Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. -G. Lu; D. Coplowe; R. Shah; G. Barr; D. Wark; A. Weber

    2015-09-03

    We propose a new technique which enables an event-by-event selection of neutrino-hydrogen interactions in multi-nuclear targets and thereby allows application of hydrogen as targets in experiments with neutrino beams without involving cryogenics or high pressure hydrogen gas. This technique could significantly improve the reconstruction of the neutrino energy spectra. Since it allows a separation between hydrogen and the accompanying nuclei, this technique also enables us to measure nuclear effects in neutrino interactions directly.

  18. Nuclear Effect-Independent Reconstruction of Energy Spectra of Neutrino Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, X -G; Shah, R; Barr, G; Wark, D; Weber, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new technique which enables an event-by-event selection of neutrino-hydrogen interactions in multi-nuclear targets and thereby allows application of hydrogen as targets in experiments with neutrino beams without involving cryogenics or high pressure hydrogen gas. This technique could significantly improve the reconstruction of the neutrino energy spectra. Since it allows a separation between hydrogen and the accompanying nuclei, this technique also enables us to measure nuclear effects in neutrino interactions directly.

  19. Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, DOE Policy 420.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides the technical basis for the Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 420.1, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 2-8-2011. It includes an analysis of the revised Policy to determine whether it provides the necessary and sufficient high-level expectations that will lead DOE to establish and implement appropriate requirements to assure protection of the public, workers, and the environment from the hazards of DOE’s operation of nuclear facilities.

  20. Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

    2010-01-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

  1. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Yousry; /Argonne; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  2. Statement of Peter Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act of 2012. Thank you for your leadership on this important issue. Nuclear power is an integral part of our "all-of-the-above" energy strategy. It provides twenty...

  3. Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haratyk, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

  4. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Members Convene in Jordan For Second Steering Group Meeting May 15, 2008 - 12:00pm...

  5. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in 1958. The paper described a three stage plan for a sustainable nuclear energy program consistent with India's limited uranium but abundant thorium natural resources. In the first stage, natural uranium would be used to fuel graphite or heavy water moderated reactors. Plutonium extracted from the spent fuel of these thermal reactors would drive fast reactors in the second stage that would contain thorium blankets for breeding uranium-233 (U-233). In the final stage, this U-233 would fuel thorium burning reactors that would breed and fission U-233 in situ. This three stage blueprint still reigns as the core of India's civil nuclear power program. India's progress in the development of nuclear power, however, has been impacted by its isolation from the international nuclear community for its development of nuclear weapons and consequent refusal to sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). Initially, India was engaged in numerous cooperative research programs with foreign countries; for example, under the 'Atoms for Peace' program, India acquired the Cirus reactor, a 40 MWt research reactor from Canada moderated with heavy water from the United States. India was also actively engaged in negotiations for the NPT. But, on May 18, 1974, India conducted a 'peaceful nuclear explosion' at Pokharan using plutonium produced by the Cirus reactor, abruptly ending the era of international collaboration. India then refused to sign the NPT, which it viewed as discriminatory since it would be required to join as a non-nuclear weapons state. As a result of India's actions, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was created in 1975 to establish guidelines 'to apply to nuclear transfers for peaceful purposes to help ensure that such transfers would not be diverted to unsafeguarded nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear explosive activities. These nuclear export controls have forced India to be largely self-sufficient in all nuclear-related technologies.

  6. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dees, L.A.

    1994-08-15

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  7. Nuclear structure studies with intermediate energy probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, T.S.H.

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear structure studies with pions are reviewed. Results from a recent study of 1 p-shell nuclei using (e,e{prime}), ({pi}, {pi}{prime}), and ({gamma},{pi}) reactions are reported. Future nuclear structure studies with GeV electrons at CEBAF are also briefly discussed.

  8. A study of nuclear stopping in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Escano-Rodriguez; D. Durand; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; the INDRA Collaboration

    2005-03-14

    Nuclear stopping has been investigated in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Firstly, it is found that the isotropy ratio, Riso, reaches a minimum near the Fermi energy and saturates or slowly increases depending on the mass of the system as the beam energy increases. An approximate scaling based on the size of the system is found above the Fermi energy suggesting the increasing role of in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions. Secondly, the charge density distributions in velocity space, dZ/dvk and dZ/dv?, reveal a strong memory of the entrance channel and, as such, a sizeable nuclear transparency in the intermediate energy range. Lastly, it is shown that the width of the transverse velocity distribution is proportional to the beam velocity.

  9. Impacts of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy on Neutron Star Crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Shishao

    2015-01-01

    Using the relativistic mean-field theory, we adopt two different methods, namely, the coexisting phase method and the self-consistent Thomas-Fermi approximation, to study the impacts of the nuclear symmetry energy on properties of neutron star crusts within a wide range of densities. It is found that the nuclear symmetry energy and its density slope play an important role in determining the pasta phases and the crust-core transition.

  10. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  11. Nuclear matter properties, phenomenological theory of clustering at the nuclear surface, and symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. N. Usmani; Nooraihan Abdullah; K. Anwar; Zaliman Sauli

    2011-12-04

    We present a phenomenological theory of nuclei that incorporates clustering at the nuclear surface in a general form. The theory explains the recently extracted large symmetry energy by Natowitz et al. at low densities of nuclear matter and is fully consistent with the static properties of nuclei. In phenomenological way clusters of all sizes, shapes along with medium modifications are included. Symmetric nuclear matter properties are discussed in detail. Arguments are given that lead to an equation of state of nuclear matter consistent with clustering in the low density region. We also discuss properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. Because of clustering, an interesting interpretation of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter emerges. As a framework, an extended version of Thomas Fermi theory is adopted for nuclei which also contain phenomenological pairing and Wigner contributions. This theory connects the nuclear matter equation of state, which incorporate clustering at low densities, with clustering in nuclei at the nuclear surface. Calculations are performed for various equation of state of nuclear matter. We consider measured binding energies of 2149 nuclei for N, Z \\geq 8. The importance of quartic term in symmetry energy is demonstrated at and below the saturation density of nuclear matter. It is shown that it is largely related to the use of, ab initio, realistic equation of state of neutron matter, particularly the contribution arising from the three neutron interaction and somewhat to clustering. Reasons for these are discussed. Because of clustering the neutron skin thickness in nuclei is found to reduce significantly. Theory predicts new situations and regimes to be explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  12. Annals of Nuclear Energy 26 (1999) 13711393 www.elsevier.com/locate/anucene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    1999-01-01

    Annals of Nuclear Energy 26 (1999) 1371±1393 www.elsevier.com/locate/anucene 0306-4549/99/$ - seeÂzsit V. Arzhanov / Annals of Nuclear Energy 26 (1999) 1371±1393 #12;I. PaÂzsit V. Arzhanov / Annals of Nuclear Energy 26 (1999) 1371±1393 1373 #12;1374 I. PaÂzsit V. Arzhanov / Annals of Nuclear Energy 26

  13. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Power", IAEA Nuclear Energy Series, No. NG-G-3.1.Essentials, March 2007. OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency. "Nuclear Energy and the Kyoto Protocol" OECD/IEA Report OECD/

  14. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    Energy Agency. "Nuclear Energy and the Kyoto Protocol" OECD/Energy Agency. "Nuclear Energy and the Kyoto Protocol" OECD/et al. "Perception of Nuclear Energy and Coal in France and

  15. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  16. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  17. Genesis of Dark Energy: Dark Energy as a Consequence of Cosmological Nuclear Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Gupta

    2004-12-07

    Recent observations on Type-Ia supernovae and low density measurement of matter (including dark matter) suggest that the present day universe consists mainly of repulsive-gravity type exotic-matter with negative-pressure often referred as dark-energy. But the mystery is about the nature of dark-energy and its puzzling questions such as why, how, where & when about the dark- energy are intriguing. In the present paper the author attempts to answer these questions while making an effort to reveal the genesis of dark-energy, and suggests that the cosmological nuclear-binding-energy liberated during primordial nucleo-synthesis remains trapped for long time and then is released free which manifests itself as dark-energy in the universe. It is also explained why for dark energy the parameter w = -2/3. Noting that w=+1for stiff matter and w=+1/3 for radiation; w = - 2/3 is for dark energy, because -1 is due to deficiency of stiff-nuclear-matter and that this binding energy is ultimately released as radiation contributing +1/3, making w = -1 + 1/3 = -2/3. This thus almost solves the dark-energy mystery of negative-pressure & repulsive-gravity. It is concluded that dark-energy is a consequence of released-free nuclear-energy of cosmos. The proposed theory makes several estimates / predictions, which agree reasonably well with the astrophysical constraints & observations.

  18. 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Background In response to the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Secretary Chu initiated a series of actions to review the safety of the Department...

  19. Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Astasia [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2011-06-28

    The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

  20. High energy overcurrent protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1982-01-01

    Electrical loads connected to capacitance elements in high voltage direct current systems are protected from damage by capacitance discharge overcurrents by connecting between the capacitance element and the load, a longitudinal inductor comprising a bifilar winding wound about a magnetic core, which forms an incomplete magnetic circuit. A diode is connected across a portion of the bifilar winding which conducts a unidirectional current only. Energy discharged from the capacitance element is stored in the inductor and then dissipated in an L-R circuit including the diode and the coil winding. Multiple high voltage circuits having capacitance elements may be connected to loads through bifilar windings all wound about the aforementioned magnetic core.

  1. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: SwitchGlenn PodonskyReactors

  2. Glauber model for heavy ion collisions from low energies to high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Shukla

    2001-12-13

    The Glauber model is extensively applied to heavy ion collision for describing a number of interaction processes over a wide range of energies from near the Coulomb barrier to higher energies. The model gives the nucleus-nucleus interaction in terms of interaction between the constituent nucleons with a given density distribution. The model is a semiclassical model picturing the nuclear collision in the impact parameter representation where the nuclei move along the collision direction in a straight path. In these lectures we derive this model and discuss its applications in variety of problems in nuclear and high energy physics.

  3. HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE A. Friedman1,2 , J.J.Barnard1,2 , R Energy Density regimes required for Inertial Fu- sion Energy and other applications. An interim goal we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto

  4. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, C.W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  5. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  6. Summary. “Materials Challenges in Nuclear Energy,” S.J. Zinkle, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay

    2015-11-05

    Nuclear energy continues to grow in abundance and importance. It offers a future electric grid based entirely off of green energy, and it has numerous applications. Nuclear power has capabilities to desalinate water, deliver process heat or steam, affordably crack hydrogen from water, and extract unconventional fossil fuel sources. Current light water reactors demonstrate high reliability under normal operating conditions. Researchers have shown significant interest and investigating how to extend reactor lifespans and into other possible reactor designs. Further understanding of mechanisms responsible for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, radiation hardening and degradation, and nuclear fuels innovations can lead to safer, more reliable, and cost-effective water-cooled nuclear reactors for electricity production.

  7. Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin

    2010-07-01

    Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment.

  8. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  9. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland(GTO)GetSafeguards | Department of

  10. Nuclear symmetry energy from the Fermi-energy difference in nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Li Ou; Min Liu

    2013-03-15

    The neutron-proton Fermi-energy difference and the correlation to nucleon separation energies for some magic nuclei are investigated with the Skyrme energy density functionals and nuclear masses, with which the nuclear symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities is constrained from 54 Skyrme parameter sets. The extracted nuclear symmetry energy at sub-saturation density of 0.11 fm$^{-3}$ is 26.2 $\\pm$ 1.0 MeV with 1.5 $\\sigma$ uncertainty. By further combining the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb, ten Skyrme forces with slope parameter of 28energy around saturation densities.

  11. Proceedings of the second US Department of Energy environmental control symposium. Volume 2. Nuclear energy, conservation, and solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-06-01

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Second Environmental Control Symposium. Symposium presentations highlighted environmental control activities which span the entire DOE. Volume II contains papers relating to: environmental control aspects of nuclear energy use and development; nuclear waste management; renewable energy sources; transportation and building conservation (fuel economy, gasohol, building standards, and industry); and geothermal energy, power transmission, and energy storage. (DMC)

  12. Nuclear power for energy and for scientific progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacomelli, G

    2012-01-01

    The Introduction in this paper underlines the present general situation for energy and the environment using the words of the US Secretary of Energy. A short presentation is made of some major nuclear power plants used to study one fundamental parameter for neutrino oscillations. The nuclear power status in some Far East Nations is summarized. The 4th generation of nuclear power stations, with emphasis on Fast Neutron Reactors, is recollected. The world consumptions of all forms of energies is recalled, fuel reserves are considered and the opportunities for a sustainable energy future is discussed. These considerations are applied to the italian situation, which is rather peculiar, also due to the many consequencies of the strong Nimby effects in Italy.

  13. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA Due Nov. 6

  14. Ramifications of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Neutron Stars, Nuclei, and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew W. Steiner; Bao-An Li; Madappa Prakash

    2007-11-29

    The pervasive role of the nuclear symmetry energy in establishing some nuclear static and dynamical properties, and in governing some attributes of neutron star properties is highlighted.

  15. Electron-Nuclear Energy Sharing in Above-Threshold Multiphoton Dissociative Ionization of H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thumm, Uwe

    Electron-Nuclear Energy Sharing in Above-Threshold Multiphoton Dissociative Ionization of H2 J. Wu­4], where the photon energy is shared by the freed electrons and the nuclear fragments. For the molecular ionization [10­15], and the imaging of inter- nuclear distance using nuclear kinetic energy release spec- tra

  16. In-medium effects for nuclear matter in the Fermi energy domain D. Durand,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    In-medium effects for nuclear matter in the Fermi energy domain O. Lopez,1 D. Durand,1 G. Lehaut,1 of nuclear reactions in the Fermi energy domain. I. INTRODUCTION Transport properties in nuclear matter energy domain, transport features should exhibit the in- terplay between mean-field (nuclear degrees

  17. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Power & Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory Fellows Jerry Simmons IsNationalNuclearNuclear

  18. PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Science, Office of Nuclear Energy, and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). OverallPRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged

  19. Nuclear Symmetry Energy in Relativistic Mean Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shufang Ban; Jie Meng; Wojciech Satula; Ramon A. Wyss

    2005-09-12

    The Physical origin of the nuclear symmetry energy is studied within the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. Based on the nuclear binding energies calculated with and without mean isovector potential for several isobaric chains we conform earlier Skyrme-Hartree-Fock result that the nuclear symmetry energy strength depends on the mean level spacing $\\epsilon (A)$ and an effective mean isovector potential strength $\\kappa (A)$. A detaied analysis of isospin dependence of the two components contributing to the nuclear symmetry energy reveals a quadratic dependence due to the mean-isoscalar potential, $\\sim\\epsilon T^2$, and, completely unexpectedly, the presence of a strong linear component $\\sim\\kappa T(T+1+\\epsilon/\\kappa)$ in the isovector potential. The latter generates a nuclear symmetry energy in RMF theory that is proportional to $E_{sym}\\sim T(T+1)$ at variance to the non-relativistic calculation. The origin of the linear term in RMF theory needs to be further explored.

  20. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  1. Description of Induced Nuclear Fission with Skyrme Energy Functionals: II. Finite Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Schunck; D. Duke; H. Carr

    2015-01-23

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite-temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239 Pu(n,f) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature, and predict the evolution of both the inner and outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T > 0, and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that finite-temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  2. Nuclear symmetry energy and the role of the tensor force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Vidana; Artur Polls; Constanca Providencia

    2011-07-27

    Using the Hellmann--Feynman theorem we analyze the contribution of the different terms of the nucleon-nucleon interaction to the nuclear symmetry energy $E_{sym}$ and the slope parameter $L$. The analysis is performed within the microscopic Brueckner--Hartree--Fock approach using the Argonne V18 potential plus the Urbana IX three-body force. We find that the main contribution to $E_{sym}$ and $L$ is due to the tensor component of the nuclear force.

  3. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Boardman, R.; Ruth, M.; Zinaman, O.; Forsberg, C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. One concept under consideration by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a 'hybrid system' that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product.

  4. The Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies and a Nuclear Venture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Contested Energy Future of Amman, Jordan: Between Promises of Alternative Energies and nuclear energy. Alternative eco-friendly energy resources represent only a small part of the potential authorities and local business elites are often seen as major players in the energy transition in the city

  5. Nuclear Physics A 781 (2007) 317341 Symmetry energies, pairing energies, and mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Physics A 781 (2007) 317­341 Symmetry energies, pairing energies, and mass equations J and pairing energies of atomic nuclei are related to the differences between the excitation energies of isobaric analog states in the same nucleus. Numerous such excitation energies are known exper- imentally

  6. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergyGeoscience HomeGridHigh

  7. Description of Induced Nuclear Fission with Skyrme Energy Functionals: II. Finite Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schunck, N; Carr, H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production of nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic model to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the fission of 239Pu(n,f). We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature, and predict the evolution of both the inner and outer fission barriers as ...

  8. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  9. Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear...

  10. www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great The Nuclear.95 For related titles, visit www.hooverpress.org or 800.621.2736 THe NuCLEAR ENterprise is a welcome introduction

  11. Collective coordinates for nuclear spectral densities in energy transfer and femtosecond spectroscopy of molecular aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Collective coordinates for nuclear spectral densities in energy transfer and femtosecond collective nuclear coordinates necessary to represent a given set of spectral densities is obtained coordinates phase space. The signatures of excitonic and nuclear motions in ultrafast fluorescence

  12. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss on determining nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. G. Duan; N. Liu; G. L. Li

    2008-11-05

    By means of two different parametrizations of quark energy loss and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order phenomenological analysis is performed on the nuclear Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei for E772 experimental data. It is shown that there is the quark energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss effect is quantified on determining nuclear sea quark distribution by using nuclear Drell-Yan data. It is found that the quark energy loss effect on nuclear Drell-Yan cross section ratios make greater with the increase of quark momentum fraction in the target nuclei. The uncertainties from quark energy loss become bigger as the nucleus A come to be heavier. The Drell-Yan data on proton incident middle and heavy nuclei versus deuterium would result in an overestimate for nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions with neglecting the quark energy loss. Our results are hoped to provide good directional information on the magnitude and form of nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions by means of the nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data.

  13. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included.

  14. Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovember 2014 Postings(NSUF) GatewayNuclear Safety

  15. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovember 2014 Postings(NSUF) GatewayNuclear SafetyRegulatory

  16. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

  17. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    force. 14 Opponents of nuclear energy expansion contend thatfar prevented the expansion of nuclear-intensive electricitysecurity through the expansion of nuclear infrastructure for

  18. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Energy Agency. Nuclear Technology Review 2008. Vienna1: Generations of Nuclear Technology Time 53 1945-1965 -the expansion of their nuclear technology potential. 3 The

  19. United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, L.

    2004-10-03

    The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield The Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF) program supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) physics for the validation of codes and models necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and effective nuclear is essential to having confidence in them. More than 99 percent of the energy from a nuclear weapon Ignition and High Yield (ICF) program supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national security

  1. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pastore; D. Davesne; J. Navarro

    2014-12-07

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin-orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the particle-hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin-isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  2. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  3. Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy utilities, governmentNuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors

  4. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Imperatives, Prospects, and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven E. Aumeier

    2010-10-01

    As global population reaches an expected 8 billion people by 2030, primary energy consumption is expected to increase by almost 40% from approximately 520 exajoules consumed today to almost 740 exajoules. Much of this increase is expected to come from non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations, and Asia specifically. In these economies, energy used for transportation is expected to grow substantially, as is industrial, commercial and to a lesser degree residential energy use, creating considerable pressure on global and local energy markets. The magnitude and timing of growth in energy consumption likely will create a global imperative to deploy energy production technologies that balance the three pillars of energy security: • economic stability – related to the affordability of energy products, stability and predictability in their price, and the efficient and effective deployment of global capital resources in their development; • environmental sustainability – related to minimizing the negative impacts of energy production to air, land, and water systems and advancing the long-term viability of using a particular resource in a way that does not limit future generations ability to prosper; • resource security – related to the ability to access energy resources and products where and when necessary, in an affordable and predictable manner. One approach to meeting these objectives is hybrid energy systems (HES). Broadly described, HES are energy product production plants that take two or more energy resource inputs (typically includes both carbon and non-carbon based sources) and produce two or more energy products (e.g. electricity, liquid transportation fuels, industrial chemicals) in an integrated plant. Nuclear energy integration into HES offers intriguing potential, particularly if smaller (<300 MWe) reactors are available. Although the concept of using nuclear energy in a variety of non-electrical process applications is certainly not new, renewed interest in more tightly coupled energy product plants (such as HES) that meet the objectives outline above have gained additional interest recently, an interest likely sparked by sharpening energy security concerns. Studies have shown that non-nuclear integrated (hybrid) energy systems can have appealing attributes in terms of overall process efficiency, enhanced electric grid stability, renewable energy integration, and economic performance, and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. These attributes seem to be sufficiently compelling that several significant commercial investments in fossil-renewable HES are being made in the United States while the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has openly solicited information regarding nuclear energy integration schemes. The challenges of nuclear energy integration include myriad issues associated with the following RD&D areas, or “platforms”: • feedstock processing (e.g. bio-feedstock integration with coal, carbon feedstock extraction using nuclear energy); • heat / energy management (e.g. advanced heat exchangers, process design); • energy storage (e.g. H2 production, liquid fuels synthesis); • byproduct management (e.g. CO2 recycle approaches); • systems dynamics, integration and control (e.g. process dynamics analyses and optimization, advanced prognostics, diagnostics, variable time scale control and flow sheet optimization).

  5. Sandia Energy - Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute Class of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergy PolicyLeaksDETL PermalinkDETL2012

  6. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Duane Arnold Energy Center

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Duane Arnold Energy Center" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  7. Office of Nuclear Energy Teachers' Edition

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    representations of their clean energy research. Introduces students to the use of a thesis, or conclusion which they reach through analysis and interpretation of what they...

  8. Atom-split it for nuclear energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adjustments were provided by the 'Calutron Girls' Seaborg-Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission 1961-1971; discovered many elements Buckyball-Buckminsterfullerene; 60...

  9. Nuclear Safety Information | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|in the subsurface isProject |NewsATVA Watts Bar Nuclear

  10. Nuclear energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclear and Particle Futuresenergy

  11. JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | International Nuclear Energyat Larger26,High Impact

  12. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  13. Nuclear symmetry energy in a modified quark meson coupling model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, R N; Panda, P K; Barik, N; Frederico, T

    2015-01-01

    We study nuclear symmetry energy and the thermodynamic instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark-meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically averaged potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to $\\sigma$, $\\omega$, and $\\rho$ mesons through mean-field approximations. We find an analytic expression for the symmetry energy ${\\cal E}_{sym}$ as a function of its slope $L$. Our result establishes a linear correlation between $L$ and ${\\cal E}_{sym}$. We also analyze the constraint on neutron star radii in $(pn)$ matter with $\\beta$ equilibrium.

  14. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that mimics nuclear energy programs. Technologies need to be established to make accessing the knowledge easier for the user. Finally, knowledge needs to be used as part of a well defined work process.

  15. Choosing transportation alternatives for highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaowen, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    The transport of highly perishable goods, in particular nuclear medicine, is subject to stringent regulations. Carefully designed transport selection criteria considering available alternatives, product attributes, decay ...

  16. Nuclear vorticity and the low-energy nuclear response - Towards the neutron drip line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Papakonstantinou; J. Wambach; E. Mavrommatis; V. Yu. Ponomarev

    2004-11-16

    The transition density and current provide valuable insight into the nature of nuclear vibrations. Nuclear vorticity is a quantity related to the transverse transition current. In this work, we study the evolution of the strength distribution, related to density fluctuations, and the vorticity strength distribution, as the neutron drip line is approached. Our results on the isoscalar, natural-parity multipole response of Ni isotopes, obtained by using a self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock + Continuum RPA model, indicate that, close to the drip line, the low-energy response is dominated by L>1 vortical transitions.

  17. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  18. A G/NARRLI Effort: Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish

    2014-01-01

    59 Previously measured low-energy nuclear recoilFluorescence: A Source of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils 5.1source of tagged low-energy nuclear recoils”. Nucl. Instrum.

  19. Energy Star Helps Manufacturers To Achieve High Energy Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutrow, E.; Hicks, T.

    2001-01-01

    From personal electronic devices to homes and office buildings, ENERGY STAR® is a recognized symbol of high quality energy performance which enables consumers, home buyers, and businesses to make informed energy decisions. Now, the U...

  20. Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25

    The purpose of this Guide is to provide U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) line management with guidance that may be useful to them in effectively and efficiently implementing the requirements of DOE O 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy, date April 25, 2011, as applied to Federal line management of hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities.